Chief-justice sentence example

chief-justice
  • Highgate grammar school was founded (1562-1565) by Sir Roger Cholmley, chief-justice.

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  • For some time all appeals to the king, to parliament, and to the courts of justice were unavailing; but on the 12th of February 1684 his application to Chief Justice Jeffreys was at last successful, and he was set at liberty on finding bail to the amount of X40,000, to appear in the House of Lords in the following session.

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  • There is a chief court for the province with a chief justice and three justices, established in May 1900.

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  • A merchant named Cony refused to pay customs not imposed by parliament, his counsel declaring their levy by ordinance to be contrary to Magna Carta, and Chief Justice Rolle resigning in order to avoid giving judgment.

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  • He came of a good family; his father was in the commission of the peace and his mother was a sister of Sir John Popham, successively attorney-general and lord chief justice.

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  • A conference between the three powers was thereupon held at Berlin, and a treaty was executed by those powers and by Samoa, on the 14th of June 1889, by virtue of which the independence and autonomy of the islands were guaranteed, Malietoa was restored as king, and the three powers constituted themselves practically a protectorate over Samoa, and provided a chief justice and a president of the municipality of Apia, to be appointed by them, to aid in carrying out the provisions of the treaty.

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  • The government was administered under this treaty, but with considerable friction, until the end of 1898, when, upon the death of Malietoa, two rival candidates for the throne again appeared, and the chief justice selected by the three powers decided against the claims of Mataafa, and in favour of a boy, Malietoa Tanu, a relative of the deceased Malietoa.

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  • The judicial department consists of a supreme court with a chief justice and two associate justices, chosen for six years, and district courts, with judges chosen for four years.

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  • On that occasion the court reaffirmed the dictum of Chief Justice Hale, that Christianity is part of the laws of England.

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  • Marshalltown, named in honour of Chief Justice John Marshall, was laid out in 1853, and became the county-seat in 1860.

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  • In 1865 President Johnson appointed as provisional governor William Lewis Sharkey (1797-1873), who had been chief justice of the state in 1832-1850, and a convention which assembled on the 14th of August recognized the "destruction" of slavery and declared the ordinance of secession null and void.

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  • There is a supreme court consisting of a chief justice and four associates, elected by popular vote for eight years, and a superior or circuit court, composed of sixteen judges elected by the people in each of sixteen districts for a term of eight years.

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  • The Supreme Court so held; its opinion, written by Chief Justice Marshall, being little else than a recital of Webster's argument.

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  • The judge of the United States district court and the chief justice and associate justices of the supreme court are appointed by the President with the consent of the Senate, and the judges of the district courts by the governor with the consent of the Executive Council.

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  • The judicial department comprises a supreme court consisting of a chief justice and (since 1881) four associate justices elected for terms of six years, and lower courts consisting of district courts with original jurisdiction in civil cases in law and equity, and in criminal cases upon indictments by grand juries; justices' courts, in which the amount in litigation cannot exceed $ioo, or the punishment cannot exceed three months' imprisonment or a fine of $loo; and of municipal and probate courts with the usual jurisdictions.

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  • He was chief justice of this court from 1791 to 1806, and presided with ability and rare distinction.

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  • On the resignation of Lord Denman in 1850, Campbell was appointed chief justice of the queen's bench.

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  • At a later date, Chief Justice Kotze, when on circuit, warned the Boers that in its retrogressive action the government was undermining the grondwet or constitution of the state.

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  • In 1897 a decision of Chief Justice Kotze was overruled by an act of the volksraad.

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  • He was a member of the Massachusetts Council from 1749 to 1756, was appointed judge of probate in 1752 and was chief justice of the superior court of the province from 1761 to 1769, was lieutenant-governor from 1758 to 1771, acting as governor in the latter two years, and from 1771 to 1774 was governor.

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  • Allentown was first settled in 1751; in 1762 it was laid out as a town by James Allen, the son of a chief-justice of the province, in honour of whose family the city is named; in 1811 it was incorporated as a borough and its name was changed to Northampton; in 1812 it was made the county-seat; in 1838 the present name was again adopted; and in 1867 the first city charter was secured.

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  • Although not a trained lawyer, he was chief justice of the court of common pleas from 1730 until his death.

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  • In 1803 he was again elected to the governor's council, and in 1807, on the reorganization of the Connecticut judiciary, was appointed chief justice of the new Supreme Court.

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  • The most noted citizens are Bishop Crowther and Sir Samuel Lewis, chief justice of Sierra Leone 1882-1894.

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  • In the conflict between the Petitioners and the Abhorrers he supported the former, and on the 27th of October 1680 brought forward a motion asserting the right of petitioning the king to summon parliament, and proposed the impeachment of Chief Justice North as the author of the proclamation against tumultuous petitioning.

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  • He was prosecuted for riot in connexion with the surrender of the charter of Nottingham in 1682, being tried before Chief Justice Jeffreys, who fined him Soo marks.

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  • When Lord Reading, the Lord Chief Justice of England, also a Jew, was appointed Viceroy of India in 1921, there was some public criticism, and it was suggested that Mr. Montagu might be moved to another office; but no change took place.

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  • Dingli was transferred from an administrative office to that of chief justice.

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  • In 1873 President Grant nominated him for chief justice of the United States, but in spite of his great learning and eminence at the bar, his ante-war record and the feeling of distrust experienced by many members of the senate on account of his inconsistency, aroused such vigorous opposition that his nomination was soon withdrawn.

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  • Secretary Folger was a man of high character and ability, who had been chief justice of the New York supreme court when placed in control of the treasury department by President Arthur in 1881.

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  • He was chief justice of New York from about 1720 until 1733, was sent to England by the popular party late in 1734 to present their grievances to the king, and was governor of New Jersey from 1738 until his death on the 21st of May 1746.

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  • Both appealed to the law, and when the chief-justice, Lewis Morris, refused Cosby's request to have the court proceed in equity jurisdiction, and denied the right of the governor to establish courts of equity, he was removed from office.

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  • William Smith (1697-1769), but when they excepted to the commissions of the chief-justice, James de Lancey (1703-1760) and one of his associates, because by these commissions the justices had been appointed " during pleasure " instead of " during good behaviour," the chief justice disbarred them.

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  • During the administration of Governor Clinton (1743-1753) a quarrel between the governor and James De Lancey, the chief-justice, had greatly weakened the court party, and nearly all its members supported their rivals in opposition to the Stamp Act.

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  • In case of a disagreement the case may be heard again in the same department, transferred to the other department, or to the court en banc. The chief justice or any four of his associates may at any time convene the court en banc, and if so convened at least five of the judges must be present, and the concurrence of at least five is necessary to a decision.

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  • He suggested that Sir Henry de Villiers, Chief Justice of Cape Colony, should be sent into the Transvaal to endeavour to gauge the true state of affairs in that country.

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  • Previously to his becoming president of the Free State he had acted as its Chief Justice and still earlier in life had practised as an advocate in Cape Colony.

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  • The ceremonies were attended by the President and Vice-President of the United States, the Chief-Justice of the Supreme Court, and a large number of eminent public men of both parties, who followed the hearse in a solemn procession, preceded by the mayor and other civic authorities, down Broadway.

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  • The supreme court is composed of a chief justice and two associate justices elected for a term of six years.

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  • Williams were confirmed as chief justice of the United States, - a contingency which did not arise.

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  • Jeffreys having suggested that his mind was disordered, he held out his hand and bade the chief-justice feel how calm and steady his pulse was.

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  • He showed great hostility to the Puritan sabbath and supported the reissue of the Book of Sports, especially odious to that party, and severely reprimanded Chief Justice Richardson for his interference with the Somerset wakes.

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  • He was arrested in 1807 on the charge of treason, was brought to trial before the United States circuit court at Richmond, Virginia, Chief-Justice Marshall presiding, and he was acquitted, in spite of the fact that the political influence of the national administration was thrown against him.

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  • The president of the king's bench division of the High Court is styled Lord Chief Justice.

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  • The senior judge presides as chief justice and in case two or more have served the same length of time one of them is chosen by lot.

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  • He was presently displaced by a thorough reactionary, General Zuloaga, and expelled from Mexico early in 1858; and for three years Mexico was a prey to civil war between two rival governments - the Republicans at Vera Cruz under Juarez, who, as Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, succeeded Comonfort; and the reactionaries at the capital.

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  • The judicial power is vested in a supreme court, consisting of a chief justice and four associate justices elected by the people; six appeal courts, each with three judges, also elected by the people; and twenty-six courts of first instance, each consisting of one judge appointed by the president and two by the chief justice of the supreme court.

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  • The appointment, first made in 1897, of the chief justice of Canada, along with the chief justices of Cape Colony and.

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  • Latterly, and possibly from its inception, this repository consisted of a closet with three locks, of which the keys were entrusted, one to the chief justice of England, another to the attorney-general and the third to the master of the crown office, or coroner.

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  • On the 16th of May, after sessions in which the Senate repeatedly reversed the rulings of the chief justice as to the admission of evidence, in which the president's counsel showed that their case was excellently prepared and the prosecuting counsel appealed in general to political passions rather than to judicial impartiality, the eleventh article was voted on and impeachment failed by a single vote (35 to 19; 7 republicans and 12 democrats voting " Not guilty ") of the necessary two-thirds.

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  • He was associate justice of the United States Supreme Court in 1789-91, and chief justice of the supreme court of South Carolina in 1791-95.

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  • Nominated chief justice of the Supreme Court of the United States in 1795, he presided during the August term, but the Senate refused to confirm the nomination, apparently because of his opposition to the Jay Treaty.

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  • In June 1780 he was created chief justice of the Court of Common Pleas, with the title of Baron Loughborough.

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  • Three of the four judges allowed the defence of the cardinal to be valid; but it was held that the papal rescript upon which he relied for his extraordinary powers as delegate was illegal under statute; and the lord chief justice decided that the plaintiff could not renounce his natural and civil liberty.

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  • He used all his influence to hamper the president and to advance the political interests of Alexander Hamilton, until he was dismissed, after refusing to resign, in May 1800, Returning to Massachusetts, he served as chief justice of the court of common pleas of Essex county in 1802-1803.

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  • His dying depositions, which were taken by Sir Francis North, chief justice of the common pleas, revealed nothing of importance.

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  • The court house (x818) stands on the site of the old court house, in which Governor George Clinton was inaugurated in July 1777, and in which Chief Justice John Jay held the first term of the New York Supreme Court in September 1777.

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  • In 1606 Coke was made chief justice of the common pleas, but in 1613 he was removed to the office of chief justice of the king's bench, which gave him less opportunity of interfering with the court.

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  • James, through Bacon, who was then attorney-general, commanded the chief justice to delay judgment till he himself should discuss the question with the judges.

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  • On their expulsion by Michael Palaeologus in 1261 Pachymeres settled in Constantinople, studied law, entered the church, and subsequently became chief advocate of the church (rrpwrkbucos) and chief justice of the imperial court (SucacochuAa).

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  • On a bluff projecting into South river is the old "Burying Point," set apart in 1637, and the oldest cemetery in the city; its oldest stone is dated 1673; here are buried Governor Simon Bradstreet, Chief-Justice Benjamin Lynde (1666-1745) and Judge John Hathorne (1641-1717) of the witchcraft court.

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  • A few months later (December 6, 1864) he was appointed chief justice of the United States Supreme Court to succeed Judge Taney, a position which he held until his death in 1873.

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  • In 1714 Stacy sold his plantation at "The Falls" to William Trent (c. 1655-1724), speaker of the New Jersey Assembly (1723) and chief justice of the colony (1723-1724), in whose honour the place came to be called Trenttown or Trenton.

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  • In 1898 he was elected chief justice of the N.Y.

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  • Charles Pinckney, the father, was long prominent in colonial affairs; he was attorney-general of the province in 1733, speaker of the assembly in 1736-1738 and in 1740, chief justice of the province in 1752-1753, and agent for South Carolina in England in 1 7531758.

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  • He returned to his law practice in Baltimore, but on the 28th of December 1835 was nominated Chief-Justice of the United States Supreme Court to succeed John Marshall.

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  • In 1777 he was chairman of the committee of the convention which drafted the first New York state constitution After acting for some time as one of the council of safety (which administered the state government until the new constitution came into effect), he was made chief justice of New York state, in September 1777.

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  • In making his first appointments to federal offices President Washington asked Jay to take his choice; Jay chose that of chief justice of the Supreme Court, and held this position from September 1789 to June 1795.

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  • The supreme court consists of seven members, four Americans and three Filipinos; and the chief justice and associate justices of the supreme court are appointed by the president of the United States with the consent of the Senate.

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  • Penal servitude, to use the words of the lord chief justice Sir Alexander Cockburn, one of the members of the committee, "was hardly calculated to produce on the mind of the criminal that salutary dread of the recurrence of the punishment which may be the means of deterring him and, through his example, others from the commission of crime."

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  • The former is composed of a chief justice and six puisne judges appointed by the Crown; the latter of a judicial commissioner and two additional judicial commissioners.

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  • The supreme court consists of three justices who are elected by the state at large for a term of eight years, and the one having the shortest term to serve is chief justice.

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  • He was a descendant of an old Devonshire family of high standing, the third son of Sir John Pratt, chief-justice of the king's bench in the reign of George I.

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  • In January 1762 Pratt was raised to the bench as chief-justice of the common pleas.

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  • Chief-Justice Pratt pronounced, with decisive and almost passionate energy, against their legality, thus giving voice to the strong feeling of the nation and winning for himself an extraordinary degree of popularity as one of the "maintainers of English constitutional liberty."

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  • The supreme judicial authority is vested in a Supreme Court, which consists of a chief justice and eight associate justices, all appointed for life by the president, subject to confirmation by the Senate.

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  • The king's bench represented the original stock of the curia regis, and its chief justice the great justiciar.

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  • Before the Judicature Act the king's bench and the common pleas were each presided over by a lord chief justice, and the lord chief justice of the king's bench was nominal head of all the three courts, and held the title of lord chief justice of England.

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  • The titles of lord chief justice of the common pleas and lord chief baron were abolished by the Judicature Act 1873, and all the common law divisions of the High Court united into the king's bench division, the president of which is the lord chief justice of England.

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  • The lord chief justice is, next to the lord chancellor, the highest judicial dignitary in the kingdom.

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  • In the United States the supreme court consists of a chief justice and eight associate justices, any six of whom make a quorum.

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  • The salary of the chief justice is $13,000 and that of the associates $12,500.

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  • The chief justice takes rank next after the president, and he administers the oath on the inauguration of a new president and vice-president.

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  • The principal or presiding judge in most of the state judicatures also takes the title of chief justice.

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  • The supreme court consisted of a chief justice and five associate justices appointed by the President.

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  • The trial began on June 26 before the'Lord Chief Justice and two other judges.

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  • He graduated at Yale in 1815, and in 1819 began to practise law at Dover, Delaware, 'where for a time he was associated with his cousin, Thomas Clayton (1778-1854), subsequently a United States senator and chief-justice of the state.

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  • In 1837-1839 he was chief justice of Delaware.

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  • He became in the same year chief justice of South Africa.

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  • The government at home was carried on principally by Rochester, Sunderland and Godolphin, while Guilford was lord chancellor and Jeffreys lord chief justice.

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  • In 1799 the office of chief justice of the Court of Common Pleas falling vacant, Sir John Scott's claim to it was not overlooked; and after seventeen years' service in the Lower House, he entered the House of Peers as Baron Eldon.

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  • In February 1801 the ministry of Pitt was succeeded by that of Addington, and the chief justice now ascended the woolsack.

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  • The administration of justice is entrusted to a supreme court, a continually increasing number of circuit courts (thirty-eight in 1909), one probate court in each county, and not exceeding four justices of the peace in each township. The supreme court is composed of one chief justice and seven associate justices, all elected for a term of ten years, not more than two retiring every two years; it holds four sessions annually, exercises a general control over the inferior courts, may issue, hear and determine any of the more important writs, and has appellate jurisdiction only in all other important cases.

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  • The supreme court consists of a chief justice and eight associate justices, but it may be held by the chief justice alone or by any one of the associate justices.

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  • At the head of the department of justice is the supreme judicial court, which consists of a chief justice and seven associate justices appointed by the governor and council for a term of seven years.

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  • They are elected by the people for a term of six years, but the term of one expires every two years, and that justice who shall have the shortest time to serve acts as chief justice.

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  • In the same year he was appointed chief justice of the Queen's Bench; and he died on the 25th of November 1876.

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  • In 1842 he became master of the rolls in Ireland, in 1846 chief-justice of the queen's bench, and in 1852 (and again in 1866) lord chancellor of Ireland.

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  • He gradually became one of the leading American lawyers, and in 1851 was made a member of the supreme court of Pennsylvania (chief-justice 1851-1854).

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  • On the native question he held a consistently strong attitude, defending their rights, and uncompromisingly opposing the native liquor traffic. In 1901 he went to the Transvaal as chief justice of that colony.

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  • The administration of justice throughout the presidency is conducted by a high court at Bombay, consisting of a chief justice and seven puisne judges, along with district and assistant judges throughout the districts of the presidency.

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  • In 1905 he resigned office, and was appointed chief justice of the exchequer division of the High Court of the province of Ontario.

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  • The justice-seat is the court of the chief justice in eyre, who, says Coke, "is commonly a man of greater dignity than knowledge of the laws of the forests; and therefore where justice-seats are to be held some other persons whom the king shall appoint are associated with him, who together are to determine omnia placita forestae."

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  • The leading place in this work belongs to Chief Justice John Marshall, but Story has a very large share in that remarkable series of decisions and opinions, from 1812 until 1832, by which the work was accomplished.

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  • He was a member of parliament, and as such was declared by Chief Justice Pratt to be privileged against arrest.

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  • He distinguished himself as a barrister, and in 1828 was promoted to the bench as a chief-justice of the common pleas.

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  • Under Comonfort, who then succeeded Alvarez, Juarez was governor of Oajaca (1855-57), and in 1857 chief justice and secretary of the interior; and, when Comonfort was unconstitutionally replaced by Zuloaga in 1858, the chief justice, in virtue of his office, claimed to be legal president of the republic. It was not, however, till the beginning of 1861 that he succeeded in finally defeating the unconstitutional party and in being duly elected president by congress.

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  • Alexander Wedderburn was created Baron Loughborough in 1780 when he became chief justice of the common pleas.

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  • Walter, tried before the Lord Chief Justice of England in July 1888, brought matters to a head, and the special commission followed.

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  • The supreme court consists of a chief justice and three associates, elected by a joint viva voce vote of the General Assembly for a term of eight years.

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  • Acting on the advice of Chief Justice Nicholas Trott (1663-1740) the proprietors adopted a reactionary policy, vetoed several popular laws, and refused to afford protection from the attacks of the Indians.

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  • He was chief justice of the supreme court of Massachusetts from 1806 until his death in Boston on the 30th of October 1813.

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  • Chief-justice Marshall ranked him second to Washington alone.

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  • The judges designate one of their number to preside as chief justice.

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  • Hubert de Burgh, Chief Justice of England, fled for sanctuary when first apprised of the King's displeasure.

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  • Here Hubert de Burgh, Chief Justice of England, sled for sanctuary when first apprised of the king's displeasure.

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  • Science department at say emphatically a chief justice earl.

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  • The charges against the president must be tried in the Senate with the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court presiding over proceedings.

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  • The current Lord Chief Justice re-kindled hope following his masterly analysis of the Strangeways riot in 1990.

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  • The Lord Chief Justice recommended a tariff of 14 years.

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  • Intended to perform obsessive police classic filled with tips chief justice warren.

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  • The chief-justice was Sir Elijah Impey, already mentioned as a schoolfellow of Hastings at Westminster.

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  • The city was named in honour of Samuel Ashe (1725-1813), chief-justice of North Carolina from 1777 to 1796, and John Ashe (1720-1781), a North Carolina soldier who distinguished himself in the War of Independence, was settled about 1790, and was incorporated in 1835.

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  • From 1851 to February 1856 he was an associate justice of the state supreme court, and from December 1854 was chief justice.

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  • He continued to act as chief justice until his resignation in June 1788, and after five years spent in retirement died on the 10th of March 1793.

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  • They, having the great opportunity of initiative, organized it in all its branches, giving it an administrative machinery that in the main endures to-day; established the doctrine of national neutrality toward European conflicts (although the variance of Federalist and Republican opinion on this point was largely factitious); and fixed the practice of a liberal construction of the Constitution,) - not only by Congress, but above all by the United States Supreme Court, which, under the lead of John Marshall (who had been appointed chief-justice by Pres.

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  • Thereafter were added sub-statues of Chief-Justice John Marshall and George Mason (1726-1792) by Crawford, and statues of Andrew Lewis (1730-1781) and Thomas Nelson (1738-1789), and six allegorical subjects, by Randolph Rogers (1825-1892), the monument being completed in 1869, at a cost of about $260,000, of which about $47,000 represented private gifts and the interest thereon.

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  • That is John Marshall, Chief Justice of the United States.

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  • Chase and Judge John C. Underwood constituted the United States circuit court sitting for Virginia before which the case was brought in December 1868; the court was divided, the chief justice voting to sustain the motion and Underwood to overrule it.

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  • During President Grant's administration he was a member of the senatorial coterie that influenced most of the president's policies, and in 1873 Grant urged him to accept an appointment as chief justice of the Supreme Court, but he declined.

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