Chickenpox sentence example

chickenpox
  • Patients with widespread eczema can also develop severe chickenpox.
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  • Study results reported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) indicate that more than 90 percent of American adults are immune to the chickenpox virus.
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  • However, as of 2004, it is too early to determine whether vaccinated children are more or less likely to develop shingles in adulthood as compared with adults who were naturally infected with chickenpox as children.
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  • Fluid from shingles blisters can cause chickenpox in people who are not already immune.
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  • Most of us have had chickenpox, most of us have had herpes simplex 1 or 2 or both.
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  • Pregnant women who get chickenpox or shingles have a higher than normal risk of developing pneumonia.
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  • What should I be doing to treat the chickenpox?
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  • Treating childhood illnesses with homeopathy (e.g. measles, mumps, chickenpox, impetigo, molluscum and whooping cough ).
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  • Chickenpox spreads in tiny droplets of saliva and nasal mucus coughed out by an infected person.
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  • Chickenpox is most serious for pregnant women, and immunocompromised individuals and exposed neonates, who are at risk of severe, disseminated disease.
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  • If chickenpox or shingles is suspected please send a swab for virus isolation.
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  • In the immunocompromised however, this viraemia may be prolonged or severe producing disseminated varicella which looks the same as primary chickenpox.
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  • Passive immunization should be carried out using Varicella zoster immunoglobulin (VZIG) in non-immune patients if exposed to chickenpox or shingles.
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  • Prevention Chickenpox is now a vaccine preventable disease with the advent of a live attenuated varicella zoster virus vaccine.
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  • One rare cause of stroke is an extreme case of the chickenpox virus, which causes a narrowing of blood vessels in the head for some children.
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  • Reye's syndrome-A serious, life-threatening illness in children, usually developing after a bout of flu or chickenpox, and often associated with the use of aspirin.
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  • In children, ITP is usually triggered by a virus infection, most often rubella, chickenpox, measles, cytomegalovirus (CMV), or Epstein-Barr virus (EBV).
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  • If the child has had a recent childhood illness (measles, chickenpox) or a virus, the risk for ITP is greater, and this fact will be considered along with diagnostic testing results.
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  • Infectious illness: A rash is a symptom of many different kinds of childhood infectious illnesses, including chickenpox and scarlet fever.
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  • Hyperthyroidism, whooping cough, chickenpox, measles, and Hib disease (a bacterial infection) may cause mental retardation if they are not treated adequately.
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  • Impetigo tends to develop in areas of the skin that have already been damaged through some other mechanism (a cut or scrape, burn, insect bite, or vesicle from chickenpox).
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  • Itching is a symptom of many common childhood ailments such as chickenpox and contact with poison ivy, as well as of some more serious conditions.
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  • The EBV that causes mononucleosis is related to a group of herpes viruses, including those that cause cold sores, chickenpox, and shingles.
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  • Herpes viruses cause several infections, all characterized by blisters and ulcers, including chickenpox, shingles, genital herpes, and cold sores or fever blisters.
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  • Although not as contagious as measles or chickenpox, mumps was once quite common.
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  • Secondary encephalitis may occur with measles, chickenpox, mumps, rubella, and EBV.
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  • Herpes viruses are the cause of infections as diverse as sexually transmitted diseases, chickenpox and cold sores.
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  • It has been conclusively proven that another herpes virus-varicella zoster virus (VZV), the cause of both chickenpox and shingles-is the culprit for Ramsey-Hunt syndrome.
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  • Shingles-An disease caused by an infection with the Herpes zoster virus, the same virus that causes chickenpox.
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  • Chickenpox (also called varicella) is a common, extremely infectious, rash-producing childhood disease that also affects adults on occasion.
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  • Chickenpox is caused by the varicella-zoster virus (a member of the herpes virus family), which is spread through the air or by direct contact with an infected person.
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  • A single attack of chickenpox almost always brings lifelong immunity against the disease.
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  • Because the symptoms of chickenpox are easily recognized and in most cases merely unpleasant rather than dangerous, treatment can almost always be carried out at home.
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  • For this reason, doctors recommend keeping children with chickenpox away from school for about a week.
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  • Prior to the use of the varicella vaccine, chickenpox was a typical part of growing up for most children in the industrialized world.
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  • More than half of all chickenpox deaths occur among adults.
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  • Because almost every case of chickenpox, no matter how mild, leads to lifelong protection against further attacks, adults account for less than 5 percent of all cases in the United States.
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  • A case of chickenpox usually starts without warning or with only a mild fever and a slight feeling of unwellness.
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  • Some chickenpox sufferers also have headaches, abdominal pain, or a fever.
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  • The threat is greatest to newborns, who are more at risk of death from chickenpox than any other group.
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  • Under certain circumstances, children born to mothers who contract chickenpox just prior to delivery face an increased possibility of dangerous consequences, including brain damage and death.
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  • They have the second-highest rate of death from chickenpox.
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  • Adults and children 15 and older: Among this group, the typical symptoms of chickenpox tend to strike with greater force, and the risk of complications is much higher than among young children.
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  • Aspirin and any medications that contain aspirin or other salicylates must not be used with chickenpox, for they appear to increase the chances of developing Reye's syndrome.
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  • Immunocompromised chickenpox sufferers are sometimes given an antiviral drug called acyclovir (Zovirax).
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  • Most cases of chickenpox run their course within a week without causing lasting harm.
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  • However, there is one long-term consequence of chickenpox that strikes about 20 percent of the population, particularly people 50 and older.
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  • Like all herpes viruses, the varicella-zoster virus never leaves the body after an episode of chickenpox.
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  • A vaccine for chickenpox became available in the United States in 1995 under the name Varivax.
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  • It has been proven to be 85 percent effective for preventing all cases of chickenpox and close to 100 percent effective in preventing severe cases.
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  • For older children, up to age 12, the CDC recommends vaccination when a reliable determination that the child in question has already had chickenpox cannot be made.
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  • The finding is important, since even chickenpox can be a serious complication in children who must undergo a kidney transplant.
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  • The vaccine is useful when given early after exposure to chickenpox and, if given in the midst of the incubation period, it can be preventative.
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  • The Infectious Diseases Society of America stated in 2000 that immunization is recommended for all adults who have never had chickenpox.
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  • Acyclovir-An antiviral drug, available under the trade name Zovirax, used for combating chickenpox and other herpes viruses.
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  • Varicella zoster-The virus that causes chickenpox (varicella).
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  • Varicella-zoster immune globulin-A substance that can reduce the severity of chickenpox symptoms.
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  • Chickenpox vaccine or varicella zoster vaccine (VZV) is an injection that protects children from contracting chickenpox (varicella), one of the most common childhood diseases.
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  • Thus it prevents children from contracting chickenpox.
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  • Prior to the introduction of VZV, approximately 4 million Americans contracted chickenpox each year, and 95 percent of children contracted the disease before the age of 18.
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  • He then tested it on children and found that it was effective in preventing chickenpox.
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  • Producing sufficient quantities of the vaccine to immunize all children against chickenpox has proven to be a major obstacle.
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  • Vaccinated children who do contract chickenpox usually have milder symptoms.
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  • The vaccine also prevents chickenpox in children exposed to the virus three to five days prior to vaccination.
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  • By 2002, some 81 percent of American children had been vaccinated with VZV, and the CDC determined that the number of chickenpox cases had declined substantially.
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  • The CDC expects that widespread childhood vaccination against chickenpox will further reduce the incidence of the virus in the general population.
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  • This, in turn, will reduce the incidence of chickenpox among those who cannot receive VZV, including children who are most at risk for serious complications from the disease.
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  • As of 2004 it was unclear whether VZV provided life-long immunity to chickenpox.
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  • It is not clear whether breakthrough chickenpox infections are less contagious than infections in unvaccinated children.
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  • Some physicians remain reluctant to vaccinate against a usually mild childhood disease such as chickenpox.
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  • Some also are concerned that vaccinated children may contract chickenpox as adults when it can be a much more serious disease with a 20 percent higher risk of death.
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  • Although children who have had chickenpox are immune to the disease and cannot contract it a second time, the varicella zoster virus can remain inactive in the human body.
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  • Chickenpox is highly contagious and easily transmitted among children through personal contact, coughing, or sneezing.
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  • Symptoms of chickenpox may not appear for as long as two to three weeks following infection.
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  • In most instances chickenpox is not a serious disease, although the itchy lesions and fever and other mild flu-like symptoms may cause a week or two of discomfort.
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  • In the United States more children die of chickenpox than of any other disease that can be prevented by a vaccine.
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  • Prior to the introduction of VZV, there were about 100 deaths and 12,000 hospitalizations annually as a result of chickenpox infections.
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  • Teenagers and adults, as well as children with leukemia or other cancers or with impaired immune systems, are at particular risk for severe chickenpox and its complications.
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  • Babies whose mothers contracted chickenpox during pregnancy are at risk for multiple birth defects.
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  • Babies whose mothers contract chickenpox shortly before or after giving birth are at risk of developing a severe form of the disease.
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  • Most high-risk children and non-immune adults contract chickenpox from unvaccinated children.
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  • Children with chickenpox miss an average of five to six days of school and their parents miss an average of three to four days of work while caring for them.
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  • Children and adolescents who have not already had chickenpox can be vaccinated at any time.
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  • Children at high risk for severe chickenpox or its complications, including newborns and premature infants exposed to chickenpox after birth, often are given varicella-zoster immune globulin (VZIG).
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  • It must be administered within 96 hours of exposure to chickenpox, and it results in a passive immunity against the disease for about three months.
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  • Medical conditions that preclude vaccination against chickenpox include active, untreated tuberculosis and any other moderate or serious illness.
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  • However, chickenpox can cause serious complications in HIV-infected children with compromised immune systems.
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  • This is far lower than the risks associated with chickenpox.
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  • There is no evidence that healthy children who have had chickenpox or who received VZV previously are at a greater for adverse effects from an additional dose of Varivax.
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  • Varicella (chickenpox vaccine)-Given by injection between the ages of 12-18 months or later for children who have not had chickenpox.
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  • Children should not be vaccinated against measles or chickenpox (varicella) for four months after being treated with RIG.
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  • It almost always follows a viral illness such as a cold, the flu, or chickenpox.
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  • Antibodies to German measles (also called rubella) and chickenpox.
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  • Shingles: Shingles is caused by the same virus that causes chickenpox.
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  • Acne scars, chickenpox and ear piercings can all result in keloids.
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  • Bailey has kidney problems and after catching chickenpox had to be admitted to the ward so doctors could keep an eye on her.
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  • Neonates Risks to the fetus and neonate from maternal chickenpox are related to the time of infection in the mother.
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  • Aspirin should never be given to children under the age of 16 who have chickenpox or influenza, because children who have received aspirin for these conditions seem to have a higher than expected frequency of developing Reye's syndrome.
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  • Fevers are caused in most cases by viral or bacterial infections, such as otitis media (ear infection), upper respiratory infection, pharyngitis (throat infection), pneumonia, chickenpox, and urinary tract infection.
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  • Before the varicella vaccine (Varivax) was released for use in 1995, nearly all of the 4 million children born each year in the United States contracted chickenpox, resulting in hospitalization in five of every 1,000 cases and 100 deaths.
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  • Although evidence has not ruled out a booster shot later in life, all research addressing the vaccine's effectiveness throughout its six-year use indicates that chickenpox may be the first human herpes virus to be wiped out.
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  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the American Academy of Pediatrics, and the American Academy of Family Physicians all recommend that healthy children be vaccinated against chickenpox.
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  • In the United States the Vaccines for Children program covers the cost of chickenpox vaccination for children without health insurance and for specific other groups of children, including Native Americans.
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  • Since shingles is very common in HIV-infected children, the NIAID and NICHD also launched a clinical study to determine whether Varivax can prevent shingles in HIV-infected children who have had chickenpox.
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  • Also, a parent should not give a child aspirin during a cold, because aspirin has been linked to the development of Reye's syndrome in children recovering from viral illnesses, especially influenza (flu) or chickenpox.
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  • A substance known as varicella-zoster immune globulin (VZIG), which reduces the severity of chickenpox symptoms, is as of 2004 available to treat immunocompromised children and others at high risk of developing complications.
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