How to use Chemical-change in a sentence

chemical-change
  • Some people find their hair is resistant to perms, and a stronger solution may need to be applied to boost the chemical change.

    15
    10
  • But on account of experimental errors in weighing and measuring, and through loss of material in the transfer of substances from one vessel to another, such analyses are rarely trustworthy to more than one part in about Soo; so that small changes in weight consequent on the chemical change could not with certainty be proved or disproved.

    4
    5
  • It is evident that if our experiments are solely directed to the verification of this law, they should, if possible; be carried out in a hermetically closed vessel, the vessel and its contents being weighed before and after the chemical change.

    5
    5
  • The distribution of weight in chemical change is readily expressed in the form of equations by the aid of these symbols; the equation 2HC1+Zn =ZnCl2+H2, for example, is to be read as meaning that from 73 parts of hydrochloric acid and 65 parts of zinc, 136 parts of zinc chloride and 2 parts of hydrogen are produced.

    4
    5
  • Similar relations were found to hold and the amounts of chemical change to be the same for the same electric transfer as in the case of solutions.

    5
    6
    Advertisement
  • Landolt and others, made it at first appear that the change in weight, if there is any, consequent on a chemical change can rarely exceed one-millionth of the weight of the reacting substances, and that it must often be much less.

    2
    4
  • The first chemical change suggested is an interaction between carbon dioxide and water, under the influence of light acting through chlorophyll, which leads to the simultaneous formation of formaldehyde and hydrogen peroxide.

    2
    4
  • Iron and quinine citrate is used as a bitter stomachic and tonic. In the blood citrates are oxidized into carbonates; they therefore act as remote alkalis, increasing the alkalinity of the blood and thereby the general rate of chemical change within the body.

    2
    5
  • Thus, the symbols 14 2 and P4 indicate that the molecules of hydrogen and phosphorus respectively contain 2 and 4 atoms. Since, according to the molecular theory, in all cases of chemical change the action is between molecules, such symbols as these ought always to be employed.

    2
    5
  • In all cases of chemical change energy in the form of heat is either developed or absorbed, and the amount of heat developed or absorbed in a given reaction is as definite as are the weights of the substance engaged in the reaction.

    2
    6
    Advertisement
  • The principal object of this more recent research has been the determination of the quantitative amount of chemical change associated with the passage for a given time of a current of strength known in electromagnetic units.

    2
    6
  • The effect may, however, also be due to chemical change known as condensation, and be accompanied by the elimination of the elements of water.

    2
    6
  • In the first place, such organisms may be differentiated by the chemical change produced by them in various culture media, e.g.

    2
    6
  • A few do not exist ready formed in the plants, but result from chemical change of inodorous substances; as for instance, bitter almonds and essential oil of mustard.

    3
    7
  • Iron and quinine citrate is used as a bitter stomachic and tonic. In the blood citrates are oxidized into carbonates; they therefore act as remote alkalis, increasing the alkalinity of the blood and thereby the general rate of chemical change within the body (see Acetic Acid).

    2
    6
    Advertisement
  • When chemical change is expressed with the aid of molecular formulae not only is the distribution of weight represented, but by the mere inspection of the symbols it is possible to deduce from the law of gaseous combination mentioned above, the relative volumes which the agents and resultants occupy in the state of gas if measured at the same temperature and under the same pressure.

    1
    5
  • Furnaces may be classified according as the products of combustion are employed (i) only for heating purposes, or (2) both for heating and bringing about some chemical change.

    2
    7
  • As the technique becomes increasingly quantitative it promises to deliver real insight into the nature of chemical change.

    2
    7