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chaucer

chaucer

chaucer Sentence Examples

  • In the first, or general, prologue, Douglas claims a higher position for Virgil than for his master Chaucer, and attacks Caxton for his inadequate rendering of a French translation of the Aeneid.

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  • Douglas is in all important respects even more of a medievalist than his contemporaries; and, like Henryson and Dunbar, strictly a member of the allegorical school and a follower, in the most generous way, of Chaucer's art.

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  • vir.) in Chaucer's Canterbury Tales prefaces his account of Alexander with the statement that his story is so common That every wight that hath discrecioun Hath herd somewhat or all of his fortune.

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  • After 1390 - but whilst he was still a young man - he made the acquaintance of Geoffrey Chaucer, with whose son Thomas he was on terms of considerable intimacy.

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  • Chaucer translated it into English prose before the year 1382; and this translation was published by Caxton at Westminster, 1480.

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  • Lydgate followed in the wake of Chaucer.

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  • Among the first, the name of the "Tabard" is well known from its mention by Chaucer in detailing the company of pilgrims for Canterbury.

    0
    0
  • John of Bohemia had fought by the Vistula: Henry of Bolingbroke was of the goodly company; Chaucer's perfect knight had travelled in "Pruce and Lettowe."

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  • Thus we read in Chaucer (Chanouns Yemannes Tale): - The bodies sevene eek, lo!

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  • Chaucer, Chanouns Yemannes Tale, where, however, mercury figures both as a spirit and a body: " The firste spirit quik-silver called is, The second orpiment, the thridde ywis Sal armoniak, and the ferthe brimstoon."

    0
    0
  • In England the chief orders of friars were distinguished by the colour of their habit: thus the Franciscans or Minors were the Grey Friars; the Dominicans or Preachers were the Black Friars (from their black mantle over a white habit), and the Carmelites were the White Friars (from their white mantle over a brown habit): these, together with the Austin Friars or Hermits, formed the four great mendicant orders - Chaucer's "alle the ordres foure."

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  • Cecilia, whose musical fame rests on a passing notice in her legend that she praised God by instrumental as well as vocal music, has inspired many a masterpiece in art, including the Raphael at Bologna, the Rubens in Berlin, the Domenichino in Paris, and in literature, where she is commemorated especially by Chaucer's "Seconde Nonnes Tale," and by Dryden's famous ode, set to music by Handel in 1736, and later by Sir Hubert Parry (1889).

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  • His restlessness leads us at times to a comparison with Skelton, not in respect of any parallelism of idea or literary craftsmanship, but in his experimental zeal in turning the diction and tuning the rhythms of the chaotic English which only Chaucer's genius had reduced to order.

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  • The greater part of Dunbar's work is occasional - personal and social satire, complaints (in the style familiar in the minor verse of Chaucer's English successors), orisons and pieces of a humorous character.

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  • The last type shows Dunbar at his best, and points the difference between him and Chaucer.

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  • Dunbar's satire is never the gentle funning of Chaucer: more often it becomes invective.

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  • Chaucer, when he spoke of Gawain coming "again out of faerie," spoke better than he knew; the home of that very gallant and courteous knight is indeed Fairy-land, and the true Gawain-tradition is informed with fairy glamour and grace.

    0
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  • - Chaucer, Treatise on the Astrolabe (Skeat's edition of Chaucer); J.

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  • But there are references which suggest its previous award in Piers Plowman and Chaucer.

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  • c. 1203), the former being the author of the Alexandreis, and the latter that of the Anti-Claudianus, a poem familiar to Chaucer.

    0
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  • The form ceorl soon became cherl, as in Havelok the Dane (ante 1300) and several times in Chaucer, and subsequently churl.

    0
    0
  • Transpositions of words, if not purely accidental, as in Chaucer, "Parson's Tale," p. 689 (ed.

    0
    0
  • In Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, most MSS.

    0
    0
  • What is clearly erroneous or faulty may as clearly be intended, and therefore not to be removed by the critic. In Chaucer's "Miller's Tale" (3455, 3457) astromie is used for astronomie, and Noe and Noel (Christmas) confused, "Nowelis flood" (345 1, 3457), because the speaker is an illiterate carpenter.

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  • In the Prologue to the "Parson's Tale" (so) there is, on the other hand, a mistake of Chaucer's own, which no judicious critic would think of removing, the constellation Libra being said to be "the moon's exaltation" when it should be Saturn's.

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  • Schofield, English Literature from the Norman Conquest to Chaucer (London, 1906); Johan Vising, Franska Spraket i England (Goteborg, 1900, 1901, 1902).

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  • The effigies of Margaret Byron, wife of Sir Robert Harcourt, K.G., at Stanton Harcourt, and of Alice Chaucer, wife of William de la Pole, duke of Suffolk, K.G., at Ewelme, which date from the reigns of Henry VI.

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  • He was also the patron of Chaucer, whose Boke of the Duchesse was a lament for Blanche of Lancaster.

    0
    0
  • Chaucer in his Nun's Priest's Tale ranks Bradwardine with St Augustine.

    0
    0
  • He was more successful with his Life of Chaucer, for which he received £600.

    0
    0
  • Godwin's more important works are - The Inquiry concerning Political Justice, and its Influence on General Virtue and Happiness (1793); Things as they are, or the Adventures of Caleb Williams (1794); The Inquirer, a series of Essays (1797); Memoirs of the Author of the Rights of Woman (1798); St Leon, a Tale of the Sixteenth Century (1799); Antonio, a Tragedy (1800); The Life of Chaucer (1803); Fleetwood, a Novel (1805); Faulkner, a Tragedy (1807); Essay on Sepulchres (1809); Lives of Edward and John Philips, the Nephews of Milton (1815); Mandeville, a Tale of the Times of Cromwell (1817); Of Population, an answer to Malthus (1820); History of the Commonwealth (1824-1828); Cloudesley, a Novel (1830); Thoughts on Man, a series of Essays (1831); Lives of the Necromancers (1834).

    0
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  • Suffolk's wife, Alice, was widow of Thomas, earl of Salisbury, and granddaughter of Geoffrey Chaucer.

    0
    0
  • Hence what is not strictly allegorical after the fashion of the Romaunt of the Rose or Chaucer's exercises in that kind, is for the most part occasional, dealing with courtiers' sorrow and fun, with the conventional plaints on the vanity of the world and with pious ejaculation.

    0
    0
  • Even Henryson, perhaps the most original of these poets, is in his most original pieces strongly " Chaucerian " in method, notably in his remarkable series of Fables, and his Testament of Cresseid, a continuation of the story left untold by Chaucer.

    0
    0
  • The setting of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales gives a vivid idea of the motley company of pilgrims; but it seems probable that Germany also sent a contingent (Gervas.

    0
    0
  • His last piece of work, the crowning glory of his printing-press, was the Kelmscott Chaucer, which had taken nearly two years to print, and fully five to plan and mature.

    0
    0
  • Both his collegiate and editorial duties stimulated his critical powers, and the publication in the two magazines, followed by republication in book form, of a series of studies of great authors, gave him an important place as a critic. Shakespeare, Dryden, Lessing, Rousseau, Dante, Spenser, Wordsworth, Milton, Keats, Carlyle, Thoreau, Swinburne, Chaucer, Emerson, Pope, Gray - these are the principal subjects of his prose, and the range of topics indicates the catholicity of his taste.

    0
    0
  • Chaucer's poetry, which owed so much to Italian examples, gave an early foretaste of the former.

    0
    0
  • It is still used where hand printing prevails, and it was this form of press which was employed by William Morris at his famous, but short-lived, Kelmscott Press, the upright frame or staple, of iron; the feet of this staple rested upon two pieces of substantial timber dovetailed into a cross, which formed a base or foundation for the in the production of many sumptuous books, the most celebrated of which was the Chaucer, a large folio volume, illustrated by Sir Edward Burne-Jones.

    0
    0
  • The essential parts of one type of bale opener are three specially shaped rollers, the peri pheries of which contain a number of 1 Also in the forms "streek," "strick" or "strike," as in Chaucer, Cant.

    0
    0
  • The gillyflower of Chaucer and Spenser and Shakespeare was, as in Italy, Dianthus Caryophyllus; that of later writers and of gardeners, Matthiola.

    0
    0
  • The use made of the flowers to impart a spicy flavour to ale and wine is alluded to by Chaucer, who writes: "And many a clove gilofre To put in ale"; also by Spenser, who refers to them by the name of sops in wine, which was applied in consequence of their being steeped in the liquor.

    0
    0
  • GALEN (or [[Galenus), Claudius]], called Gallien by Chaucer and other writers of the middle ages, the most celebrated of ancient medical writers, was born at Pergamus, in Mysia, about A.D.

    0
    0
  • Both sacred languages differ from the language of the people, but it cannot be said that in the Eastern Church worship is conducted in an unknown tongue - " the actual difference," says Neale, " may be about that between Chaucer's English and our own."

    0
    0
  • There is no trace in classical writers of the story of Shakespeare's Troilus and Cressida, the materials for which were derived from Chaucer's poem of the same name, Lydgate's History, Sege, and Destruction of Troy, Caxton's Recuyell of the Historyes of Troy (trans.

    0
    0
  • Those in which the foundations of modern Europe were laid, which produced parliaments, cathedrals, cities, Dante and Chaucer, were grouped alike on one dismal level and christened the middle ages.

    0
    0
  • The poet Chaucer may serve as a humbler example of the rise of the burgher class the son of a vintner, he became the father of a knight, and the ancestor, through female descents, of many baronial families.

    0
    0
  • As to intellectual vigour, the age that produced two minds of such marked originality in different spheres as Wycliffe and Chaucer must not be despised, even if it failed to carry out all the promise of the 13th century.

    0
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  • Wright), treatises like those of John of Salisbury, Gerald of Wales, and, later, Wycliffes works, Netters Fasciculi Zizaniorum, Gascoignes Loci e libro veritatum, Pecocks Repressor, and the literary writings of Chaucer, Langland, Gower, Richard Rolle and others.

    0
    0
  • The name is of uncertain origin; some derive it from lolium, tares, quoting Chaucer (C. Shipman's Prologue) "This Loller heer wil prechen us somwhat..

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  • Geoffrey Chaucer >>

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  • The prediction was believed far and wide, and President Aurial, at Toulouse, built himself a Noah's ark - a curious realization, in fact, of Chaucer's merry invention in the Miller's Tale.

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  • Chaucer wrote a treatise on the astrolabe; Milton constantly refers to planetary influences; in Shakespeare's King Lear, Gloucester and Edmund represent respectively the old and the new faith.

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  • Whether you know nothing about Chaucer or Canterbury Tales, are currently studying it or loved (or indeed loathed!

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  • Chaucer and Journey's End present obvious parallels, as do all the portmanteau horror films from the 1970s produced by Amicus Productions.

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  • What Henryson is concerned with is a highly reductive reading of Chaucer's text.

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  • Visitors to the area need sustenance, just as Chaucer's pilgrims did as they set off for Canterbury from the Tabard Inn.

    0
    0
  • Did a lot of medieval pilgrims go along for the fun, as in Chaucer, rather than the spiritual uplift?

    0
    0
  • In the first, or general, prologue, Douglas claims a higher position for Virgil than for his master Chaucer, and attacks Caxton for his inadequate rendering of a French translation of the Aeneid.

    0
    0
  • Douglas is in all important respects even more of a medievalist than his contemporaries; and, like Henryson and Dunbar, strictly a member of the allegorical school and a follower, in the most generous way, of Chaucer's art.

    0
    0
  • P. Lange's dissertation Chaucer's Einfluss auf die Originaldichtungen des Schotten Gavin Douglas (Halle, 1882) draws attention to Douglas's indebtedness to Chaucer.

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  • He also wrote The House of Austria in the Thirty Years' War (1869), Great Britain and Hanover (1899),(1899), The Electress Sophia and the Hanoverian Succession (1903); he edited Crabbe's Poems (2 vols., 1905-1906) and Pope's Poetical Works (1869); he wrote the volumes on Chaucer and Dickens in the "English Men of Letters" series, translated Curtius's History of Greece (5 vols., 1868-1873); he was one of the editors of the Cambridge Modern History, and with A.

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  • vir.) in Chaucer's Canterbury Tales prefaces his account of Alexander with the statement that his story is so common That every wight that hath discrecioun Hath herd somewhat or all of his fortune.

    0
    0
  • After 1390 - but whilst he was still a young man - he made the acquaintance of Geoffrey Chaucer, with whose son Thomas he was on terms of considerable intimacy.

    0
    0
  • In these he reveals himself as a not unworthy successor of Chaucer, and the pity of it is that he should have squandered his powers in a futile attempt to create an entire literature.

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  • This was in a sense only natural, since he was the real founder of the school of which Stephen Hawes was a distinguished ornament, and which "held the field" in English letters during the long and dreary interval between Chaucer and Spenser.

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  • Since his writings are read more easily than Chaucer's, the inference is plain - that he was more effectual as a maker of our present English.

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  • Chaucer translated it into English prose before the year 1382; and this translation was published by Caxton at Westminster, 1480.

    0
    0
  • Lydgate followed in the wake of Chaucer.

    0
    0
  • Among the first, the name of the "Tabard" is well known from its mention by Chaucer in detailing the company of pilgrims for Canterbury.

    0
    0
  • John of Bohemia had fought by the Vistula: Henry of Bolingbroke was of the goodly company; Chaucer's perfect knight had travelled in "Pruce and Lettowe."

    0
    0
  • Thus we read in Chaucer (Chanouns Yemannes Tale): - The bodies sevene eek, lo!

    0
    0
  • Chaucer, Chanouns Yemannes Tale, where, however, mercury figures both as a spirit and a body: " The firste spirit quik-silver called is, The second orpiment, the thridde ywis Sal armoniak, and the ferthe brimstoon."

    0
    0
  • In England the chief orders of friars were distinguished by the colour of their habit: thus the Franciscans or Minors were the Grey Friars; the Dominicans or Preachers were the Black Friars (from their black mantle over a white habit), and the Carmelites were the White Friars (from their white mantle over a brown habit): these, together with the Austin Friars or Hermits, formed the four great mendicant orders - Chaucer's "alle the ordres foure."

    0
    0
  • Cecilia, whose musical fame rests on a passing notice in her legend that she praised God by instrumental as well as vocal music, has inspired many a masterpiece in art, including the Raphael at Bologna, the Rubens in Berlin, the Domenichino in Paris, and in literature, where she is commemorated especially by Chaucer's "Seconde Nonnes Tale," and by Dryden's famous ode, set to music by Handel in 1736, and later by Sir Hubert Parry (1889).

    0
    0
  • His restlessness leads us at times to a comparison with Skelton, not in respect of any parallelism of idea or literary craftsmanship, but in his experimental zeal in turning the diction and tuning the rhythms of the chaotic English which only Chaucer's genius had reduced to order.

    0
    0
  • The greater part of Dunbar's work is occasional - personal and social satire, complaints (in the style familiar in the minor verse of Chaucer's English successors), orisons and pieces of a humorous character.

    0
    0
  • The last type shows Dunbar at his best, and points the difference between him and Chaucer.

    0
    0
  • Dunbar's satire is never the gentle funning of Chaucer: more often it becomes invective.

    0
    0
  • Chaucer, when he spoke of Gawain coming "again out of faerie," spoke better than he knew; the home of that very gallant and courteous knight is indeed Fairy-land, and the true Gawain-tradition is informed with fairy glamour and grace.

    0
    0
  • - Chaucer, Treatise on the Astrolabe (Skeat's edition of Chaucer); J.

    0
    0
  • But there are references which suggest its previous award in Piers Plowman and Chaucer.

    0
    0
  • c. 1203), the former being the author of the Alexandreis, and the latter that of the Anti-Claudianus, a poem familiar to Chaucer.

    0
    0
  • The form ceorl soon became cherl, as in Havelok the Dane (ante 1300) and several times in Chaucer, and subsequently churl.

    0
    0
  • Transpositions of words, if not purely accidental, as in Chaucer, "Parson's Tale," p. 689 (ed.

    0
    0
  • Chaucer's House of Fame, iii., 1975, "Of good or misgovernement" which should be "mis (i.e., bad) governement"; Shelley's Prometheus, iii.

    0
    0
  • In Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, most MSS.

    0
    0
  • What is clearly erroneous or faulty may as clearly be intended, and therefore not to be removed by the critic. In Chaucer's "Miller's Tale" (3455, 3457) astromie is used for astronomie, and Noe and Noel (Christmas) confused, "Nowelis flood" (345 1, 3457), because the speaker is an illiterate carpenter.

    0
    0
  • In the Prologue to the "Parson's Tale" (so) there is, on the other hand, a mistake of Chaucer's own, which no judicious critic would think of removing, the constellation Libra being said to be "the moon's exaltation" when it should be Saturn's.

    0
    0
  • Schofield, English Literature from the Norman Conquest to Chaucer (London, 1906); Johan Vising, Franska Spraket i England (Goteborg, 1900, 1901, 1902).

    0
    0
  • The naming of the intermediate subdivisions making up the thirty-two points or rhumbs of the compass card is probably due to Flemish navigators; but they were recognized even in the time of Chaucer, who in 1391 wrote, "Now is thin Orisonte departed in xxiiii partiez by thi azymutz, in significacion of xxiiii partiez of the world: al be it so that ship men rikne thilke partiez in xxxii" (Treatise on the Astrolabe, ed.

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    0
  • The effigies of Margaret Byron, wife of Sir Robert Harcourt, K.G., at Stanton Harcourt, and of Alice Chaucer, wife of William de la Pole, duke of Suffolk, K.G., at Ewelme, which date from the reigns of Henry VI.

    0
    0
  • He was also the patron of Chaucer, whose Boke of the Duchesse was a lament for Blanche of Lancaster.

    0
    0
  • Chaucer in his Nun's Priest's Tale ranks Bradwardine with St Augustine.

    0
    0
  • He was more successful with his Life of Chaucer, for which he received £600.

    0
    0
  • Godwin's more important works are - The Inquiry concerning Political Justice, and its Influence on General Virtue and Happiness (1793); Things as they are, or the Adventures of Caleb Williams (1794); The Inquirer, a series of Essays (1797); Memoirs of the Author of the Rights of Woman (1798); St Leon, a Tale of the Sixteenth Century (1799); Antonio, a Tragedy (1800); The Life of Chaucer (1803); Fleetwood, a Novel (1805); Faulkner, a Tragedy (1807); Essay on Sepulchres (1809); Lives of Edward and John Philips, the Nephews of Milton (1815); Mandeville, a Tale of the Times of Cromwell (1817); Of Population, an answer to Malthus (1820); History of the Commonwealth (1824-1828); Cloudesley, a Novel (1830); Thoughts on Man, a series of Essays (1831); Lives of the Necromancers (1834).

    0
    0
  • Suffolk's wife, Alice, was widow of Thomas, earl of Salisbury, and granddaughter of Geoffrey Chaucer.

    0
    0
  • Hence what is not strictly allegorical after the fashion of the Romaunt of the Rose or Chaucer's exercises in that kind, is for the most part occasional, dealing with courtiers' sorrow and fun, with the conventional plaints on the vanity of the world and with pious ejaculation.

    0
    0
  • Even Henryson, perhaps the most original of these poets, is in his most original pieces strongly " Chaucerian " in method, notably in his remarkable series of Fables, and his Testament of Cresseid, a continuation of the story left untold by Chaucer.

    0
    0
  • The setting of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales gives a vivid idea of the motley company of pilgrims; but it seems probable that Germany also sent a contingent (Gervas.

    0
    0
  • His last piece of work, the crowning glory of his printing-press, was the Kelmscott Chaucer, which had taken nearly two years to print, and fully five to plan and mature.

    0
    0
  • Both his collegiate and editorial duties stimulated his critical powers, and the publication in the two magazines, followed by republication in book form, of a series of studies of great authors, gave him an important place as a critic. Shakespeare, Dryden, Lessing, Rousseau, Dante, Spenser, Wordsworth, Milton, Keats, Carlyle, Thoreau, Swinburne, Chaucer, Emerson, Pope, Gray - these are the principal subjects of his prose, and the range of topics indicates the catholicity of his taste.

    0
    0
  • Chaucer's poetry, which owed so much to Italian examples, gave an early foretaste of the former.

    0
    0
  • It is still used where hand printing prevails, and it was this form of press which was employed by William Morris at his famous, but short-lived, Kelmscott Press, the upright frame or staple, of iron; the feet of this staple rested upon two pieces of substantial timber dovetailed into a cross, which formed a base or foundation for the in the production of many sumptuous books, the most celebrated of which was the Chaucer, a large folio volume, illustrated by Sir Edward Burne-Jones.

    0
    0
  • The essential parts of one type of bale opener are three specially shaped rollers, the peri pheries of which contain a number of 1 Also in the forms "streek," "strick" or "strike," as in Chaucer, Cant.

    0
    0
  • The gillyflower of Chaucer and Spenser and Shakespeare was, as in Italy, Dianthus Caryophyllus; that of later writers and of gardeners, Matthiola.

    0
    0
  • The use made of the flowers to impart a spicy flavour to ale and wine is alluded to by Chaucer, who writes: "And many a clove gilofre To put in ale"; also by Spenser, who refers to them by the name of sops in wine, which was applied in consequence of their being steeped in the liquor.

    0
    0
  • GALEN (or [[Galenus), Claudius]], called Gallien by Chaucer and other writers of the middle ages, the most celebrated of ancient medical writers, was born at Pergamus, in Mysia, about A.D.

    0
    0
  • Both sacred languages differ from the language of the people, but it cannot be said that in the Eastern Church worship is conducted in an unknown tongue - " the actual difference," says Neale, " may be about that between Chaucer's English and our own."

    0
    0
  • There is no trace in classical writers of the story of Shakespeare's Troilus and Cressida, the materials for which were derived from Chaucer's poem of the same name, Lydgate's History, Sege, and Destruction of Troy, Caxton's Recuyell of the Historyes of Troy (trans.

    0
    0
  • Those in which the foundations of modern Europe were laid, which produced parliaments, cathedrals, cities, Dante and Chaucer, were grouped alike on one dismal level and christened the middle ages.

    0
    0
  • The poet Chaucer may serve as a humbler example of the rise of the burgher class the son of a vintner, he became the father of a knight, and the ancestor, through female descents, of many baronial families.

    0
    0
  • As to intellectual vigour, the age that produced two minds of such marked originality in different spheres as Wycliffe and Chaucer must not be despised, even if it failed to carry out all the promise of the 13th century.

    0
    0
  • Wright), treatises like those of John of Salisbury, Gerald of Wales, and, later, Wycliffes works, Netters Fasciculi Zizaniorum, Gascoignes Loci e libro veritatum, Pecocks Repressor, and the literary writings of Chaucer, Langland, Gower, Richard Rolle and others.

    0
    0
  • The name is of uncertain origin; some derive it from lolium, tares, quoting Chaucer (C. Shipman's Prologue) "This Loller heer wil prechen us somwhat..

    0
    0
  • Geoffrey Chaucer >>

    0
    0
  • The prediction was believed far and wide, and President Aurial, at Toulouse, built himself a Noah's ark - a curious realization, in fact, of Chaucer's merry invention in the Miller's Tale.

    0
    0
  • Chaucer wrote a treatise on the astrolabe; Milton constantly refers to planetary influences; in Shakespeare's King Lear, Gloucester and Edmund represent respectively the old and the new faith.

    0
    0
  • What Henryson is concerned with is a highly reductive reading of Chaucer 's text.

    0
    0
  • The Wool Trade Chaucer gave of his best in the rollicking tale of the much-married Wife of Bath.

    0
    0
  • Visitors to the area need sustenance, just as Chaucer 's pilgrims did as they set off for Canterbury from the Tabard Inn.

    0
    0
  • Did a lot of medieval pilgrims go along for the fun, as in Chaucer, rather than the spiritual uplift?

    0
    0
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