Charter sentence example

charter
  • By a charter, dated the 21st of November 1214, he granted freedom of election to the church.
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  • It is, however, very much longer than the former charter and somewhat longer than the Articles.
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  • All right, I'll charter a plane for the morning.
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  • The parks are a fine feature of the city; by its charter a fixed percentage of all expenditures for public improvements must be used to purchase park land.
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  • John then asked the barons for a charter that they on their part would keep the peace.
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  • Nearly all the cable companies possess their own steamers, of sufficient dimensions and specially equipped for making ordinary repairs; but for exceptional cases, where a considerable quantity of new cable may have to be inserted, it may be necessary to charter the services of one of the larger vessels owned by a cable-manufacturing company, at a certain sum per day, which may well reach £200 to £300.
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  • Early Saturday morning, the two had boarded a charter bus with scores of bikers for the 372-mile, eight-hour trip to Cortez, Colorado, where they found a pleasant little town abuzz with the activity of 2,000 riders and hundreds of support personnel.
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  • In April 1695 he was impeached once more by the Commons for having received a bribe of 5000 guineas to procure the new charter for the East India Company.
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  • They are forty-eight in number, and on them Magna Carta was based, the work of converting them into a charter, which was regarded as a much more binding form of engagement, being taken in hand immediately.
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  • The issue of a separate forest charter at this time led subsequently to some confusion.
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  • As Rodrigo Diaz de Vivar he is first mentioned in a charter of Ferdinand I.
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  • It has no charter of incorporation.
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  • This charter provided that no war could be declared nor marriage concluded by the sovereign, nor taxes raised without the assent of the states, that natives were alone eligible for high office, and that the national language should be used in public documents.
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  • This arrangement was not, however, approved of by the physicians, who obtained in 1617 a separate charter for the apothecaries, to the number of 114, which was the number of physicians then practising in London.
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  • This condition being unfulfilled, the charter lapsed in the reign of James I., and an attempt to obtain its renewal in the 18th century failed.
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  • Under the state constitution of 1875 it has had the right, since attaining a population of 100,000, to form a charter for itself.
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  • The bishops did not obtain possession until the reign of John, who during the interval in 1201 gave Hartlepool a charter granting the burgesses the same privileges that the burgesses of Newcastle enjoyed; in 1230 Bishop Richard Poor granted further liberties, including a gild merchant.
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  • A charter providing for its government was granted on the 59th of March 5907.
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  • Thus ends the Saxon period, and the Norman period in London begins with the submission of the citizens as distinct from the action of the rest of the kingdom, which submission resulted soon afterwards in the Conqueror's remarkable charter to William the bishop and Gosfrith the portcity, reeve, supposed to be the elder Geoffrey de Mandeville.
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  • 27 parliament passed an act in 1670 confirming the charter granted by Charles II.
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  • The name, Hamstede, is synonymous with "homestead," and the manor is first named in a charter of Edgar (957-975), and was granted to the abbey of Westminster by Ethelred in 986.
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  • Thirteen M.A.'s and seven bachelors, besides the president, John Hornley, B.D., were named in the charter.
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  • The borough was never represented in parliament, nor incorporated by charter.
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  • For instance, the provisions in Magna Carta concerning the freedom of the church find no place in the Articles, while a comparison between the two documents suggests that in other ways also influences favourable to the church and the clergy were at work while the famous charter was being framed.
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  • As Pollock and Maitland (History of English Law) say "on the whole the charter contains little that is absolutely new.
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  • Modern historians, although less rhetorical, speak in the highest terms of the importance of Magna Carta, the view of most of them being summed up in the words of Dr Stubbs: "The whole of the constitutional history of England is a commentary on this charter."
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  • On the 12th of November 12 t 6 the regent William Marshal, earl of Pembroke, reissued the charter in the name of the young king Henry III.
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  • This promise was carried out, but two charters appeared, one being a revised issue of Magna Carta proper, and the other a separate charter dealing with the forests, all references to which were omitted from the more important document.
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  • Roger of Wendover asserts that John issued a separate charter of this kind when Magna Carta appeared.
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  • The sheriffs were ordered to publish the revised charter on the 22nd of February 1218.
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  • On this occasion some supplementary articles were added to the charter; these were intended to limit the taxing power of the crown.
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  • This, however, was not the original text, which was neglected until the time of Blackstone, who printed the various issues of the charter in his book The Great Charter and the Charter of the Forest (1759).
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  • His advocacy of an American episcopate, in connexion with which he wrote the Answer to Dr Mayhew's Observations on the Charter and Conduct of the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts (London 1764), raised considerable opposition in England and America.
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  • The charter of William the Conqueror abrogated the laws of Edgar.
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  • The earliest charter to the citizens of Ghent was that granted by Count Philip of Flanders between 1169 and 1191.
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  • Far more comprehensive was the second charter, granted by Philip's widow Mathilda, after his death on crusade in 1191, as the price paid for the faithfulness of the city to her cause.
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  • This charter was confirmed and extended by Count Baldwin VIII.
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  • On the 18th of February 1843 a royal charter of incorporation was granted to the society, and a permanent status was thus acquired.
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  • The gild, to which both sexes were admitted, was in existence early in the 13th century, and it was incorporated by a charter from Edward III.
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  • Another charter, confirming former liberties but altering the constitution of the corporation, was granted in 1611.
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  • In 1832, two years after receiving its charter, it opened near Boydton, Mecklenburg county, Virginia, and in 1868 was removed to Ashland.
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  • On the 31st of December 1 599 Queen Elizabeth granted the charter of incorporation to the East India Company, and Sir James Lancaster, one of the directors, was appointed general of their first fleet.
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  • 29 cities of former days, there is a succession of small towns along the course of the river - Ramadiya, Feluja, Mussaib, Hillah, Diwanieh, Samawa, el-Khudr (an ancient daphne or sacred grove, 3 I° 11' 58" N., 76° 6' 9" E., the only one anywhere which preserves to this day its ancient charter of the inviolability of all life within its precincts), Nasrieh and Suk-esh-Sheiukh----by means of which the Turkish government controls the river and levies taxes on a small part of the adjacent territory.
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  • It was incorporated as a village in 1857, but the charter was allowed to lapse; it was again incorporated as a village in 1865, and was chartered as a city in 1873.
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  • It is possible that Minehead had a corporate existence during the 15th century, as certain documents executed by the portreeve and burgesses at that date are preserved, but no record of the grant of a charter has been found.
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  • Indianapolis is governed under a form of government adopted originally in a special charter of 1891 and in 1905 incorporated in the new state municipal code, which was based upon it, It provides for a mayor elected every four years, a single legislative chamber, a common council, and various administrative departments - of public safety, public health, &c. The guiding principle of the charter, which is generally accepted as a model of its kind, is that of the complete separation of powers and the absolute placing of responsibility.
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  • Indianapolis suffered severely from the business panic of 1837, and ten years later, when it received its first city charter, it had only about 6000 inhabitants; in the same year a free public school system was inaugurated.
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  • Its charter is said to date from 121 8, and it was the seat of the courts of the earls of Strathearn till 1 747, when heritable jurisdictions were abolished.
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  • In 1851 Mr Lafone's interest in Lafonia, as the peninsula came to be called, was purchased for £30,000 by the Falkland Islands Company, which had been incorporated by charter in the same year.
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  • In 1618, however, the burgesses received an incorporation charter; but after the civil wars the corporate body began to fail through poverty, and in the 18th century had ceased to exist.
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  • Parkersburg was settled in 1789, was incorporated in 1820, and received a new charter in 1903, when its boundaries were enlarged.
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  • It became a borough in 1319 by a charter of Edward II., which was confirmed in 1342 and 1378, and by each of the Lancastrian kings.
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  • No charter has been found, but a judgment given under a writ of quo warranto in 1578 confirms to the burgesses freedom from toll, passage and pontage, the tolls and stallage of the quay and the right to hold two fairs - privileges which they claimed under charters of Baldwin de Redvers and Isabel de Fortibus, countess of Albemarle, in the 13th century, and Edward Courtenay, earl of Devon, in 1405.
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  • In accordance with authority conferred by the home-rule amendment of the state constitution, a charter, submitted by a special commission, was accepted by the citizens on July I 1913.
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  • The borough was represented by two members in parliament in 1300 and 1311, and then not again till 1640, from which date it returned two members until disfranchised by the act of 1868, the returning officer being the portreeve, who was also the chief magistrate of the borough until its incorporation by charter of 1846.
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  • By a second charter issued in 1665 the limits were extended to 29° and 36° 30'.
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  • According to the charter the northern boundary was to be the line of 36° 30', but the surveys (of 1728, 1749 and 1779) were not strictly accurate, and the actual line runs irregularly from 3 6 ° 33' 15" at its eastern to 3 6 ° 34' 2 5.5" at its western end.
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  • Settled about 1854, Ashland was incorporated as a village in 1863 and received a city charter in 1887.
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  • During the middle ages the Friday market and fair in Whit week, granted by the first charter, were centres for the sale of yarn and cloth called "Dunsters," made in the town.
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  • A market on Wednesday and a fortnightly fair on the same day from the Feast of St Mark to that of St Andrew are claimed under a charter of Charles II.
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  • Wheelock appealed to the legislature in the following year, when it was strongly Republican, and that body responded by passing acts which virtually repealed the charter received from George III., created a state university, placed Wheelock at its head, and transferred to it the property of the college.
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  • It was a borough by prescription as early as 1201, in which year King John granted the burgesses a charter of liberties according to the custom of the burgesses of Northampton.
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  • A governing charter, under the title of mayor and burgesses, was given by James II.
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  • Richmond is governed under a charter of 1870 with amendments.
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  • The debt limit is set by the city charter at 18% of the assessed value of the taxable real estate of the city.
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  • In England the Agricultural Society was founded in 1838, with the motto " Practice with Science," and shortly afterwards incorporated by royal charter.
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  • By James I.'s charter the burgesses sent one member to parliament, and continued to do so until 1885.
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  • As Chateaubriand remarked, in reference to Louis XVIII.'s constitutional charter, the new constitution - La Benjamine, it was dubbed - was merely a slightly improved charter.
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  • The town received a municipal charter in 1860, and during the governorship of Lord Lamington (1896-1897) became the summer residence of the governor and his staff.
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  • The Heath grammar school was founded in 1585 under royal charter for instruction in classical languages.
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  • The city charter was revised in 1854, and again reconstructed in important particulars by laws of 1885 separating the executive and legislative powers, and by subsequent acts.
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  • A new charter went into effect in 1910.
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  • In 1818 a charter was secured from the legislature of the territory of Illinois incorporating the city and bank of Cairo.
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  • The charter was soon forfeited, and the land secured by it reverted to the government.
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  • In 1835 a new charter was granted to a second company, and in 1837 the Cairo City & Canal Co.
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  • In1643-1644the colony was expanded into the New Haven Jurisdiction, embracing the towns of New Haven, Guilford, Milford, Stamford and Branford in Connecticut, and, on Long Island, Southold; but this "Jurisdiction" was dissolved in 1664, and all these towns (except Southold) passed under the jurisdiction of Connecticut, according to the Connecticut charter of 1662.
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  • 2.5 East Indies „ ' 1 Smyrna or Turkey 5.7 The British Cotton Growing Association works under the sanction of a royal charter and has met with valuable official support.
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  • The assistance of the Trinity Masters, which has been already mentioned, was provided for in the charter of incorporation of the Trinity House.
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  • The charter of incorporation granted in 1614 states that by the invasion of the Spaniards it had been treacherously spoiled and burnt but that its strength, prosperity and usefulness for navigation, and the acceptable and laudable services of the inhabitants in rebuilding and fortifying it, and their enterprise in erecting a pier, have moved the king to grant the petition for its incorporation.
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  • He endowed the priory by charter with the lordship of the manor and borough, which it retained till its dissolution in 1536-1537.
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  • In 1864 the town was made a municipal borough by royal charter.
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  • The incorporators included James Madison, Patrick Henry (who is believed to have drafted the college charter), Paul Carrington, William Cabell, Sen., and Nathaniel Venable.
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  • The town charter of 1843 changed the name to Marthasville, in honour of the daughter of Governor Wilson Lumpkin; and the city charter of 1847 changed this to Atlanta.
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  • Monroe was chartered as a city in 1871, and received a new charter in 1902.
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  • Henry de Bohun figures with the earls of Clare and Gloucester among the twenty-five barons who were elected by their fellows to enforce the terms of the Great Charter.
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  • In 1216 John confirmed toRobertBruce the market on Wednesday granted to his father and the fair on the feast of St Lawrence; this fair was extended to fifteen days by the grant of 1230, while the charter of 1595 also granted a fair and market.
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  • It received its charter of incorporation from George III.
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  • In 1585 Elizabeth granted a charter of incorporation under the name of the mayor and commonalty of Helston.
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  • Roger de Lacy in 1194 granted a charter to the burgesses confirming their liberties and right to be a free borough at a fee-farm of 12d.
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  • Henry de Lacy cofirmed this charter in 1278 and in 1484 Richard III.
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  • His charter was withdrawn on the accession of Henry VII.
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  • The privilege of returning two members to parliament which had belonged to Pontefract at the end of the 13th century was revived in1620-1621on the grounds that the charter of1606-1607had restored all their privileges to the burgesses.
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  • The incorporation charter of 1468 granted these to the burgesses, who continue to hold them.
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  • In the first charter (which is undated) Henry II.
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  • There were numerous trade gilds, one of the chief being that of the weavers, which received a charter from Henry II.
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  • Many of the Franciscans refused to abandon their work, and in 1463 they received a charter from the sultan Mahomet II., which is still preserved in the monastery of Fojnica, near Travnik.
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  • The revolt was suppressed, the Turko-Greek conflict was settled by a conference of the powers in Paris, and Crete received a charter of local self-government which for a time pacified the island.'
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  • In September yet another Cretan charter of self-government was promulgated.
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  • The charter of that year placed the balance of power in a council composed of three members chosen from each ward and as many aldermen as there were wards, elected on a general ticket.
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  • Then, from 1891 to 1903, by what was practically a new charter, that which is known as the "federal plan" of government was tried; this centred power in the mayor by making him almost the only elective officer, by giving to him the appointment of his cabinet of directors - one for the head of each of the six municipal departments - and to each director the appointment of his subordinates.
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  • Edward II.'s charter of 1324 indicates that Cardiff ha, d become even then a trading and shipping centre of some importance.
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  • Its most important early charter was that granted in 1340 by Hugh le Despenser, whereby the burgesses acquired the right to nominate persons from whom the constable of the castle should select a bailiff and other officers, two ancient fairs, held on the 29th of June and, 9th of September, were confirmed, and extensive trading privileges were granted, including the right to form a merchant gild.
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  • A charter granted in 1421 by Richard de Beauchamp provided that the town should be governed by twelve elected aldermen, but that the constable of the castle should be mayor.
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  • In 1581 Queen Elizabeth granted a confirmatory charter to the mayor and bailiffs direct without reference to the lord of the castle.
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  • In 1687 the town surrendered this charter to James II., who in a substituted one, which, however, was never acted upon, reserved to the Crown the right of removing any member of the corporation from office.
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  • He accepted the Restoration and sat on the commission which drew up the charter.
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  • In the meantime the new king, by issuing his famous charter, by recalling Anselm, and by choosing the Anglo-Scottish princess Edith-Matilda, daughter of Malcolm III.,.
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  • The charter of Canute (1032) contains a reference to "hustings" weights, which points to the early establishment of the court.
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  • The first charter was not obtained until 1573, when it was incorporated by Elizabeth under the title of a "guardian and free tenants" of the town of Sittingbourne.
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  • This charter obtained until in 1599 a second one incorporated the town by the name of "mayor and jurats" and regranted the market and fairs together with some additional privileges, among others that of returning members to parliament, which, however, was never exercised.
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  • In medieval times Droitwich was governed by two bailiffs and twelve jurats, the former being elected every year by the burgesses; Queen Mary granted the incorporation charter in 1554 under the name of the bailiffs and burgesses.
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  • King John's charter granted the burgesses a fair on the feast of SS.
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  • A mayor is mentioned in the court roll of 1386-1387, and a charter from Henry VII.
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  • The present governing charter was granted by Elizabeth in 1596, and instituted a governing body of a mayor, fourteen masters or councillors, and an indefinite number of burgesses, including a select body called "the Twenty-men."
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  • In 1867 Southport received a charter of incorporation.
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  • Henry VII., while confirming this charter in 1505, granted further that the burgesses should hold their town and soke with all the manors in the soke on payment of a fee farm.
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  • By the charter of 1194 the burgesses received licence to hold a fair on the vigil, feast and morrow of the Annunciation, and this with the fair on St James's day was confirmed to them by Henry VII.
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  • The first mention of "that place called Weymouth" occurs in a charter of King Ethelred (866-871), while it is again spoken of in a charter of King ZEthelstan (895-940).
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  • The first charter was that granted by the prior and convent in 1252, by which Weymouth was made a free borough and port for all merchants, the burgesses holding their burgages by the same customs as those of Portsmouth and Southampton.
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  • Melcombe had received a charter from Edward I.
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  • No charter of incorporation is recorded, however, and after returning two members to the parliament of 1295 the town does not appear to have enjoyed any of the privileges of a borough.
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  • With a charter, or a representative system based on population, he would have nothing to do.
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  • Its charter, granted by Malcolm Canmore, having been burned, it was renewed by James VI.
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  • The earliest charter recorded was granted in 1201 under King John; a charter of James I.
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  • New colonies were thus formed round those districts in which gold had been found, and in the beginning of the 18th century five principal settlements in Minas Geraes had been elevated by royal charter to the privileges of towns.
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  • In 1910 it was renamed and appropriated to the uses of the Royal Scottish Academy of Painting, Sculpture and Architecture, which was instituted in 1826, and incorporated by royal charter in 1838, on the model of the Royal Academy in London.
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  • The university of Edinburgh, the youngest of the Scottish universities, was founded in 1583 by a royal charter granted by James IV., and its rights, immunities and privileges have been remodelled, ratified and extended at various periods.
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  • The college is an ancient corporate body, with a charter of the year 1505, and exercises the powers of instructing in surgery and of giving degrees.
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  • The Royal College of Physicians is another learned body organized, with special privileges, by a charter of incorporation granted by Charles II.
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  • Further immunities and privileges were granted by James III.; and by a precept of 1482, known as the Golden Charter, he bestowed on the provost and magistrates the hereditary office of sheriff, with power to hold courts, to levy fines, and to impose duties on all merchandise landed at the port of Leith.
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  • Those privileges were renewed and extended by various sovereigns, and especially by a general charter granted by James VI.
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  • Bristol was one of the first places to be settled in Pennsylvania after William Penn received his charter for the province in 1681, and from its settlement until 1725 it was the seat of government of the county.
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  • It was laid out in 1697 and was incorporated as a borough in 1720; the present charter, however, dates only from 1851.
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  • The ancient constitution, often suspended and modified, based upon this charter, was reformed under the influence of Western Liberalism in 1848, the supremacy of the Magyar race, however, being secured by a somewhat narrow franchise.
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  • So early as March 1908 Mr Hallo had laid a formal proposal before the House that the charter of the AustroHungarian bank, which was to expire on the 31st of December 19 10, should not be renewed; that negotiations should be opened with the Austrian government with a view to a convention between the banks of Austria and Hungary; and that, in the event of these negotiations failing, an entirely separate Hungarian bank should be established.
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  • From his brother Payn descended the barons of Bedford, of whom William held Bedford Castle against the royal forces in the struggle for the Great Charter, and was afterwards made prisoner at the battle of Lincoln, while John, who sided with the barons under Simon de Montfort, fell at Evesham.
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  • Special linguistic and other privileges were assured to the Italian minority in the Dalmatian towns, but no corresponding charter was granted to the four to five hundred thousand Slovenes and Croats annexed to Italy.
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  • The expedition cost Great Britain a million and a half, but the attempt at farther extension westwards was foiled, and a little later treaties with Lobenguela and the grant to Cecil Rhodes and his co-directors of a charter for the British South.
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  • The governing charter till 1835 was that of Henry VIII., granted in 1545 and confirmed by Edward VI.
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  • The first charter of incorporation was granted by Queen Mary in 1553, and instituted a common council consisting of a bailiff, 12 aldermen and 12 chief burgesses; a court of record, one justice of the peace, a Thursday market and two annual fairs.
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  • Both these charters were surrendered in 1683 in favour of a new charter, but were resumed in 1688.
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  • From the date of Queen Mary's charter until the Redistribution of Seats Act of 1885 the borough was represented by one member in parliament.
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  • Other institutions include a grammar school founded in the middle of the 16th century and provided for by a charter of Edward VI., the Cambridgeshire hospital, a custom-house, a cattle-market, and an important corn-exchange, for Wisbech has a large trade in grain.
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  • After its dissolution the townsmen became, in 1549, a corporation holding of the king, by a charter which transferred to them the property and duties of the gild, and was renewed in 1610 and 1669.
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  • It is the headquarters of the Companhai de Mocambique, which administers the Beira district under charter from the Portuguese crown.
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  • Kalamazoo was settled in 1829, was known as Bronson (in honour of Titus Bronson, an early settler) until 1836, was incorporated as the village of Kalamazoo in 1838, and in 1884 became a city under a charter granted in the preceding year.
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  • The town grew up around the castle but never received a charter or had a governing body.
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  • The League of Mercy, under royal charter, operates in conjunction with the Fund in the collection of small subscriptions.
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  • Gas-lighting was introduced on one side of Pall Mall in 1807, and in 1810 the Gas Light & Coke Company received a charter, and developed gas-lighting in Westminster.
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  • St Olave's and St Saviour's grammar school, Southwark, received its charter in 1571.
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  • The University of London was incorporated by royal charter in 1836, as an examining body for conferring degrees.
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  • The list of bishops from Cedda to William (who is addressed in the Conqueror's Charter) is long, and each bishop apparently held a position of great importance in the government of the city.
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  • This king granted the citizens their first real charter, but this was constantly violated.
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  • The first charter by which the city claims the jurisdiction and conservancy of the river Thames was granted by Richard I.
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  • When William the Conqueror granted the first charter to London he addressed the bishop and the portreeve - the bishop as the ecclesiastical governor and the portreeve as the representative of the civil power.
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  • Round holds that this title disappeared after the Conqueror's charter.
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  • Round holds that the office of Justiciar was created by Henry I.'s charter, and as he was the chief authority in the city this somewhat takes off from the value of the privilege of appointing sheriffs.
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  • The number of members of the common council varied greatly at different times, but the right to determine the number was indirectly granted by the charter of Edward III.
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  • Charles directed a writ quo warranto against the corporation of London in 1683, and the Court of King's Bench declared its charter forfeited.
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  • Tuam received its first charter from James I.
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  • In 1686 Governor Dongan granted to Albany a city charter, which provided for an elected council.
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  • He contributed to draw up Louis's charter, and in his memoirs boasted of having furnished the text of the proclamation addressed by the king to the French people before his return to France; but it is known now that it was another text that was adopted.
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  • The governing charter in 1835 was that of Charles II., incorporating it under the title of the bailiffs and commonalty of the borough of Tamworth in the counties of Stafford and Warwick.
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  • In 1356 Louvain was the scene of the famous Joyeuse Entree of Wenceslas which represented the principal charter of Brabant.
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  • There is evidence to show that Fareham had become a borough before 1264, but no charter can be found.
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  • Sir Alexander obtained for it in 1613 a charter as a burgh of royalty, and also in 1592 a charter for the founding of a university.
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  • Neath is a borough by prescription and received its first charter about the middle of the 12th century from William, earl of Gloucester, who granted its burgesses the same customs as those of Cardiff.
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  • Kirkwall received its first charter from James III.
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  • Stendal was founded in 11, 51 by Albert the Bear, on the site of a Wendish settlement, and soon afterwards acquired a municipal charter.
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  • A charter was granted to the town by the lords of Powis, confirmed by James I.
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  • Ibn Ali Talib, anxious to perpetuate their severance from the orthodox church and the Byzantine empire, confirmed these privileges by charter and in 762 the patriarchate was removed to Bagdad.
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  • In 1237 Vienna received a charter of freedom from Frederick II., confirmed in 1247.
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  • The castle dates from the days of the dukes of Zaringen (11th-12th centuries), the last of whom (Berchtold V.) built walls round the town at its foot, and granted it a charter of liberties.
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  • Formerly an integral part of China, the island of Hong-Kong was first ceded to Great Britain in 1841, and the cession was confirmed by the treaty of Nanking in 1842, the charter bearing the date 5th of April 1843.
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  • Allentown was first settled in 1751; in 1762 it was laid out as a town by James Allen, the son of a chief-justice of the province, in honour of whose family the city is named; in 1811 it was incorporated as a borough and its name was changed to Northampton; in 1812 it was made the county-seat; in 1838 the present name was again adopted; and in 1867 the first city charter was secured.
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  • The New York College for the Training of Teachers became its Teachers' College of Columbia; a Faculty of Pure Science was added; the Medical School gave up its separate charter to become an integral part of the university; Barnard College became more closely allied with the university; relations were entered into between the university and the General, Union and Jewish theological seminaries of New York City and with Cooper Union, the Metropolitan Museum of Fine Arts and the American Museum of Natural History; and its faculty and student body became less local in character.
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  • Both factions appealed to the governor of New York, that province having claimed jurisdiction over the islands under the grant to the duke of York in 1664, and, becoming increasingly dissatisfied with that government, sought a union with Massachusetts until the islands were annexed to that province by its new charter of 1691.
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  • It is a place of great antiquity, its first charter having been granted by Malcolm IV.
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  • In 1636, owing to a serious visitation of the plague, 200 families were thrown out of work, and in 1687 so much had its importance declined that it was deprived of its charter.
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  • James I., in his charter of incorporation, granted fairs on Monday and Tuesday in Whitsun week, and confirmed an ancient fair at Michaelmas and a market on Monday.
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  • Solingen received its municipal charter in 1374.
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  • In 1910 a charter was granted to the Grand Trunk system.
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  • A reunion was effected in 1654 through the influence of Roger Williams, and a charter was secured from Charles II.
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  • The official designation for the province as a whole in the charter of 1663, therefore, was Rhode Island and Providence Plantations.
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  • The charter was suspended at the beginning of the Andros regime in 1686, but was restored again after the Revolution of 1689.
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  • The charter of 1663 and the franchise law of 1724 established substantial equality of representation among the towns, and restricted the suffrage to freeholders.
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  • 2 The charter was suspended from 1686 to 1689, during which time the province was under the supervision of Sir Edmund Andros.
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  • The first charter, of which a copy only is preserved among the corporation records, is one given in 1262 by John Fitzalan granting the burgesses self-government.
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  • A charter granted by Charles II.
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  • Albert Lea was settled in 1855 and received a city charter in 1878.
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  • The town, which is very ancient, being mentioned in Domesday, obtained a grant for a market and fair in 1251, and received its charter of incorporation in 1887.
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  • In 1129 Geoffrey appears at Oxford among the witnesses of an Oseney charter.
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  • Local tradition asserts that Frome was a medieval borough, and the reeve of Frome is, occasionally mentioned in documents after the reign of Edward I., but there is no direct evidence that Frome was a borough and no trace of any charter granted to it.
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  • The Wednesday market is held under the charter of Henry VII.
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  • The first charter was granted by John in 1204, and conferred a gild merchant, together with freedom from all pleas except pleas of the Crown and from all secular exactions by sea and land.
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  • Newton is a burgh or barony of very ancient creation, the charter of which is traditionally said to have been granted by Robert Bruce in favour of forty-eight of the inhabitants who had distinguished themselves at Bannockburn.
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  • By an undated charter still preserved with the corporation's muniments he surrendered to the burgesses all the liberties given them by his predecessors (antecessores) when they founded the town.
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  • In 1325 Richard's charter was confirmed and the market ordered to be held on Thursdays.
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  • In 1609 a charter of incorporation provided for a mayor, recorder, six capital burgesses and seventeen assistants and courts of record and pie powder.
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  • Under the reformed charter granted in 1885 the corporation consists of a mayor, four aldermen and twelve councillors.
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  • Villele, who before the promulgation of the charter had written some Observations sur le projet de constitution opposing it, as too democratic in character, naturally took his place on the extreme right with the ultra-royalists.
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  • He was prosecuted for riot in connexion with the surrender of the charter of Nottingham in 1682, being tried before Chief Justice Jeffreys, who fined him Soo marks.
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  • Auburn was first settled in 1786, and was incorporated in 1842, but the present charter dates only from 1869.
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  • This catechism has been called the charter of the German Reformed Church..
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  • Chanute was incorporated as a city of the third class in 1873, and its charter was revised in 1888.
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  • This charter was confirmed to Thomas, Lord Berkeley, in 1330, and in 1395-1396 Lord Berkeley received a grant of another fair on the vigil and day of Holyrood.
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  • The town has no charter, but is mentioned as a borough in 1284-1285.
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  • In 1888 the rank of a city was conferred by royal charter upon Belfast, with the incidental rank, liberties, privileges, and immunities.
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  • A charter was now granted to the town by James I.
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  • The old charter was annulled by James II.
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  • The Maltese, at first, challenged the grant as a breach of the charter of King Alfonso, but eventually welcomed the knights.
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  • A new city charter, embodying what has become known as the "Des Moines Plan" of municipal government, was adopted in 1907.
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  • In 1190 it received a charter from the counts of Champagne.
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  • The town received a charter from Bishop Arnulf in 998.
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  • A protracted boundary dispute with Maryland, which colony at first claimed the whole of Delaware under Lord Baltimore's charter, was not settled until 1767, when the present line separating Delaware and Maryland was adopted.
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  • Fayetteville was incorporated as a town in 1841, and in 1859 received a city charter, which was abolished by act of the Legislature in 1867; under a general law of 1869 the town was re-incorporated; and in 1906 it became a city of the first class.
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  • In the middle ages Aire belonged to the counts of Flanders, from whom in 1188 it received a charter, which is still extant.
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  • At the beginning of the 13th century it obtained a charter from the earl of Strathearn, afterwards became a royal burgh for a period, and was represented in the Scottish parliament.
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  • Other treaties followed, and on the 17th of February 1885, the German emperor granted a charter of protection to the Colonization Society.
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  • It is thus styled in a charter granted by Henry VIII., but by Elizabeth's time the town was invariably termed Aberystwyth in all documents.
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  • It was a royal borough before 1086, and a charter of Henry II.
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  • The charter of incorporation was given by Henry VI.
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  • Further privileges were granted by successive kings, and a charter was finally given by Charles I.
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  • Los Angeles, like all other Californian cities, has the privilege of making and amending its own charter, subject to the approval of the state legislature.
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  • But all attempts to procure a royal charter for Plymouth Colony were unsuccessful, and in 1691 it was annexed to the Colony of Massachusetts Bay under what is termed the Provincial Charter.
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  • King James having by patent in 1620 created a Council for New England to whom he made a large grant of territory, the council in 1628 made a sub-grant, confirmed by a royal charter that passed the seals on the 4th of March 1629, to the "Governor and Company of the Massachusetts Bay in Newe England."
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  • In 1630 the government of the company, with questionable right (for the charter seems evidently to have contemplated the residence of the company in England), transferred itself to their territory, and under the leadership of John Winthrop laid the foundations anew of the Massachusetts colony, when they first settled Boston in the autumn of that year.
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  • The charter gave the company control over the admission of " freemen " (co-partners in the enterprise, and voters), " full and absolute power and authority to correct, punish and rule " subjects settling in the territory comprised in their grant, and power to " resist.
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  • The struggle with the Crown, which ended in independence, began at the foundation of the colony, with assumptions of power under the charter which the colonial government was always trying to maintain, and the crown was as assiduously endeavouring to counteract.
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  • After more than half a century of struggle, the crown finally annulled the charter of the colony in 1684, though not until 1686 was the old government actually supplanted on the arrival of Joseph Dudley, a native of the colony, as president of a provisional council; later, Sir Edmund Andros was sent over with a commission to unite New York and New England under his rule.
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  • The colonists had been for many years almost independent; they made their own laws, the Crown appointed natives as officials, and the colonial interpretation of the old charter had in general been allowed to stand.
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  • The revocation of the charter aroused the strongest fears of the colonists Andros speedily met determined opposition by measures undertaken relative to taxation and land titles, by efforts to secure a church for Episcopal service, and an attempt to curb the town meetings.
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  • Then came a struggle, carried on in England by Increase Mather as agent (1688-1692) of the colony, to secure such a form of government under a new charter as would preserve as many as possible of their old liberties.
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  • Plymouth Colony, acting through its agent in London, endeavoured to secure a separate existence by royal charter, but accepted finally union with Massachusetts when association with New York became the probable alternative.
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  • The province of Maine was also united in the new provincial charter of 1691, and Sir William Phips came over with it, commissioned as the first royal governor.
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  • As has been mentioned already, the new charter softened religious tests for office and the suffrage, and accorded " liberty of conscience " except to Roman Catholics.
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  • Throughout the continuance of the government under the provincial charter, there was a constant struggle between a prerogative party, headed by the royal governor, and a popular party who cherished recollections of their practical independence under the colonial charter, and who were nursing the sentiments which finally took the form of resistance in 1775.
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  • Governors of Massachusetts (Under the First Charter - chosen annually).
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  • Under Second Charter - appointed by the Sir William Phips .
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  • Matthew Cradock, first governor of the Company, from the 4th of March 1629 to the 10th of October 1629, was succeeded on the latter date by John Winthrop, who, on reaching Salem on the 12th of June 1630 with the charter, superseded Endecott.
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  • The extant imperial charter does not specify what were the municipal rights that were conceded, but it is certain that at this time they were very limited.
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  • In the parish of Tintagel is the hamlet of Bossiney which under the name of Tintagel received a charter (undated) from Richard king of the Romans, granting freedom to the borough and to the burgesses freedom from pontage and stallage throughout Cornwall, a market on Wednesdays and a three days' fair at Michaelmas.
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  • This charter was confirmed in 1386.
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  • Its charter was surrendered to Charles II.
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  • South Portland was part of the old town of Cape Elizabeth (pop. in woo, 887) until March 1895; the legislature granted it a city charter in 1895, which was not accepted by the town until December 1898.
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  • A forged grant of Ceadwalla speaks of the fall of Kent before Sigehere as a well-known event; and in a Kentish charter dated 676 a king of Kent called Swebhard grants land with the consent of his father King Sebbe.
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  • As the laws of Ine of Wessex speak of Erconwald as "my bishop," it is possible that the influence of Wessex for a short time prevailed in Essex; but a subsequent charter of Swefred is approved by Coenred of Mercia, and Offa, the son of Sigehere, accompanied the same king to Rome in 709.
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  • Discontent with the religious policy of New Haven, however, caused a number of the Stamford citizens to withdraw and to found Hempstead, Long Island, and for the same reason many of the people of Stamford approved of the union of the New Haven colony and Connecticut by the charter of 1662; and in October 1662 Stamford submitted to Connecticut.
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  • Haarlem, which was a prosperous place in the middle of the 12th century, received its first town charter from William II., count of Holland and king of the Romans, in 1245.
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  • A fair on the 29th of August was granted by the charter of 1203.
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  • Other fairs on the 27th of December, the 22nd of July, and the Monday before Palm Sunday, were held under a charter of 1289.
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  • The charter of Henry I., although no longer extant, is quoted in later confirmation charters of Richard I., Henry III., Edward III.
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  • No charter of incorporation is known.
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  • In 1787 a second university act was passed which restored to Columbia College the substance of its original charter and made the University of the State of New York an exclusively executive body with authority to incorporate new colleges and academies and to exercise over them the right of visitation.
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  • The first state institution to receive a bank charter was the bank of New York, incorporated in 1791.
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  • On the expiration of the charter of the New Netherland Company (1618) the StatesGeneral refused to grant a renewal, and only private ventures were authorized until 1621, when the West India Company was chartered for a term of twenty-four years; to this company was given a monopoly of Dutch trade with the whole American coast from Newfoundland to the Straits of Magellan.
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  • In 1629, chiefly to encourage agriculture, the Company issued its famous Charter of Privileges and Exemptions, which provided that any member might have anywhere in New Netherland except on Manhattan Island his choice of a tract of unoccupied land extending 16 m.
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  • He had civil and criminal jurisdiction within the boundaries of his estate; he could create offices, found cities, and appoint officers and magistrates, and, although the charter permitted an appeal from his court to the directorgeneral and council in any case in which the amount in dispute exceeded fifty guilders ($20), some of the patroons exacted from their colonists a promise not to avail themselves of the privilege.
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  • The charter did not give the encouragement to agriculture that was expected of it because the status created for colonists of a patroon was no attraction to a successful farmer in the Netherlands.
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  • Immediately after the issue of the charter a few of the more adroit directors of the Amsterdam Chamber hastened to acquire for themselves, as patroons, the tracts of land most favourably situated for trade.
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  • Two years later, by a revision of the Charter of Privileges and Exemptions, the prohibition on manufactures was abolished, the privileges of the original charter with respect to patroons were extended to " all good inhabitants of the Netherlands," and the estate of a patroon was limited to 4 m.
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  • The revised charter also provided that any one who brought over five colonists and established them in a new settlement should receive 200 acres, and if such a settlement grew to be a town or village it should receive a grant of municipal government.
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  • The Connecticut Charter of 1662 included in that colony some settlements acknowledged by the treaty of Hartford to belong to New Netherland, and strife was renewed.
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  • A new charter was issued to the duke to perfect his title and Edmund (later Sir Edmund) Andros, the new governor, was instructed to establish English institutions and enforce English law in all sections.
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  • The first, styled a charter of liberties and privileges, required that an assembly elected by the freeholders and freemen should be called at least once every three years; vested all legislative authority in the governor, council and assembly; forbade the imposition of any taxes without the consent of the assembly; and provided for religious liberty and trial by jury.
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  • The charter of liberties and privileges was approved by the duke, but before the news of this reached its authors the duke became King James II., and in 1686, when a frame of government for New York as a royal province was provided, the assembly was dispensed with.
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  • At its first session the assembly passed an act declaratory of the rights and privileges of the people, and much like the charter of liberties and privileges enacted in 1683, except that annual instead of triennial sessions of the assembly were now requested and, as was also provided in Sloughter's commission and instructions, religious liberty was denied to Roman Catholics.
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  • Edwardsville was incorporated in 1819 and received its present charter in 1872.
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  • It is empowered by royal charter to confer degrees entitled to rank and consideration throughout the British dominions, as fully as if they were granted by any university in the United Kingdom.
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  • A further grant of privileges was bestowed in 1292 by the earl of Devon, but no charter of incorporation was granted until that from James I.
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  • On a petition from the inhabitants the town was reincorporated by a new charter in 1885.
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  • The town was first incorporated in 1791; its present charter dates from 1890.
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  • Subsequently a village was laid out which was incorporated in 1847; a city charter was secured in 1852.
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  • A city of the first class is permitted to frame its own charter, but its general powers are prescribed by statute.
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  • In 1854, in their resistance of an arbitrary tax, the miners came into armed conflict with the authorities; but a commission was appointed to investigate their grievances; and a charter was granted to the town in 1855.
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  • Benton Harbor, which was known as Bronson Harbor until 1865, was incorporated as a village in 1869, was chartered as a city in 1891, and in 5903 received a new charter.
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  • In one is represented Moses receiving the Old Law, in the other Christ delivers to St Peter the New Law - a charter sealed with the X P monogram.
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  • It is referred to in a charter of the year 943.
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  • Milwaukee is governed under a city charter of 1874, providing the form of city government most common in America, a mayor (elected biennially) and a single board of aldermen.
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  • The influence of this early rivalry may be seen in several provisions of the existing city charter.
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  • "Commerce City" was laid out here in 1834 by Connecticut speculators; but the first settlement of importance was made by the Mormons in 1839-1840; they named it Nauvoo,' in obedience to a "revelation" made to Joseph Smith, and secured a city charter in 1840.
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  • Four years later its population was about 15,000, and a large Mormon temple had been built, but internal dissensions arose, "gentile" hostility was aroused, the charter of Nauvoo was revoked in 1845, two of the leaders, Joseph Smith and his brother Hyrum, were killed at Carthage, the county-seat, by a mob, and in 1846 the sect was driven from the state.
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  • A new charter was received in 1870.
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  • King John by charter of 1204 granted the bailiff of Boston sole jurisdiction in the town.
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  • Nevertheless it was raised to the rank of a free borough by Henry VII I.'s charter of 1546, confirmed by Edward VI.
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  • Two annual fairs and two weekly markets were granted by Henry VIII.'s charter, and are still held.
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  • A fresh charter was issued by Charles II.
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  • Newark was incorporated as a township in 1693, was chartered as a city in 1836 and received another charter in 1857; from it the township of Orange was formed in 1806 and the township of Bloomfield in 1812.
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  • On the 11th of February 1477 she was compelled to sign a charter of rights, known as "the Great Privilege," by which the provinces and towns of the Netherlands recovered all the local and communal rights which had been abolished by the arbitrary decrees of the dukes of Burgundy in their efforts to create in the Low Countries a centralized state.
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  • In 1356 Duke Wenceslas confirmed this charter and also the Golden Bull of the emperor Charles IV.
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  • In 1420 the gilds of Brussels obtained a further charter recognizing their status as the Nine Nations, a division still existing.
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  • In the charter of 1387 we hear only of the conseil general (composed of all male heads of families) which acted as the legislature, and elected annually the executive of 4 syndics; no, doubt this form of rule existed earlier than 1387.
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  • The charter requires "a course of military instruction, both theoretical and practical," and the discipline of the institution is military in form and principle.
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  • Thus he annulled the Great Charter in 1215.
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  • The constitutional charter thus represents an honest effort to set up a truly democratic: republic which shall fairly meet the demands of the varied races and religions within its borders.
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  • The collective responsibility of this Cabinet of ministers is expressly laid down in the charter of the constitution.
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  • A constitutional court decides whether laws promulgated by Parliament are in harmony with the charter of the constitution.
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  • The city has a Carnegie library, De Veaux College (Protestant Episcopal, chartered in 1853), and Niagara University, a Roman Catholic institution, founded in 1856 by the priests of the Congregation of the Mission and incorporated in 1863 as the Seminary of Our Lady of Angels, a name still used for the theological department, but displaced, since the charter of the university in 1883, by the present name.
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  • In 1892 the village of Suspension Bridge (formerly Niagara City) was joined with it under a city charter, which has been frequently amended.
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  • But though he met with sufficient success to encourage him to issue a charter in 858, dated "the first year of the reign in West Francia," treachery and desertion in his army, and the loyalty to Charles of the Aquitanian bishops brought about the failure of the enterprise, which Louis renounced by a treaty signed at Coblenz on the 7th of June 860.
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  • Jadwiga, the wife of Jagiello, was mainly instrumental in creating the university of Cracow, which received a charter in 1364, but did not come into effective existence till its reconstitution in 1400.
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  • In 1663 the "Invisible College" became the "Royal Society of London for improving natural knowledge," and the charter of incorporation granted by Charles II.
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  • In 1884 it was incorporated by royal charter, under the title of mayor, aldermen and councillors.
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  • The elaborately carved chair of the lieutenant-governor in the senate chamber, made of wood from the historic Charter Oak, and the original charter of 1662 (or its duplicate of the same date) are preserved in a special vault in the Connecticut state library.
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  • In 1636 Hartford was the meeting-place of the first general court of the Connecticut colony; the Fundamental Orders, the first written constitution, were adopted at Hartford in 1639; and after the union of the colonies of New Haven and Connecticut, accomplished by the charter of 1662, Hartford became the sole capital; but from 1701 until 1873 that honour was shared with New Haven.
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  • Hartford was first chartered in 1784, was rechartered in 1856 (the charter of that date has been subsequently revised), and in 1881 was made coterminous with the township of Hartford.
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  • During this period, with his friend Benjamin Franklin, he led the opposition to the Proprietary government, and in 1764 and 1765 attempted to secure a royal charter for the province.
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  • In October 1908, by popular vote, the city adopted a new charter providing for government by commission.
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  • George Calvert died before the charter had passed the great seal, but about two months later in the same year it was issued to his eldest son, Cecilius.
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  • He had opposed the grant of the Maryland charter, had established a trading post on Kent Island in Chesapeake Bay in 1631, and when commanded to submit to the new government he and his followers offered armed resistance.
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  • Again, although the charter reserved to the proprietor the right of calling an assembly of the freemen or their delegates at such times and in such form and manner as he should choose, he surrendered in 1638 his claim to the sole right of initiating legislation.
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  • The territory now forming the state of Delaware was within the boundaries defined by the Maryland charter, but in 1682 it was transferred by the duke of York to William Penn and in 1685 Lord Baltimore's claim to it was denied by an order in council, on the ground that it had been inhabited by Christians before the Maryland charter was granted.
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  • The new constitution drawn and adopted in 1776 to take the place of the charter was of an aristocratic rather than a democratic nature.
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  • There is no evidence to show that Romsey was a borough before the charter of incorporation granted by James I.
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  • Herbert de Losinga (c. 1054-1119) granted its jurisdiction to the cathedral of Norwich but this right was resumed by a later bishop, John de Gray, who in 1204 had obtained from John a charter establishing Lynn as a free borough.
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  • A royal charter of 1524 established the cattle, corn and general provisions market, still held every Tuesday and Saturday.
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  • He was one of the promoters of the scheme for the Royal Society, and in the king's charter in 1662 was nominated a member of its directing council.
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  • The Bank of the Commonwealth was chartered in 1820 as a state institution and the charter of the Bank of Kentucky was revoked in 1822.
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  • In 1763 the Kentucky country was claimed by the Cherokees as a part of their hunting grounds, by the Six Nations (Iroquois) as a part of their western conquests, and by Virginia as a part of the territory granted to her by her charter of 1609, although it was actually inhabited only by a few Chickasaws near the Mississippi river and by a small tribe of Shawnees in the north, opposite what is now Portsmouth, Ohio.
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  • Both before and after the issue of the Great Charter Hubert adhered loyally to the king; he was rewarded, in June 1215, with the office of chief justiciar.
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  • Some colour was given to their attacks by Hubert's injudicious plea that he held a charter from King John which exempted him from any liability to produce accounts.
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  • It has been questioned whether Caesar passed such a law, since the Lex Julia Municipalis mentioned in an inscription of Patavium (Padua) may have been a local charter.
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  • We possess the charter of the colony planted at Urso in southern Spain under the name of Colonia Julia Genetiva Urbanorum.
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  • A charter of incorporation was granted in 1876.
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  • Mason died in December of this year, and New Hampshire, unlike the other colonies from which the United States originated, New Jersey and Delaware excepted, never received a royal charter.
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  • The charter of that colony was drafted under the impression that the Merrimac flowed east for its entire course, but now an investigation was in progress which was to show that its source in Lake Winnepesaukee was several miles north of any of the four settlements in New Hampshire.
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  • As the trustees of this institution were Federalists with the right to fill vacancies in their number, the Democrats attempted to gain control by converting it into a state university and increasing the number of trustees, but when the case reached the Supreme Court of the United States that body pronounced (1819) the charter a contract which the Federal constitution forbade the state to violate.
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  • Among educational institutions, the grammar school existed in the 16th century, and in 1663 received a charter of incorporation from Charles II.
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  • In 1891 the northern frontier of the protectorate was extended to its present boundaries, and the whole of it placed P P under the administration of a resident commissioner, a protest being made at the time by the British South Africa Company on the ground that the protectorate was included in the sphere of their charter.
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  • This was founded under charter from Queen Elizabeth in 1591, and is the greatest foundation of its kind in the Bank of Ireland.
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  • Lunatics are maintained in St Patrick's hospital, founded in 1745, pursuant to the will of Dean Swift, and conducted by governors appointed under the charter of incorporation.
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  • Previous to his departure for England, Henry bestowed the government on Hugh de Lacy, having granted by charter "to his subjects of Bristol his city of Dublin to inhabit, and to hold of him and his heirs for ever, with all the liberties and free customs which his subjects of Bristol then enjoyed at Bristol and through all England."
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  • A fresh charter was granted in 1207 by King John to the inhabitants of Dublin, who had not yet made their peace with the neighbourhood, but, like the settlers in other towns, were at constant feud with the native Irish; so that two years after the date of this charter, whilst the citizens of Dublin were celebrating Easter at Cullenswood, they were set upon by the Irish of the neighbouring mountains, and 500 of them killed.
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  • In 1227 the same monarch confirmed the charter of John fixing the city boundaries and the jurisdiction of its magistrates.
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  • Meanwhile Mayhew had recognized the jurisdiction of Maine; 2 and though the officials of that province showed no disposition to press their claim, it seems that this technical suzerainty continued until 1664, when the Duke of York received from his brother, Charles II., the charter for governing New York, New Jersey, and other territory, including Martha's Vineyard.
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  • Under the new charter of Massachusetts Bay (1691), after some dispute between Massachusetts and New York, Martha's Vineyard became a part of Massachusetts.
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  • Waltheof probably built the castle, under the shelter of which the town grew up. Although it never received any royal charter, the earliest records relating to Cockermouth mention it as a borough.
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  • In 1853 Henry VIII.'s charter was repealed, and under a chancery scheme adopted two years later, D1200 a year was appropriated for the school.
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  • In time a town grew up outside the castle, and its inhabitants received a series of charters from the de Bohuns, into which family the castle and lordship passed, the earliest recorded charter being granted by Humphrey, 3rd earl of Hereford.
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  • The town was incorporated by a charter granted by Philip and Mary in 1556 and confirmed by Elizabeth in the nineteenth year of her reign.
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  • A charter granted by James II.
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  • It was usual to evidence the feoffment by writing in a charter or deed of feoffment; but writing was not essential until the Statute of Frauds; now, by the Real Property Act 1845, a conveyance of real property is void unless evidenced by deed, and thus feoffments have been rendered unnecessary and superfluous.
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  • During his second visit to England in1826-1827he obtained a royal charter for the university of King's College, with provision for its endowment out of the crown lands.
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  • The university of King's College was finally established, with certain modifications of its charter, in 1843, Bishop Strachan being the first president.
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  • No charter granting self-government to Wiveliscombe has been found, and the only evidence for the traditional existence of a borough is that part of the town is called "the borough," and that until the middle of the 19th century a bailiff and a portreeve were annually chosen by the court leet.
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  • In 1909 a new city charter was adopted under which the city government is vested in five commissioners (one of whom acts as mayor), each in charge of a city department.
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  • This charter is the only one which gives Knutsford a claim to the title of borough.
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  • In the same year as the charter to Knutsford the king granted to William de Tabley a market every Saturday at Nether Knutsford, and a three days' fair at the Feast of St Peter and St Paul.
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  • When this charter was confirmed by Edward III.
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  • The city is governed, under a charter of 1907, by a mayor and four commissioners, who together pass ordinances, appoint nearly all city officers, and generally are responsible for administering the government.
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  • The charter contains initiative and referendum provisions, provides for the recall of any elective city official, and prohibits the granting of any franchise for a longer term than twenty years.
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  • In every one of the North American colonies there was in operation at that date a system of self-government, in seven colonies under a charter from the Crown.
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  • In each there was a governor, with minor executive officers, a legislature, and a judiciary; and although the Crown retained the power of altering the charter, and the British parliament could (in strict legal view) legislate over the head of the colonial legislature so as to abrogate statutes passed by the latter, still in practice each colony was allowed to manage its own affairs and to enact the laws it desired.
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  • In two colonies, Rhode Island and Connecticut, the colonial charter was substantially maintained as the constitution of the state for many years, in the former case till 1842, in the latter till 1818.
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  • The basis for the government of each American city is still a charter, but since the Revolution these charters have been granted by the state legislatures, and are subject to constant change by statute.
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  • In 1648 the sovereign courts of Paris procured their momentary suppression in a kind of charter of liberties which they imposed upon the crown, but which was ephemeral.
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  • It is a place of very considerable antiquity, was created a royal burgh by Alexander I., and received its charter from Alexander II.
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  • In 1663 the charter of the company was revoked.
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  • But once more, in contrast with English experience, the great trading company proved a failure in French hands as a colonizing agent, and in 1674 its charter was summarily revoked by Louis XIV.
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  • After prolonged discussions the company agreed to surrender to the crown, in consideration of a payment of £300,000, the rights and interests in the north-west guaranteed by its charter, with the exception of a reservation of one-twentieth part of the fertile belt, and 45,00 0 acres of land adjacent to the trading posts of the company.
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  • In 12 4 7 the bishop granted the first charter, giving, among other privileges, a fair on All Saints' Day.
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  • Bishop Waynflete is said to have confirmed the original charter in 1452, and in 1566 Bishop Horne granted a new charter by which the burgesses elected 2 bailiffs and 12 burgesses annually and did service at their own courts every three weeks, the court leet being held twice a year.
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  • The first charter, said to be a forgery, purports to have been given by i z Ethelstan.
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  • By this charter it was governed until 1885.
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  • In 1564 Lord Robert Stewart, natural son of James V., who had visited Kirkwall twenty-four years before, was made sheriff of the Orkneys and Shetlands, and received possession of the estates of the udallers; in 1581 he was created earl of Orkney by James IV., the charter being ratified ten years later to his son Patrick, but in 1615 the earldom was again annexed to the crown.
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  • The industry comprises the manufacture of coarse textiles, pasteboard, &c. Its charter as a town dates from 1298, and it was a much frequented market in the preceding century.
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  • His descendants (who from the 13th century onwards styled themselves De Avan or D'Avene) established, under the protection of the castle, a chartered town, which in 1372 received a further charter from Edward Le Despenser, into whose family the lordship had come on an exchange of lands.
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  • It became a mesne borough by the charter granted by John in 1201, which provided that the town should be a free borough, the burgesses to be free and quit of all tolls, and made William de Briwere overlord.
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  • It was incorporated by charter of Edward IV.
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  • A Saturday market and a fair on the 24th of June were granted by the charter of 1201.
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  • In 1231 Ranulf de Blundeville, earl of Chester, granted a charter constituting Salford a "free borough."
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  • In 1844 it received a municipal charter and became a county borough in 1889.
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  • A charter was granted in 1732 to " the Trustees for establishing the colony of Georgia in America," and parliament gave io,000 to the enterprise.
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  • In 1753 the charter of the trustees expired and Georgia became a royal province.
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  • The charter of the township was granted by Gov.
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  • Leitmeritz was originally the castle of a royal count and is first mentioned, in 993, in the foundation charter of the convent of St Margaret near Prague.
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  • In 1248 it received a town charter, and was governed by the laws of Magdeburg until the time of Ferdinand I., having a special court of jurisdiction over all the royal towns where this law obtained.
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  • Little Falls was settled about 1850, was chartered as a city in 1889 and adopted a new charter in 1902.
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  • Villele's successor was the vicomte de Martignac, who took Decazes for his model; and in the speech from the throne Charles declared that the happiness of France depended on "the sincere union of the royal authority with the liberties consecrated by the charter."
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  • Marshall was first settled in 1842, was incorporated in 1843, and received a city charter in 1848; in 1909 it adopted the commission form of government.
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  • The charter also granted that the above places with the town itself should become the county of the town of Kingston-upon-Hull.
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  • The town was incorporated by Queen Elizabeth in 1576 and a new charter was granted by James II.
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  • It was brought into prosperity by Richard Boyle, first earl of Cork, and was granted a charter in 1613; but was partly demolished on the occasion of a fight between the English and Irish in 1641.
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  • The city is the see of Protestant Episcopal and 1 The cathedral is the centre of the city according to the charter, which describes the city as including "six miles square, of which the sides shall be equi-distant from what is known as the cupola of the cathedral of San Fernando and three miles therefrom."
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  • Under the charter of 1903, as amended in 1907, the municipal government consists of a city council, composed of the mayor, four aldermen, elected at large, and eight ward aldermen, all elected for a term of two years, as are the other elective officers; a city attorney, an assessor, a collector, a treasurer, an auditor and judge of the Corporation Court.
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  • The city has a sewer-farm of S30 acres which the charter forbids it to sell.
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  • Buffalo is governed under an amended city charter of 1896 by which the government is vested in a bicameral city council, and a mayor elected for a term of four years.
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  • In 1832 Buffalo obtained a city charter, and Dr Ebenezer Johnson (1786-1849) was chosen the first mayor.
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  • In 1539 a charter incorporated the bailiff and inhabitants.
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  • A mayor, aldermen and councillors received governing power by a charter of 1898.
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  • From before the Conquest until the incorporation charter of 1604 Ripon was governed by a wakeman and 12 elders, or aldermen, but in 1604 the title of wakeman was changed to mayor, and 12 aldermen and 24 common councilmen were appointed.
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  • In May 1844 a settlement, named Ceresco or "the Wisconsin Phalanx," a Fourierist community,' organized ' The charter, granted by the legislature in 1845, contained the following features: (1) property to be held in common; in Southport (now Kenosha), had been established in the vicinity.
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  • Rivalry developed with the village of Ripon, and the community gave up its charter at the close of 1850, dividing property valued at $40,000 among the shareholders.
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  • The charter for Eton was granted on the 11th of October 1440, and that for King's College in the following February.
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  • The town was founded by Charlemagne, and received its charter as a town in 1298.
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  • He enlarged the curriculum at the college, and established chairs in languages, science, philosophy and divinity, which were confirmed by charter in 1577.
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  • The first charter given by Richard I.
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  • But the charter of 1663 was confirmed in 1693 and remained in force till 1741, when the liberties were allowed to lapse.
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  • By the act of 1188, the fundamental charter of the Roman commune, the people recognized the supremacy of the pope over the senate and the town, while the pope on his part sanctioned the legal existence of the commune and of its government and assemblies.
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  • He abolished all privileges which were not secured by charter and imposed a more rigidly centralized scheme of government in which the activities of the provincial diet were restricted to some judicial and financial functions, and their freedom in matters of foreign policy was withdrawn altogether.
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  • The famous Friends' public school, founded in Philadelphia in 1689 and chartered in 1697, still exists as the William Penn charter school.
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  • The party which had carried this constitution through attacked its opponents by withdrawing the charter of the college of Philadelphia (now the university of Pennsylvania) because its trustees were anti-Constitutionalists and creating in its place a university of the State of Pennsyl vania.
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  • The Constitutional party in 1785 secured the annulment by the state assembly of the charter of the Bank of North America, which still retained a congressional charter; and the cause of this action also seems to have been party feeling against the anti-Constitutionalists, among whom Robert Morris of the bank was a leader, and who, especially Morris, had opposed the paper money policy of the Constitutionalists.
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  • It received a charter in the reign of Edward III., at which time it was walled and fortified, and entered by four gates, two of which remain.
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  • The Castilian use of the word in the sense of a right, privilege or charter is most probably to be traced to the Roman conventus juridici, otherwise known as jurisdictiones or fora, which in Pliny's time were already numerous in the Iberian peninsula.
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  • It emanated from the king in a general council of the kingdom of Leon and Castile, and consisted of two separate parts; in the first 19 chapters were contained a series of statutes which were to be valid for the kingdom at large, while the rest of the document was simply a municipal charter.'
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  • The former of these, which was distinguished by the unusual largeness of its concessions, and by the careful minuteness of its details, rapidly extended to many places in the neighbourhood, while the latter charter was given also to Miranda by Alphonso VI., and was further extended in 1181 by Sancho el Sabio of Navarre to Vitoria, thus constituting one of the earliest written fora of the "Provincias Vascongadas."
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  • He 1 In accordance with his own wish he was buried in a small graveyard rather than in one of the regular city cemeteries, and on his tombstone is the following epitaph written by himself: "I repose in this quiet and secluded spot, not from any natural preference for solitude, but, finding other cemeteries limited as to race by charter rules, I have chosen this, that I might illustrate in my death the principles I advocated through a long life - Equality of man before his Creator."
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  • He was chairman of the commission which drafted the charter for Greater New York, and in 1897 was defeated as Republican candidate for mayor of the city.
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  • According to tradition, Daventry was created a borough by King John, but there is no extant charter before that of Elizabeth in 1576, by which the town was incorporated under the name of the bailiff, burgesses and commonalty of the borough of Daventry.
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  • The charter of 1576 confirms this market and fair to the burgesses, and grants them two new fairs each continuing for two days, on Tuesday after Easter and on the feast of St Matthew the Apostle.
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  • It returned two members to parliament as a borough from 1295 until deprived of one member by the act of 1867, and finally disfranchised by that of 1885, but no charter of corporation was granted until 1683, when Charles II.
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  • Tavistock was one of the four stannary towns appointed by charter of Edward I., at which tin was stamped and weighed, and monthly courts were held for the regulation of mining affairs.
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  • In 1853 the two villages were united under a city charter, which was superseded by a revised charter in 1887.
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  • Stockport (Stokeporte, Stopport, Stopford) was made a free borough by a charter of Robert de Stokeport about the year 1220.
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  • He was the local governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony from the 30th of April 1629 to the 12th of June 1630, when John Winthrop, who had succeeded Matthew Cradock as governor of the company on the 10th of October 1629, brought the charter to Salem and became governor of the colony as well as of the company.
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  • Rochester, named in honour of Lawrence Hyde, earl of Rochester, was incorporated as a town by a royal charter in 1722, but no settlement was made here until 1728.
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  • South Norwalk, long an unincorporated village called Old Well, was chartered as a city under its present name in 1870, and its charter was revised and amended in 1882, 1897 and 1909.
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  • In 1196 the abbot granted the vill of Ulverstone with the inhabitants to Gilbert Fitz-Reinfred, who granted it a charter by which he raised it to the rank of a free borough.
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  • In 1280 Roger de Lancaster obtained a charter from Edward I.
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  • A charter for a town to be founded here was granted by the province of New Hampshire in 1763, but no settlement was made until 1774.
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  • The Dutch strongly opposed the establishment of the Church of England, and contributed largely toward the adoption (in October 1683) of the Charter of Liberties which confirmed in their privileges all churches then "in practice" in the city of New York and elsewhere in the province, but which was repealed by James II.
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  • In 1696 the first church charter in New York was granted to the Reformed Protestant Dutch Church (now the Collegiate Church) of New York City; at this time there were Dutch ministers at Albany and Kingston, on Long Island and in New Jersey; and for years the Dutch and English (Episcopalian) churches alone received charters in New York and New Jersey - the Dutch church being treated practically as an establishment - and the church of the fort and Trinity (Episcopalian; chartered 1697) were fraternally harmonious.
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  • This action was opposed by the church of New York City, and partly through this difference and partly because of quarrels over the denominational control of King's College (now Columbia), five members of the Coetus seceded, and as the president of the Coetus was one of them they took the records with them; they were called the Conferentie; they organized independently in 1764 and carried on a bitter warfare with the Coetus (now more properly called the American Classis), which in 1766 (and again in 1770) obtained a charter for Queen's (now Rutgers) College at New Brunswick.
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  • Mallow received a charter of incorporation from James I.
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