How to use Charleston in a sentence

charleston
  • In 1733 he had established a press in Charleston, South Carolina, and soon after did the same in Lancaster, Pa., in New Haven, Conn., in New York, in Antigua, in Kingston, Jamaica, and in other places.

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  • Educated in England, he returned to Charleston in 1773, and was admitted to the bar in 1774.

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  • Huguenot churches were formed on Staten Island, New York, in 1665; in New York City in 1683; at Charleston, South Carolina, in 1686; at Boston, Massachusetts, in 1687; at New Rochelle, New York, in 1688; and at other places.

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  • The Charleston church alone of these early churches maintains its independence of any American denomination.

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  • At Charleston a mixed congregation of Scotch Presbyterians and English Puritans was organized in 1690.

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  • The first American-built loccmotive, the Best Friend, of Charleston, was made at the West Point Foundry, New York, in 1830, and was put to work on the South Carolina railroad in that year.

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  • Those who believe the " Declaration " to be spurious argue that survivors remembered only one such document, that the Resolutions might easily be thought of as a declaration of independence, that Governor Martin in all probability had knowledge only of these and not of the alleged " Declaration," and that the dates of publication in the Raleigh and Charleston newspapers, and the politics of those papers, show that the Resolutions are authentic. In July 1905 there appeared in Collier's Weekly (New York) what purported to be a facsimile reproduction of a copy of the Cape Fear Mercury which was referred to by Governor Martin and which contained the " Declaration "; but this was proved a forgery.'

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  • Hammond 1 has constructed a table from information supplied by the secretaries of the cotton exchanges at New York, Charleston, Savannah, Mobile, New Orleans and Galveston, showing the sales of " spot " cotton at those ports for the twenty-two years between 1874-1875 and 1895-1896, and in all cases an absolute decline is evident.

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  • In 1706 a Spanish and French expedition against Charleston, South Carolina, failed, and the Carolinians retaliated by invading middle Florida in 1708 and again in 1722.

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  • Beauregard, and was made the centre of the new line along the Memphis & Charleston railway, "the great East and West artery of the Confederacy."

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  • During the War of Independence his early training at the French military college at Caen enabled him to render effective service to General Benjamin Lincoln in 1778-1779, to Count d'Estaing (1779), to General Lincoln in the defence of Charleston and afterwards to General Horatio Gates.

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  • He died in Charleston on the 2nd of November 1828.

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  • His father, Thomas Gadsden, was for a time the king's collector for the port of Charleston.

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  • Christopher went to school near Bristol, in England, returned to America in 1741, was afterwards employed in a counting house in Philadelphia, and became a merchant and planter at Charleston.

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  • He was lieutenant-governor of his state in 1780, when Charleston was surrendered to the British.

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  • For about three months following this event he was held as a prisoner on parole within the limits of Charleston; then, because of his influence in deterring others from exchanging their paroles for the privileges of British subjects, he was seized, taken to St Augustine, Florida, and there, because he would not give another parole to those who had violated the former agreement affecting him, he was confined for forty-two weeks in a dungeon.

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  • He died in Charleston on the 28th of August 1805.

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  • The first southern serial was the Monthly Register (1805) of Charleston.

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  • Charleston is in the midst of a region rich in bituminous coal, the shipment of which by river and rail constitutes one of its principal industries.

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  • The first permanent white settlement at Charleston was made soon after the close of the War of Independence; it was one of the places through which the streams of immigrants entered the; Ohio Valley, and it became of considerable importance as a centre of transfer and shipment, but it was not until the development of the coalmining region that it became industrially important.

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  • Charleston was incorporated in 1794, and was chartered as a city in 1870.

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  • Lake Charles was settled about 1852, largely by people from Iowa and neighbouring states, was incorporated as a town in 1857 under the name of Charleston and again in 1867 under its present name, and was chartered as a city in 1886.

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  • In 1860 he presided over the National Democratic Convention which met first at Charleston and later at Baltimore, until he joined those who seceded from the regular convention; he then presided also over the convention of the seceding delegates, who nominated John C. Breckinridge for the presidency.

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  • In South Carolina, where there are important deposits of phosphate, formerly more productive than at present, the " land rock " is worked near Charleston, and the " river rock " in the Coosaw River and other streams near Beaufort.

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  • For a year following the capture of Charleston by the British in May 1780, during the War of Independence, Camden was the centre of important military operations.

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  • Mitchel with a division was sent straight southwards from the same place to cut the Memphis & Charleston line.

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  • Charleston was attacked without success in 1862, but from June to August 1863 it was besieged by General Gillmore and Admiral Dahlgren, and under great difficulties the Federals secured a lodgment, though it was not until Sherman appeared on the land side early in 1865 that the Confederate defence collapsed, Fort Fisher near Wilmington also underwent a memorable siege by land and sea.

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  • One corps of the Army of the Tennessee was detached to cover the Memphis & Charleston railway.

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  • Many of the greater combats in which the navy was engaged on the coast and inland have been referred to above, and thefightingbefore Charleston,NewOrleans, Mobile and Vicksburg is described in separate articles.

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  • An isolated attack on Charleston, South Carolina, had been made by Sir Henry Clinton and Sir Peter Parker as early as June 1776, but this was foiled by the spirited resistance of General William Moultrie; after 1778 the southern attempts, stimulated in part by the activity of the French in the West Indies, were vigorously sustained.

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  • General Benjamin Lincoln, succeeding Howe, undertook to drive the British out of Georgia, but General Augustine Prevost, who had commanded in Florida, moved up and compelled Lincoln to retire to Charleston.

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  • In September 1 779 he was besieged by Lincoln in conjunction with a French naval and military force under Admiral d'Estaing, but successfully repelled an assault (October 9), and Lincoln again fell back to Charleston.

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  • Marching upon Charleston, Clinton compelled Lincoln to surrender on the 12th of May.

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  • They fell upon isolated British posts established to protect the Loyalist population, and generally captured or broke them up. Rawdon found himself unable with his diminishing force to cover the country beyond Charleston; and he fell back to that place, leaving the situation in the south as it had been in the early part of 1780.

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  • Charleston, S.C., was evacuated late in 1782; New York on the 25th of November 1783.

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  • Only one of the original six (Charleston) was in the true South, which was distinctly rural.

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  • Savannah and Charleston are other great ports and southern outlets, particularly for cotton.

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  • Augusta is served by the Southern, the Augusta Southern (controlled by the Southern), the Atlantic Coast Line, the Charleston & Western Carolina (controlled by the Atlantic Coast Line), the Georgia and the Central of Georgia railways, by an electric line to Aiken, South Carolina, and by a line of steamers to Savannah.

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  • The "Unionists" were successful in the elections of 1851 and 1852, but the feeling of uncertainty engendered in the south by the passage of the Kansas-Nebraska Bill and the course of the slavery agitation after 1852 led the State Democratic convention of 1856 to revive the "Alabama Platform"; and when the "Alabama Platform" failed to secure the formal approval of the Democratic National convention at Charleston, South Carolina, in 1860, the Alabama delegates, followed by those of the other cotton "states," withdrew.

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  • He studied law in London and began to practise in Charleston in 1761.

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  • His mind failed late in 1795, and he died in Charleston on the 23rd of July 1800.

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  • His brother, Edward Rutledge (1749-1800), a signer of the Declaration of Independence, was born in Charleston on the 23rd of November 1749.

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  • He studied law in his brother's office, and in London in 1769-73, and began to practise in Charleston in 1773.

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  • As captain of artillery and later as lieutenant-colonel he served against the British in South Carolina in 1779-80, but he was captured near Charleston in 1780, and was imprisoned at St Augustine, Florida, for a year.

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  • From 1798 until his death in Charleston, on the 23rd of January 1800, he was governor of South Carolina.

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  • For his health the king visited California in the United States cruiser " Charleston " in November 1890, and died on the 10th of January 1891 in San Francisco.

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  • The legislature of Virginia appointed him a commissioner to confer with President Buchanan and arrange, if possible, for the maintenance of the status quo in the matter of Fort Sumter, in Charleston harbour; but his efforts were unavailing.

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  • It is served by the Charleston & Western Carolina railway, has inland water communication with Savannah, Georgia, and its harbour,.

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  • In 1683, several families, chiefly Scotch, led by Henry Erskine, third Lord Cardross (1650-1693), established on the island a settlement named Stuart's Town (probably in honour of Cardross's family); but three years later most of the settlers were murdered by Spaniards from Florida and the remainder fled to Charleston.

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  • When two years old she was taken with the rest of the family to Charleston, South Carolina.

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  • Charleston was settled about 1835, was incorporated in 1839, and was reincorporated in 1865.

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  • He studied law in the office of Langdon Cheves(1 776-1857)in Charleston, S.C., and in November 1812 was admitted to the bar there, soon obtaining a large practice.

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  • He was intendant (mayor) of Charleston, S.C., from 1835 to 1837, and was president of the Louisville, Cincinnati & Charleston railway from 1837 to 5839.

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  • Fort Sumter, in Charleston harbour, had been besieged by the secessionists since January; and, it being now on the point of surrender through starvation, Lincoln sent the besiegers official notice on the 8th of April that a fleet was on its way to carry provisions to the fort, but that he would not attempt to reinforce it unless this effort were resisted.

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  • In Perry Street, mounted on a granite pedestal, is the "Swamp Angel," the great gun used by Federal troops in the marshes near Charleston, South Carolina, during their attack on that city in August 1863.

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  • In America Rawdon served at the battles of Bunker Hill, Brooklyn, White Plains, Monmouth and Camden, at the attacks on Forts Washington and Clinton, and at the siege of Charleston.

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  • Returning to America in 1769, C. C. Pinckney began the practice of law at Charleston, and soon became deputy attorney-general of the province.

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  • He was a member of the first South Carolina provincial congress in 1775, served as colonel in the South Carolina militia in 1776-1777, was chosen president of the South Carolina Senate in 1779, took part in the Georgia expedi tion and the attack on Savannah in the same year, was captured at the fall of Charleston in 1780 and was kept in close confinement until 1782, when he was exchanged.

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  • He disapproved of Major Anderson's removal of his troops from Fort Moultrie to Fort Sumter in December 1860; but there is probably no basis for the charge made by Southern writers that the removal itself was in violation of a pledge given by the president to preserve the status quo in Charleston harbour until the arrival of the South Carolina commissioners in Washington.

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  • In 1832, when the state of South Carolina attempted to "nullify" the tariff laws, Jackson at once took steps to enforce the authority of the federal government, ordering two war vessels to Charleston and placing troops within convenient distance.

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  • His father, a native of France, died when the boy was in his sixth year, and his mother, a member of an aristocratic Virginia family, then removed to Charleston, South Carolina.

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  • In 1828, after a year's special preparation, young Fremont entered the junior class of the college of Charleston, and here displayed marked ability, especially in mathematics; but his irregular attendance and disregard of college discipline led to his expulsion from the institution, which, however, conferred upon him a degree in 1836.

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  • Soon after returning to Charleston he was appointed professor of mathematics in the United States navy, but he chose instead to serve as assistant engineer of a survey undertaken chiefly for the purpose of finding a pass through the mountains for a proposed railway from Charleston to Cincinnati.

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  • After 1818 his parents lived in Charleston, South Carolina, and he went to Yale in 1825 for his education, but left without taking a degree, and entered an attorney's office in New Orleans.

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  • He then studied first at the famous law school in Litchfield, Conn., and afterwards in a law office in Charleston, S.C., and in 1807 was admitted to the bar.

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  • Pinckney's Life of John C. Calhoun (Charleston, 1903) gives a sympathetic Southern view.

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  • Persecution led to migration, Screven and some of the members making their way to South Carolina, where, with a number of English Baptists of wealth and position, what became the First Baptist church in Charleston, was organized (about 1684).

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  • The withdrawal of members to form other churches in the neighbourhood and the intrusion of Socinianism almost extinguished the Charleston church about 1746.

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  • The First Church, Charleston, had been wrecked by Socinianism.

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  • The First Church, Charleston, which had become almost extinct through Arminianism in 1746, entered upon a career of remarkable prosperity in 1749 under the leadership of Oliver Hart (1723-1795), formerly of the Philadelphia Association.

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  • In 1751 the Charleston Association was formed, also on the model of the Philadelphia, and proved an element of denominational strength.

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  • The most noted leader of the Baptists of South Carolina during the four decades following the War of Independence was Richard Furman (1755-1825), pastor of the First Church, Charleston.

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  • The remarkable numerical progress of Baptists in South Carolina from 1787 to 1812 (from 1620 members to 11,325) was due to the "Separate" Baptist movement under Stearns and Marshall far more than to the activity of the churches of the Charleston Association.

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  • On the night of the 9th, however, Colonel Stewart retreated toward Charleston, abandoning 1000 stand of arms. The battle has been classed as a tactical victory for the British and a strategical victory for the Americans, terminating a campaign which left General Greene in virtual possession of the Carolinas, the British thereafter confining themselves to Charleston.

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  • Thus Austin found that at the Charleston mills, Arizona, 92.13% of the total silver recovered was extracted after 1 hour, 94.10% after 2 hours, 95.9 2% after 3 hours, and 100% after 4 hours.

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  • Spartanburg is served by the Southern, the Charleston & Western Carolina (controlled by the Atlantic Coast line), the Glenn Springs, the Carolina, Clinchfield & Ohio, and inter-urban (electric) railways.

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  • Spartanburg was founded in 1787, and, although railway communication with Columbia and Charleston was opened in 1859, there was little growth until the establishment of the first cotton mill in the vicinity in 1880; it was chartered as a city in this year.

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  • During the war in America he was employed against the privateers, and with a naval brigade at the occupation of Charleston, S.C. In January 1781, when in command of the "Warwick" (50), he captured a Dutch 50gun ship which had beaten off an English vessel of equal strength a few days before.

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  • Breveted major-general in 1865, he remained in the army for a year as commander of the military district of Charleston, South Carolina.

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  • When sixteen he became a clerk in a counting-house in London, and later engaged in commercial pursuits with great success at Charleston until 1771, when he retired from active business.

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  • Becoming convinced that a peaceful settlement was impracticable, he returned to Charleston at the close of 1774, and there allied himself with the conservative element of the Whig party.

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  • On account of failing health he did not remain for the signing of the definitive treaty, but returned to Charleston, where he died on the 8th of December 1792.

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  • His son, John Laurens (1754-1782), American revolutionary officer, was born at Charleston, South Carolina, on the 28th of October 1754.

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  • Laurens distinguished himself further at Savannah, and at the siege of Charleston in 1780.

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  • After the capture of Charleston by the English, he rejoined Washington, and was selected by him as a special envoy to appeal to the king of France for supplies for the relief of the American armies, which had been brought by prolonged service and scanty pay to the verge of dissolution.

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  • He left his incumbency of Savannah to a lay delegate and the commissary's court at Charleston suspended him for ceremonial irregularities.

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  • He was captured by the British at Charleston in May 1780, was exchanged in July 1781, was again a delegate to Congress in 1781-1783, and later served in the state legislature.

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  • He died on the ist of January 1787 at Middleton Place, near Charleston.

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  • The Rev. William Hazlitt (father of the essayist and critic), visiting the United States in 1783-1785, published the fact that there were Unitarians in Philadelphia, Boston, Charleston, Pittsburg, Hallowell, on Cape Cod and elsewhere.

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  • Churches were established in New York, Baltimore, Washington, Charleston and elsewhere during this period.

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  • It is served by the Southern, the Greenville & Knoxville and the Charleston & Western Carolina railways.

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  • The chief deposits are found in Berkeley, Dorchester, Charleston, Colleton and Beaufort counties, at the bottom of rivers, 20 to 30 ft.

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  • Between 1816 and 1826 the state expended upon internal improvements $1,712,626, a large part of which was appropriated for building canals round the rapids of five rivers; 1 In this class are included the manufactures of only four cities, Charleston, Columbia, Greenville and Spartanburg, which in 1900 had populations of 8000 or more.

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  • The ports of entry are Charleston, Beaufort and Georgetown.

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  • The' principal cities are Charleston, Columbia (the capital), Spartanburg, Greenville, Sumter, Anderson and Rock Hill.

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  • The state supports wholly or in part, the university of South Carolina (before 1906 South Carolina College), established at Columbia in 1801; the South Carolina Military Academy (locally called " The Citadel ") established at Charleston in 1845, Clemson Agricultural College (1889), at Clemson, Oconee county, with departments of agriculture, chemistry, mechanics and electricity, textiles and military, and academic and preparatory courses; Winthrop Normal and Industrial College for Girls (1895) at Rock Hill, and the Coloured Normal, Industrial, Agricultural and Mechanical College (1896) at Orangeburg.

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  • Charities, eec. - The state has no board of public charities, and under the present constitution the county commissioners are overseers of the poor, except in Charleston and Columbia whose poor are provided for by the municipal authorities.

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  • The first permanent English settlement was made in April 1670 at Albemarle Point, on the west bank of the Ashley river, but as the situation proved unfavourable the government and most of the people moved over in 1680 to the neck between the Ashley and the Cooper rivers, the site of the present city of Charleston.

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  • Until 1691 each had its own governors, from 1691 to 1712 there was usually a governor at Charleston and a deputy for the northern settlements, and after 1712 there were again separate governors.

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  • In the summer of 1776 the British, under Sir Henry Clinton and Sir Peter Parker attempted to capture Charleston and summon the South Carolina Loyalists to their standard, but on the 28th of June the fleet was repulsed in an assault on Fort Moultrie.

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  • The most significant feature in the early history of the state was the struggle between the Low Country, which centred about Charleston, and the Up Country, which was settled largely by Scotch-Irish, who came down the mountain valleys from North Carolina, Virginia and Pennsylvania.

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  • In 1832 there was a majority from each section in favour of Nullification, and the legislature called the famous Nullification Convention, which met at Charleston the 19th of November, and five days later passed the Ordinance of Nullification declaring that certain acts of Congress imposing import duties " are unauthorized by the Constitution of the United States and violate the true meaning and intent thereof, and are null and void and no law, nor binding upon this state, its officers or citizens."

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  • Rivers, Sketch of the History of South Carolina to the Close of the Proprietary Government, 1719 (Charleston, 1856), which was utilized by McCrady in his first volume and was the first history of the colony based on the documents in the Public Records Office.

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  • In 1858, when the Supreme Court, after the vote of Kansas against the Lecompton constitution, had decided that Kansas was a " slave " territory, thus quashing Douglas's theory of " popular sovereignty," he engaged in Illinois in a close and very exciting contest for the senatorship with Abraham Lincoln, the Republican candidate, whom he met in a series of debates (at Ottawa, Freeport, Jonesboro, Charleston, Galesburg, Quincy and Alton), in one of which, that at Freeport, Douglas was led to declare that any territory, by " unfriendly 1 Her death in 1853 was a great blow to him and embittered him.

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  • In 1860 in the Democratic national convention in Charleston the adoption of Douglas's platform brought about the withdrawal from the convention of Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, South Carolina, Florida, Texas and Arkansas.

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  • His father, a physician, and a graduate of the University of Edinburgh, migrated to Charleston before 1729.

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  • On Fort Johnson, on James Island in Charleston harbour, he raised what is said to have been the first American battle-flag - blue, with a white crescent in the dexter corner, inscribed with the word "Liberty"; the flag was devised by him in September 1775.

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  • In March 1776 he took command of a palmetto fort which he had built on Sullivan's Island, off Charleston, which he held against the attack of Admiral Sir Peter Parker on the 28th of June, and which soon after the battle was renamed Fort Moultrie by the General Assembly.

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  • He dislodged the British from Beaufort, South Carolina, in February 1779, and in April made it possible for the city of Charleston to put itself into a state of defence by delaying the advance of General Augustine Prevost.

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  • He was one of those who advised against the surrender of Charleston, where he commanded the garrison until the arrival of General Benjamin Lincoln.

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  • His imprisonment after the surrender of Charleston (May 1780) lasted until his exchange with others for General Burgoyne in February 1782.

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  • He died in Charleston on the 27th of September 1805.

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  • That branch of the Southern railway extending from Chattanooga to Memphis was formerly the Memphis & Charleston, under which name it became famous in the American Civil War.

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  • He graduated at Miami University in 1856, and spoke frequently in behalf of John C. Fremont, the Republican candidate for the presidency in that year; was superintendent of schools of South Charleston, Ohio, in 1856-58, and in 1858-59 was editor of the Xenia News.

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  • Grant next ascended the Tennessee river to Pittsburg Landing with the intention of capturing the Memphis & Charleston railway, and on the 6th-7th of April defeated the Confederates in the battle of Shiloh.

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  • Charleston south life insurance networks you're licensed to.

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  • In the spring Katie was the assistant curator for an exhibit held during the Piccolo Spoleto Festival held annually in Charleston in May.

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  • The Chesapeake & Ohio traverses the southern part of the state, from White Sulphur Springs in the east, through Charleston to the Ohio, serving the New and Kanawha rivers coal district as a freight carrier; the Norfolk & Western runs just within the south-western boundary along the valley of the Big Sandy, carrying coal both east and west from the Pocahontas coal-field; and the new Virginian railway entering at the south-east taps the coal-producing region (the Kanawha and Pocahontas districts) at Deepwater, serving in addition to the Norfolk & Western as a carrier of coal to Norfolk on the Virginia coast.

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  • He was executive officer in the "Patapsco" when she was blown up in Charleston Harbor in January 1865.

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  • The danger lay in the suddenly changed situation in that direction; as General Greene, instead of following Cornwallis to the coast, boldly pushed down towards Camden and Charleston, S.C., with a view to drawing his antagonist after him to the points where he was the year before, as well as to driving back Lord Rawdon, whom Cornwallis had left in that field.

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  • At other points of the coast the British navy was employed in punitive expeditions against the coast towns - as for example the burning of Falmouth (now Portland, Maine) in October 1775 - which served to exasperate, rather than to weaken the enemy, or the unsuccessful attack on Charleston, S.C., in June 1776.

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  • At last Charleston, in South Carolina, was taken by the British.

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  • The British soldiers soon returned to Charleston, and he was allowed to go home.

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  • Charleston Seafood offers fresh ocean fish and shellfish as well as freshwater fish.

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  • This piece is from the blog Just a Modern Guy from the owners of The Purple Moon located in Charleston, West Virginia.

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  • Born in Houston, Texas and raised in Charleston, West Virginia, Jennifer is the middle child to Bill and Pat Garner and is one of the three Garner sisters.

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  • He and his have also have a home in Charleston.

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  • Rockabilly, which combined rock 'n' roll and hillbilly a la Elvis, was an intense, rhythm-driven music that made for very busy dancing, like the Jitterbug of the 1940s and the Charleston in the 1920s.

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  • A third style, the Charleston bending brace, is used at night to bend the spine in the opposite direction.

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  • Featured swing dances include the Charleston, Lindy Hop, East Coast Swing and Balboa.

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  • From the Charleston to the Lindy Hop, you can learn both basic and advanced swing dancing steps through this website.

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  • This made for a bold and memorable effect when dancing the Charleston and other exuberant dances of the day.

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  • You can find out how to get started and how much you can make with each sale by calling or stopping by the store at 42 River Walk Mall in Charleston, West Virginia.

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  • Charleston's most haunted inn has a cast of ghosts, especially in rooms 8 and 10.

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  • Set on the fictional base of Fort Marshall outside of Charleston, South Carolina, Lifetime TV's Army Wives follows the lives and exploits of four army wives and one army husband as they cope with life, marriage, family and more.

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  • The five discs of the Complete Third Season include webisodes, Army Wives Gives Back where the cast surprises deserving military families, and a feature on filming in Charleston.

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  • Charleston motels are the ideal accommodations for budget-conscious travelers who need a place to stay while visiting South Carolina.

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  • Whether you are visiting for business, pleasure, or you're just passing through, Charleston, South Carolina, will undoubtedly make an impression.

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  • Charleston is the second largest city in South Carolina.

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  • During your time in Charleston you can tour of an antebellum mansion, climb aboard a WWII aircraft carrier or experience what life was like centuries ago at one of the city's many museums.

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  • Fortunately, finding a home away from home in Charleston is simple.

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  • There are dozens of properties in the area; however, if you are trying to stick to a strict travel budget you will likely want to stay at Charleston motels rather than the city's higher priced hotels and suites.

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  • Days Inn Historic Charleston is located in the center of the city's historic area.

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  • The property sits directly across from Charleston's famous open-air market.

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  • It is also within easy walking distance of downtown Charleston, which is home to 40 award-winning restaurants and a host of charming shops.

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  • When you are searching for Charleston motels, don't overlook the Econo Lodge.

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  • Rodeway Inn Charleston is situated near dozens of recreational attractions as well as business centers, colleges and military bases.

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  • Motel 6 Charleston prides itself on being centrally located.

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  • When booking Charleston motels, keep in mind that the properties are different from standard hotels in the area.

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  • The downside of staying at Charleston motels is that they don't offer as many high-end amenities as some hotels in the area.

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  • Charleston hotels typically feature gyms, pools, restaurants, room service, free Internet, and other luxuries.

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  • What's more, you can often find additional discounts for Charleston motels, by surfing the Internet.

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  • Websites, such as HotelGuides.com provide a list of coupons and other money-saving options to insure you get the best rate on Charleston motels.

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  • A Charleston family vacation allows you to take a step back in time to explore beautiful beaches, stately mansions, historic landmarks and sprawling plantations.

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  • Get a taste of true southern charm by visiting Charleston’s top tourist attractions.

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  • The island is located at the entrance of Charleston Harbor and is accessible via regular scheduled ferries.

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  • If you are traveling with older children, then consider taking a Fort Sumter tour which includes dinner and a ferry ride around Charleston Harbor.

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  • Architectural buffs will have a hard time keeping their jaws shut while touring the historic Edmondston-Alston House located on Charleston’s High Battery.

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  • Completed in 1825, the towering structure offers breathtaking views of Charleston Harbor.

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  • Educated tour guides take you on a stroll through Charleston's history from its infancy as a burgeoning colony, through the American Revolution and Civil War.

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  • Summer is high season in Charleston, so if you are planning a family vacation to the popular city in June, July or August, expect a lot of company.

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  • Charleston beaches are a tourist magnet in the spring as well.

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  • The tops, however, were only seen in flashes when doing exuberant dances like the Charleston.

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  • The first season included team members from Charleston, North Carolina and the company Trademark Properties.

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  • For this, the king granted Berford's Hall, formerly Charleston's Inn, which Chicheley's trustees had granted to him so as to obtain a royal grant and indefeasible title.

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  • In 1771 Thomas Jefferson described a " burning spring " in the Kanawha Valley, and when wells were drilled for salt brine near Charleston petroleum and natural gas were found here before there was any drilling for oil in Pennsylvania.

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  • The principal cities of the state are Wheeling, Huntington, Parkersburg, Charleston (the capital), Martinsburg, Fairmont and Grafton.

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  • The Supreme Court of Appeals, consisting of five judges, elected for terms of twelve years, holds three terms annually, one at Wheeling, one at Charleston and one at Charles Town.

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