Charles i sentence example

charles i
  • The dukedom for which Arundel had petitioned Charles I.
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  • In so doing Anglesey was held by Ormonde to have censured his conduct and that of Charles I.
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  • In that year he was elected member of the Irish parliament for Dungannon, and joined the earl of Antrim and other lords in concerting measures for supporting Charles I.
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  • On the 22nd of October 16 4 1 he surprised and captured Charlemont Castle; and having been chosen commander-in-chief of the Irish forces in the north, he forged and issued a pretended commission from Charles I.
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  • The lace manufacture was introduced by Flemish refugees, and was flourishing in the reign of Charles I.
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  • In 1251 it submitted to Charles I.
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  • He waited on Archbishop Laud before his execution, and was chaplain to Charles I.
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  • He became chaplain to his patron the archbishop, and chaplain in ordinary to Charles I.
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  • In 1643 he was presented to the rectory of Overstone, Northamptonshire, by Charles I.
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  • He second wife was Joanna Bridges, said on very doubtful authority to have been a natural daughter of Charles I.
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  • There is also a school founded by Lady Margaret Boswell, wife of Sir William Boswell, ambassador to Charles I.
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  • He immediately began to complain to Hyde, earl of Clarendon, of the poverty of the see, and based claims for a better benefice on a certain secret service, which he explained on the 20th of January 1661 to be the sole invention of the Eikon Basilike, The Pourtraicture of his sacred Majestic in his Solitudes and Sufferings put forth within a few hours after the execution of Charles I.
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  • The city is still very favourably situated for obtaining supplies of oils both local and foreign, including sesame, ground nut, castor oil, &c. In England, during the reign of Charles I.
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  • James died here in 1625, and Charles I.
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  • His family was of Royalist descent and emigrated to America after the execution of Charles I.
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  • The establishment of shows at Newcastle-on-Tyne in June 1859 secured for dogs attention which had been denied them up to that time, although sportsmen had appreciated their value for centuries and there had been public coursing meetings since the reign of Charles I.
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  • In 1642 the castle was garrisoned for Charles I.
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  • The grammar school was founded by Sir Norton Knatchbull in the reign of Charles I.
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  • He disapproved of the execution of Charles I.
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  • It was reserved for the two great princes of the house of Anjou, Charles I.
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  • (1633-1701), king of Great Britain and Ireland, second surviving son of Charles I.
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  • In 1630 a scheme to bring water from I-Ioddesdon on the Lea was promoted by aid of a lottery licensed by Charles I.
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  • It was during the reign of Charles I.
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  • The order holds that sovereign authority is of divine sanction, and that the execution of Charles I.
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  • The keep is doubtfully assigned to a date previous to the Conquest; the important position on the Welsh March led to several subsequent additions, especially in the 14th century, and the castle was only dismantled by order of the Parliamentarians after it had strongly resisted their arms on behalf of Charles I.
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  • It was destroyed by Manfred in 1259, but soon rebuilt by Charles I.
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  • During the 15th century a war with the count palatine of the Rhine deprived Margrave Charles I.
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  • (1650-1702), king of England and prince of Orange, was the only son of William II., prince of Orange, stadtholder of the Dutch republic, and Mary, daughter of Charles I.
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  • The castle ceased to be an important stronghold after the Wars of the Roses, but was garrisoned for Charles I.
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  • For the victory gained by Charles I.
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  • He was succeeded by his brother Charles I.
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  • He represented Woodstock in the Short Parliament (April 1640), and was chosen by King Charles I.
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  • In 1633 he crowned Charles I.
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  • Further privileges were granted by successive kings, and a charter was finally given by Charles I.
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  • The lord keeper's counsel of moderation was less pleasing to Charles I.
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  • Harsnett was no favourite with the Puritan community, and Charles I.
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  • The history of Maryland begins in 1632 with the procedure of Charles I.
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  • The living of St Gabriel he exchanged for that of St Martin, Ironmonger Lane; and, as rector of that parish, he in 1648 subscribed the Remonstrance against putting Charles I.
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  • It was given by Cyril Lucar, A patriarch of Constantinople, to Charles I.
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  • On the 12th of May 1641 William married, in the royal chapel at Whitehall, Mary, princess royal of England, eldest daughter of King Charles I.
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  • He visited Charles I.
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  • The word "chapel" was in this restricted sense first applied to places of worship belonging to the Roman Church in England, and was thus restricted to those attached to foreign embassies, or to those of the consorts of Charles I.
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  • It was formerly famed for the chalybeate springs to which it owes its name, and in 1621 was visited by Charles I.
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  • It was rebuilt and garrisoned for Charles I.
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  • He and his son Robert, afterwards the 2nd earl, fought under Montrose for Charles I.
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  • During the civil wars Hull, although the majority of the inhabitants were royalists, was garrisoned by the parliamentarians, and Charles I.
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  • In 1640, Radcliffe, like Strafford, was arrested and was impeached, but the charges against him were not pressed, and in 1643 he was with Charles I.
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  • By the usurpation of Cromwell the Stuarts were excluded from the throne from the defeat of Charles I.
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  • Next to the son of James II., still an infant under his father's control, Mary, princess of Orange, elder daughter of James II., had the strongest claim to the crown; but the claims of the prince of Orange also, even apart from his marriage, were not very remote, since he was the son of Mary, eldest daughter of Charles I.
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  • He was ordained and became vicar of Fawsley in 1637, but soon resigned and became chaplain successively to Lord Saye and Sele, Lord Berkeley, and Prince Charles Louis, nephew of Charles I.
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  • On his return to France he joined the Oratorian Fathers, and when Marshal Bassompierre was sent to England in 1627 to regulate the differences between Henrietta Maria and her husband, Harlay de Sancy was attached to the queen's ecclesiastical household, but Charles I.
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  • During the civil wars Daventry was the headquarters of Charles I.
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  • Cavan has no buildings of antiquarian interest, but the principal county institutions are here, and the most conspicuous building is the grammar school, founded by Charles I.
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  • It has been stated indeed that Charles I.
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  • A castle formerly stood here, in which died Henrietta Maria, queen of Charles I.
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  • By order of the parliament he attended Charles I.
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  • Friction and disputes had frequently arisen between the Dutch and the English English traders in different parts of the world, and especially in the East Indies, culminating in the so-called Massacre of Amboyna "; and the strained relations between the two nations would, but for the civil discords in England, have probably led to active hostilities during the reign of Charles I.
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  • He was educated at Oxford, and was first brought into notice by his controversy with Dr Henry Chandler regarding the Irish massacre, in which he defended Charles I.
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  • Peter and Paul, which was maintained until within recent years, when fairs were also held at the feast of St Mark, chiefly for linen cloth, under grant from Charles I.
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  • He was the author of Memorials of the English affairs from the beginning of the reign of Charles I.
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  • It then remained a royal manor until Charles I.
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  • A Portuguese by birth, he had been sailing in the employ of King Charles I.
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  • In 1904 the chapel of St Nicholas in the castle was reopened and reconsecrated, having been rebuilt as a national memorial of Charles I.
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  • He was an excellent preacher; Charles I.
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  • A fortnightly cattle market was granted by Charles I.
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  • A yearly fair on the feast of the Translation of St Leonard and three following days was granted to the burgesses in 1 359, and in 1630 Charles I.
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  • He also wrote a Life of Me Right Honourable Robert Boyle (London, 1744); Inquiry into the share which King Charles I.
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  • (1630-1685), king of Great Britain and Ireland, second son of Charles I.
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  • He accompanied the king during the campaigns of the Civil War, and sat in the parliament at Oxford, but on the 4th of March 1645 he was sent by Charles I.
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  • To Argyll he promised the payment of £40,000 at his restoration, doubtless the sum owing as arrears of the Scottish army unpaid when Charles I.
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  • The struggle between the Crown and the parliament prevented Charles I.
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  • Juxon soon obtained other important positions, including that of chaplain-in-ordinary to Charles I.
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  • He appears to have been an excellent bishop, and in March 1636 Charles I.
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  • A mayor and twenty-four brethren who formed the council of the borough are mentioned in 1440, but the earliest charter of incorporation is that of Charles I.
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  • In 1635 it was erected by Charles I.
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  • Castel Nuovo, a very picturesque building constructed near the harbour in 1283 by Charles I.
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  • In Guildford Street, near the town hall, is the Red Hall, where Charles I.
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  • The town was incorporated by Charles I.
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  • In 1330 the voivode John Bassaraba 1 or Bazarab the Great (1310-38) succeeded in inflicting a crushing defeat on his suzerain King Charles I.
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  • It is also said that he was ready to plead on the side of Charles I.
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  • Poole Harbour, extending inland 6 m., with a general breadth of 4 m., has a very narrow entrance, and is studded with low islands, on the largest of which, Brownsea or Branksea, is a castle, transformed into a residence, erected as a defence of the harbour in Tudor times, and strengthened by Charles I.
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  • Though a stanch Covenanter, he was a zealous Royalist, preaching before Charles I.
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  • The revival of the forest laws was one of the means resorted to by Charles I.
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  • An order of the crescent was instituted by Charles I.
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  • The old rude arrangements of the middle ages had provided by frequent depositions that an inefficient sovereign should cease to rule, and those arrangements had been imitated in the cases of Charles I.
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  • As far as they were concerned, the British parliament had stepped The Rockinto the position of Charles I.
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  • The town sided with Charles I.
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  • In 1645 it was for a time the headquarters of Prince Rupert, while Charles I.
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  • A large nunnery, called St Augustine's Priory, was erected near the town in 1861; while eastward is the Jacobean Forde House, belonging to the earl of Devon, and visited by Charles I.
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  • In 1648 he had a conference with Charles I.
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  • He disapproved of the rising of the Scots, but was none the less a severe critic of the government of Charles I.
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  • (who granted two annual fairs) in 1.606, and by Charles I.
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  • After them the Dutch endeavoured, but with little success, to form colonies; and in the time of Charles I.
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  • The incorporation charter granted by Queen Elizabeth in 1573 was confirmed by Charles I.
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  • The queen, haughty and exasperated though she was, yielded for the time being, because the invasion of the Spaniards in the north, the arrest of Charles I.
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  • Here negotiations were begun, on the 30th of January 1645, between the commissioners of Charles I.
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  • In 1643 a meeting took place in the town between Charles I.
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  • He came to it from Flanders, where he had received his education, unable to speak the language and sur- Charles I.
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  • His brother, Colonel Robert Lilburne, was among those who signed the death-warrant of Charles I.
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  • The last authentic instance of the creation of a knight banneret was that of John Smith, created banneret at the battle of Edgehill by Charles I.
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  • Old Swindon received the right of holding a fair from Charles I.
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  • In 1661, the judges who had signed the death warrant of Charles I of England were pursued by Charles II.
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  • Consignia In 1635 King Charles I issued a royal proclamation opening up his Royal Mail to public use.
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  • After the Dissolution the manor remained with the crown until 1624, when Charles I.
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  • He was educated in Coventry, became a successful merchant, travelled widely throughout Europe, and for several years was the financial agent of Charles I.
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  • At Franeker his house was a small château, " separated by a moat from the rest of the town, where the mass could be said in safety."' And one motive in favour of accepting an invitation to England lay in the alleged leanings of Charles I.
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  • His administration as it stands in history is undoubtedly open to the charge that after abolishing the absolutism of the ancient monarchy he substituted for it, not law and liberty, but a military tyranny far more despotic than the most arbitrary administration of Charles I.
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  • Additionally, the palace served as a prison for King Henry's fifth wife and King Charles I.
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  • He finally accepted Charles I.
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  • He was educated in Coventry, became a successful merchant, traveled widely throughout Europe and for several years was the financial agent of Charles I.
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  • He now steadily pursued the design of the Restoration, but without holding any private correspondence with the king, and only on terms similar to those proposed in 1648 to Charles I.
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  • At Franeker his house was a small château, " separated by a moat from the rest of the town, where the mass could be said in safety."' And one motive in favour of accepting an invitation to England lay in the alleged leanings of Charles I.
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  • "Cavalier" is chiefly associated with the Royalists, the supporters of Charles I.
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  • On the 25th of lvIarch the Remonstrance, now termed the Petition and Advice, and including a new scheme of government, was passed by a majority of 123 to 62 in spite of the opposition of the officers; and on the 31st it was presented to Cromwell in the Banqueting House at Whitehall whence Charles I.
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  • The dockyard was altered and improved by Charles I.
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