Charles sentence example

charles
  • Charles here has been offered up by Jonny in exchange for your help for a thirty-day ceasefire.
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  • There was nothing remotely friendly or soft about Charles.
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  • "Charles, this needs chopped," Bianca said cheerfully, holding out an onion.
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  • Charles' eyes glowed red in the night.
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  • I'll send you Charles.
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  • "Charles," the vamp corrected him.
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  • A vamp who could track Others was an invaluable treasure, especially if Charles could also track the sneaky little Watchers.
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  • This is Charlie … Charles.
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  • Charles found the Other.
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  • And this … thing—" Damian indicated the man with red eyes "—is Charles.
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  • You look like Charles with those red eyes.
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  • Charles, the vamp Hunter Damian traded for Jenn, rose with a growl.
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  • "Find one," Charles ordered.
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  • Find one, focus on him, and let your power do its job, Charles answered.
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  • "No, don't—" Charles' warning was swallowed as Darian relaxed enough for his magic to carry them to the Others.
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  • Charles whipped out his weapons, and Darian soon saw why.
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  • "Charles, step back," Darian said.
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  • She recognized him as Charles, the vamp Damian had gotten in exchange for sending her to the Black God.
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  • "He went after Others," Charles supplied.
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  • You need someone with Charles' skill.
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  • Maybe he'll give me Charles back, at least for a day or two.
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  • "Charles and Xander are actively looking for the portal," Jonny said.
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  • Redheaded Yully and tiny Bianca raced down the hallway towards the foyer, chasing the vamp Charles.
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  • "Charles!" she shouted and opened another door.
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  • "You're sure they didn't go out for breakfast?" he asked uneasily, joining her at Charles' door.
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  • Charles was half dressed, wearing sweats only.
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  • "Maybe the Others got fed up with you hauling off their people," Charles replied.
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  • "Because we can Travel," Charles said.
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  • "Charles, this is not the time," Darian snapped.
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  • We got shit to do, he said to Charles.
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  • Charles' words struck Darian in a new light.
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  • Struggling into his shirt, Charles tried to yank away, but Darian Traveled to his cabin before releasing him.
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  • Darian's mind worked fast as he rejoined Charles in the living room.
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  • His rhythm disrupted, he glanced towards the boulder where he'd hidden Yully and Charles, making sure they weren't in danger.
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  • At some point, he'd have to snatch Yully and Charles and drag them down to the immortal world and hope they had a chance to Travel before being blasted to pieces.
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  • He dropped to his knees behind the boulder where Yully and Charles hid.
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  • "I hate my life," Charles muttered.
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  • Darian glanced at Charles.
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  • He held out his hand to Charles, pushing the location into his mind.
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  • She ran hard, spotting Yully and Charles fighting back-to-back at the base of the obelisk.
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  • Something seemed off about Charles, but Jenn didn't have time to place what.
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  • Yully appeared as uneasy as she sounded while Charles licked his lips at the blood around them.
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  • Charles let out a string of curses and dragged one of the guardsmen off the ground.
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  • She sensed nothing; she wouldn't, for only Charles and Darian could.
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  • "Destroying this place," Charles answered.
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  • Charles darted to the other side of the obelisk to protect Yully.
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  • Jenn dashed forward and grabbed Yully's arm, motioning for Charles to follow her.
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  • Charles tripped and fell through the portal.
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  • He didn't know how Yully and Charles made it back or if Jenn had been with them.
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  • Xander looked twice at Charles.
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  • Charles bared his teeth in a look of extreme displeasure.
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  • Charles, however, was unaffected.
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  • "I do not know how much without tasting her," Charles said then looked intently at Xander.
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  • Charles was quiet, pensive.
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  • Charles was coiled, as if ready to take a bite out of her.
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  • She was texting with one hand and reached for the purse on the chair beside Charles with her other.
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  • "Change me back," Charles said.
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  • Charles knelt before him, bowing his head.
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  • Xander gripped Charles' neck in his massive hand.
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  • Despite being over six feet tall, Charles was no more of an obstacle than Jessi's small body.
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  • Xander didn't feel the need to be gentle with Charles as he was with Jessi and the other girls.
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  • Xander lowered his head, burying his teeth into Charles' throat.
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  • Charles was limp in his grip.
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  • Charles didn't respond for a long moment then finally began to drink.
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  • Xander didn't let him drink long, more interested in his own full stomach than Charles' life.
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  • He did the minimum required to keep Charles from dying.
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  • "I hope you're gentler with your women than you are your vamps," Jule said, gaze on Charles.
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  • Charles was disposable to him.
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  • Mind if I stick around until either Charles wakes up or she comes back?
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  • Charles up there is a Tracker.
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  • Behind them was Charles, the newly re-vamped Tracker.
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  • "Others did this, ikir," Charles reported.
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  • Charles and I can track them, and I can fight them.
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  • Charles was a short distance away, alert.
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  • Facing the ocean, Charles waved them over.
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  • He was swept away by the magic of Charles, who guided them to where the Others were.
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  • "Two," Charles said, pointing to the factory.
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  • Damian, his three brothers, Charles and Jenn were all gathered in the barn, along with his least favorite Natural, Sofi.
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  • Emerging from his solitude Rienzi journeyed to Prague, which he reached in July 1350, and threw himself upon the protection of the emperor Charles IV.
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  • Denouncing the temporal power of the pope he implored the emperor to deliver Italy, and especially Rome, from their oppressors; but, heedless of his invitations, Charles kept him in prison for more than a year in the fortress of Raudnitz, and then handed him over to Clement, who had been clamouring for his surrender.
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  • He married in 1852 Marie Caroline, daughter of the Archduke Charles, the victor of Aspern.
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  • This threefold division of the office of imperial archchancellor was acknowledged in 1356 by the Golden Bull of the emperor Charles IV., but the duties of the office were performed by the elector of Mainz.
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  • The only point of interest on the banks is the cavern, near the mouth of the Alder, in which Prince Charles Edward concealed himself for a time after the battle of Culloden.
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  • He refused to use his full influence in favour of the candidacy of Charles of Valois, brother of Philip IV., lest France became too powerful; and recognized Henry of Luxemburg, whom his representatives crowned emperor at the Lateran in 1312.
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  • He made his home with his elder brother Piero at Florence throughout the agitation of Savonarola and the invasion of Charles VIII.
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  • He finally accepted Charles I.
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  • Charles took Florence and the Medici family under his protection and promised to punish all enemies of the Catholic faith.
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  • Leo agreed to invest Charles with Naples, to crown him emperor, and to aid in a war against Venice.
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  • In 1664 he was chosen one of the directors of the imperial army raised to fight the Turk; and after the peace which followed the Christian victory at St Gotthard in August 1664, he aided the English king Charles II.
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  • The conspirators endeavoured to obtain the co-operation of the prince of Carignano, afterwards King Charles Albert, who was known to share their patriotic aspirations.
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  • Charles of Valois, was carefully educated, and was destined for the order of Malta.
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  • The duchy afterwards changed hands several times, one of its holders being Charles of Valois, natural son of Charles IX.
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  • Landing at Nice on the 24th of June 1848, he placed his sword at the disposal of Charles Albert, and, after various difficulties with the Piedmontese war office, formed a volunteer army 3000 strong, but shortly after taking the field was obliged, by the defeat of Custozza, to flee to Switzerland.
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  • In 1708 Peter sent Alexius to Smolensk to collect provender and recruits, and thence to Moscow to fortify it against Charles XII.
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  • At the end of 1709 he went to Dresden for twelve months for finishing lessons in French and German, mathematics and fortification, and, his education completed, he was married, greatly against his will, to the princess Charlotte of BrunswickWolfenbiittel, whose sister espoused, almost simultaneously, the heir to the Austrian throne, the archduke Charles.
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  • Rather than face this ordeal Alexius fled to Vienna and placed himself under the protection of his brother-in-law, the emperor Charles VI., who sent him for safety first to the Tirolean fortress of Ahrenberg, and finally to the castle of San Elmo at Naples.
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  • The Supreme Court of Appeals, consisting of five judges, elected for terms of twelve years, holds three terms annually, one at Wheeling, one at Charleston and one at Charles Town.
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  • Charles II.of England, in 1661, granted to a company of gentlemen the land between the Potomac and Rappahannock rivers, commonly known as the " Northern Neck."
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  • There is a statue of General Louis Charles Desaix de Veygoux in the Place de Jaude.
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  • For a short time he assisted Charles Osborne in editing the Philanthropist; in 1819 he went to St Louis, Missouri, and there in 1819-1820 took an active part in the slavery controversy; and in 1821 he founded at Mount Pleasant, Ohio, an anti-slavery paper, the Genius of Universal Emancipation.
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  • He was educated in Coventry, became a successful merchant, traveled widely throughout Europe and for several years was the financial agent of Charles I.
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  • Rupert, who from 1353 to 1390 was sole ruler, gained the electoral dignity for the Palatinate of the Rhine in 1356 by a grant of some lands in upper Bavaria to the emperor Charles IV.
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  • In 1742, after the extinction of the two senior lines of this family, the Sulzbach branch became the senior line, and its head, the elector Charles Theodore, inherited Bavaria in 1777.
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  • The Wittelsbachs gave three kings to Germany, Louis IV.,' Rupert and Charles VII.
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  • From 1701 to 17 21 Collier was employed on his Great Historical, Geographical, Genealogical and Poetical Dictionary, founded on, and partly translated from, Louis Moreri's Dictionnaire historique, and in the compilation and issue of the two volumes folio of his own Ecclesiastical History of Great Britian from the first planting of Christianity to the end of the reign of Charles II.
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  • Matters improved considerably under Charles Emmanuel III., in whose reign of forty-three years (1730-1773) the prosperity of the island was much increased.
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  • On the deposition of Charles the Fat in 887 he was excluded from the throne by his youth; but during the reign of Odo, who had succeeded Charles, he succeeded in gaining the recognition of a certain number of notables and in securing his coronation at Reims on the 28th of January 893.
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  • The same year Charles, on the invitation of the barons, took possession of the kingdom of Lotharingia.
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  • In his extremity Charles trusted himself to Herbert, count of Vermandois, who deceived him, and threw him into confinement at Château-Thierry and afterwards at Peronne.
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  • Eckel, Charles le Simple (Paris, 1899).
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  • A small fort was built at Sheerness by Charles II., which, on the 10th of July 1667, was taken by the Dutch fleet under De Ruyter.
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  • Upon the execution of Charles, Cooper took the Engagement, and was a commissioner to administer it in Dorsetshire.
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  • By his three marriages he was thus connected with many of the leading politicians of Charles II.'s reign.
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  • He now steadily pursued the design of the Restoration, but without holding any private correspondence with the king, and only on terms similar to those proposed in 1648 to Charles I.
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  • Cooper was one of the twelve commissioners who went to Charles at Breda to invite him to return.
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  • He is stated also to have influenced the king in issuing his dispensing declaration of the 26th of December 1662, and he zealously supported a bill introduced for the purpose of confirming the declaration, rising thereby in favour and influence with Charles.
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  • The treaty contained a clause by which Charles was bound to declare himself a Catholic, and with the knowledge of this Ashley, as a stanch Protestant, could not be trusted: In order to blind him and the other Protestant members of the Cabal a sham treaty was arranged in which this clause did not appear, and it was not until a considerable while afterwards that he found out that he had been duped.
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  • This treaty, however, was kept from public knowledge, and Ashley helped Charles to hoodwink parliament by signing a similar treaty on the 2nd of February 1672, which was laid before them as the only one in existence.
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  • His approval of the attempt of the Lords to alter a money bill led to the loss of the supply to Charles and to the consequent displeasure of the king.
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  • His support to the Lord Roos Act, ascribed generally to his desire to ingratiate himself with Charles, was no doubt due in part to the fact that his son had married Lord Roos's sister.
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  • In the other great measure of the Cabal ministry, Charles's Declaration of Indulgence, he concurred.
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  • On the 8th of March he announced to parliament that the declaration had been cancelled, though he did his best to induce Charles to remain firm.
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  • He now began to be regarded as the chief upholder of Protestantism in the ministry; he lost favour with Charles, and on Sunday, the 9th of September 1673, was dismissed from the chancellorship. Among the reasons for this dismissal is probably the fact that he opposed grants to the king's mistresses.
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  • Charles soon regretted the loss of Shaftesbury, and endeavoured, as did also Louis, to induce him to return, but in vain.
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  • With nine other peers he presented a petition to the king in November, praying for the meeting of parliament, of which Charles took no notice.
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  • In the meantime the Six Nations (in 1768) had repudiated their sale of the region to the Susquehanna Company and had sold it to the Penns; the Penns had erected here the manors of Stoke and Sunbury, the government of Pennsylvania had commissioned Charles Stewart, Amos Ogden and others to lay out these manors, and they had arrived and taken possession of the block-house and huts at Mill Creek in January 1769.
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  • Though the rule of Podébrad had proved very successful and Bohemia had under it obtained a degree of prosperity which had been unknown since the time of Charles IV., the Calixtine king had many enemies among the Romanist members of the powerful Bohemian nobility.
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  • Peace negotiations were begun with Charles II.
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  • Charles's sons Robert and Philip landed in Sicily, but after capturing Catania were defeated by Frederick, Philip being taken prisoner (1299), while several Calabrian towns were captured by the Sicilians.
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  • For two years more the fighting continued with varying success, until Charles of Valois, who had been sent by Boniface to invade Sicily, was forced to sue for peace, his army being decimated by the plague, and in August 1302 the treaty of Caltabellotta was signed, by which Frederick was recognized king of Trinacria (the name Sicily was not to be used) for his lifetime, and was to marry Eleonora, the daughter of Charles II.; at his death the kingdom was to revert to the Angevins (this clause was inserted chiefly to save Charles's face), and his children would receive compensation elsewhere.
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  • Bonif ace tried to induce King Charles to break the treaty, but the latter was only too anxious for peace, and finally in May 1303 the pope ratified it, Frederick agreeing to pay him a tribute.
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  • Robert, who had succeeded Charles II.
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  • An Angevin fleet and army, under Robert's son Charles, was defeated at Palermo by Giovanni da Chiaramonte in 1325, and in 1326 and 1327 there were further Angevin raids on the island, until the descent into Italy of the emperor Louis the Bavarian distracted their attention.
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  • It remained the capital of the Palatinate for nearly sixty years, being especially flourishing under the elector Charles Theodore.
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  • On the 18th of August 1477, by his marriage at Ghent to Mary, who had just inherited Burgundy and the Netherlands from her father Charles the Bold, duke of Burgundy, he effected a union of great importance in the history of the house of Habsburg.
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  • This treaty provided that Maximilian's daughter Margaret should marry Charles, the dauphin of France, and have for her dowry Artois and FrancheComte, two of the provinces in dispute, while the claim of Louis on the duchy of Burgundy was tacitly admitted.
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  • In December 1491 Anne was married to Charles VIII., king of France, and Maximilian's daughter Margaret, who had resided in France since her betrothal, was sent back to her father.
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  • In 1494 he was again in the Netherlands, where he led an expedition against the rebels of Gelderland, assisted Perkin Warbeck to make a descent upon England, and formally handed over the government of the Low Countries to Philip. His attention was next turned to Italy, and, alarmed at the progress of Charles VIII.
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  • The need for help to prosecute the war in Italy caused the king to call the diet to Worms in March 1495, when he urged the necessity of checking the progress of Charles.
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  • The three succeeding years were mainly occupied with quarrels with the diet, with two invasions of France, and a war in Gelderland against Charles, count of Egmont, who claimed that duchy, and was supported by French troops.
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  • Having established his daughter Margaret as regent for Charles in the Netherlands, Maximilian met the diet at Constance in 1507, when the imperial chamber (Reichskammergericht) was revised and took a more permanent form, and help was granted for an expedition to Italy.
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  • He attempted in vain to secure the election of his grandson Charles.
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  • It was enclosed by Humphrey, duke of Gloucester, and laid out by Charles II., and contains a fine avenue of Spanish chestnuts planted in his time.
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  • Coleridge wrote to Charles Lamb averring that the book must be his work.
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  • Each mayor, however, sought to supplant the others; the Pippins and Charles Martel succeeded, and their victory was at the same time the victory of Austrasia over Neustria and Burgundy.
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  • At Franeker his house was a small château, " separated by a moat from the rest of the town, where the mass could be said in safety."' And one motive in favour of accepting an invitation to England lay in the alleged leanings of Charles I.
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  • The Port Royalists, Pierre Nicole (1625-1695) and Antoine Arnauld (1612-1694), had applied it to grammar and logic; Jean Domat or Daumat (1625-1696) and Henri Francois Daugesseau (1668-1751) to jurisprudence; Fontenelle, Charles Perrault (1628-1703) and Jean Terrasson (1670-1750) to literary criticism, and a worthier estimate of modern literature.
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  • In 1272 the commands of the chief of his order and the request of King Charles brought him back to the professor's chair at Naples.
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  • Innocent excommunicated and deposed Ferdinand, king of Naples, by bull of the 11th of September 1489, for refusal to pay the papal dues, and gave his kingdom to Charles VIII.
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  • During his stay at the Northamptonshire village of Holdenby or Holmby - where Sir Thomas Herbert complains the green was not well kept - Charles frequently rode over to Lord Vaux's place at Harrowden, or to Lord Spencer's at Althorp, for a game, and, according to one account, was actually playing on the latter green when Cornet Joyce came to Holmby to remove him to other quarters.
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  • To prevent this bill from passing into law, Charles had dissolved parliament in July 1679, and in the following October had prorogued its successor without allowing it to meet.
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  • In 1 533 it was raised to a margraviate by the emperor Charles V., and wds held by various families until in 1799 it passed, through the Sultzbach branch of the Wittelsbachs, to the royal house of Bavaria, by whom it was renounced in favour of the Batavian republic in 1801.
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  • In 1874 a further rise in the fork to a' 454 was instigated by Sir Charles Halle.
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  • This charter was confirmed by Charles II.
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  • There is a fine park outside the town belonging to the duke of Arenberg, whose ancestor, Charles de Ligne, bought it from Henry IV.
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  • Freeman and Charles Elton discovered by historical research that a breach of the conditions of the professorship had occurred, and Christ Church raised the endowment from Loo a year to £50o.
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  • Soon afterwards he was chosen fellow and tutor of his college; in 1676 he became chaplain to the bishop of Oxford, and in 1681 he obtained the rectory of Bletchington, Oxfordshire, and was made chaplain to Charles II.
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  • In 1672 she received a yearly grant from Charles II.
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  • Charles Augustus Briggs, tried for heresy for his inaugural address in 1891 as professor of biblical theology at Union Seminary, was acquitted by the presbytery of New York, but was declared guilty and was suspended from its ministry by the General Assembly of 1893.
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  • Antonio and Francesco both having died childless, the duchy passed to Charles of Bourbon (Don Carlos), infante of Spain, who, becoming king of Naples in 1734, surrendered Parma and Piacenza to Austria, but retained the artistic treasures of the Farnese dynasty which he had removed from Parma to Naples.
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  • The new duke, unwilling to yield to the wishes of his people for greater political liberty, was soon compelled to take flight, and the duchy was for a time ruled by a provisional government and by Charles Albert of Sardinia; but in April 1849 Baron d'Aspre with 15,000 Austrians took possession of Parma, and the ducal government was restored under Austrian protection.
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  • Charles opened a small business as an apothecary in Dublin, and between 1735 and 1741 he began his career as a pamphleteer by publishing papers on professional matters which led to legislation requiring inspection of drugs.
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  • As an orator Charles Lucas appears to have had little power, and he made no mark in the House of Commons.
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  • Four years later (1520) the Portuguese seaman, Ferdinand Magellan, entered the estuary in his celebrated voyage round the world, undertaken in the service of the king of Spain (Charles I., better known as the emperor Charles V.).
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  • Sebastian Cabot had in 151 9 deserted England for Spain, and had received from King Charles the post of pilot-major formerly held by Juan de Solis.
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  • Negotiations for the marriage began during the reign of Charles I., were renewed immediately after the Restoration, and on the 23rd of June, in spite of Spanish opposition, the marriage contract was signed, England securing Tangier and Bombay, with trading privileges in Brazil and the East Indies, religious and commercial freedom in Portugal and two million Portuguese crowns (about 300,000); while Portugal obtained military and naval support against Spain and liberty of worship for Catherine.
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  • She reached England on the 13th of May 1662, but was not visited by Charles at Portsmouth till the loth.
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  • Catherine possessed several good qualities, but had been brought up in a conventual seclusion and was scarcely a wife Charles would have chosen for himself.
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  • Her personal charms were not potent enough to wean Charles away from the society of his mistresses, and in a few weeks after her arrival she became aware of her painful and humiliating position as the wife of the selfish and licentious king.
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  • On the first presentation to her of Lady Castlemaine, Charles's mistress en titre, whom he insisted on making lady of her bedchamber, she fainted away.
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  • In the midst of Charles's debauched and licentious court, she lived neglected and retired, often deprived of her due allowance, having no ambitions and taking no part in English politics, but keeping up rather her interest in her native country.
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  • As the prospect diminished of her bearing children to Charles, several schemes were set on foot for procuring a divorce on various pretexts.
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  • During Charles's last illness in 1685 she showed great anxiety for his reconciliation with the Romish Church, and it was probably effected largely through her influence.
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  • (921-954), king of France, surnamed "d'Outremer" (Transmarinus), was the son of Charles III.
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  • "Cavalier" is chiefly associated with the Royalists, the supporters of Charles I.
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  • Charles in the Answer to the Petition (June 13, 1642) speaks of cavaliers as a "word by what mistake soever it seemes much in disfavour."
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  • Charles Island, the most valuable of the group, is cultivated by a small colony.
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  • Except on Charles Island, where settlement has existed longest, little or no influence of the presence of man is evident in the group; still, the running wild of dogs and cats, and, as regards the vegetation, especially goats, must in a comparatively short period greatly modify the biological conditions of the islands.
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  • Since 1860 several visits have been paid to the group by scientific investigators - by Dr Habel in 1868; Messrs Baur and Adams, and the naturalists of the "Albatross," between 1888 and 1891; and in 1897-1898 by Mr Charles Harris, whose journey was specially undertaken at the instance of the Hon.
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  • When he died three years later Lauenburg passed to his nephew, George Louis, elector of Hanover, afterwards king of Great Britain as George I., whose rights were recognized by the emperor Charles VI.
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  • At Stangabro (Stanga Bridge), close by, an obelisk (1898) commemorates the battle of Stangabro (1598), when Duke Charles (Protestant) defeated the Roman Catholic Sigismund.
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  • But a son Charles, called, as heir of Navarre, prince of Viana, had been born of the marriage.
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  • The Catalans, who had adopted the cause of Charles and who had grievances of their own, called in a succession of foreign pretenders.
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  • His great-grandson, Charles, son of Philip of Artois, count of Eu, and Marie of Berry, played a conspicuous part in the Hundred Years' War.
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  • He accompanied Charles VII.
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  • The second son of the duke of Maine, Louis Charles de Bourbon (1701-1775), bore the title of count of Eu.
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  • The numerous facts, geological, geographical and biological, which when linked together lend great support to this theory, have been well worked out in Australia by Mr Charles Hedley of the Australian Museum, Sydney.
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  • Mr Charles Green was commissioned to conduct the astronomical observations, and Sir Joseph Banks and Dr Solander were appointed botanists to the expedition.
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  • (1655-1697), king of Sweden, the only son of Charles X., and Hedwig Leonora of Holstein-Gottorp, was born in the palace at Stockholm, on the 24th of November 1655 His father, who died when the child was in his fourth year, left the care of his education to the regents whom he had appointed.
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  • All the Swedish commanders showed remarkable ability, but the chief glory of the day indisputably belongs to Charles XI.
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  • In the following year, Charles with 9000 men routed 12,000 Danes near Malmo (July 15, 1678).
    0
    0
  • Charles devoted the rest of his life to the gigantic task of rehabilitating Sweden by means of a reduktion, or recovery of alienated crown lands, a process which involved the examination of every title deed in the kingdom, and resulted in the complete readjustment of the finances.
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  • By his beloved consort Ulrica Leonora of Denmark, from the shock of whose death in July 1693 he never recovered, he had seven children, of whom only three survived him, a son Charles, and two daughters, Hedwig Sophia, duchess of Holstein, and Ulrica Leonora, who ultimately succeeded her brother on the Swedish throne.
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  • One of his great-grandfathers was town clerk and at the same time secretary to Queen Anne of Neuberg, widow of Charles II.
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    0
  • Charles de Lesseps, a victim offered to the fury of the politicians, tried to divert the storm upon his head and prevent it from reaching his father.
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    0
  • While still an undergraduate he formed a league with John Herschel and Charles Babbage, to conduct the famous struggle of "d-ism versus dot-age," which ended in the introduction into Cambridge of the continental notation in the infinitesimal calculus to the exclusion of the fluxional notation of Sir Isaac Newton.
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    0
  • The emperor, Charles the Fat, was roused to collect a large army, with which he surrounded the main body of the Northmen under their leader Godfrey in the camp at Elsloo.
    0
    0
  • But Charles preferred negotiation and bribery to fighting.
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    0
  • Philip did not live to see Gelderland and Liege pass definitively under his rule; it was reserved for his son, Charles the Bold, to crush the independence of Liege (1468) and to incorporate Gelderland in his dominions (1473).
    0
    0
  • Before the accession of Charles, the only son of Philip, two steps had been taken of great importance in the direction of unification.
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    0
  • But Charles, rightly surnamed the Bold or Headstrong, did not possess the qualities of a builder of states.
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    0
  • But Charles, though a brave soldier and good military organizer, was neither a capable statesman nor a skilful general.
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    0
  • Gelderland, however, which had revolted after Nancy, had Charles of Egmont for its duke, and the two bishoprics of Liege and Utrecht were no longer subject to Burgundian authority.
    0
    0
  • His Burgundian lands passed without opposition to his son Charles, then six years of age.
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    0
  • The duties of this minister were of special importance, for it was to the Netherlands that Charles looked for much of the resources wherewith to carry on his many wars.
    0
    0
  • During this time Charles consolidated his dominion over the Netherlands.
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    0
  • At the time of her accession to office Charles changed the form of administration by the creation of three separate councils, those of State, of Finance, and the Privy Council.
    0
    0
  • The policy of Charles towards the Netherlands was for many years one of studied moderation.
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  • The struggle, however, with the Protestant princes of Germany not only led to continual demands of Charles for men and money from his Netherland dominions, but to his determination to prevent the spread of Protestant opinions; and a series of edicts was passed, the most severe of which (that of 1550) was carried out with extreme rigour.
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  • In 1548 Charles laid before the states a scheme for making the Netherlands an integral part of the empire under the name of the Circle of Burgundy; but the refusal of the German Electors to make his only son Philip king of the Romans led him to abandon the project, which was never renewed.
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    0
  • At Nancy Charles was himself among the slain, leaving his only daughter Mary of Burgundy, then in her twentieth year, sole iheiress to his possessions.
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  • This extremely able man, a Burgundian by birth, was the son of one of Charles V.'s most trusted councillors, and it was largely to him that the government of the Netherlands was confided.
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    0
  • Louis of Nassau, with a small force raised in France with the connivance of Charles IX., made a sudden dash into Hainault (May 1572) and captured Valenciennes and Mons.
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    0
  • When feudal possessions, instead of being purely personal, were vested in the families of the holder after the death of Charlemagne, Tournai was specially assigned to Baldwin of the Iron Arm by [[Charles (disambiguation)|Charles Knights Jousting With Cronells On Tt-Tfir Lances]].
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    0
  • During the Burgundian period it was the residence of Margaret of York, widow of Charles the Bold; and the pretender Perkin Warbeck, whom she championed, if not born there, was the reputed son of a Jew of Tournai.
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    0
  • It did not long remain French, for in 1521 the count of Nassau, Charles V.'s general, took it and added it to the Spanish provinces.
    0
    0
  • When Charles of Bourbon stormed Rome in 1527 Paleario went first to Perugia and then to Siena, where he settled as a teacher.
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    0
  • He went to Vienna and in 1809 was appointed imperial court secretary at the headquarters of the archduke Charles.
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    0
  • The next salt to be obtained was the mercuric salt, which was prepared in 1 799 by Edward Charles Howard, who substituted mercury for silver in Brugnatelli's process.
    0
    0
  • Manfred lost his life in 1266 in battle with Charles of Anjou not far from the town.
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    0
  • In the principal streets are memorial stones with inscriptions in honour of Charles V., surmounted by an old crucifix with a mosaic cross.
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    0
  • Immediately after the overthrow of Charles X., King Louis Philippe appointed Fain first secretary of his cabinet (August 1830).
    0
    0
  • During the earlier part of the year 164 3 the military position of Charles was greatly superior to that of the parliament.
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    0
  • It seemed likely that the whole of the north would be laid open and the royalists be able to march upon London and join Charles and Hopton there.
    0
    0
  • As the king had no longer a field army, the war after Naseby resolved itself into a series of sieges which Charles had no means of raising.
    0
    0
  • Cromwell and the army now turned with hopes of a settlement to Charles.
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    0
  • He returned on the 19th of April, and on the 23rd was sent to Oxfordshire to prevent a junction between Charles and Prince Rupert, in which he succeeded after some small engagements and the storming of Blechingdon House.
    0
    0
  • Meanwhile the failure to come to terms with Charles and provide a settlement appeared to threaten a general anarchy.
    0
    0
  • Meanwhile all hopes of an accommodation with Charles were dispelled by his flight on the 11th of November from Hampton Court to Carisbroke Castle in the Isle of Wight, his Flight object being to negotiate independently with the Scots, the parliament and the army.
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    0
  • Both the army and the parliament gave cold replies to his offers to negotiate; and Charles, on the 27th of December 1647, entered into the Engagement with the Scots by which he promised the establishment of Presbyterianism for three years, the suppression of the Independents and their sects, together with privileges for the Scottish nobles, while the Scots undertook to invade England and restore him to his throne.
    0
    0
  • This alliance, though the exact terms were not known to Cromwell - "the attempt to vassalize us to a foreign nation," to use his own words - convinced him of the uselessness of any plan for maintaining Charles on the throne; though he still appears to have clung to monarchy, proposing in January 1648 the transference of the crown to the prince of Wales.
    0
    0
  • Meanwhile the position of Charles's opponents had been considerably strengthened by the suppression of a dangerous rebellion in November 1647 by Cromwell's intervention, and by the return of troops to obedience.
    0
    0
  • Meanwhile behind his back the royalists had risen all over England, the fleet in the Downs had declared for Charles, and the Scottish army under Hamilton had invaded the north.
    0
    0
  • On his return to London he found the parliament again negotiating Cromwell with Charles, and on the eve of making a treaty which Charles himself had no intention of keeping and the regarded merely as a means of regaining his power, and which would have thrown away in one moment all the advantages gained during years of bloodshed and struggle.
    0
    0
  • During the next few weeks Cromwell appears to have made once more attempts to come to terms with Charles; but the king was inflexible in his refusal to part with the essential powers of the monarchy, or with the Church; and at the end of December it was resolved to bring him to trial.
    0
    0
  • Opinions, no doubt, will always differ as to the wisdom or authority of the policy which brought Charles to the scaffold.
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    0
  • Whatever crimes might be charged against Charles, his past conduct might appear to be condoned by the act of negotiating with him.
    0
    0
  • Cromwell had exhausted every expedient for arriving at an arrangement with the king by which the royal authority might be preserved, and the repeated perfidy and inexhaustible shiftiness of Charles had proved the hopelessness of such attempts.
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    0
  • Cromwell's land settlement - modified by the restoration under Charles II.
    0
    0
  • This movement, however, left open the way to England, and Charles immediately marched south, in reality thus giving Cromwell the wished-for opportunity of crushing the royalists finally and decisively.
    0
    0
  • Complete toleration in fact was only extended to Protestant nonconformists, who composed the Cromwellian established church, and who now meted out to their antagonists the same treatment which they themselves were later to receive under the Clarendon Code of Charles II.
    0
    0
  • On the 25th of lvIarch the Remonstrance, now termed the Petition and Advice, and including a new scheme of government, was passed by a majority of 123 to 62 in spite of the opposition of the officers; and on the 31st it was presented to Cromwell in the Banqueting House at Whitehall whence Charles I.
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  • At the Restoration his body was exhumed, and on the 30th of January 1661, the anniversary of the execution of Charles I., it was drawn on a sledge from Holborn to Tyburn, together with the bodies of Ireton and Bradshaw, accompanied by "the universal outcry and curses of the people."
    0
    0
  • Having married Constance, daughter of Manfred of Beneventum, he came forward as the representative of the claims of the Hohenstaufen in Naples and Sicily against Charles, duke of Anjou.
    0
    0
  • He repelled an invasion of Catalonia undertaken by the king of France in support of Charles of Anjou, and died on the 8th of November 1286.
    0
    0
  • The marriage of Charles the Bold and Margaret of York, sister of Edward IV., was celebrated at Damme on the 2nd of July 1468.
    0
    0
  • Dr Cave was chaplain to Charles II., and in 1684 became a canon of Windsor.
    0
    0
  • She made her first appearance on the stage at Rouen with Charles Chevillet (1645-1701), who called himself sieur de Champmesle, and they were married in 1666.
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    0
  • He received his education first at La Roche, in the Arve valley, then at the college of Annecy, founded by Eustace Chappius, ambassador in England of Charles V., in 1549.
    0
    0
  • According to this, Duke Charles Emmanuel of Savoy, who succeeded his more tolerant father in 1580, was determined to reduce the Chablais to the Catholic religion, by peaceful means if possible, by force if necessary.
    0
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  • The saint's nephew and successor, Charles Auguste de Sales, brought out a more extended life, Latin and French, in 1635.
    0
    0
  • The lives of Giarda (1650), Maupas du Tour (1657) and Cotolendi (1687) add little to Charles Auguste.
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    0
  • A little later Lingen was sold to the emperor Charles V., from whom it passed to his son, Philip II.
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  • The dockyard was altered and improved by Charles I.
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    0
  • A market to be held on Tuesday, and a fair on the 4th, 5th and 6th of May, were granted by Charles II.
    0
    0
  • On the British side the question of constructing an Atlantic cable was engaging the attention of the Magnetic Telegraph Company and its engineer Mr (afterwards Sir) Charles Bright.
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    0
  • It was stated by Sir Charles Bright in 1887 that by that date 107,000 m.
    0
    0
  • On the 26th of August 1854 there appeared in L'Illustration (Paris) an interesting article by Charles Bourseul on the electric transmission of speech.
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    0
  • The works at Vinovo, which had fame in the f 8th century,, came to an untimely end in 1820; those of Castelli (in, Ares the Abruzzi), which have been revived, were supplanted f~t by Charles III.s establishment at Capodimonte, I7~ which after producing articles of surprising execution was closed before the end of the century.
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  • The Franko-Papal alliance, which conferred a crown on Pippin and sovereign rights upon the see of Rome, held within itself that ideal of mutually Charles supporting papacy and empire which exercised so the iireat powerful an influence in medieval history.
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  • When Charles the Great (Charlemagne) deposed his father-in- lin~as.
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    0
  • Charles took possession of the kingdom of Italy, as limited by Pippins settlement.
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    0
  • The kingdom of Italy, transmitted on his death by Charles the Great, and afterwards Confirmed to his grandson Lotbar by the peace of Verdun in 843, stretched from the Alps to Terracina.
    0
    0
  • Internally Charles left the affairs of the Italian kingdom much as he found them, except that he appears to have pursued the policy of breaking up the larger fiefs of the Lombards, substituting counts for their dukes, and adding to the privileges of the bishops.
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    0
  • The Italians acknowledged eight kings of the house of Charles the Great, ending in Charles the Fat, who was deposed in 888.
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    0
  • Anarchy and misery are indeed the main features of that long space of time which elapsed between the death of Charles the Great and the descent of Otto.
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    0
  • Charles accepted these terms, and was welcomed by the Guelph party as their chief throughout Italy.
    0
    0
  • Charles was forced to resigr the senatorship of Rome and the signoria of Lombardy and Tuscany.
    0
    0
  • Not long after the battle of Meloria Charles of Anjou died, and was succeeded by his son Charles II.
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    0
  • Here in the year 1300 new factions, subdividing the old Guelphs and Ghibellines under the names of Neri and Bianchi, had acquired such force that Boniface VIII., a violently Guelph pope, called in Charles of Valois to pacify the republic and undertake the charge of Italian affairs.
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    0
  • In I309 Robert, grandson of Charles, the first Angevine sovereign, succeeded to the throne of Naples, and became the leader of the Guelphs in Italy.
    0
    0
  • Feeling himself alone, with no right to the title he was bent on seizing, he had recourse to Charles VIII.
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    0
  • Charles hurried back from Naples, and narrowly escaped destruction at Fornovo in the passes of the Apennines.
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    0
  • No policy could have been less far-sighted; for Charles V., joint heir to Austria, Burgundy, Castile and Aragon, the future overwhelming rival of France, was already born.
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    0
  • Leo for a while relied on Francis; for the vast power of Charles V., who succeeded to the empire in 1519, as in 1516 he had succeeded to the crowns of Spain and Lower Italy, threatened the whole of Europe.
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  • In 1521 he changed sides, allied himself to Charles, and died after hearing that the imperial troops had again expelled the French from Milan.
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  • In the reign of this pope Francis was released from his prison in Madrid (1526), and Clement hoped that he might still be used in the Italian interest as a counterpoise to Charles.
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  • Charles then entered the port of Genoa, and on the 5th of November met Clement VII.
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    0
  • Charles V., it must be remembered, achieved his conquest and confirmed his authority far less as emperor than as the heir of Castile and Aragon.
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  • In 1556 Philip II., by the abdication of his father Charles V., became king of Spain.
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  • In the next year Ferdinand, brother of Charles, was elected emperor.
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    0
  • He encouraged the duke of Guise to undertake the conquest of Naples, as Charles of Anjou had been summoned by his predecessors.
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  • When Emmanuel Philibert succeeded to his father Charles III.
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    0
  • Emmanuel Philibert was succeeded by his son Charles Emmanuel I., who married Catherine, a daughter of Philip II.
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    0
  • He seized the first opportunity of annexing Saluzzo, which had been lost to Savoy in the last two reigns, and renewed the disastrous policy of his grandfather Charles III.
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    0
  • Charles Emmanuel now attempted the acquisition of Montferrat, which was soon to become vacant by the death of Francesco Gonzaga, who held it together with Mantua.
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    0
  • When the male line of the Gonzaga family expired in i62~, Charles, duke of Nevers, claimed Mantua and Montferrat in right of his wife, the only daughter of the last duke.
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  • Charles Emmanuel was now checkmated by France, as he had formerly been by Spain.
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  • Charles, archduke of Austria, opposed him.
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    0
  • Charles of Austria, now emperor, took Milan, Mantua, Naples and Sardinia for his portion of the Italian spoil.
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    0
  • On this occasion Charles Emmanuel acquired Tortona and Novara.
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    0
  • Worse complications ensued for the Italians when the emperor Charles VI., father of Maria Theresa, died in i74o.
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    0
  • Charles Emmanuel now threatened Genoa.
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    0
  • Parma, Piacenza and Guastalla were formed into a duchy for Don Philip, brother of Charles III.
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    0
  • Charles Emmanuel made his will law, and erased the remnants of free institutions from his state.
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    0
  • The close of Bonapartes victorious campaign against the Archduke Charles in 1797 enabled him to mature those designs respecting Venice which are detailed in the article NAPOLEON.
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    0
  • Further, at the close of 1798 they virtually compelled the young king of Sardinia, Charles Emmanuel IV., to abdicate at Turin.
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    0
  • Both King Victor Emmanuel and his brother Charles Felix had no sons, and the heir presumptive to the throne was Prince Charles Albert, of the Carignano branch of the house of Savoy.
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  • In March 1821, Count Santorre di Santarosa and other conspirators informed Charles Albert of a constitutional and anti-Austrian plot, and asked for his help. After a momentary hesitation he informed the king; but at his request no arrests were made, and no precautions were taken.
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  • The next day the king abdicated after appointing Charles Albert regent.
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    0
  • The latter immediately proclaimed the constitution, but the new king, Charles Felix, who was at Modena at the time, repudiated the regents acts and exiled him to Tuscany; and, with his consent, an Austrian army invaded Piedmont and crushed the constitutionalists at Novara.
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    0
  • Charles Alberts somewhat equivocal conduct also roused the hatred of the Liberals, and for a long time the esecrato Carignano was regarded, most unjustly, as a traitor even by many who were not republicans.
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  • The mission of Gaetano Castiglia and Marquis Giorgio Pallavicini to Turin, where they had interviewed Charles Albert, although without any definite resultfor Confalonieri had warned the prince that Lombardy was not ready to risewas accidentally discovered, and Confalonieri was himself arrested.
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  • On the 27th of April 1831, Charles Albert succeeded Charles Felix on the throne of Piedmont.
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  • Though eventually this activity of the Giovane Italia supplanted that of the older societies, in practice it met with no better success; the two attempts to invade Savoy in the hope of seducing the army from its allegiance failed miserably, and only resulted in a series of barbarous sentences of death and imprisonment which made most Liberals despair of Charles Albert, while they called down much criticism on Mazzini as the organizer of raids in which he himself took no part.
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  • He extolled Charles Albert and appealed to his patriotism; he believed that the church was necessary and the secret societies harmful; rqpresentative government was undesirable, but he advocated a consultative assembly.
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    0
  • There was great resentment throughout Italy, and in answer to the popes request Charles Albert declared that he was with him in everything, while from South America Giuseppe Garibaldi wrote to offer his services to Hi~ Holiness.
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    0
  • Charles Albert, although mahftaining his reactionary policy, had introduced administrative reforms, built railways, reorganized the army and developed the resources of the country.
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    0
  • Charles Louis, the opera Douffe duke of Lucca, who had coquetted with Liberalism in the past, now refused to make any concessions to his subjects, and in Ferdinand III.
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    0
  • The duke of Modena and Charles Louis of Parma (Marie Louise was now dead) abandoned their capitals; in both cities provisional governments were set up which subsequently proclaimed annexation to Piedmont.
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  • There were now three main political tendencies, viz, the union of north Italy under Charles Albert and an alliance with the pope and Naples, a federation of the different states under their present rulers, and a united republic of all Italy.
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    0
  • Charles Albert could dispose of 90,000 men, including some 30,000 from central Italy, but he took the field with only half his force.
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    0
  • He then requested Charles Albert to take the papal troops under his command, and also wrote to the emperor of Austria asking him voluntarily to relinquish Lombardy and Venetia.
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    0
  • A force of Tuscan volunteers was attacked by a superior body of Austrians at Curtatone and Montanaro and defeated after a gallant resistance on the 27th of May; Charles Albert, after wasting precious time round Peschiera, which capitulated on the 3oth of May, defeated Radetzky at Goito.
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    0
  • But so long as Piedmont was not completely crushed none of the princes dared to take decisive measures against their subjects; in spite of Custozza, Charles Albert still had an army, and Austria, with revolutions in Vienna, Hungary and Bohemia on her hands, could not intervene.
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    0
  • But Charles Charles Albert, who, whatever his faults, had a generous Albertre- nature, was determined that so long as be had an news the army in being he could not abandon the Lombards War, and the Venetians, whom he had encouraged in their resistance, without one more effort, though he knew full well that he was staking all on a desperate chance.
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    0
  • Charles Albert, realizing ~ his own failure and thinking that his son might obtain better terms, abdicated and departed at once for Portugal, where he died in a monastery a few months later.
    0
    0
  • He had led the country out of the despondency which followed the defeat of Novara and the abdication of Charles Albert, through all the vicissitudes of national unification to the final triumph at Rome.
    0
    0
  • This national policy, however, could only be pursued, and the minister could only maintain himself in power, by acquiescence in the king's personal relations with the king of France settled by the disgraceful Treaty of Dover in 1670, which included Charles's acceptance of a pension, and bound him to a policy exactly opposite to Danby's, one furthering French and Roman ascendancy.
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    0
  • In any case, in 1676, together with Lauderdale alone, he consented to a treaty between Charles and Louis according to which the foreign policy of both kings was to be conducted in union, and Charles received an annual subsidy of £10o,000.
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    0
  • In 1678 Charles, taking advantage of the growing hostility to France in the nation and parliament, raised his price, and Danby by his directions demanded through Ralph Montagu (afterwards duke of Montagu) six million livres a year (30o,000) for three years.
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    0
  • In 1678, on the rupture of relations between Charles and Louis, a splendid opportunity was afforded Louis of paying off old scores by disclosing Danby's participation in the king's demands for French gold.
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    0
  • Charles is said to have told him when he made him treasurer that he had only two friends in the world, himself and his own merit.
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  • Popular scepticism - perhaps even Charles Darwin's; Huxley himself was a student of Hume - understands by agnosticism that science is certain while philosophy and theology are baseless.
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  • In 718 he appears as the ally of Chilperic II., king of Neustria, who was fighting against the Austrasian mayor of the palace, Charles Martel; but after the defeat of Chilperic at Soissons in 719 he probably made peace with Charles by surrendering to him the Neustrian king and his treasures.
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  • When, however, he was again attacked by Charles Martel, the Saracens renewed their ravages, and Odo was defeated near Bordeaux; he was compelled to crave protection from Charles, who took up this struggle and gained his momentous victory at Poitiers in 732.
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  • Baldwin raised them to great prosperity by his energy and foresight, and chiefly as a result of the active political and military support he rendered to the emperors Henry VII., Louis the Bavarian and Charles IV.
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  • At Madrid he preached a sermon which pleased Prince Charles, afterwards Charles I., and the latter on his accession appointed Frewen one of his chaplains.
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  • Huxley, who in the 9th edition of this encyclopaedia traced the history of the growth of the biological idea of evolution from its philosophical beginnings to its efflorescence in Charles Darwin.
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  • In a well-known note to Charles Leopold Laurillard's Eloge, prefixed to the last edition of the Ossemens fossiles, the " radical de l'etre " is much the same thing as Aristotle's " particula genitalis " and Harvey's " ovum."
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  • The theory of natural selection, or survival of the fittest, was suggested by William Charles Wells in 1813, and further elaborated by Patrick Matthew in 1831.
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  • A closer scrutiny of the writers of all ages who preceded Charles Darwin, and, in particular, the light thrown back from Darwin on the earlier writings of Herbert Spencer, have made plain that without Darwin the world by this time might have come to a.
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  • It is mentioned so early as the 7th century and in 868 Baldwin of the Iron Arm, first count of Flanders, who had been entrusted by Charles the Bald with the defence of the northern marches, built a castle here against the Normans raiding up the Scheldt.
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  • The appearance of Charles himself, however, with an overwhelming force quelled the disturbance; the ringleaders were executed, and all the property and privileges of the city were confiscated.
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  • Prince Charles Edward slept in it the night following the fight at Prestonpans (1745).
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  • See Life of Harriet Beecher Stowe, compiled from her letters and journals by her son, Charles Edward Stowe (Boston, 1890).
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  • In 1825 he received the title of baron from Charles X., and in 1832 Louis Philippe made him a peer of France.
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    0
  • The first settlement here was made about 1659 in a part of Marlboro called Chauncy (because of a grant of Soo acres here to Charles Chauncy, president of Harvard College, made in 1659 and revoked in 1660 by the General Court of Massachusetts).
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  • The peace of Crepy in September 1544 deprived him of this employment, but he had won a considerable reputation, and when Charles was preparing to attack the league of Schmalkalden, he took pains to win Albert's assistance.
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    0
  • He then followed the fortunes of his friend Maurice, the new elector of Saxony, deserted Charles, and joined the league which proposed to overthrow the emperor by an alliance with Henry II.
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    0
  • When Charles lef t Germany a few weeks later, Albert renewed his depredations in Franconia.
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    0
  • The evolutionary theory, more than hinted at in Kant's " Physical Geography," has, since the writings of Charles Darwin, become the unifying principle in geography.
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    0
  • In the following year the Portuguese Ferdinando Magalhaes, familiarly known as Magellan, laid before Charles V., at Valladolid, a scheme for reaching the Spice Islands by sailing westward.
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    0
  • On a second voyage, in 1556, Chancellor was drowned; and three subsequent voyages, led by Stephen Burrough, Arthur Pet and Charles Jackman, in small craft of 50 tons and under, carried on an examination of the straits which lead into the Kara sea.
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    0
  • From Persia much new information was supplied by Jean Chardin, Jean Tavernier, Charles Hamilton, Jean de Thevenot and Father Jude Krusinski, and by English traders on the Caspian.
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    0
  • A commission left Paris in 1735, consisting of Charles Marie de la Condamine, Pierre Bouguer, Louis Godin and Joseph de Jussieu the naturalist.
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    0
  • 1738, Pierre Louis Moreau de Maupertuis, Alexis Claude Clairaut, Charles Etienne Louis Camus, Pierre Charles Lemonnier and the Swedish physicist Celsius measured an arc of the meridian in Lapland.
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    0
  • The belief in a vast Antarctic continent stretching far into the temperate zone had never been abandoned, and was vehemently asserted by Charles Dalrymple, a disappointed candidate nominated by the Royal Society for the command of the Transit expedition of 1769.
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  • His only surviving son was Charles Spencer, 3rd earl of Sunderland.
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  • The dukedom for which Arundel had petitioned Charles I.
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  • At his death in 1786 he was succeeded by his son Charles, the notorious "Jockey of Norfolk," the big, coarse, generous, slovenly, hard-drinking Whig of whom all the memoirwriters of his age have their anecdotes.
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  • His eldest son Charles (1536-1624), lord admiral of England in 1585, sailed as commander in chief against the Spanish Armada, and, although giving due weight to the counsel of Drake and his other officers, showed himself a leader as prudent as courageous.
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  • Two of his sons succeeded in turn to the earldom of Nottingham, extinct on the death of Charles, the third earl in 1681.
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  • His great-grandson Charles Howard, although fledged in a nest of cavaliers, changed sides and fought at Worcester for the parliament.
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  • After his release he engaged in commerce at Hamburg with his brother Charles and the duc d'Aiguillon, and did not return to France until the Consulate.
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