Chaplains sentence example

chaplains
  • In the navy, chaplains are likewise appointed but do not hold official rank.

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  • Of original authorities the best on the English side is the Gesta Henrici Quinti (down to 1416), printed anonymously for the English Historical Society, but probably written by Thomas Elmham, one of Henry's chaplains.

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  • At Madrid he preached a sermon which pleased Prince Charles, afterwards Charles I., and the latter on his accession appointed Frewen one of his chaplains.

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  • Almoners, as distinct from chaplains, appear early as attached to the court of the kings of France; but the title of grand almoner of Franc* first appears in the reign of Charles VIII.

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  • When Ridley became bishop of London, he made Grindal one of his chaplains and gave him the precentorship of St Paul's.

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  • In 1851 he was collated to a prebend in Chichester; and in 1853 he became one of Queen Victoria's chaplains.

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  • In the additional explanatory notes at the end of the book, after directions as to the wearing of surplice and hood in quire, in cathedral and collegiate churches (they are not made obligatory elsewhere), bishops are directed to wear, besides the rochet, a surplice or alb, and a cope or vestment, with a pastoral staff borne either by themselves or their chaplains.'

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  • He was one of the clerks at the Westminster Assembly, one of Cromwell's chaplains and a "trier," and held livings at Stoke Newington (1645) and St Paul's, Covent Garden (1656).

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  • Gustavus at once took the young priest by the hand, appointed him, at twenty-five, one of his chaplains; made him a canon before he was thirty and a bishop at thirty-two, and finally placed him at the head of the newly appointed commission for reforming the ecclesiastical administration of the country.

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  • Thus a bishop of the English Church appoints examining chaplains who conduct the examination of candidates for holy orders; such officials generally hold ordinary benefices also.

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  • The British sovereign has 36 "Chaplains in Ordinary," who perform service at St James's in rotation, as well as "Honorary Chaplains" and "Chaplains of the Household."

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  • There are also royal chaplains in Scotland and Ireland.

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  • The Scottish chaplains in ordinary are on the same basis as those in England, but the Irish chaplains are attached to the household of the lord-lieutenant.

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  • These clergymen are known as Chaplains, and are subject to the same conditions as other civil servants, being eligible for a retiring pension after 23 years of service.

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  • Chaplains are also appointed under the foreign office to embassies, legations, consulates, &c.

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  • Workhouse chaplains are appointed by overseers and guardians on the direction of the Local Government Board, to which alone such chaplains are responsible.

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  • Prison chaplains are appointed by the home secretary.

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  • In the British army there are two kinds of chaplains, permanent and occasional.

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  • Special chaplains (Acting Chaplains for Temporary Service) may be appointed by a secretary of state under the Army Chaplains Act of 1868 to perform religious service for the army in particular districts.

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  • The permanent chaplains may be Church of England, Roman Catholic, or Presbyterian; Wesleyans (if they prefer not to accept commissions) may be appointed Acting Chaplains.

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  • In 1909 a Chaplains' Department of the Territorial Force was formed; there is no denominational restriction.

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  • In the armies and navies of all Christian countries chaplains are officially appointed, with the single exception of France, where the office was abolished on the separation of Church and State.

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  • In the army of the United States of America chaplains are originally appointed by the president, and subsequently are under the authority of the secretary of war, who receives recommendations as regards transfer from department commanders.

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  • By act of Congress, approved in April 1904, the establishment of chaplains was fixed at 57 (15 with the rank of major), 12 for the artillery corps and r each for the cavalry and infantry regiments.

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  • In the U.S. navy the chaplains are 24 in number, of whom 13 rank as lieutenants, 7 as commanders, 4 as captains.

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  • Where the chaplains are numerous a chaplainmajor is generally appointed, but in the absence of special sanction from the pope such officer has no spiritual jurisdiction.

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  • Moreover, chaplains must be approved by the ordinary of the locality.

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  • In Austria there are Roman Catholic, Greek Church, Jewish and Mahommedan chaplains.

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  • The Roman Catholic chaplains are classed as parish priests, curates and assistants, and are subject to an army Vicar Apostolic. In war, at an army headquarters there are a "field-rabbi," a "military imam," an evangelical minister, as well as the Roman Catholic hierarchy.

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  • There are also army corps and divisional chaplains of both faiths.

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  • The Roman Catholic Church also recognizes a class of beneficed chaplains, supported out of "pious foundations" for the specific duty of saying, or arranging for, certain masses, or taking part in certain services.

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  • There are elaborate regulations governing the appointment and conduct of these chaplains.

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  • He is entitled to consecrate all the bishops within his province and was formerly entitled, upon consecrating a bishop, to select a benefice within his diocese at his option for one of his chaplains, but this practice was indirectly abolished by 3 and 4 Vict.

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  • He is entitled to nominate eight chaplains, who had formerly certain statutory privileges, which are now abolished.

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  • During his visits to England he was at the disposal of Cardinal Wiseman, who through him, at the time of the Crimean War, was enabled to obtain from the government the concession that for the future Roman Catholic army chaplains should not be regarded as part of the staff of the Protestant chaplain-general.

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  • In 1552 they were revised by other bishops and were laid before the council and the royal chaplains.

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  • He was made one of Charles's chaplains, and vainly tried to secure the legal ratification of Charles's declaration of the 25th of October 1660.

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  • Andrewes was preferred to the prebendal stall of St Pancras in St Paul's, London, in 1589, and on the 6th of September of the same year became master of his own college of Pembroke, being at the time one of the chaplains of Archbishop Whitgift.

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  • On the 4th of March 1590, as one of the chaplains of Queen Elizabeth, he preached before her a singularly outspoken sermon, and in October gave his introductory lecture at St Paul's, undertaking to comment on the first four chapters of Genesis.

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  • Of the twelve homilies contained in the first book, four (the 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th) are probably to be attributed to Cranmer, and one (the 12th) possibly to Latimer; one (the 6th) is by Bonner; another (the 5th) is by John Harpsfield, archdeacon of London, and another (the 11th) by Thomas Becon, one of Cranmer's chaplains.

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  • After the restoration he was named one of the king's chaplains in ordinary.

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  • James VI., Like Henry VIII., accepted this compromise, and the oath in this form was taken by Craig, the royal chaplains and some others.

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  • The service done by Methodist chaplains in war time, and especially in the Boer War, won the warmest recognition from the authorities.

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  • Though the appeal was without effect on the immediate policy of Henry, he could not have been displeased with its tone, for shortly afterwards he appointed Latimer one of the royal chaplains.

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  • In a lower degree there are also the chaplains of honour.

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  • In his third year he was taken up to London, inspected by the court surgeon, prayed over by the court chaplains and stroked and presented with a piece of gold by Queen Anne.

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  • It was a "double order," each convent having attached to it a small community of canons to act as chaplains, but under the government of the abbess.

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  • This novel and disturbing phenomenon was mainly due to the zeal and eloquence of the ex-monk Hans Tausen and his associates, or disciples, Peder Plad and Sadolin; and, in the autumn of 1526, Tausen was appointed one of the royal chaplains.

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  • Thus down to 1840 there were but ten colonial bishops; and of these several were so hampered by civil regulations that they were little more than government chaplains in episcopal orders.

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  • As the director of votes thus doubtful, he was in a position to secure concessions that bettered the position of Catholics in regard to poor schools, reformatories and workhouses, and in the status of their army chaplains.

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  • In 1735 he became one of the chaplains of the king.

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  • Here he gained commanding influence as a preacher and in 1898 was appointed one of the court chaplains.

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  • Soon afterwards Queen Anne appointed him one of her chaplains in ordinary, and in 170 9 presented him to the rectory of St James's, Westminster.

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  • He vigorously opposed the action of Bishop Welldon, then metropolitan of Calcutta, in excluding Scottish chaplains and troops from the use of garrison churches in India because these had received episcopal consecration.

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  • The popes, as the phrase went, became Spanish chaplains, with a fixed territory guaranteed to them by Spanish arms; apart from the addition of Ferrara and one or two other petty principalities on the extinction of the reigning house, its boundaries remained unchanged till Napoleonic times.

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  • In October 15 26 King Frederick I., during his visit to Aalborg, took Hans Tausen under his protection, appointed him one of his chaplains, and charged him to continue for a time "to preach the holy Gospel" to the citizens of Viborg, who were to be responsible for his safety, thus identifying himself with the new doctrines in direct contravention of the plain letter of his coronation oath.

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  • On the recommendation of Laud he was appointed one of the royal chaplains in 1631, and was a favourite preacher with the king, who made him regius professor of divinity at Oxford in 1642.

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  • In 1535 Laelius Capitulus produced from Virgil an attack upon the dissolute lives of the monks; in 1536 there appeared at Venice a Petrarca Spirituale; and in 1634 Alexander Ross (a Scotsman, and one of the chaplains of Charles I.) published a Virgilius Evangelizans, seu Historia Domini nostri Jesu Christi Virgilianis verbis et versibus descripta.

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  • When the abbot condescended to dine in the refectory, his chaplains waited upon him with the dishes, a servant, if necessary, assisting them.

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  • Relief soon came through his acquaintance with Selina, countess of Huntingdon, who appointed him one of her chaplains.

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  • In 1184 he was made one of the king's chaplains, and was elected to accompany Prince John on his voyage to Ireland.

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  • Many of the nobles, like Lords Montacute and Salisbury, supported the poor preachers, took them as private chaplains, and protected them against clerical interference.

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  • It was found also that many of the poorer rectors and parish priests, and a great many chaplains and curates, were in secret association with the Lollards, so much so that in many places processions were never made and worship on saints' days was abandoned.

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  • Once in London he resigned his professorship (September 1674) at Glasgow; but, although James remained his friend, Charles struck him off the roll of court chaplains in 1674, and it was in opposition to court influence that he was made chaplain to the Rolls Chapel by the master, Sir Harbottle Grimston, and appointed lecturer at St Clement's.

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  • He was now noticed by the king and made one of his chaplains.

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  • Chaplains should therefore be in close touch with the spiritual caregivers in their local situation who minister to people of these faiths.

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  • The Presbytery notes the receipt of annual reports from its prison chaplains.

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  • The chapel also had a small display to army chaplains.

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  • Three specialist routes - military, schools and healthcare chaplains, each route specifically tailored to the needs of each chaplaincy discipline.

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  • The doctor was sworn one of the king's chaplains by the Earl of Manchester, Lord Chamberlain, who truly honored him.

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  • There are also chaplains of other faiths in the community who can help if needed, visit the chaplains of other faiths in the community who can help if needed, visit the Chaplaincy website for more information.

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  • The local presbytery or Bishop currently appoints part-time Chaplains.

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  • By a decree of the Sacred Congregation of Propaganda (May 15, 1906), the archbishop of Westminster is the ecclesiastical superior of all commissioned Roman Catholic chaplains in the British army and navy, and he is empowered to negotiate with the civil authorities concerning appointments.

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  • Gaol fees were once more distinctly abolished; the appointment of chaplains was insisted upon, and the erection of improved prison buildings was rendered imperative upon local authorities.

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  • There was a convention that viceregal chaplains ended up bishops.

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  • They sell Fire Dress uniforms and Class A uniforms for the Federation of Fire Chaplains.

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  • For while at New College only twenty out of seventy fellows were to study law instead of arts, philosophy and theology, at All Souls College sixteen were to be " jurists " and only twenty-four " artists "; and while at New College there were ten chaplains and three clerks necessarily, at All Souls the number was not defined but left optional; so that there are now only one chaplain and four bible clerks.

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  • Notwithstanding intervening reverses there were by 1647 nearly thirty ordained ministers in fixed charges in Ulster besides the chaplains of the Scottish regiments.

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  • He was commended to the hospitality of Anne Boleyn's father, the earl of Wiltshire, in whose house at Durham Place he resided for some time; the king appointed him archdeacon of Taunton and one of his chaplains; and he also held a parochial benefice, the name of which is unknown.

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  • He was soon promoted to be one of Edward VI.'s chaplains and prebendary of Westminster, and in October 1552 was one of the six divines to whom the Forty-two articles were submitted for examination before being sanctioned by the Privy Council.

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