Chaplain sentence examples

chaplain
  • He became chaplain to his patron the archbishop, and chaplain in ordinary to Charles I.

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  • Soon after 1509 he was appointed a member of 'the royal council and chaplain to Henry VIII.

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  • During Kett's rebellion he was allowed to preach in the rebels' camp on Mousehold Hill, but without much effect; and later on he encouraged his chaplain, Alexander Neville, to write his history of the rising.

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  • The pope, John XXII., made him his principal chaplain, and presented him with a rochet in earnest of the first vacant bishopric in England.

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  • The king put forward his chaplain, Hugh; the pope supported the archdeacon, John the Scot, who had been canonically elected.

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  • Thomas Cornish, suffragan bishop in the diocese of Bath and Wells, and provost of Oriel College, Oxford, from 1493 to 1507, appointed him chaplain of the college of St Mary Ottery, Devonshire.

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  • Dr Cave was chaplain to Charles II., and in 1684 became a canon of Windsor.

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  • Nanfan died in 1507, but the king made Wolsey his chaplain and employed him in diplomatic work.

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  • In 1617 and 1621 the college allowed him to act as chaplain to Sir John Digby, ambassador in Spain.

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  • Ordained to the priesthood, probably towards the close of 1521, he entered the household of Sir John Walsh, Old Sodbury, Gloucestershire, as chaplain and domestic tutor.

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  • Oldham wrote other satires, notably one "addressed to a friend about to leave the university," which contains a well-known description of the state of slavery of the private chaplain, and another "dissuading from poetry," describing the ingratitude shown to Edmund Spenser, whose ghost is the speaker, to Samuel Butler and to Abraham Cowley.

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  • John Clayton, afterwards chaplain of the Collegiate Church of Manchester, who remained a strong High Churchman; James Hervey, author of Meditations among the Tombs, and Theron and Aspasio; Benjamin Ingham, who became the Yorkshire evangelist; and Thomas Broughton, afterwards secretary of the S.P.C.K., were members of the Holy Club, and George Whitefield joined it on the eve of the Wesleys' departure for Georgia.

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  • Here he became private chaplain to Richard Vaughan, 2nd earl of Carbery (1600-1686), whose hospitable mansion, Golden Grove, is immortalized in the title of Taylor's still popular manual of devotion, and whose first wife was a constant friend of Taylor.

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  • He was for some time a military chaplain.

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  • Besides holding several livings he became in 1704 chaplain to Archbishop Tenison, and shortly afterwards was made chaplain-in-ordinary to Queen Anne.

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  • He preached in Quincy, and in 1859-64 in Salem, Massachusetts, and in 1862-63 was chaplain of the 40th Massachusetts Volunteers.

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  • He acted for a short time as a private chaplain, but was appointed in 1679 to the small rectory of Ampton, near Bury St Edmunds, and in 1685 he was made lecturer of Gray's Inn.

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  • The first series contained six essays, the most notable being that "On the office of a Chaplain," which throws much light on the position of a large section of the clergy at that time.

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  • degree in 1743, and as chaplain to the 3rd regiment of foot guards he was at the battle of Fontenoy, 1745.

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  • He was already king's chaplain; his appointment at Paris had been accompanied by promotion to the see of Hereford, and before he returned to take possession he was translated to the bishopric of London (October 1539) Hitherto Bonner had been known as a somewhat coarse and unscrupulous tool of Cromwell,a sort of ecclesiastical Wriothesley.

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  • It is certain that he was a secular priest, and that he composed his history in the latter part of the 14th century; and it is probable that he was a chaplain in the cathedral of Aberdeen.

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  • The tradition that he was descended from Dr Rowland Taylor, Cranmer's chaplain, who suffered martyrdom under Mary, is grounded on the untrustworthy evidence of a certain Lady Wray, said to have been a granddaughter of Jeremy Taylor.

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  • This suspicion seems to have arisen chiefly from his intimacy with Christopher Davenport, better known as Francis a Sancta Clara, a learned Franciscan friar who became chaplain to Queen 1 An obviously erroneous entry in the Admission Book states that he had been at school under Mr. Lovering for ten years, and was in his fifteenth year.

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  • He too entered the ministry (1864) and during the Franco-German War served as army chaplain, an experience described in his Erlebnisse eines Feldgeistlichen (1890).

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  • Deane, however, died in 1503, and Wolsey became chaplain to Sir Richard Nanfan, deputy of Calais, who apparently recommended him to Henry VII.

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  • In 1537 he was appointed chaplain to Henry VIII., and in 1538 he was threatened with prosecution by the reactionary party.

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  • He waited on Archbishop Laud before his execution, and was chaplain to Charles I.

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  • Ralph of Coggeshall, who used information gained from crusaders, and William of Newburgh, who had access to a work by Richard I.'s chaplain Anselm, which is now lost.4 The French side is presented in Rigord's Gesta Philippi Augusti and in the Gesta (an abridgment and continuation of Rigord) and the Philippeis of William the Breton.

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  • CHAPLAIN, strictly one who conducts service in a chapel, i.e.

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  • chaplain to the Princess.

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  • His lectures and poems had now made him famous, and he was summoned to Munich where, in 1638, he became court chaplain to the elector Maximilian I.

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  • In 1529 he was Wolsey's chaplain, and he was with the cardinal at Cawood at the time of his arrest.

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  • He had a share in writing Smectymnuus, was appointed chaplain to the earl of Essex's regiment in 1642, and a member of the Westminster Assembly in 1643.

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  • For while at New College only twenty out of seventy fellows were to study law instead of arts, philosophy and theology, at All Souls College sixteen were to be " jurists " and only twenty-four " artists "; and while at New College there were ten chaplains and three clerks necessarily, at All Souls the number was not defined but left optional; so that there are now only one chaplain and four bible clerks.

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  • Soon afterwards he was chosen fellow and tutor of his college; in 1676 he became chaplain to the bishop of Oxford, and in 1681 he obtained the rectory of Bletchington, Oxfordshire, and was made chaplain to Charles II.

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  • About the same time he had the offer of the post of chaplain to the factory at Bencoolen, in the Straits Settlements.

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  • He had been chaplain to Murray of Broughton, and afterwards became minister of Balmaghie, about 31 m.

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  • During Charles's second state-visit to Scotland, in the autumn of 1641, Henderson acted as his chaplain, and managed to get the funds, formerly belonging to the bishopric of Edinburgh, applied to the metropolitan university.

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  • He was chaplain to Robert Rich, second earl of Warwick, and preached before the House of Commons in 1640.

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  • Geoffrey of Monmouth was at one time chaplain of the castle, where he probably wrote some of his works.

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  • In 1882 he became honorary chaplain and sub-almoner to Queen Victoria, and in the following year was appointed dean of Windsor, and domestic chaplain to the queen.

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  • "Vedderburn's" Complainte of Scotlande (1549) has been variously assigned to Robert Wedderburn, to Sir David Lyndsay and to Sir James Inglis, who was chaplain of the Abbey of Cambuskenneth from about 1508 to 1550.

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  • He took orders in 1874 and held a curacy at Dartford, in Kent, till 1877, when he became resident chaplain and private secretary to Dr Tait, archbishop of Canterbury, a position which he occupied till Dr Tait's death, and retained for a short time (1882-1883) under his successor Dr Benson.

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  • Having entered the church he became rector of Ripple, Worcestershire, and later of St Vedast, Foster Lane, London, and it was probably when he was chaplain to John de Vere, earl of Oxford, that he made the acquaintance of Elizabeth Woodville, afterwards the queen of Edward IV.

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  • Loisy next became chaplain to a Dominican convent and girls' school at Neuilly-sur-Seine (Oct.

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  • In 1666 he was appointed to the abbey church, Bath; in 1678 he became prebendary of Worcester Cathedral, and acted as chaplain in ordinary to Charles II.

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  • It was, however, no doubt at his wish that his chaplain wrote the Life of Julian the Apostate, in reply to Dr Hickes's sermons, in which the lawfulness of resistance in extreme cases was defended.

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  • He obtained the necessary dispensations from Rome for Henrietta Maria's marriage to Charles I., and acted as her chaplain during the first year of her stay in England.

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  • He was made Hulsean professor in 1861, and shortly afterwards chaplain to the Prince Consort and honorary chaplain in ordinary to the queen.

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  • He also became chaplain to the earl of Oxford.

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  • 1726) became prebendary of Salisbury in 1715, and chaplain to George I.

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  • From the care of sacred relics preserved in royal chapels, &c. (sacella or capellae), the office of capellanus naturally extended its scope until it covered practically that of the modern court chaplain, and was officially recognized by the Church.

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  • In Warriston cemetery (opened in 1843) in the New Town, were buried Sir James Young Simpson, Alexander Smith the poet, Horatio McCulloch, R.S.A., the landscape painter, the Rev. James Millar, the last Presbyterian chaplain of the castle, and the Rev. James Peddie, the pastor of Bristo Street church.

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  • When at Rochester he appointed William Laud as his chaplain and gave him several valuable preferments.

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  • In 1868 he became prebendary of Lincoln and examining chaplain to Bishop Christopher Wordsworth, an office which he also held for a short time in 1870 for Dr Temple, just appointed to the see of Exeter.

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  • In 1745, owing to his knowledge of Gaelic, he was appointed deputy chaplain of the 43rd (afterwards the 42nd) regiment (the Black Watch), the licence to preach being granted him by special dispensation, although he had not completed the required six years of theological study.

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  • Ordained in 1662, he successively held the livings of Little Easton in Essex, Brighstone (sometimes called Brixton) in the Isle of Wight, and East Woodhay in Hampshire; in 1672 he resigned the last of these, and returned to Winchester, being by this time a prebendary of the cathedral, and chaplain to the bishop, as well as a fellow of Winchester College.

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  • In some cases a parish priest is also appointed to a chaplaincy, but in so far as he is a chaplain he has no parochial duties.

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  • Before the end of that year he obtained from the pope a dispensation to hold two livings in conjunction with Limington, and Archbishop Deane of Canterbury also appointed him his domestic chaplain.

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  • He had come under the influence of the Cambridge reformers, and after Anne Boleyn's recognition as queen he was made her chaplain.

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  • He took orders; and his reputation for learning and piety attracted the notice of Margaret Beaufort, mother of Henry VII., who made him her confessor and chaplain.

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  • These chaplains are classified as follows: - Ecclesiastical, if the foundation has been recognized officially as a benefice; Lay, if this recognition has not been obtained; Mercenary, if the person who has been entrusted with the duty of performing or procuring the desired celebration is a layman (such persons also are sometimes called "Lay Chaplains"); Collative, if it is provided that a bishop shall collate or confer the right to act upon the accepted candidate, who otherwise could not be recognized as an ecclesiastical chaplain.

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  • After his return he became the first head of St Stephen's House, Oxford (1876-1878), and then, after presiding for two years over the Theological College at Salisbury, where he acted as his father's chaplain, he accepted the college living of Great Budworth in Cheshire in 1880, and the same year married Alice, the daughter of his father's predecessor, Walter Kerr Hamilton.

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  • He was ordained deacon and priest on August 12th 1667, and until 1676 was chaplain and tutor in the family of Sir Heneage Finch at Kensington House.

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  • In 1686, when chaplain to James II., he was suspended for ten months on a charge of having made some reflections on the king, and in 1688 was cited for refusing to read the declaration of indulgence.

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  • Having received an offer of an appointment as travelling tutor and chaplain to the young prince of Eutin-Holstein, he abandoned his somewhat visionary scheme of a social reconstruction of a Russian province.

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  • He took orders, and in 1682 went to Paris as chaplain to the ambassador Richard Graham, Viscount Preston (1648-1695).

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  • It is said that he advised the chaplain of Henry III.

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  • On the 10th of August 1660 he was chosen public orator of the university, and in 1661 domestic chaplain to Lord Clarendon.

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  • In 1667 he became chaplain to the duke of York.

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  • In 1676 he was appointed chaplain to Lawrence Hyde (afterwards earl of Rochester), ambassador-extraordinary to the king of Poland, and of his visit he sent an interesting account to Edward Pococke in a letter, dated Dantzic, 16th December, 1677, which was printed along with South's Posthumous Works in 1717.

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  • It is the privilege of the archbishop of York to crownthe queen consort and to be her perpetual chaplain.

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  • But "on the holiest soil of history, he gave his people a fatherland"; and Fulcher of Chartres, his chaplain, who paints at the beginning of Baldwin's reign the terrors of the lonely band of Christians in the midst of their foes, can celebrate at the end the formation of a new nation in the East (qui fuimus occidentales, nunc facti sumus orientales) - an achievement which, so far as it was the work of any one man, was the work of Baldwin I.

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  • - The Historia Hierosolymitana of Fulcher, who had accompanied Baldwin as chaplain to Edessa, and had lived in Jerusalem during his reign, is the primary authority for Baldwin's career.

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  • Thus it came about that he was brought up as a Roman Catholic, chiefly at the scat of Mr Holman at Warkworth, Northamptonshire, where the Rev. John Gother, a celebrated controversialist, officiated as chaplain.

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  • He was ordained in 1834, and after a short curacy at Bubbenhall in Warwickshire was appointed chaplain of Guy's Hospital, and became thenceforward a sensible factor in the intellectual and social life of London.

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  • In 1601 he attended Ludowick, duke of Lennox, as his chaplain, in an embassy to the court of France, returning in 1603.

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  • Hamilton), whose examining chaplain he had been, appointed him prebendary of Salisbury cathedral.

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  • Its author (generally referred to since the edition of Nevelet in 1610 as the "Anonymus Neveleti") was long unknown, but Hervieux has shown grounds for identifying him with Walther of England, chaplain to Henry II.

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  • EDMUND CALAMY, known as "the elder" (1600-1666), English Presbyterian divine, was born of Huguenot descent in Walbrook, London, in February 1600, and educated at Pembroke Hall, Cambridge, where his opposition to the Arminian party, then powerful in that society, excluded him from a fellowship. Nicholas Felton, bishop of Ely, however, made him his chaplain, and gave him the living of St Mary, Swaffham Prior, which he held till 1626.

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  • After a residence in the north as chaplain to Henry Hastings, earl of Huntingdon, President of the North, he was made vicar of St Giles's, Cripplegate, in 1588, and there delivered his striking sermons on the temptation in the wilderness and the Lord's prayer.

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  • Its officers included a constable and a chaplain.

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  • He certainly married, and is said to have been made Cranmer's chaplain, and bishop of Sodor and Man; but he was never consecrated to that see.

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  • After the accession of Edward VI., Ferrar was, probably through the influence of Bishop Barlow, appointed chaplain to Protector Somerset, a royal visitor, and bishop of St David's on Barlow's translation to Bath and Wells in 1548.

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  • His convictions on this matter were so much intensified by his later experiences as army chaplain that in 1521 he prevailed upon the authorities of the canton of Zurich to renounce the practice altogether.

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  • Three visits which he had paid to Italy in his capacity of army chaplain had done much to open his eyes to the worldly character of the papal rule, and it was not long before he began to attack at Einsiedeln the superstitions which attended the great pilgrimages made to that place.

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  • Zwingli, who as chaplain was carrying the banner, was struck to the ground, and was later despatched in cold blood.

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  • 1450), Scottish writer, author of the Buke of the Howlat, was secretary or chaplain to the earl of Moray (1450) and rector of Halkirk, near Thurso.

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  • In 1617 he became chaplain to the king, in 1619 dean of Salisbury, and in the following year dean of Westminster.

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  • In 1845 and 1846 he preached the Hulsean lecture, and in the former year was made examining chaplain to Wilberforce, now bishop of Oxford.

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  • He studied at Paris and Bologna, and, having been successively archpriest of St Peter's, papal chaplain, cardinal-deacon of Sant' Eustachio, cardinal-bishop of Ostia, the first protector of the Franciscan order, and papal legate in Germany under Innocent III., and Honorius III., he succeeded the latter in the papacy.

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  • He permitted free study of the Aristotelian writings, and issued (1234), through his chaplain, Raymond of Pennaforte, an important new compilation of decretals which he prescribed in the bull Rex pacificus should be the standard text-book in canon law at the universities of Bologna and Paris.

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  • His father, Johann Christoph Droysen, was an army chaplain, in which capacity he was present at the celebrated siege of Kolberg in 1806-7.

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  • But the elector John George III., at whose personal desire the post had been offered to him, was soon offended at the fearless conscientiousness with which his chaplain sought to discharge his pastoral duties.

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  • After holding the living of Chigwell (1597-1605) he became chaplain to Bancroft (then bishop of London), and afterwards archdeacon of Essex (1603-1609), rector of Stisted and bishop of Chichester (1609-1619) and archbishop of York (1629).

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  • Ordained about that time, he was named chaplain to Richard Cox, then bishop of Ely, and in 1575 was presented to the rectory of Teversham in Cambridgeshire.

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  • He was chaplain successively to Lord Chancellor Hatton and Archbishop Whitgift.

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  • He matriculated at Christ Church, Oxford, but migrated to Merton, where he obtained a fellowship. In 1631 he was proctor and also chaplain to Philip, earl of Pembroke, then chancellor of the university, who presented him to the rectory of Bishopston in Wiltshire.

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  • His fame spread, and in 1641 he was appointed chaplain and tutor to Prince Charles.

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  • After Cromwell's great victory at Worcester, Earle went abroad, and was named clerk of the closet and chaplain to Charles II.

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  • The old gentleman in his aristocratic imperiousness frequently reminds us of the amusing directions given by Sir John Wynne to his chaplain, quoted in Pennant's Tour in Wales.

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  • Little else is known about him save that he was chaplain to the French king, Robert II.

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  • In 1601 he took orders, in 1603 becoming chaplain to Charles Blount, earl of Devonshire.

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  • In 1607 he was made vicar of Stanford in Northamptonshire, and in 1608 he became chaplain to Bishop Neile, who in 1610 presented him to the living of Cuxton, when he resigned his fellowship. In 1611, in spite of the influence of Archbishop Abbot and Lord Chancellor Ellesmere, Laud was made president of St John's, and in 1614 obtained in addition the prebend of Buckden, in 1615 the archdeaconry of Huntingdon, and in 1616 the deanery of Gloucester.

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  • An interesting account of this mission, which remained for several years, was written by Francisco Alvarez, the chaplain.

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  • Having been admitted to holy orders, he left the university in 1641 to act as chaplain to Sir William Darley, and in the following year accepted a similar appointment from the widow of Sir Horatio Vere.

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  • He was rector of Scarning, Norf., from 1879 to 1911 and during most of that time he acted as chaplain in ordinary to King Edward VII.

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  • In 1672 he was ordained priest, and remained till 1681 as under-chaplain at Nesne, a little parish near his birthplace; for eight years more he was resident chaplain at Nesne; and at last in 1689 he received the living of Alstahoug, the most important in the north of Norway.

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  • In 1700 he asked leave to resign his living in favour of his son Anders Dass, but this was not permitted; in 1704, however, Anders became his father's chaplain.

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  • Before the death of the old king he became chaplain to Maurice, bishop of London, under whom he had formerly served in the chancery.

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  • He is usually described as the chaplain of Rufus; he seems in that capacity to have been the head of the chancery and the custodian of the great seal.

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  • Such a sanctuary was served by a priest, who was hence called capellanus, from which is derived the English "chaplain" (q.v.).

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  • There he met Nicolai and Moses Mendelssohn, with whom he formed a close friendship. In 1768 he became preacher or chaplain to the workhouse at Berlin and the neighbouring fishing village of Stralow.

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  • In 182 9 Bosworth went to Holland as chaplain, first at Amsterdam and then at Rotterdam.

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  • A short experience convinced him that this was not for him the ideal Christian life ("amisi monachum, inveni Christianum"), and in February 1522 he made his way to Ebernburg, near Creuznach, where he acted as chaplain to the little group of men holding the new opinions who had settled there under the leadership of Franz von Sickingen.

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  • Before the beginning of 1522 we find Tyndale as chaplain and tutor in the family of Sir John Walsh of Old Sodbury in Gloucestershire.

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  • educated at the cloister school of Bebenhausen, near Tubingen, where his father, an able Orientalist, was chaplain and professor, and at the theological seminary at Tübingen, which he was specially allowed to enter when he was three years under the prescribed age.

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  • In 1853 he resigned his position as examining chaplain to the bishop of Bath and Wells owing to his pronounced eucharistic views.

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  • Bishop Ridley, who in 1550 was translated to the see of London, sent for him and appointed him his chaplain.

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  • In 1553 he was also made chaplain to Edward VI., and became one of the most popular preachers in the kingdom, earning high praise from John Knox.

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  • After a stay at Strassburg as professor of the Petit Seminaire, he was appointed director of the College Stanislas in Paris in 1842 and, in 1847, chaplain of the Ecole Normale Superieure.

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  • In November he became chaplain to Lord Peterborough, whom he accompanied on the continent, returning in August 1714.

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  • In the same year he returned to Ireland as chaplain to the duke of Grafton, and was made divinity lecturer and university preacher.

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  • In 1868 Westcott was appointed examining chaplain by Bishop Connor Magee (of Peterborough); and in the following year he accepted a canonry at Peterborough, which necessitated his leaving Harrow.

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  • Shortly afterwards, having previously resigned his canonry at Peterborough, he was appointed by the crown to a canonry at Westminster, and accepted the position of examining chaplain to Archbishop Benson.

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  • He went from one Catholic family to another, administering the rites of his Church, and in 1589 became domestic chaplain to Ann Howard, whose husband, the first earl of Arundel, was in prison convicted of treason.

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  • In 1715 he was appointed chaplain to the king, and the same year he obtained the bishopric of Bangor.

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  • In 1579 he was appointed chaplain to the young James VI., and returned to Edinburgh.

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  • Whenever a bishop was celebrant he was to wear, "beside his rochette, a surplice or albe, and a cope or vestment," and also to carry " his pastoral staff in his hand, or else borne or holden by his chaplain."

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  • Returning to Evesham he was there when the abbey was surrendered to the king (27th of January 1540); and then, with a pension of fro a year, he once more went back to Oxford, but soon after became chaplain to Bishop Bell of Worcester and then served Bonner in that same capacity from 1543 to 1549.

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  • Released by Queen Mary (5th of September 1553), he returned to Bonner and became prebendary of St Paul's, rector of Finchley, then of Greenford Magna, chaplain and confessor to the queen, and dean of St Paul's (loth of March 1554).

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  • In the 13th century a master and chaplain took the place of the lay brethren, and in 1334 a chantry was founded.

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  • He was ordained and became vicar of Fawsley in 1637, but soon resigned and became chaplain successively to Lord Saye and Sele, Lord Berkeley, and Prince Charles Louis, nephew of Charles I.

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  • There is a life of Henry by his chaplain John Blakman (printed at the end of Hearne's edition of Otterbourne); but it is concerned only with his piety and patience in adversity.

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  • After serving as chaplain in two Massachusetts regiments during the first two years of the Civil War, he became editor (1863) of The Christian Times in New York, and subsequently edited The Episcopalian and The Magazine of American History.

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  • He was educated privately and at a dissenting academy in London, and became chaplain and companion to a Mr Streatfield at Stoke Newington.

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  • Dr William Harris Rule (1802-1890), who was appointed chaplain at Gibraltar in 1832, won for it fuller recognition from the authorities.

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  • They were not invested with their office until they had been examined by a papal chaplain, or sometimes even by the vice-chancellor of the Curia.

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  • He entered Queen's College, Cambridge, in 1644, and after taking orders in 1651 became successively chaplain to Sir Walter St John and vicar of Battersea, Surrey.

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  • Subsequently he was chaplain, first to the royalist Sir Robert Shirley of Eatington (1629-1656), and then at the Exeter House chapel.

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  • He was subsequently appointed chaplain of Chelsea hospital (1824), chaplain-general of the forces (1844-1875) and inspector-general of military schools (1846-1857).

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  • In addition to the nine distinct missions (300 workers) in Siberia and the six (with 50 workers) in European Russia, the Orthodox Church (Russian) has three foreign missions: (1) in China, founded at Pekin 1714, in the face of Jesuit opposition; (2) in Japan, established about 1863 by Bishop Nicolai, a chaplain at Nagasaki; (3) in Alaska and the Aleutian Islands, the bishop residing 1 See E.

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  • The Maoris of New Zealand first came under Christian influence through the efforts of Samuel Marsden, a colonial chaplain in New South Wales about 1808.

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  • The society in which the child was thenceforward reared is known to readers of Brantome as well as that of imperial Rome at its worst is known to readers of Suetonius or Petronius as well as that of papal Rome at its worst is known to readers of the diary kept by the domestic chaplain of Pope Alexander VI.

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  • Ten years later he came back to Paris, and was eventually persuaded (1676) to enter the priesthood, and become a chaplain at Port Royal.

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  • labours were broken up, and after some time in Long Island he took refuge in New York City, where he was appointed in 1778 chaplain to the king's American regiment.

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  • In 1864 he was made dean of Cork and chaplain to the lord lieutenant.

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  • At the same time he professes to follow as his "autour" an account that had been written in Latin by John Blair, the personal friend and chaplain of Wallace himself.

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  • chaplain to, and a personal friend of, Queen Victoria, and published several religious books, notably The Miracles of Jesus as Marks of the Way of Life (r900) and The Opportunity of the Church of England (1906).

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  • On Owen's advice he did not proceed to Oxford (a step which he afterwards regretted), but went to Ludlow Castle to read with Richard Wickstead, the council's chaplain there.

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  • After the battle of Naseby he took the situation of chaplain to Colonel Whalley's regiment, and continued to hold it till February 1647.

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  • He regretted that he had not previously accepted an offer of Cromwell to become chaplain to the Ironsides, being confident in his power of persuasion under the most difficult circumstances.

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  • He had been made a king's chaplain, and was offered the bishopric of Hereford, but he could not accept the offer without virtually assenting to things as they were.

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  • Having taken orders in 1560, he became in the same year chaplain to Richard Cox, bishop of Ely, who collated him to the rectory of Teversham, Cambridgeshire.

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  • In 1859 he became chaplain to Queen Victoria; in 1860 he was appointed to the professorship of modern history at Cambridge, which he resigned in 1869; and soon after he was appointed to a canonry at Chester.

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  • Mary's, Shrewsbury, in 1884; in 1885 he became private chaplain to the Bishop of Lichfield and in 1889 head of the Oxford House, Bethnal Green, where he gained much popularity owing to his devoted work among the East End poor.

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  • He studied theology and canon law, and, after acting as parish priest in his native diocese for twelve years, was sent by the pope to Canada as a bishop's chaplain.

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  • There was a church or chapel here in early times, and a chaplain is mentioned in Henry II.'s reign.

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  • From being chancellor of the diocese of London, he became chaplain and confessor to Edward III., whom he attended during his wars in France.

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  • In the autumn of 1823 he was appointed chaplain to the Prussian embassy in Rome, of which Baron Bunsen was the head.

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  • For twenty years he was chaplain to Shute Barrington, bishop of Durham.

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  • He changed the sentence on Katte to one of death and ordered the execution to take place in Frederick's presence, himself arranging its every detail; Frederick's own fate would depend upon the effect of this terrible object-lesson and the response he should make to the exhortations of the chaplain sent to reason with him.

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  • On Frederick himself lay the terror of death, and the chaplain was able to send to the king a favourable report of his orthodoxy and his changed disposition.

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  • After standing unsuccessfully for the headship of the college in 1569, he became chaplain to the earl of Leicester, and received from him the livings of Warley, in Essex, and Dennington in Suffolk.

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  • Mary was now in France, the destined bride of the Dauphin; while Knox, released from the galleys, preached his doctrines in Berwick and Newcastle, and was a chaplain of Edward VI., till the crowning of Mary Tudor drove him to France and Switzerland.

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  • He was also examining chaplain to Bishop A.

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  • His bishopric was taken from him and given to Dr Poynet, a chaplain of Cranmer's who had not long before been made bishop of Rochester.

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  • Tetzel he could not see; the man was afraid to leave his convent; but he had lengthy interviews with Luther in the house of Spalatin the chaplain and private secretary of the elector Frederick.

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  • He became a Benedictine monk at Canterbury, and then joining the Cluniacs, was prior of Lenton Abbey, near Nottingham; he was chaplain to Henry V., whom he accompanied to France in 1415, being present at Agincourt.

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  • This work, often referred to as the "chaplain's life," and thought by some to have been written by Jean de Bordin, has been published for the English Historical Society by B.

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  • He was ordained in 1847, and shortly afterwards appointed chaplain, and then professor of pastoral theology, at King's College, London.

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  • His life was written by his chaplain, Helgaud, and this panegyric, Epitoma vitae Roberti regis, is published by J.

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  • He accompanied the earl of Sussex to Ireland as his chaplain in 1560, and three years later was consecrated archbishop of Armagh by Hugh Curwen, archbishop of Dublin.

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  • He was ordained in 1757, and in 1762 was appointed domestic chaplain to the archbishop of Canterbury.

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  • About two years later he was appointed chaplain to the king and master of the hospital of St Cross, Winchester.

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  • Having taken holy orders, he became chaplain to John Moore (1646-1714), bishop of Norwich, who was ever afterwards his friend and patron.

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  • Throughout the sentence the prisoner has the advantage of religious and moral instruction; he attends divine service regularly, and whatever his creed is visited by a chaplain professing it, and receives educational assistance according to his needs.

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  • He exercises and goes to chapel daily in the society of others, but holds no communication with them; his only intercourse with his fellow-creatures is when he is visited by the governor, chaplain, schoolmaster or trade instructor.

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  • Putting aside the temporary Christian work of a Jesuit chaplain to the Japanese Christian General Konishe, in 1594 during the Japanese invasion, as well as that on a larger scale by students who received the evangel in the Roman form from Peking in 1792, and had made 4000 converts by the end of 1793, the first serious attempt at the conversion of Korea was made by the French Societe des Missions Etrangeres in 1835.

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  • These dignities he relinquished for a time in order to attend the king as chaplain during his captivity in the hands of the parliament.

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  • Adopting reformed views he was made chaplain by Cranmer in 1J40 and presented to the living of Hadleigh, Suffolk, in 1544.

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  • After the revocation of the edict of Nantes he fled to Rotterdam (November 1685), and in 1686 was appointed chaplain to the princess of Dessau, Henrietta Catherine of Orange.

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  • In 1693, on the death of the prince of Dessau, he went to Berlin and became chaplain to the court at Oranienbaum, and in 1695 pastor of the French church at Berlin.

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  • In 1665 the earl of Southampton presented him to St Andrew's, Holborn, two years later he became prebendary of St Paul's, in 1668 chaplain to Charles II., in 1670 canon residentiary, and in 1678 dean of St Paul's.

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  • He next became chaplain to John Moore (1646-1714), the learned bishop of Norwich, from whom he received the living of Lowestoft in 1698.

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  • OATES, TITUS (1649-1705), English conspirator, was the son of Samuel Oates (1610-1683), an Anabaptist preacher, chaplain to Pride, and afterwards rector of All Saints' Church, Hastings.

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  • C. D.) Another English prelate who bore the name of Langton was Thomas Langton, bishop of Winchester, chaplain to Edward IV.

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  • As chaplain in the American Revolutionary Army he also exerted a widespread influence.

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  • He was then chaplain to Canute and afterwards to his son, Harold Harefoot, and after the death of the former king appears to have acted as the chief adviser of his widow, Emma.

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  • He was educated for the medical profession, but entered the Sulpician Seminary of Paris in November 1803, was ordained priest in 1808, refused the post of chaplain to Napoleon, was professor of theology in the Diocesan Seminary at Rennes in 1808-1810, and in August 1810 settled in Baltimore, Maryland, whither his long general interest in missions, and particularly his acquaintance with Bishop Flaget of Kentucky, had drawn him.

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  • In 1847 he received an appointment to the Trinity Church in Berlin, and in 1853 he became court chaplain at Potsdam.

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  • He was a member of the Old Testament Revision Committee (1876-1884) and examining chaplain to the bishop of Southwell (1884-1904); received the honorary degrees of doctor of literature of Dublin (1892),(1892), doctor of divinity of Glasgow (1901), doctor of literature of Cambridge (1905); and was elected a fellow of the British Academy in 1902.

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  • 1327), archbishop of Canterbury, was the son of a Windsor baker, and became a clerk, or chaplain, in the service of Edward I.

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  • After serving as a soldier he studied at Poitiers, and then returning to Normandy became chaplain to Duke William (William the Conqueror) and archdeacon of Lisieux.

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  • In 1551 he seems to have been made a royal chaplain; in 1552 he was certainly offered an English bishopric, which he declined; and during most of this year he used his influence, as preacher at court and in London, to make the new English settlement more Protestant.

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  • Shortly after becoming chaplain to the bishop of London in 1762 he was appointed to a prebendal stall of St Paul's and to the vicarage of Kensington, and in 1764 he was made archdeacon of London.

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  • In 1733 he was made chaplain to Lord Chancellor Talbot, elder brother of his dead friend Edward, and in 1736 prebendary of Rochester.

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  • He married a daughter of Dr Burgess, who was Vere's chaplain, and, on his father-in-law's return to England, succeeded to his place.

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  • They elect after dinner two persons of the company so assembled - Roger Osekyn and Lawrence de Haliwell - as their first governors or wardens, appointing, at the same time, in conformity with the pious custom of the age, a priest or chaplain to celebrate divine offices for their souls" (Heath's "Account of the Grocers' Company," quoted in Herbert's Twelve Great Livery Companies, 1836, i.

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  • He was chaplain to the English garrison at Guernsey in April - December 16J9 and again in 1661; and in the latter year, refusing valuable livings in England offered on condition of conformity, he returned to America.

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  • He was imprisoned for a time, but eventually regained his liberty and spent the remainder of his life as chaplain in the Reformed church at Middleburgh.

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  • But apart from the fact that this Wykeham is described in the grant as "chaplain," the probate of his will on the 8th of March1376-1377(Norwich Reg.

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  • He in fact never obtained possession of it, probably because the pope had already "provided" it to Robert of Stretton, a papal chaplain, who, however, asked in January 1362 for a canonry at Lincoln instead, because he was "in fear and terror of a certain William of Wykeham."

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  • Mr Fraser, the commissioner, Mr Hutchinson, the collector, Captain Douglas, the commandant of the palace guards, and the Rev. Mr Jennings, the residency chaplain, were at once murdered, as were also most of the civil and non-official residents whose houses were situated within the city walls.

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  • He became a monk at Glastonbury, then dean of the monastery of Christ Church, Canterbury, and chaplain to King Canute, and on the 13th of November 1020 was consecrated archbishop of Canterbury.

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  • He became prebendary of Gloucester in 1753, chaplain to the king in 1754, prebendary of Durham in 1755, dean of Bristol in 1757, and in 1 759 bishop of Gloucester.

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  • He became chaplain to Margaret, countess of Richmond and Derby, and was employed by her to forward the schemes for securing the English throne for her son, Henry of Richmond, afterwards Henry VII.

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  • In the early days most of them worshipped at the Female Orphan Asylum, St George's, whose chaplain, Rev. Jacob Duche, like Clowes at Manchester, preached the doctrines from his own pulpit.

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  • He at once became the principal champion of Swiss Protestantism against the Lutherans as well as the Catholics, and was appointed chaplain to Protector Somerset.

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  • Hooper became Warwick's chaplain, and after a course of Lent lectures before the king he was offered the bishopric of Gloucester.

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  • In 1841 he was chosen Bampton lecturer, and shortly afterwards made chaplain to Prince Albert, an appointment he owed to the impression produced by a speech at an anti-slavery meeting some months previously.

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  • 1841) was appointed canon residentiary of Westminster in 1894, chaplain of the House of Commons in 1896 and archdeacon of Westminster in 190o; he has published several volumes of sermons.

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  • In 1882 he was senior proctor of the university, and the same year was made a canon of Truro and examining chaplain to its bishop. He was appointed a canon of St.

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  • Henry VIII.'s chaplain, John Leland, is the father of English antiquaries.

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  • A chaplain must also be appointed to officiate at burials in the consecrated portion.

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  • When his name became famous he was made domestic chaplain to the duke and duchess of Northumberland, and was tempted into the belief that he belonged to the illustrious house of Percy.

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  • He was, perhaps, a curate first at Paddington, and presently was appointed royal chaplain.

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  • His health suffered from the austerity of his life, and it was probably in connexion with this fact that he allowed himself to be persuaded in May 1619 to accompany Lord Doncaster as his chaplain on an embassy to Germany.

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  • Swift was to be his chaplain and secretary, but upon reaching Ireland Berkeley gave the secretaryship to a Mr Bushe, who had persuaded him that it was an unfit post for a clergyman.

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  • He studied theology at Berlin and in 1834 became chaplain to the Prussian embassy in Rome.

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  • On the other hand, those Antinomians for whom his Calvinism is not strong enough, may study the Pilgrimage of Hephzibah, in which 1 He had resumed his pastorate in Bedford after his imprisonment of 1675, and, although he frequently preached in London to crowded congregations, and is said in the last year of his life to have been, of course unofficially, chaplain to Sir John Shorter, lord mayor of London, he remained faithful to his own congregation.

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  • Queen's College, Oxford, was not, as is stated in Skelton's version of her epitaph, founded by her, but by her chaplain, Robert of Eglesfield.

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  • In 1840 Bishop Blomfield of London appointed him his examining chaplain and presented him to the rectory of Launton, Oxfordshire, which he resigned in 1850 on becoming a Roman Catholic. Allies was appointed secretary to the Catholic poor school committee in 1853, a position which he occupied till 1890.

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  • Here David Lindsay (1531-1613), its minister, James VI.'s chaplain and afterwards bishop of Ross, preached before the king the thanksgiving sermon on the Gowrie conspiracy (1600).

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  • In process of time the title abbot was improperly transferred to clerics who had no connexion with the monastic system, as to the principal of a body of parochial clergy; and under the Carolingians to the chief chaplain of the king, Abbas Curiae, or military chaplain of the emperor, Abbas Castrensis.

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  • In 1640 he was chaplain to the Scottish army and then settled as minister at Aberdeen.

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  • Arabella entered with ardour into the project, and planned an escape from Hardwick with the aid of her chaplain Starkey, who after its failure committed suicide.

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  • The warden and chaplain are clergy, and the visitor is commonly a bishop. In one important regard there has been hesitation, and authorities like Dr Littledale and Bishop Grafton contend strongly for the primitive ideal of the convent as family, with a constitutional government, as against the later and widespread Jesuit ideal of the convent as regiment, with a theory of despotic rule and absolute obedience.

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  • On taking orders he was appointed secretary to Bishop Overall of Lichfield, and then domestic chaplain to Bishop Neile of Durham.

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  • He thereupon withdrew to France, preached at Paris, and served as chaplain to some members of the household of the exiled royal family.

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  • He was ordained in 1795, and after holding a chaplaincy in India at Barrackpur (1797-1799) was appointed Calcutta chaplain and vice-principal of the college of Fort William.

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  • He was ordained in 1622 and was appointed chaplain to Thomas Lord Coventry (1578-1640).

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  • Burnet found it wiser to retire to England on the plea of fulfilling his duties as royal chaplain.

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  • Once in London he resigned his professorship (September 1674) at Glasgow; but, although James remained his friend, Charles struck him off the roll of court chaplains in 1674, and it was in opposition to court influence that he was made chaplain to the Rolls Chapel by the master, Sir Harbottle Grimston, and appointed lecturer at St Clement's.

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  • FRIEDRICH DANIEL ERNST SCHLEIERMACHER (1768-1834), theologian and philosopher, was the son of a Prussian army chaplain of the Reformed confession, and was born on the 21st of November 1768 at Breslau.

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  • In 1796 he became chaplain to the Charite Hospital in Berlin.

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  • He was elected fellow of Corpus Christi College in 1620; in 1633 he became chaplain to Archbishop Laud and in 1634 master of Jesus College, Cambridge, and rector of Yelverton, Somerset.

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  • He was also chaplain to the young king and took an active part in the reforming measures of his reign.

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  • The standard account of his voyage round the world is that by his chaplain Richard Walter, 1748, often reprinted.

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  • In 1753 he was elected moderator of the General Assembly; in 1771 he was appointed a dean of the Chapel Royal and chaplain to George III.

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  • There he attracted the notice of Sir Rowland Cotton, an amateur Hebraist of some distinction, who made him his domestic chaplain at Bellaport.

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  • 15th) 1731, his father the Rev. John Cowper being rector of the parish as well as a chaplain to George II.

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  • Here he completed his translation of Homer, materially assisted by Mr Throckmorton's chaplain Dr Gregson.

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  • He found a retreat as chaplain in the house of the Hon.

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  • In 1663 he was made chaplain to the king and regius professor of divinity.

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  • But the only well-authenticated observations we have of this kind show anomalies which have never been cleared up. This is especially the case with those of Chaplain George Jones, who spent eight months at Quito, Peru, at an elevation of more than woo ft., for the express purpose of observing the phenomenon in question.

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  • The most elaborate attempt in the required direction was made by the American chaplain, George Jones, during a voyage of the "Mississippi" in the Pacific Ocean, in 1852-54.

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  • Chaplain Jones concluded, from his observations at Quito, that the central line of the arch made an angle of 3° 20' with the ecliptic, the ascending node being in Taurus, near longitude 62°.

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  • The third, John, became chaplain at Gibraltar, where he accumulated much material for a work on the natural history of the rock and its neighbourhood, and carried on a scientific correspondence, not only with his eldest brother, but with Linnaeus.

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  • Besides the preferments above mentioned, he was rector of the gild of Jesus at St Paul's and chaplain to Henry VIII.

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  • In 1863 he was appointed chaplain to the Speaker of the House of Commons, declined the professorship of modern history at Cambridge in 1869, but in the same year accepted from Mr Gladstone the deanery of Ely, and until his death on the 27th of December 1893 devoted himself to the best interests of the cathedral.

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  • ARTHUR YOUNG (1741-1820), English writer on agriculture and social economy, second son of the Rev. Arthur Young, rector of Bradfield, in Suffolk, chaplain to Speaker Onslow, was born on the 11th of September 1741.

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  • But criticism is still busy attempting to trace these also to historical originals, and Theodor Abeling (Das Nibelungenlied, 1907) makes out a very plausible case for identifying Siegfried with Segeric, son of the Burgundian king Sigimund, Brunhild with the historical Brunichildis, and Hagen with a certain Hagnericus, who, according to the Life of St Columban, guided the saint (the chaplain of the Nibelungenlied), who had incurred the enmity of Brunichildis, safe to the court of her grandson Theuderich, king of the West Franks.

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  • The Penitentiary is governed by a board of three prison commissioners, a superintendent, a warden, an assistant or deputy warden, a matron, a physician, and a chaplain, all appointed `by the governor, the commissioners for a term of four years, the other officers for a term of two years.

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  • From the first he championed the cause of the Allies in the World War, and after America's entrance into the war he served as a naval chaplain.

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  • Following prayers led by the Chaplain, the assembly adjourned.

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  • army chaplain and asked if it was right for me to fight in this war.

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  • The settlement's chaplain reported " instances, many instances, of horrible barbarity " against the slaves.

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  • The volunteers include a baroness, an Oxford Chaplain, and a Serbian Olympic athlete.

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  • Whatever students ' religious beliefs, the Chaplain is always happy to talk to them.

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  • Many schools employ a chaplain, usually a priest, who also teaches part-time.

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  • In 1847 he became chaplain in ordinary to Queen Victoria.

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  • In the early 15th century the chapel was served by a chaplain from Bampton once a week.

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  • The same statutes will also serve as rules for the rights of passage of deacons or conventual chaplain, whatever their age on reception.

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  • The Rev Janet Foggie has been appointed as the first whole-time mental health care chaplain in Tayside.

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  • Janet has been working as a part-time chaplain in the Royal Victoria Hospital, Dundee.

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  • Rev Dr. Nicholas Heap, catholic chaplain to the college, accompanied the pupils to the ceremony.

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  • We have just appointed a full-time ecumenical chaplain to oversee the work - on all five sites!

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  • He is joining up as a naval chaplain, and has no-one to take care of her.

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  • He shares his insights, as a hospice chaplain into the fundamental needs of human connection and how he connects with dying people.

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  • You should contact the hospital chaplain at Frimley Park Hospital.

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  • The nature of them must he communicated to the warden through somebody, and through whom so naturally as the bishop's chaplain?

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  • conventual chaplain, whatever their age on reception.

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  • dissonance caused by a chaplain traveling from a distant campus.

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  • graveside ceremony with just the Chaplain and the four of us.

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  • hospice chaplain into the fundamental needs of human connection and how he connects with dying people.

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  • We were there to enable the chaplain to go on Sabbatical leave.

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  • matron of the workhouse, & the Rev William B Bransby is the chaplain.

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  • presbytery thanks Rev. James Gibson for his service as Chaplain at Kirklands Hospital.

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  • religious beliefs, the Chaplain is always happy to talk to them.

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  • To call a chaplain, please ask a member of staff to ring the switchboard who will contact the on-call chaplain.

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  • The new priest has been a naval chaplain and is not unaccustomed to entering Afghanistan and Iraq by helicopter.

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  • He was, therefore, well able to promote the preferment of his brother George, who went to Ireland as chaplain to the duke of Dorset when that nobleman became lord-lieutenant in 1731.

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  • Bertrand was made a chaplain to Boniface VIII., who in 1295 nominated him bishop of Cominges (Haute Garonne), and in 1299 translated him to the archbishopric of Bordeaux.

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  • HEINRICH LEO (1799-1878), German historian, was born at Rudolstadt on the 19th of March 1799, his father being chaplain to the garrison there.

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  • Tunstall disappointed him, so he got employment as a preacher at St Dunstan's-inthe-West, and worked at his translation, living as chaplain in the house of Humphrey Monmouth, an alderman, and forming a firm friendship with John Frith; but finding publication impossible in England, he sailed for Hamburg in May 1524.

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  • The refusal of Raymund meant the choice of Godfrey of Bouillon, who had, as we have seen, become prominent since the siege of Arca; and Godfrey accordingly became - not king, but "advocate of the Holy Sepulchre," while a few days afterwards Arnulf, the chaplain of Robert of Normandy, and one of the sceptics in the matter of the Holy Lance, became "vicar" of the vacant patriarchate.

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  • In August of this same year he accompanied Lord Dartmouth to Tangier as chaplain to the fleet, and Pepys, who was one of the company, has left on record some quaint and kindly reminiscences of him and of his services on board.

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  • His bones now lie in the great church at Innsbruck, side by side with those of his two chief supporters, the Capuchin friar and army chaplain, Joachim Haspinger (d.

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  • educated at the cloister school of Bebenhausen, near Tubingen, where his father, an able Orientalist, was chaplain and professor, and at the theological seminary at Tübingen, which he was specially allowed to enter when he was three years under the prescribed age.

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  • From the chaplain and his mistress and her damsels he learnt the rudiments of religion, of rectitude and of love, 3 from his master and his squires the elements of military exercise, to cast a spear or dart, to sustain a shield, and to march with the measured tread of a soldier; and from his master and his huntsmen and falconers the " mysteries of the woods and rivers," or in other words the rules and practices of hunting and hawking.

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  • On the 6th of July 1653 he took the degree of B.D., and became a tutor and chaplain of Corpus Christi, preferring this to a fellowship. In 1654 he had offers of high preferment in the state, which he declined; but in 1655 George Newton, of the great church of St Mary Magdalene, Taunton, sought him for assistant and Alleine accepted the invitation.

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  • Amongst them were Jakob Boehme (Behmen), the theosophic mystic; Johann Arndt, whose work on True Christianity became widely known and appreciated; Heinrich Muller, who described the font, the pulpit, the confessional and the altar as the four dumb idols of the Lutheran Church; the theologian, Johann Valentin Andrea, the court chaplain of the landgrave of Hesse; Schuppius, who sought to restore to the Bible its place in the pulpit; and Theophilus Grossgebauer (d.

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  • He afterwards served on board the "Washington" (74) carrying the broad pennant of Commodore Chauncey in the Mediterranean, and pursued his professional and other studies under the instruction of the chaplain, Charles Folsom, with whom he contracted a lifelong friendship. Folsom was appointed from the "Washington" as U.S. consul at Tunis, and obtained leave for his pupil to pay him a lengthened visit, during which he studied not only mathematics, but also French and Italian, and acquired a familiar knowledge of Arabic and Turkish.

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  • Chaplain Jones concluded, from his observations at Quito, that the central line of the arch made an angle of 3° 20' with the ecliptic, the ascending node being in Taurus, near longitude 62°.

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  • The chaplain suffered, and was torn with pity for that sullen man whose life was almost at an end.

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  • As a chaplain, I was asked to testify as a character witness for a forty year old man on remand.

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  • In like manner Sir Thomas Roe's mission to India resulted not only in a large collection of valuable reports and letters of his own, but also in the detailed account of his chaplain Terry.

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