Chap sentence example

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  • Butler on the soul may be studied in chap. i.

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  • The new section which begins at chap. xlix.

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  • The portions which may represent discourses of Jotham's reign are chap. ii.

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  • A special reference seems needed at this point to the oracle on Egypt, chap. xix.

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  • Is it possible, one cannot help asking, that the abrupt description of the strange fortunes of the "Servant" - by this time entirely personalized - was written to follow chap. lii.

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  • It is the ode on the fall of the king of Babylon in chap. xiv.

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  • One of his great aims was to secure for the Nestorian clergy freedom to marry, and this was finally sanctioned by a council at Seleucia in 486 (Labourt, op. cit., chap. vi.).

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  • In 1699 he began to publish his largest work, described by Tolstoy (The Kingdom of God is within You, chap. iii.) as "remarkable, although little known," Unparteiische Kirchenand Ketzerhistorie, in which he has been thought by some to show more impartiality towards heresy than towards the Church (cp. Otto Pfleiderer, Development of Theology, p. 277).

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  • They are divided by precise chronological headings into three sections - (a) chap. i.

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  • See Miss Harrison, Prolegomena to the Study of Greek Religion, chap. xii.

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  • As an illustration of his theory Gunkel seeks at great length to establish the Babylonian origin of chap. xii.

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  • In the same work, chap. x., he speaks of " the Sacrament of the Passion foreshadowed in prophecies."

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  • In his work On the Soul, chap. xviii., the aeons and genealogies of the Gnostics are " the sacraments of heretical ideas."

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  • In the work About the Crown, chap. iii., he describes how the faithful " take the sacrament of the Eucharist also in their meetings held before dawn."

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  • With few and early exceptions, such as we may note in the Epistle of Barnabas, chap. i., they confine the word to doctrine.

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  • Investigation, then, of that part of the bookof Acts which follows the death of Agrippa, recorded in chap. xii.

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  • These leading narratives are supplemented by Adam of Bremen, Gesta Hammaburgensis ecclesiae pontificum, chap. 38 (247 Lappenberg) of book iv.

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  • A distinction (chap. 2) is drawn between things which are predicates of a subject (Kae' U?oKEi b tevov) and things which inhere in a subject (iv U7roKEL ivC J); and, while universals are called predicates of a subject, things in a subordinate category, i.e.

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  • It is true that the work gives only a negative definition of the inherent, namely, that it does not inhere as a part and cannot exist apart from that in which it inheres (1 a 24-25), and it admits that what is inherent may sometimes also be a predicate (chap. 5, 2 a 27-34).

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  • For though both works rest on the reality of individual substances, the Categories (chap. 5) admits that universal species and genera can be called substances, whereas the Metaphysics (Z 13) denies that a universal can be a substance at all.

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  • Afterwards (chap. so) proceeding to the opposition of propositions, he adds the form called tertii adjacentis, in a passage which is the first appearance, or rather adumbration, of the verb of being as a copula.

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  • The words introducing this form (6Tav bE TO '&TL Tptrov irpoo-KaTnyopijTac, chap. so, s 9 b s 9), which are the origin of the phrase tertii adjacentis, disengage the verb of being (g un) partially but not entirely, because they still treat it as an extra part of the predicate, and not as a distinct copula.

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  • It divides (chap. 8) evidences (7r1aTEts) into two kinds (I) evidence from arguments, actions and men (ai j s v E air&v Tcev Xhywv cal Twv 7rpit aw cal TWV avOpcoirwv); (2) adventitious evidences (ai S' iIriOETOtTOLs X yo,u vots cal Tois rpm-To/lb/0a).

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  • The former treatise (chap. 9), under the head of examples (7rapabeiyµara), gives historical examples of the unexpected in war for the years 4 0 3, 371, 35 8, concluding with the year 340, in which the Corinthians, coming with nine triremes to the assistance of the Syracusans, defeated the Carthaginians who were blockading Syracuse with 150 ships.

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  • Each of them, the probability (chap. 8), the example (chap. 9), the proof (chap. to), the consideration (chap. 11), the maxim (chap. 12), the sign (chap. 13), the refutation (chap. 14), though very like what it is in the Rhetoric, receives in the Rhetoric to Alexander a definition slightly different from the definition in the Rhetoric, which it must be remembered is also the definition in the Prior Analytics.

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  • The disappointment thus inflicted on Russia was a determining cause of the outbreak of the Crimean War (see Kinglake, Invasion of the Crimea, chap. iii.).

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  • With the growing weakness and corruption of the Hasmonaean princes, and the alienation of a large part of the nation from their cause, the hope of a better kingship begins to appear in Judaea also; at first darkly shadowed forth in the Book of Enoch (chap. xc.), where the white steer, the future leader of God's herd after the deliverance from the heathen, stands in a certain contrast to the actual dynasty (the horned lambs); and then much more clearly, and for the first time with use of the name Messiah, in the Psalter of Solomon, the chief document of the protest of Pharisaism against its enemies the later Hasmonaeans.

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  • The Libel of English Policie, a poem of the first half of the 15th century, says with reference to Iceland (chap. x.) "Out of Bristowe, and costes many one, Men haue practised by nedle and by stone Thider wardes within a litle while."

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  • Simeon Luce (chap. vi.) has shown how much the English successes in this war were due to strict business methods.

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  • It will be remembered that when the laird of Dumbiedikes lay dying (Scott's Heart of Midlothian, chap. viii.) he gave his son one bit of advice which Bacon himself could not have bettered.

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  • Max Muller (Asien und Europa, 1893, chap. v.), this represents an endeavour to express the vocalization; but, if so, it was carried out with very little system.

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  • In the book of Exodus the words written on the tables of stone are nowhere expressly identified with the ten commandments of chap. xx.

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  • That the Germans were familiar with some sort of marks on wood at a much earlier period is shown by Tacitus's Germania, chap. x.

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  • For a long series of suggested bases of classification see Raoul de la Grasserie, Des Religions Comparees au Point de Vue Sociologique (1899), chap. xii.; cf.

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  • This group of laws clearly formed no part of the original narrative of P since it interrupts the connexion of chap. viii.

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  • The consecration of Aaron and his sons was, according to P, a necessary preliminary to the offering of sacrifice, and chap. ix.

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  • Verses 12-15 relate to the portions of the mealand peace-offerings which fell to the lot of the priests, and connect, therefore, with chap. ix.; possibly they have been wrongly transferred from that chapter.

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  • This is made evident not only by the present position of chap. xii.

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  • It has been already pointed out that this chapter would follow more suitably after chap. xv., with which it is closely allied in regard to subjectmatter.

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  • A similar character must be assigned to the remaining verses of chap. xiv., with the exception of the colophon in v.

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  • The first section, doubtless, belongs to the main narrative of P; it connects directly with chap. x.

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  • Like chap. xviii., the main body of laws is provided with a paraenetic setting, vv.

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  • This view, however, is not borne out by a comparison of the two chapters, for four of the cases mentioned in chap. xviii.

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  • Verses 25, 26 apparently formed the conclusion of a law on clean and unclean animals similar to that of chap. xi., and very probably mark the place where H's regulations on that subject originally stood.

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  • Most critics detect a stronger influence of P in chap. xxii., more especially in vv.

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  • With regard to the literary relation of this chapter with Ezekiel, it must be admitted that Ezekiel presents many striking parallels, and in particular makes use, in common with chap. xxvi., of several expressions which do not occur elsewhere in the Old Testament.

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  • What does, however, seem probable is that the first book of Pantagruel (the second of the whole work) was composed with a definite view to this chap book and not to the existing first book of Gargantua, which was written afterwards, when Rabelais discovered the popularity of his work and felt that it ought to have some worthier starting-point than the Grandes chroniques.

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  • Between chap. 37 and chap. 43 is inserted the so-called Seven-Chapter Yasna (haptanghaiti), a number of small prose pieces not far behind the Gathas in antiquity.

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  • The Vendidad, the priestly code of the Parsees, contains in 22 chapters (fargard) a kind of dualistic account of the creation (chap. 1), the legend of Yima and the golden age (chap. 2), and in the bulk of the remaining chapters the precepts of religion with regard to the cultivation of the earth, the care of useful animals, the protection of the sacred elements, such as earth, fire and water, the keeping of a man's body from defilement, together with the requisite measures of precaution, elaborate ceremonies of purification, atonements, ecclesiastical expiations, and so forth.

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  • If the boy does not dream of the person whom the priest has determined on as the criminal, he is kept under drugs until he does what is required of him" (Count Gleichen, With the Mission to Menelik, chap. xvi., 1898).

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  • This addition was placed by Theodotion before chap. i., and Bel and the Dragon at its close, whereas by the Septuagint and the Vulgate it was reckoned as chap. xiii.

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  • The first, which gives the dream of Mordecai and the events which led to his advancement at the court of Artaxerxes, precedes chap. i.

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  • The legislative and statistical and especially the ritualistic parts belonging to P are so detailed and uninteresting that they make no impression on a reader's memory, and P's diffuseness, always undue, reaches a climax in chap. vii.

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  • But this is but probability and not knowledge " (chap. 11, § 9).

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  • For a collection of legends about the roc, see Lane's Arabian Nights, chap. xx.

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  • His fate early became the centre of popular tradition, which found its way into the narrative of Jordanes or Jornandes (De rebus geticis, chap. 24), who compared him to Alexander the Great and certainly exaggerated the extent of his kingdom.

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  • See Grote (History of Greece, chap. 88, appendix), who prefers the arrangement ii.

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  • The title "Deuteronomy" is due to a mistranslation by the Septuagint of the clause in chap. xvii.

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  • The king must have listened to the curses as well as the blessings in chap. xxviii., and no doubt also to the exhortations in chaps.

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  • The account of the creation, too, is different; for example, in chap. i.

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  • After the battle of Blenheim the manor of Woodstock was by Act 3 and 4 of Queen Anne, chap. 4, bestowed in perpetuity on John, duke of Marlborough.

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  • But the incident was evidently unknown to the author of chap. xv., and in this subordination of the history of Saul to that of David, in the reshaping of writings by specifically Judaean hands, we have a preliminary clue to the literary growth of the book.

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  • He was an amiable chap, who wouldn't give any profit forecasts.

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  • He was a knowledgeable chap.

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  • Fair play also to the chap donning the sumo suit, much amusement provided all-round.

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  • The first chap we got out, we applied artificial respiration for two hours.

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  • Did the chap forget to haul his lazy backside out of bed this morning, or what?

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  • For instance, a chap called Dave spent the entire evening lying in a bath of pink blancmange!

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  • The chap who kicked me out is a funny old blighter.

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  • These days, a chap is more likely to tune in to a party in the park or a rowdy street carnival.

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  • I can remember a chap, I think they used to call Monty.

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  • From inside his head, he seems a pleasant enough chap.

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  • She asks the chap from the Halifax for advice.

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  • He is a most likeable chap, yet displays cutting and sometimes acidic wit.

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  • He is a handsome chap, waiting for his luck to change.

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  • Halfway through some cheeky chap mentioned how he wanted to strip off!

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  • You must keep me informed, my dear chap.

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  • Well what can I say about this poor wee chap.

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  • Not a pleasant chap, but a shrewd politician who stabilized the Crown, and was able to mend fences.

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  • She'd draw a chap with a Mohican hairdo dancing on the left hand side, now where was that picture of Daniel Day-Lewis?

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  • However, I am feeling particularly magnanimous this morning, so I shall not harangue the Minister; he is a jolly fine chap.

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  • Your first encounter is with a seemingly harmless little chap who shows you the way to the village.

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  • Despite all that bullying streak within my recent development, the thoroughly decent good sort of chap was still there, firmly ingrained.

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  • And therefore the apostle showeth the wretched estate of the Galatians, chap. IV.

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  • Wi the verra first chap, the yungest lassie, the dure bar in hir haund, flang the dure wyde ti the waw.

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  • There's a chap in a kilt, but he's also wearing light brown loafers and Marks and Spencer socks.

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  • It was a Brit, Malcolm Sayer, a rather portly chap who smoked roll up cigarettes.

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  • A chap called Harry " wanted to round off his evening with a good old-fashioned punch-up " .

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  • By now the rear wheel had been loosened, after telling the poor chap he was trying to tighten it not slacken it.

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  • Pleasant chap who, as we arrived, was greeted by a number of men in blue fishing smocks.

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  • Just the two songs from a chap with hair so spiky he could walk into the Hibs midfield in an instant.

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  • Reverend Neville Greystone was a young chap with a slight nervous stammer.

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  • How Germanus the Bishop, sailing into Britain with Lupus, first quelled the tempest of the CHAP.

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  • For instance, the well-known description (in chap. xlvii.) of the preposition " in " occurring in a theological dogma as a " momentous particle which the memory rather than the understanding must retain " is taken directly from the first Provincial Letter.

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  • What is said of this affair interrupts the original context of chap. xviii., to which the insertion has been clumsily fitted by an interpolation in the second half of ver.

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  • It is, however, the vengeance taken by Sargon upon Ashdod (711) which seems to be preserved in chap. xx., and the striking little prophecy in xxi.

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  • The above method was adopted by Bousset in his work Der Antichrist in der Uberlieferung des Judenthums, des Neuen Testaments, and der alter Kirche (1895), in which he sought to show that a fixed tradition of the Antichrist originating in Judaism can be traced from New Testament times down to the middle ages, and that this tradition was in the main unaffected by the Apocalypse, though in chap. xi.

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  • In the work Against Valentinians, chap. xxxix., he speaks of the " great sacrament of the name," here rendering the Greek word µvo riipcov, mystery.

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  • In the tract On Monogamy, chap. xi., he speaks of " the sacrament of monogamy."

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  • The book closes (chap. xvi.) with exhortations to steadfastness in the last days, and to the coming of the "world-deceiver" or Antichrist, which will precede the coming of the Lord.

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  • A chap called Harry " wanted to round off his evening with a good old-fashioned punch-up ".

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  • A funny little kitten would make a lovely Charlie Chaplin, a name that would get shortened as it got older to "Charlie" or "Chap".

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  • Nasal congestion may also force you to breathe through your mouth, which dries out the lips and causes them to chap.

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  • It has been sometimes misspelt "Tapacolo," as by C. Darwin, who gave (Journal of Researches, chap. xii.) a brief but entertaining account of the habits of this bird and its relative, Hylactes megapodius, called by the Chilenos "El Turco."

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  • Wallace's Gifford Lecture, 6 chap. i., may also be consulted; but Wallace does not distinguish the unusual sense which the term bears as applied to Raymond's book.

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  • Spencer's " instability of the homogeneous " is perhaps an attempt to perform the impossible (First Principles, chap. xix.).

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  • Among many lectureships, the Gifford Lectures are supposed to be strictly appropriated to Natural Theology; yet subjects and 2 Dr MacTaggart's beliefs once more present themselves as an unexpected modern type (Studies in Hegelian Cosmology, chap. iii.).

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  • In England the Constitutions of Clarendon (by chap. viii.) prohibited appeals to the pope; but after the murder of St Thomas of Canterbury Henry II.

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  • Yahweh's servant David, whereas in the ideal scheme detailed in chap. xl.

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  • But it cannot be said that we possess in later literature any fresh contribution to the conception of God or any presentation of a higher ideal of human life or national destiny than that which meets us in chap. xl.

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  • A clear conception of his life at this time, and of the respect which he inspired by the discipline in which he held his men, and of the generosity which tempered his fiery nature, is given in chap. xxv.

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  • Such, at least, was the thought of later writers, who have given effect to the belief in chap. viii.

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  • Public opinion of the hour in each section of the community was the only force in the land" (History of South Africa 1834 - 1854, chap. xliv.).

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  • Exegesis, the only safe basis of criticism for the prophetic literature, is unfavourable to the view that even chap. i.

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  • Chap. vi., which describes a vision of Isaiah "in the death-year of King Uzziah" (740 or 734 B.C.?) may possibly have arisen out of notes put down in the reign of Jotham; but for several reasons it is not an acceptable view that, in its present form, this striking chapter is earlier than the reign of Ahaz.

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  • I-II ought undoubtedly to be read in immediate connexion with chap. vii.; it presupposes the alliance of Syria and northern Israel, whose destruction it predicts, though opening a door of hope for a remnant of Israel.

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  • The fatal siege of Samaria (724-722 B.C.) seems to have given occasion to chap. xxviii.; but the following On the question of the Isaianic origin of the prophecy, ix.

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  • Glover, The Conflict of Religions tin the Early Roman Empire, chap. x.

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  • Homer, nice chap, could expect no less.

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  • One little chap, about seven, was persuaded to learn the letters, and he spelled his name for Helen.

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  • Fleming, The Principles of Electric Wave Telegraphy (London, 1906), chap. vii.; also Cantor Lectures on Hertzian wave telegraphy, Lecture iv., Journ.

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