How to use Central-europe in a sentence

central-europe
  • Matthias consolidated his position by alliances with the dukes of Saxony and Bavaria, with the Swiss Confederation, and the archbishop of Salzburg, and was henceforth the greatest potentate in central Europe.

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  • That the arctic flora was driven south into Central Europe cannot be contested in the face of the evidence collected by Nathorst from deposits connected with the boulderclay.

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  • On the other hand, there are Arctic species like the ground-beetle, Pelophila borealis, and south-western species like the boring weevil, Mesites Tardyi, common in Ireland, and represented in northern or western Britain, but unknown in eastern Britain or in Central Europe.

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  • When the two became united under one ruler towards the end of the 14th century they formed a broad strip of territory stretching from the Baltic to the Black Sea and separating Russia from central Europe.

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  • This ordinance may be regarded as the beginning of the Synodal government of Judaism, which was a marked feature of medieval life in the synagogues of northern and central Europe from the 12th century.

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  • Throughout he kept up his work of relief, and at the beginning of 1921 was collecting funds as chairman of the European Relief Council, for the starving children of central Europe.

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  • In central Europe it thrives best in enclosed, preserved waters, with a clayey or muddy bottom and with an abundant vegetation; it avoids clear waters with stony ground, and is altogether absent from rapid streams. The tench is distinguished by its very small scales, which are deeply imbedded in a thick skin, whose surface is as slippery as that of an eel.

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  • The district possesses many natural attractions, and is one of the most fertile in central Europe.

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  • The Hook (Hoek) of Holland harbour, built at the mouth of the New Waterway (1866-1872) from Rotterdam, is the chief approach to Central Europe from Harwich on the east coast of England.

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  • Both facts are largely due to the opening (1882) of the St Gotthard railway, as merchandise collected from every part of north and central Europe is stored in Basel previous to being redistributed by means of that line.

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  • Papen, on his hypsographical map of Central Europe (1857) introduced a perplexing range of colours.

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  • In Scotland and Ireland its remains are less abundant, and in Scandinavia and Finland they appear to be unknown; but they have been found in vast numbers at various localities throughout the greater part of central Europe (as far south as Santander and Rome), northern Asia, and the northern part of the American continent.

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  • In prehistoric times it occurred throughout northern and central Europe.

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  • It is now considered that the people who erected the lake dwellings of Central Europe were also the people who were spread over the mainland.

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  • Those of the great cave bear (Ursus spelaeus), found abundantly in certain caverns of central Europe and Asia, show that it must have exceeded in size the polar bear of the present day.

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  • Some of its constituent territories, however, notably Bohemia and the lands of the Bohemian crown (Moravia, Silesia, Lusatia) enjoyed, up to the year 1620, many centuries of independent existence and played an important, sometimes a dominating, part in the political and religious history of central Europe.

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  • It was in favour of aiding Austria on a broad basis of financial and economic help, to be rendered generally to the states of central Europe by international agreement.

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  • It was in favour of creating in central Europe a new political and economic system by which permanent peace would be secured - a definite understanding between all the " Succession States " of the former AustroHungarian monarchy in the matter of communications, post, telegraphs, navigation, finance and banking, exchange of goods and commercial treaties generally, opening up the way to a system of unfettered economics and freer trade - but at the same time jealously guarding the economic and political sovereignty of the Czechoslovak Republic.

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  • In pursuance of its practical policy of rapprochement and economic cooperation in the reconstruction of central Europe in particular and of Europe in general, Czechoslovakia concluded a series of commercial treaties with her various neighbours and with the Allied Powers.

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  • While suffering from the symptoms affecting central Europe generally, the republic was distinctly better off as regards its financial situation than any of its neighbours.

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  • Czechoslovakia was thus the only country in central Europe with a well-balanced budget.

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  • It was not till the 18th century that the importance of mummy in all its forms waned, and in some of the least progressive quarters of central Europe it survived even to the middle of the 19th.

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  • The range of the common or brown hare, inclusive of its local races, extends from England across southern and central Europe to the Caucasus; while that of the blue or mountain species, likewise inclusive of local races, reaches from Ireland, Scotland and Scandinavia through northern Europe and Asia to Japan and Kamchatka, and thence to Alaska.

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  • This was accomplished by the convention of Trencsen (1335), confirmed the same year at the brilliant congress of Visegrad, where all the princes of central Europe met to compose their differences and were splendidly entertained during the months of October and November.

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  • Thus by diplomacy as well as by force of arms Catholic France made possible the continued existence of a Protestant Germany, and helped to create the balance of power between Catholic, Lutheran and Reformed within the Empire, that, crystallized in the Peace of Westphalia, fixed the religious boundaries of central Europe for upwards of two centuries.

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  • It aimed at a close alliance with the house of Austria, with the double object of drawing Sweden within its orbit and overawing the Porte by the conjunction of the two great Catholic powers of central Europe.

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  • These will depend on the meaning we attach to the word Alps as referring to the great mountain-chain of central Europe.

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  • Its closest relationship is with the flora of the Pyrenees; but an alpine flora is characteristic of all the lofty mountains of central Europe.

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  • The same explanation covers the case of the similarity of the flora (not merely as regards the northern element) on all the high mountains of central Europe.

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  • The presence of these plants among the alpine flora is traceable to the steppe-like conditions which prevailed in central Europe both during the warmer inter-glacial periods and (probably) for a time after the close of the ice-age.

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  • Thus western Europe in early Carboniferous time was occupied by a series of constricted, gulf-like seas; and on account of the steady progress of intermittent warping movements of the crust, we find that the areas of clearer water, in which the limestone-building organisms could exist, were repeatedly able to spread, thus forming those thin limestones found interbedded with shale and sandstone which occur typically in the Yoredale district of Yorkshire and in the region to the north, and also in the culm deposits of central Europe.

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  • The Reformation and the religious wars that followed in its wake destroyed the monasteries and religious orders of all kinds in northern Europe and crippled them in central Europe.

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  • The French Revolution swept them out of France and caused the secularization of the great majority in central Europe and Italy.

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  • Such a body, Metternich held, " powerful for defence, powerless for offence," would form a guarantee of the peace of central Europe - and of the preponderance of Austria; and in its councils Austrian diplomacy, backed by the weight of the Habsburg power beyond the borders of Germany, would exercise a greater influence than any possible prestige derived from a venerable title that had become a by-word for the union of unlimited pretensions with practical impotence.

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  • The fall of Metternich was the signal for the outburst of the storm, not in Austria only, but throughout central Europe.

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  • In 1892 Austria-Hungary joined with Germany, Italy, Belgium, and Switzerland in commercial treaties to last for twelve years, the object being to secure to the states of central Europe a stable and extended market; for the introduction of high tariffs in Russia and America had crippled industry.

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  • A large export trade in almonds is carried on with north and central Europe.

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  • These also are largely exported to central Europe for use in the manufacture of chocolate.

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  • In the Adriatic he helped Hellenic extension, desiring no doubt to secure the important trade route into central Europe.

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  • The wild animals and birds of Denmark are those of the rest of central Europe.

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  • He realized that in Napoleon sentiment never got the better of reason, that as a matter of fact he had never intended his proposed " grand enterprise " seriously, and had only used it to preoccupy the mind of the tsar while he consolidated his own power in central Europe.

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  • Nuremberg was the chief mart for the merchandise that came to central Europe from the east through Venice and over the passes of Tirol.

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  • The principal treaties affecting the distribution of territory between the various states of Central Europe are those of Westphalia (Osnabruck and Miinster), 1648; Utrecht, 1713;1713; Paris and Hubertusburg, 1763; for the partition of Poland, 1772, 1793; Vienna, 1815; London, for the separation of Belgium from the Netherlands, 1831, 1839; Zurich, for the cession of a portion of Lombardy to Sardinia, 1859; Vienna, as to SchleswigHolstein, 1864; Prague, whereby the German Confederation was dissolved, Austria recognizing the new North German Confederation, transferring to Prussia her rights over SchleswigHolstein, and ceding the remainder of Lombardy to Italy, 1866; Frankfort, between France and the new German Empire, 1871.

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  • In Scotland, North America and Canada important deposits of limestone occur and subordinate limestones are found in the Cambrian of central Europe.

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  • Northern and central Europe became free about 1714, and the south of France in 1722.

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  • It seems to have been spread in western and central Europe from about the end of the 16th century by means of botanic gardens.

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  • P. Cembra is the stone pine of Siberia and central Europe.

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  • It is found wild chiefly in wooded mountainous situations in central Europe.

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  • In central Europe it may have lingered somewhat longer in view of the evidence of the Salzburg MS. mentioned above.

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  • In the first eight years of his reign Attila was chiefly occupied in the wars with other barbarian tribes, by which he made himself virtually supreme in central Europe.

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  • Glyceria fluitans, manna-grass, socalled from the sweet grain, is one of the best fodder grasses for swampy meadows; the grain is an article of food in central Europe.

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  • There he organized a school which, under him, soon became one of the most flourishing in the north of Europe, but a disagreement with Marshal Munich led him, in spite of the empress's offers of high advancement, to return to central Europe in 1765.

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  • Though numerous ancient monuments at Prague have been destroyed in consequence of intestine strife and foreign warfare, the city still contains many of great value and may be considered one of the most interesting cities of central Europe.

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  • Orchards are very extensive, and all the fruits of central Europe will thrive in Servia.

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  • The railway which connects western and central Europe with Constantinople and Salonica takes the same course.

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  • Finally, the BohemianMoravian Mountains, which enclose Bohemia and Moravia, and form the so-called quadrilateral of Bohemia, constitute the link of the Austrian mountain-system with the hilly region (the Mittelgebirge) of central Europe.

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  • Still more recently it has become the great highway of commerce for central Europe.

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  • Here you find articles in the encyclopedia on topics related to Central Europe (the region that in 1911 was part of Austria-Hungary).

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  • As regards temperature, the heart of the table-land is characterized by extremes as great as are to be met in almost any part of central Europe.

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  • The northern maritime province, in accordance with its climate, has a vegetation resembling that of central Europe.

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  • Many species belonging to central Europe winter in Spain.

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  • Its cultivation was introduced by the Arabs in the 12th century or later, and was of great importance in the kingdom of Granada at the time of the expulsion of the Moors (1489), but has since undergone great vicissitudes, first in consequence of the introduction of the cane into America, and afterwards because of the great development of beet-sugar in central Europe.

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  • He was aucceeded by his grandson Charles of Habsburg, and when Charles was elected to the empire in 15f9 Spain was dragged into the wars and politics of central Europe.

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  • This was the signal for the outbreak of the war of liberation in Germany, and French troops had to be withdrawn from Spain to central Europe.

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  • Most of the deposits which have yielded Angiosperms of Cretaceous age in central Europe correspond in age with the English Upper Chalk (Senonian), but a small Cenomanian flora has been collected from the Unter Quader in Moravia.

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  • The Cenomanian flora of central Europe appears to be a subtropical one, with marked approaches to the living flora of Australia.

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  • The Miocene period is unrepresented by any deposits in Great Britain, unless the Bovey lignite should belong to its earliest stage; we will therefore commence with the best known region - that of central Europe and especially of Switzerland, whence a prolific flora has been collected and described by Oswald Heer.

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  • This difficulty will disappear as the strata become better known; but at present each of the silted-up lakes has to be studied separately, for we cannot expect so close a correspondence in their faunas and floras as is found in the more crowded and smaller basins in central Europe.

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  • Among the plants from Disco, more than a quarter are also found in the Miocene of central Europe.

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  • But if this process is continuous from latitude to latitude, then we ought not to look for a flora of equivalent age in the warm-temperate Miocene deposits of central Europe, but should rather expect to find that the temperate plants of Greenland were contemporaneous with a tropical flora in central Europe.

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  • Hence Pigorini regards the terramara people as an Aryan lake-dwelling people who invaded the north of Italy in two waves from Central Europe (the Danube valley) in the end of the stone age and the beginning of the bronze age, bringing with them the building tradition which led them to erect pile dwellings on dry land.

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  • He said his own forebears had come from central Europe in a previous wave of immigration, no doubt to escape persecution.

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  • They can appeal to a half century of border stability which, however smashed down elsewhere, remains inviolate in Central Europe.

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  • The Bank used the meetings to celebrate the fact that the transition to a functioning market economy has largely been achieved in Central Europe.

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  • Vast oak forests still covered the greater part of England and central Europe in the earlier historic period; and, though they have been gradually cleared in the progress of cultivation, oak is yet the prevailing tree in most of the woods of France, Germany and southern Russia, while in England the coppices and the few fragments of natural forest yet left are mainly composed of this species.

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  • After the Armistice, 1918, his services were extended to the destitute populations of central Europe.

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  • His efforts to induce his master to accord lenient terms to Austria in November 1805 were futile; and he looked on helplessly while that Power was crushed, the Holy Roman Empire swept away, and the Confederation of the Rhine set up in central Europe.

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  • The name of Cathari (see CATHAxs), taken by the adherents of this new teaching, sufficiently shows the Oriental origin of their opinions, which spread from Bulgaria amongst the Sla y s, and followed the routes of commerce into central Europe.

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  • The Hallstatt culture is that of the Homeric Achaeans (see Achaeans), but as the brooch (along with iron, cremation of the dead, the round shield and the geometric ornament) passed down into Greece from central Europe, and as brooches are found in the lower town at Mycenae, 1350 B.C., they must have been invented long before that date in central Europe.

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  • In 1811 the group of people that had formed in France unites into one group with the peoples of Central Europe.

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  • Let's imagine that you are going to Central Europe.

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  • Are you going to several countries in Central Europe?

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  • Since 2001, the show has branched out to include several international versions in Asia, Brazil, Egypt and Central Europe.

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