Celts sentence example

celts
  • The Bretons, who most nearly represent the Celts, and the Basques, who inhabit parts of the western versant of the Pyrenees, have preserved their distinctive languages and customs, and are ethnically the most interesting sections of the nation; the Flemings of French Flanders where Flemish is still spoken are also racially distinct.
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  • The Celts had continually moved westwards also.
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  • Prominent among them, and dwelling in the division occupied by the Celts, were the Helvetii, the Sequani and the Aedui, in the basins of the Rhodanus and its tributary the Arar (Saone), who, he says, were reckoned the three most powerful nations in all Gaul; the Arverni in the mountains of Cebenna; the Senones and Carnutes in the basin of the Liger; the Veneti and other Armorican tribes between the mouths of the Liger and Sequana.
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  • In prehistoric times the southern coast of the Baltic seems to have been occupied by Celts, who afterwards made way for tribes of Teutonic stock.
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  • After a vain attempt to expel the garrison in 287, the Athenians regained their liberty while Macedonia was thrown into confusion by the Celts, and in 279 rendered good service against the invaders of the latter nation with a fleet off Thermopylae.
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  • The stone knives, arrowheads, celts, hoe-blades, hammers, nails, awls, etc., associated with this pottery are of kinds which though simple and often crude in type are nevertheless not early, but date from the transition period to the age of metal and the earliest centuries of the latter period.
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  • The most striking difference between Zoroaster's doctrine of God and the old religion of India lies in this, that while in the Avesta the evil spirits are called daeva (Modern Persian div), the Aryans of India, in common with the Italians, Celts and Letts, gave the name of deva to their good spirits, the spirits of light.
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  • Next they sailed up the Eridanus into the Rhodanus, passing through the country of the Celts and Ligurians to the Stoechades, then to the island of Aethalia (Elba), finally reaching the Tyrrhenian Sea and the island of Circe, who absolved them from the murder of Absyrtus.
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  • Claudius Marcellus over the Celts (222).
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  • The first fortification of the rock, at the confluence of the Save and the Danube, was made by the Celts in the 3rd century B.C. They gave it the name of Singidunum, by which Belgrade was known until the 7th century A.D.
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  • The whole valley seems to have been originally occupied by Celtic tribes, who have left traces of their presence on the contents of tombs and in the forms of names (Moguntiacum or Mainz, Borbetomagus or Worms); but at the beginning of the historical period we find the Celts everywhere in retreat before the advancing Teutons.
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  • It was the Roman patron and client relationship which had remained in existence into the days of the empire, in later times less important perhaps legally than socially, and which had been reinforced in Gaul by very similar practices in use among the Celts before their conquest.
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  • On the whole, the historical evidence indicates that in Spain, when it first became known to the Greeks and Romans there existed many separate and variously civilized tribes connected by at least apparent identity of race, and by similarity (but not identity) of language, and sufficiently distinguished by their general characteristics from Phoenicians, Romans and Celts.
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  • The original Welsh legend was spread by British refugees in Brittany, and was thus celebrated by both English and French Celts.
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  • Hence it is suggested that the attack on Rome was merely an incident of the march of the Etruscans, driven southward by the invasion of upper Italy by the Celts, through Latium on their way to Campania.
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  • Anglo-Saxons, Celts, and England and Wales Scotland Total.
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  • They probably represent an old population perhaps connected with some Caucasus stock; in spite of the resemblance of the name Taurisci they are not likely to be Celts.
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  • vii., stratagems of the barbarians (Medes, Persians, Egyptians, Thracians, Scythians, Celts); bk.
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  • yc,o f30vX1 7), named after the hill, is to be compared in origin and fundamental character with the council of chiefs or elders which we find among the earliest Germans, Celts, Romans, and other primitive peoples.
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  • It has yielded four bronze swords, ten socketed spear-heads, forty celts or axe-heads and sickles, fifty knives, twenty socketed chisels, four hammers and an anvil, sixty rings for the arms and legs, several highly ornate torques or twisted neck rings, and upwards of two hundred hair pins of various sizes up to 16 in.
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  • It is true that from the 4th century onwards it expanded beyond the borders of that empire to east and west, north and south; but the infant churches which gradually arose in Persia and Abyssinia, among some of the scattered Teutonic races, and among the Celts of Ireland, were at first not co-operating factors in the development of Christendom: they received without giving in return.
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  • Beside him are the Celts Josephus Scottus and Dungal, the Lombards Paulinus and Paulus Diaconus, the West Goth Theodulf and many Franks.
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  • The district which later bore the name of Venetia was inhabited, under the Roman Republic, by a variety of tribes - Celts, Veneti, Raeti, &c. Under Augustus, Venetia and Histria formed the tenth region of Augustus, the latter including the Istrian peninsula as far as the river Arsia, i.e.
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  • By the age of Julius Caesar all the inhabitants of Britain, except perhaps some tribes of the far north, were Celts in speech and customs. Politically they were divided into separate and generally warring tribes, each under its own princes.
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  • In art, these tribes possessed a native Late Celtic fashion, descended from far-off Mediterranean antecedents and more directly connected with the La-Tene culture of the continental Celts.
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  • In none of the early records, however, do we get any clear indication that the Teutonic peoples were distinguished from the Celts.
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  • Towards both the south and west the Teutonic peoples seem to have been pressing the Celts for some considerable time, since we are told that the Helvetii had formerly extended as far as the Main, while another important Celtic tribe, the Volcae Tectosages, had occupied a still more remote position, which it is impossible now to identify.
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  • Polybius and the authors who copy him regard the Bastarnae as Galatae; Strabo, having learned of the Romans to distinguish Celts and Germans, first allows a German element; Tacitus expressly declares their German origin but says that the race was degraded by intermarriage with Sarmatians.
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  • Here he maintained himself as a captain of brigands, his lieutenants being two Celts named Crixus and Oenomaus, who like himself had been gladiators.
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  • 9) as a mixed race of Celts and Spaniards (Iberians); in either case the name represents a geographer's theory rather than an ascertained fact.
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  • It is interesting to note how the Celts absorb Roman and still more Greek culture, even imitating foreign coins, and pass on their new arts to their Teutonic neighbors; but in spite of the strong foreign influence the Celtic civilization can in some sort be termed national.
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  • Roman Period (from the 1st century A.D.).The period succeeding to La Tne ought rather to be called Romano-Germanic, the relation of the Teutonic races to the Roman civilization being much the same as that of the Celts to classical culture in the preceding period.
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  • The Achaeans, or Hellenes, as they were later termed, were on this hypothesis one of the fair-haired tribes of upper Europe known to the ancients as Keltoi (Celts), who from time to time have pressed down over the Alps into the southern lands, successively as Achaeans, Gauls, Goths and Franks, and after the conquest of the indigenous small dark race in no long time died out under climatic conditions fatal to their physique and morale.
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  • It was the irruption of the Celts, beginning in 278-277 B.C., which checked the Hellenization of the interior.
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  • In Roman times the eastern half of the county formed part of the territory of the Silures, a pre-Celtic race, whose governing class at that time probably consisted of Brythonic Celts.
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  • After the Norman Conquest, England would have subjugated the Celts and held Scotland by a tenure less precarious and disputed than they possessed in the western island.
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  • Her reforms in church matters had apparently made her unpopular with the Celts, but under cover of a mist her body was conveyed to and buried at Dunfermline.
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  • The Celts (apart from the claimant of the blood of Lulach and the house of Moray) placed Donald Ban on the throne; England supported Duncan (by primogeniture Malcolm's heir, and a hostage in England); there was division of the kingdom till Duncan was slain, and Edgar, son of Malcolm and Margaret, was restored by Edgar ZEtheling.
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  • is marked by war with the northern Celts, and by the introduction of English bishops of St Andrews, while the claims of the see of York to superiority over the Scottish church were cleverly evaded at Glasgow (David's bishopric), as well as at St Andrews, where English Augustinian canons were now established, to the prejudice of the Celtic Culdees.
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  • We observe that the chief peers of Alexander, who signed the charter of his monastery at Scone, are Celts - Heth, earl of Moray (husband of the daughter of Lulach), Ma]ise of Strathearn, Dufagan of Fife, and Rory.
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  • Malcolm the Maiden, before his early death in 1165, had put down the menacing power of Somerled, lord of the Isles, a chief apparently of mixed Celtic and Scandinavian blood, the founder of the great clan of Macdonald, whose chiefs, the lords of the Isles, were almost royal; Malcolm also subdued the Celts of Galloway, sometimes called Picts, but at this time Gaelic in speech.
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  • An ill-kept truce of three years ended in October 1346, when David attempted to lead the whole force of his realm, including the levies of John, Lord of the Isles, and of the western Celts in general, against England.
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  • As the Celts marched south the earl of Ross slew Ronald Macdonald, whose inheritance was claimed by John of the Isles.
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  • Under his nominal rule, the Celts of the north and west, in 1385, became troublesome, while Robert's son, the Wolf of Badenoch, who was justiciary, with his own wild sons, rather fanned than extinguished the flames.
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  • Next year Albany received the submission of Donald at Lochgilp in Knapdale, and the Celts were, for the moment, useless to their allies of England.
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  • was crowned, and at once made pact and alliance with the banished Douglas and the Celts of the west Highlands and the isles.
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  • From Ardtornish castle, John, lord of the Isles, sent ambassadors to Westminster, where (1462) a treaty was made for an English alliance and the partition of Scotland between Douglas and the Celts.
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  • was spoken of, but Kennedy would not meet the English, and in March 1463 the English treaty with Douglas and the Celts was ratified.
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  • This has passed through three stages, the first being represented by solid castings, such as are most celts and other implements of the prehistoric time; the mould was formed of clay, sand or stone, and the fluid metal was poured in till the hollow was full.
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  • Connexion has been traced between the early Libyan race and the Cro-Magnon and other early European races and, later, the Basque peoples, Iberians, Picts, Celts and Gauls.
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  • The megalithic monuments of Iberia and Celtic Europe have their counterparts in northern Africa, and it is suggested that these were all erected by the same race, by whatever name they be known, Berbers and Libyans in Africa, Iberians in Spain, Celts, Gauls and Picts in France and Britain.
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  • This iron needed no tempering, and the Celts had probably found it ready smelted by nature, just as the Eskimo had learned of themselves to use telluric iron embedded in basalt.
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  • Both flanged and socketed celts occurred, the iron being much more numerous than the bronze.
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  • The Celts who saw the world peopled with the spirits of trees and animals, rocks, mountains, springs and rivers, grouped them in classes like the Dervonnae (oak-spirits), the Niskai (water-spirits), the Proximae; the Matronae (earthgoddesses) 9 and the like.
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  • It is the practice to speak of the dark-complexioned people of France, Great Britain and Ireland as " black Celts," although the ancient writers never applied the term " Celt " to any dark-complexioned person.
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  • The Teutons, whose name is generic for Germans, appear in history along with the Cimbri, universally held to be Celts, but coming from the same region as the Guttones (Goths) by the shores of the Baltic and North Sea.
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  • The Celts had firmly' established themselves by the 7th century B.C. and we know not how long before, the Bituriges (whose name survives in Berri) being the dominant tribe.
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  • The Umbrians, who were part of the Alpine Celts, had been pressing down into Italy from the Bronze Age, though checked completely by the rise of the Etruscan power in the ioth century B.C. The invention of iron weapons made the Celts henceforth irresistible.
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  • At the beginning of the 6th century B.C. the Celts of France had grown very powerful under the Biturigian king Ambigatus.
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  • Turdentani and Turduli, forming permanent settlements and being still powerful there in Roman times; and in northern central Spain, from the mixture of Celts with the native Iberians, the population henceforward was called Celtiberian.
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  • The next great wave of Celts recorded was that which swept down on north Italy shortly before 400 B.C. These invaders broke up in a few years the Etruscan power, and even occupied Rome herself after the disaster on the Allia (390 B.C.).
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  • About 280 B.C. the Celts gathered a great host at the head of the Adriatic, and accompanied by the Illyrian tribe of Autariatae, they overthrew the Macedonians, overran Thessaly, and invaded Phocis in order to sack Delphi, but they were finally repulsed, chiefly by the efforts of the Aetolians (279 B.C.).
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  • It is not unlikely that, as tradition states, there were incursions of Celts from central Gaul into Ireland during the general Celtic unrest in the 6th century B.C. It is certain that at a later period invaders from the continent, bringing with them the later Iron Age culture, commonly called La Tene, which had succeeded that of Hallstatt, had settled in Ireland.
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  • The Celts in Italy, in the Balkan, in France and in Britain, overspread the Indo-European peoples, who differed from themselves but slightly in speech.
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  • The Celts represented Indo-European q by p, whilst the Greeks, Illyrians, Thracians, Ligurians, and aborigines of France, Britain and Ireland represented it by k, c or qu.
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  • The Umbrian-Sabellian tribes had the same phonetic peculiarity as the Celts.
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  • The Celts are thus clearly distinguished from the Gaelic-speaking dark race of Britain and Ireland, and in spite of usage it must be understood that it is strictly misleading to apply the term Celtic to the latter language.
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  • Bretagne), known as Armorica until the influx of Celts from Britain, an ancient province and duchy of France, consisting of the north-west peninsula, and nearly corresponding to the departments of Finistere, Cotes-duNord, Morbihan, Ille-et-Vilaine and Lower Loire.
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  • The Celts sustained a long struggle against the Frankish kings, who only nominally occupied Brittany.
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  • The Alcluith ("hill of the Clyde")- of the Britons, and Dunbreatan ("fort of the Britons") of the Celts, it was the capital of the district of Strathclyde.
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  • A more real bond of union was found in the dangers to which both had been exposed from the assaults of the Celts (Livy x.
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  • The Hindus, Medes,Persians, Greeks, Romans, Germans, Celts and Sla y s make their appearance at more or less remote dates as nations separate in language as in history.
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  • The name Padus was taken from the Celts or the Veneti.
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  • of the Alps), in ancient geography, that portion of northern Italy north of Liguria and Umbria and south of the Alps, which was inhabited by various Celtic and other peoples, of whom the Celts were in continual hostility to Rome.
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  • The same applies to Hindus, Greeks, Romans Germans, Celts and Slaves.
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  • I assert nothing beyond their language when I call them Hindus, Greeks, Romans, Germans, Celts and Slaves; and in that sense, and in that sense only, do I say that even the blackest Hindus represent an earlier stage of Aryan speech and thought than the fairest Scandinavians.
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  • As far as we know, the first inhabitants of the country were the Celts, and then the Suebi.
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  • The frequent intermarriages which mingled the best families of either race are sufficient proof of the close communion of Northmen and Celts in the 9th and 10th centuries, while there are in the poems themselves traces of Celtic mythology, language and manners.1 When one turns to the early poetry of the Scandinavian continent, preserved in the rune-staves on the memorial stones of Sweden, Norway and Denmark, in the didactic Havamal, the Great Volsung Lay (i.e.
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  • Art MacMurrough, the great hero of the Leinster Celts, practically had the best of the contest.
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  • Nor were the Celts overlooked.
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  • The Celts cared nothing for the king except as a weapon against the Protestants; the old Anglo-Irish Catholics cared much, but the nearer Charles approached them the more completely he alienated the Protestants.
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  • He could never co-operate with the Roman Catholic confederacy at Kilkenny, which was under old English influence, and by throwing in his lot with the Celts only widened the gulf between the two sections.
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  • The Roman Catholic Celts aided by France were entirely beaten, the Protestant colonists aided by England were entirely victorious at the battle of the Boyne, on the 1st of July 1690; ill and at the battle of Aughrim on the 12th of July 1691.
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  • Celts, Germans, speakers of Sanskrit and Zend, Ldtins and Greeks, all prove by their languages that their tongues may be traced to one family of speech.
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  • Upon thes~ peoples it was that the conquering minority of Celts or Gauls imposed themselves, to be succeeded at a later date by the Roman aristocracy.
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  • Coming from the valley of the Danube in the 6th century, the Celts or Gauls had little by little occupied central and southern Europe long before they penetrated into the plains of the Sane, the Seine, and the Loire as far as the Spanish border, driving out the former inhabitants of the country.
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  • These are divided by Caesar in his Commentaries into three groups: the Aquitanians to the south of the Garonne; the Celts, properly so called, from the Garonne to the Seine and the Marne; and the Belgae, from the Seine to the Rhine.
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  • the east, north and south), Celts (north-west) and Celtiberians (centre), but the classification does not help us far.
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  • Vizcaya (Biscay)a tongue which is utterly unlike Celtic or Italian or any Indo-Germanic languagesuggests that the Iberians may have been an older people than the Celts and alien from them in race, though the attempts hitherto made to connect Basque with ancient traces of strange tongues in the Basque lands have not yielded clear results.
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  • On the other hand, numerous placenames show that parts of the Peninsula were once held by Celtic-speaking peoples, and it is, of course, possible that Celts and Iberians may have formed a mixed race in certain regions.
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  • They were got where bronze celts and other remains of a remote antiquity have been found.
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  • The earliest bronze axes are very like stone celts in form.
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  • The High Kings of Tara The Gaels or Celts stayed faithful to the goddess through her sacred marriage to the king.
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  • The majority of these celts are plain, although a number of them show finely incised imagery or even low relief sculpted faces.
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  • petaloid celts were also identified.
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  • There is rarely any suggestion that the Celts might have maintained a culture of any intellectual pretension.
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  • As to the lesser sabbats, there is little evidence for the celebration of any of these by any pagan Celts except possibly midsummer.
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  • tribe of celts led by Queen Boudica stormed London, burning it to the ground.
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  • xi No. 4 The topic this issue is the Celts.
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  • From the Celts has been derived the gay, brilliant and adventurous temperament easily moved to extremes of er,thiisi~cm snd t-lenrpgcg-,n whwh combined with logical and organizing faculties of a high order, the heritage from the Latin domination, and with the industry, frugality and love of the soil natural in an agricultural people go to make up the national character.
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  • The statement of Diodorus Siculus that the mingling of these Iberians with the immigrant Celts gave rise to the Celtiberians is in itself probable.
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  • In England it had not been possible to bring the old British and the young Anglo-Saxon churches into friendly union; but in spite of this the Celts did not abstain from working at the common tasks of Christendom, and the continent has much to thank them for.
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  • The Celts, Scoto-Picts, of Alban, had thus annexed a great English-speaking region, which remained loyal to their dynasty, the more loyal from abhorrence of the Norman conquerors.
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  • p. 264), it was from Britain that the use of runes upon gravestones was derived, a use which, to judge from the number of bilingual inscriptions in Britain, the Celts derived from the Romans.
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  • In the Alps and the Danube valley some of the Celts had dwelt from the Stone Age; there they had developed the working of copper, discovered bronze (an alloy of copper and tin), and the art of smelting iron (see Hallstatt).
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  • Around AD 61, the Iceni tribe of Celts led by Queen Boudica stormed London, burning it to the ground.
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  • XI No. 4 The topic this issue is the Celts.
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  • Classical authors have written about tattoos used by the Thracians, Greeks, Romans, ancient Germans, ancient Celts, and ancient Britons.
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  • In ancient times, the Celts used bronze, silver, and gold for their jewelry and added gemstones.
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  • The Celts were known for giving their warriors a burial befitting a prince.
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  • Unfortunately, the Celts didn't leave behind very many clues to help us understand what the symbols in their knot designs might represent.
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  • The Celts created flowing lines and connecting patterns that showed how all things were joined in a circular, ever repeating pattern.
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  • Step back into the world of the ancient Celts, and learn how their beliefs and their jewels are intertwined.
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  • The Celts were a people very in tune with nature.
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  • These beliefs quite naturally led the Celts into jewelry making.
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  • In this manner, the Celts began developing their craft of jewelry design.
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  • Eventually, the Celts came to believe that pendants could be worn as amulets.
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  • The Celts often used images of snakes and dragons in their designs.
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  • When we speak of the Celts we are referring to the people who once inhabited Ireland, Scotland, Cornwall, the Isle of Man, Wales and Brittany, all of whom spoke Celtic languages.
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  • These crosses were a symbol of Christianity for the Celts, who constructed many freestanding high crosses from stone as early as the 7th century.
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  • The Celts were great exponents of carved jewelry and their unique style has remained popular throughout the centuries.
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  • The Celts believed that everything was interconnected.
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  • Celtic knots: The Celts were an ancient people who were known for their fierceness and their beautiful artwork.
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  • Celtic jewelry has captured the imagination of the modern world as people wonder about the lives of the ancient Celts.
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  • Since the Celts lives in so many parts of the world, Celtic jewelry also varies slightly based on the area of origin and the influence of other local cultures.
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  • The Celts were a group of people who lived in what is now Ireland, Great Britain and the northern part of France.
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  • The Celts knew the approaching season was a long, cold winter.
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  • For the Celts, winter was a dark time of year with fewer daylight hours.
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  • The Druids also dressed up in costumes that were made from animal heads and skins.When they were finished with the Samhain celebrations, the Celts re-lit the fires in their homes from the flames of those sacred bonfires.
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  • The Romans eventually conquered the territory where the Celts lived, and the tradition of observing Samhain was eventually combined with two Roman celebrations.
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  • By the 800s, the influence of Christianity had taken hold in the lands formerly occupied by the Celts.
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  • Most people today think of the Celts as those who lived in what is now England, Scotland, Wales and Ireland.
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  • Some people who lived in France at the time of Julius Caesar, for example, were also called "Celts", but they themselves used the term "Gaul" or even Gaelic.
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  • Celtic knots and bands can be seen on many different tapestries and artwork from early on in the Middle Ages (and even before), and some early tattoos seen on the Celts and the Picts were created using knot designs.
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  • Learn more about what the Celts thought of these creatures and why butterfly tattoos are so incredibly popular today.
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  • To understand why so many people choose Celtic butterflies for their personal tattoos, we first need to understand what butterflies meant to the ancient Celts themselves.
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  • To the Celts, the butterfly was a strong symbol of rebirth and/or transformation.
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  • Similar to their beliefs about other winged creatures, the Celts thought butterflies had souls.
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  • The Celts also held that to see a butterfly flitting about at night was a bad omen, one that foretold of impending death.
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  • The Celts are famous for their never-ending knot work designs.
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  • The Celts eventually adopted Christianity, but rather than set aside all of their old traditions and beliefs, they began incorporating them into symbols of the new religion.
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  • Is it any wonder the Celts had such a passion for butterflies?
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  • The Celts were fascinated by butterflies, and there is no butterfly tat that is closer to an Irishman's heart than one created by using a Celtic knot design.
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  • This design is believed to have come into existence when St. Patrick was struggling to convert the Celts to Christianity, although many people contend the design was around long before Patrick ever reached Ireland's shores.
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  • However, many Celts simply incorporated the cross symbol into their own current beliefs, and so the Celtic cross was born.
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  • When the Romans ruled over the Celts, they merged Samhain with two other festivals: Feralia and a celebration for the goddess Pomona.
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  • In the slow process of time they drove them into the most southerly corner of Australia, just as the Saxons drove the Celts into Cornwall and the Welsh hills.
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  • Celts, of the usual late neolithic type, were generally of green jasper; hoe-blades (looking almost exactly like palaeolithic haches a main) of chert or coarse limestone; hammers of granite; mace-heads, of identical type with the early Egyptian, of diorite and limestone; nails of obsidian or smoky quartz, often beautifully made.
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  • The Romans took it from the Celts, and replaced their fort by a regular Roman castrum, placing in it a strong garrison.
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  • This Neolithic race has consequently been nicknamed " Iberians," and it is now common to speak of the " Iberian " ancestry of the people of Britain, recognizing the racial characteristics of " Iberians " in the" small swarthy Welshman," the " small dark Highlander," and the " Black Celts to the west of the Shannon," as well as in the typical inhabitants of Aquitania and Brittany.
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  • Poor, distracted, threatened on occasion by the Celts on her flank and rear, anglicized Scotland preferred her poverty with independence, to the prosperity and peace which England would have given, if unresisted, but never could impose by war.
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  • To the Celts of Scotland, or at least to those of the great subkingship or province of Moray, Duncan, not Macbeth, was the usurper.
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  • They are described by Strabo as a mixed race of Celts and Illyrians, who used Celtic weapons, tattooed themselves, and lived chiefly on spelt and millet.
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  • The fortress was rebuilt, and after 280 served the Aetolians as a bulwark against Celts and Macedonians.
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  • According to this authority, Gaul was at that time divided among three peoples, more or less distinct from one another, the Aquitani, the Gauls, who called themselves Celts, and the Belgae.
    0
    3