Celtic sentence example

celtic
  • Love the color and the swirlies, like Celtic designs around it.

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  • It was old, silver, and covered with Celtic knots.

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  • She had eyes the deepest blue-green of the Celtic Sea and flaxen hair, which although matted and unkempt, promised to shine sun-kissed when groomed.

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  • But dissensions arose between the German and Celtic elements of Civilis's following.

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  • They are described by Strabo as a mixed race of Celts and Illyrians, who used Celtic weapons, tattooed themselves, and lived chiefly on spelt and millet.

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  • Up to the present day the population retains strongly-marked Celtic characteristics.

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  • Britain remained outside that jurisdiction, the Celtic churches of the British islands, after those islands were abandoned by the Empire, pursuing a course of their own.

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  • So it was with Celtic saints, and Adamnan, in his life of St Columba, i.

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  • No satisfactory collection has been made of the Celtic inscriptions of Cisalpine Gaul, though many are scattered about in different museums. For our present purpose it is important to note that the archaeological stratification in deposits like those of Bologna shows that the Gallic period supervened upon the Etruscan.

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  • Originally Celtic, the population was modified during the Roman period by the arrival of a Germanic people, the Triboci.

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  • With reference to the Celtic race, P. cordata, it is interesting to note its connexion with Arthurian legend and the Isle of Avalon or Isle of Apples.

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  • An island in Loch Awe has a Celtic legend containing the principal features of Arthurian story; but in this case the word is "berries" instead of "apples."

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  • Two days later Isabella, countess of Buchan, claimed the right of her family, the Macduffs, earls of Fife, to place the Scottish king on his throne, and the ceremony was repeated with an addition flattering to the Celtic race.

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  • This was no less than the rising of the whole Celtic race, who had felt the galling yoke of Edward I.

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  • Carinthia is so called from the Carni, a Celtic people, and in the time of Augustus it formed part of Noricum.

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  • The name of Llandilo implies the town's early foundation by St Teilo, the great Celtic missionary of the 6th century, the friend of St David and reputed founder of the see of Llandaff.

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  • The new essays in this volume were mostly critical, but one of them, in which perhaps his guessing talent is seen at its best, "The Divisions of the Irish Family," is an elaborate discussion of a problem which has long puzzled both Celtic scholars and jurists; and in another, "On the Classificatory System of Relationship," he propounded a new explanation of a series of facts which, he thought, might throw light upon the early history of society, at the same time putting to the test of those facts the theories he had set forth in Primitive Marriage.

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  • Worterbuch, who derives the element bel from an old Celtic root meaning shining, &c.) (W.

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  • At the earliest period of which we have any record Moravia was occupied by the Boii, the Celtic race which has perpetuated its name in Bohemia.

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  • It was proposed that all the land north of the Padus (Po) lately in possession of the Cimbri, including that of the independent Celtic tribes which had been temporarily occupied by them, should be held available for distribution among the veterans of Marius.

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  • In 1857 he completed the libretto of Tristan and Isolde at Venice, adopting the Celtic legend modified by Gottfried of Strasburg's medieval version.

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  • It has been regarded as a survival of the Roman Floralia, but its origin is believed by some to be Celtic. Flowers and branches were gathered, and dancing took place in the streets and through the houses, all being thrown open, while a pageant was also given and a special ancient folk-song chanted.

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  • The skull is I There are no native names either in Teutonic or Celtic languages; such words as German Kaninchen or English cony are from the Latin cuniculus, while the Irish, Welsh and Gaelic are adaptations from English.

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  • These last were inspired largely by the Paschal Question, which was the subject of such bitter controversy between the Roman and Celtic Churches in the 7th century.

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  • Agen (Aginnum) was the capital of the Celtic tribe of the Nitiobroges, and the discovery of extensive ruins attests its importance under the Romans.

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  • There were the true indigenous Thracians and also Celtic tribes such as the Treres in the early period, the Getae and Trausi later, and the Gallic Scordisci in Roman days.

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  • The name Rhine, which is apparently of Celtic origin, is of uncertain etymology, the most favoured derivations being either from der Rinnende (the flowing), or from Rein (the clear), the latter being now the more generally accepted.

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  • The whole valley seems to have been originally occupied by Celtic tribes, who have left traces of their presence on the contents of tombs and in the forms of names (Moguntiacum or Mainz, Borbetomagus or Worms); but at the beginning of the historical period we find the Celts everywhere in retreat before the advancing Teutons.

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  • Probably the Teutonic pressure began as early as the 4th century before Christ, and the history of the next few hundred years may be summed up as the gradual substitution of a Germanic for a Celtic population along the banks of the Rhine.

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  • The strongest reason for believing in a British London is to be found in the name, which is undoubtedly Celtic, adopted with little alteration by the Romans.

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  • From the 4th century B.C. it was invaded by various Celtic tribes, probably survivors of the hosts of Brennus, the chief of whom were the Carni, Scordisci and Taurisci.

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  • Saliunca (Celtic, nard) was a common growth, as in Noricum.

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  • A Celtic origin has been suggested, connecting the word with Gael.

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  • The first settlement was probably a Celtic one, Boiudurum; this was on the site of the present Innstadt.

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  • The story of Vienna begins in the earliest years of the Christian era, with the seizure of the Celtic settlement of Vindomina by the Romans, who changed its name to Vindobona, and established a fortified camp here to command the Danube and protect the northern frontier of the empire.

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  • In Celtic and English martyrologies (November 25) there is also commemorated St Catherine Audley (c. 1400), a recluse of Ledbury, Hereford, who was reputed for piety and clairvoyance.

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  • At the time of the foundation of Aquileia by the Romans, the district which now includes Trieste was occupied by Celtic and Illyrian tribes; and the Roman colony of Tergeste (q.v.) does not seem to have been established till the reign of Vespasian.

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  • The Celtic heroic saga in the British islands may be divided into the two principal groups of Gaelic (Irish) and Brython (Welsh), the first, excluding the purely mythological, into the Ultonian (connected with Ulster) and the Ossianic. The Ultonianis grouped round the names of King Conchobar and the heroCuchulainn, " the Irish Achilles," the defender of Ulster against all Ireland, regarded by some as a solar hero.

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  • Speaking generally, the Celtic heroes are differentiated from the Teutonic by the extreme exaggeration of their superhuman, or rather extra-human, qualities.

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  • Such figures as these make no human impression, and criticism has busied itself in tracing them to one or other of the shadowy divinities of the Celtic pantheon.

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  • However this may be, remnants of their primitive superhuman qualities cling to the Celtic heroes long after they have been transfigured, under the influence of Christianity and chivalry, into the heroes of the medieval Arthurian romance, types - for the most part - of the knightly virtues as these were conceived by the middle ages; while shadowy memories of early myths live on, strangely disguised, in certain of the episodes repeated uncritically by the medieval poets.

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  • Mainz, one of the oldest cities in Germany, was originally a Celtic settlement.

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  • The Celtic name became latinized as Maguntiacum, or Moguntiacum, and a town gradually arose around the camp, which became the capital of Germania Superior.

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  • On land Patavium was equally powerful (it had been able, we are told, to put 120,000 men into the field), and perpetually made war against its Celtic neighbours.

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  • The people, belonging to the " Celtic fringe " of Germany, had fallen during the revolutionary period completely under the.

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  • In the Roman period Styria, which even thus early was famed for its iron and steel, was inhabited by the Celtic Taurisci, and divided geographically between Noricum and Pannonia.

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  • The missing link which has hitherto been lacking in the evidence has been found by Barns in the influence of Celtic missionaries who streamed across from Europe until they came in touch with the remnants of the Old Latin Christianity of the Danube.

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  • By far the greater portion of the region later called Tirol was inhabited, when it makes its appearance in history, by the Raetians (perhaps a Celtic race, though some still hold that they were connected with the Etruscans), who were conquered (14 B.C.) by Drusus and Tiberius, and were later organized into the Roman province of Raetia.

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  • Pictet, however, recognizes allied forms in Celtic languages, e.g.

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  • In many parts the Benedictine Rule met the much stricter Irish Rule of Columbanus, introduced by the Irish missionaries on the continent, and after brief periods, first of conflict and then of fusion, it gradually absorbed and supplanted it; thus during the 8th century it became, out of Ireland and other purely Celtic lands, the only rule and form of monastic life throughout western Europe, - so completely that Charlemagne once asked if there ever had been any other monastic rule.

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  • In 1877 he was elected professor of Celtic at Oxford, the first occupant of the newly created chair, and he held that post till his death.

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  • This story may be compared with the Celtic legend of the boyhood of Peredur or Perceval.

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  • The name denotes "the fortress of Camulos," the Celtic Mars.

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  • There were then neither dioceses nor parishes in Ireland and Celtic Scotland; and by the Columbite rule the bishops themselves, although they ordained the clergy, were subject to the jurisdiction of the abbots of Iona, who, like the founder of the order, were only presbyters.

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  • Two old camps on the Welsh border are now called Caer Caradoc, but the names seem to be the invention of antiquaries and not genuinely ancient memorials of the Celtic hero.

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  • Bruzen Lamartiniere states in his Dictionnaire Geographique that the Gauls and Bretons called it by a word signifying "the forest," which was turned into Latin as Arduenna silva, and he thinks it quite probable that the name was really derived from the Celtic word ardu (dark, obscure).

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  • The earliest known inhabitants were of Celtic origin, and the names of the townlands or subdivisions, supposed to have been made in the 13th century, are pure Celtic. Antrim was exposed to the inroads of the Danes, and also of the northern Scots, who ultimately effected permanent settlements.

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  • Celtic monks worked as missionaries in this part of the country side by side with Franks.

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  • In the German tradition she is die lichte, Iseult of Britanny die schwarze Isolt; it is this latter who is the Celtic princess.

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  • This appears to be the great Celtic measure, as opposed to the old English, or Germanic, mile.

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  • In 58 B.C. the Helvetii, a Celtic people inhabiting Switzerland, determined to migrate for the shores of the Atlantic and demanded a passage through Roman territory.

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  • The original inhabitants seem to have been of the same Celtic race as those settled on the mainland.

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  • Keightley's Fairy Mythology is full of interesting matter; Rhys's Celtic Mythology is especially copious about Welsh fairies, which are practically identical with those of Ireland and Scotland.

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  • Celtic altar-bell of hammered iron, known as the "Ronnell bell."' Such is the odour of sanctity of this venerable church that there is an old local saying that "to be thrice prayed for in the kirk of Birnie will either mend or end ye."

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  • Papa Stronsay (16) commemorates in its name, as others of both the Orkneys and Shetlands do, the labours of the Celtic papae, or missionaries, who preached the Christian gospel before the arrival of the Northmen.

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  • It is doubtful whether it must be ascribed to the Celtic evangelists or to a much later period - not earlier than the 12th century.

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  • In the wake of the Scots incursionists followed the Celtic missionaries about 565.

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  • Their name is Celtic in form, and many writers suppose that the Teutoni were really a Celtic tribe, a branch of the Helvetii.

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  • Numerous parallels exist between the Arthurian and early Irish heroic cycles, notably the Fenian or Ossianic. This Fenian cycle is very closely connected with the Tuatha de Danaan, the Celtic deities of vegetation and increase; recent research has shown that two notable features of the Arthurian story, the Round Table and the Grail, can be most reasonably accounted for as survivals of this Nature worship, and were probably parts of the legend from the first.

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  • The foundation of the Celtic chair at Edinburgh University was mainly due to his efforts.

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  • The Greek and Roman forms are doubtless attempts to reproduce a Celtic original, the exact form of which is still matter of dispute.

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  • Real knowledge begins with two Celtic invasions, that of the Goidels in the later part of the Bronze Age, and that of the Brythons and Belgae in the Iron Age.

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  • These invaders brought Celtic civilization and dialects.

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  • It is uncertain how far they were themselves Celtic in blood and how far they were numerous enough to absorb or obliterate the races which they found in Britain.

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  • In art, these tribes possessed a native Late Celtic fashion, descended from far-off Mediterranean antecedents and more directly connected with the La-Tene culture of the continental Celts.

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  • The late Celtic age was one which genuinely delighted in beauty of form and detail.

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  • The chief of these seem to be cantonal capitals, probably developed out of the market centres or capitals of the Celtic tribes before the Roman conquest.

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  • Traces of late Celtic art are singularly absent; Roman fashions rule supreme, and inscriptions show that even the lower classes here spoke and wrote Latin.

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  • In fact, as well as in Celtic etymology, it was " the town in the forest."

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  • The Celtic element, never quite extinct in those hills and, like most forms of barbarism, reasserting itself in this wild age - not without reinforcement from Ireland - challenged the remnants of Roman civilization and in the end absorbed them.

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  • The Celtic language reappeared; the Celtic art emerged from its shelters in the west to develop in new and medieval fashions.

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  • There is no evidence that it was still practised when the Roman and Celtic missionaries arrived, but it is worth noting that according to the tradition given in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, Oxfordshire, where the custom seems to have been fairly common, was not conquered before the latter part of the 6th century.

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  • Various Celtic and Roman antiquities have been found around Niederbronn.

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  • His close alliance with the Celtic church is the characteristic feature of his reign.

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  • In the British Isles, especially Ireland, there is (in addition to the Celtic-speaking elements) a considerable population which claims Celtic nationality though it uses no language but English; and further all Teutonic communities contain to a greater or less degree certain immigrant (especially Semitic) elements which have adopted the languages of their neighbours.

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  • What peoples inhabited these regions can only be conjectured, but there is a certain amount of evidence from place-names - not altogether satisfactory - that the Celtic peoples at one time extended eastwards throughout the basin of the Weser.

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  • With the beginning of the iron age (perhaps c. 500-400 B.C.) Celtic influence becomes apparent everywhere.

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  • By this time, however, the great Celtic movement towards the south-east had probably begun, so that the Teutonic peoples were now cut off from direct communication with the centres of southern civilization.

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  • These latter districts, however, had been conquered from the Boii, a Celtic people, shortly before the beginning of our era.

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  • Towards both the south and west the Teutonic peoples seem to have been pressing the Celts for some considerable time, since we are told that the Helvetii had formerly extended as far as the Main, while another important Celtic tribe, the Volcae Tectosages, had occupied a still more remote position, which it is impossible now to identify.

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  • The settlers, however, were not sufficiently numerous to preserve their nationality, and in almost all cases they were soon absorbed by the populations (Teutonic, Celtic, Latin or Slavonic) which they had conquered.

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  • Further, there is satisfactory evidence that the basin of the Rhine, perhaps also a considerable area beyond, had been conquered from Celtic peoples not very long before - from which it is probable that western Germany was still in a more or less unsettled condition.

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  • During the time that it was occupied by the Romans, a period estimated at 320 years, the city was called Victoria; but shortly after their withdrawal it seems to have borne the Celtic appellation of Aber-tha ("at the mouth of the Tay").

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  • The similar Celtic form Pinc is said to have given rise to the Low Latin Pincio, and thence come the Italian Pincione, the Spanish Pinzon, and the French Pinson.

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  • The first pioneers who went forth to engage in this difficult enterprise came from the secluded Celtic Churches of Ireland and the Scottish Highlands.

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  • Travelling generally in companies, and carrying a simple outfit, these Celtic pioneers flung themselves on the continent of Europe, and, not content with reproducing at Annegray or Luxeuil the willow or brushwood huts, the chapel and the round tower, which they had left behind in Derry or in the island of Hy (Iona), they braved the dangers of the northern seas, and penetrated as far as the Faroes and even far distant Iceland.

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  • The valour of the Aetolians was conspicuously displayed in 279, when they broke the strength of the Celtic irruption by slaughtering great hordes of marauders.

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  • The derivation of the name Alps is still very uncertain, some writers connecting it with a Celtic root alb, said to mean height, while others suggest the Latin adjective albus (white), referring to the colour of the snowy peaks.

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  • Most likely they were descendants of the Marcomanni, Quadi and Narisci, tribes of the Suevic or Swabian race, with possibly a small intermixture of Gothic or Celtic elements.

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  • No doubt they were an outpost of the Germans, and so had absorbed into themselves strong Getic, Celtic and Sarmatian elements.

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  • At the earliest historical period we find the territories between the Ardennes and the Rhine occupied by the Treviri, the Eburones and other Celtic tribes, who, however, were all more or less modified and influenced by their Teutonic neighbours.

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  • The place probably owes its Celtic name of Llan-ym-ddyffri (the church amid the waters) to the proximity of Llandingat church to the streams of the Towy, Bran and Gwydderig.

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  • The beginnings of Celtic monachism are obscure, but it seems to have been closely connected with the tribal system.'

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  • The ancient Celtic Brixia, a town of the Cenomani, became Roman in 225 B.C., when the Cenomani submitted to Rome.

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  • In and after the later part of the 5th century it received many Celtic immigrants from the British Isles, fleeing (it is said) from the Saxons; and the Celtic dialect which the Bretons still speak is thought to owe its origin to these immigrants.

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  • The earliest known natives of this region were the Celtic Rutheni, to whom the numerous megalithic monuments found in the department are attributed.

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  • The harbour, a natural recess among the cliffs, is sheltered on the east by Hilsborough Head, where there are some alleged Celtic remains; on the west by Lantern Hill, where the ancient chapel of St Nicholas has been transformed into a lighthouse.

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  • That a strong Celtic element existed in Spain is proved both by numerous traditions and by the more trustworthy evidence of place-names.

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  • The Celtic place-names of Spain, however, are not confined to Celtiberia or even to the north and east; they occur even in the south and west.

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  • After wandering about two months through the Celtic region, sometimes in rude boats which did not protect him from the rain, and sometimes on small shaggy ponies which could hardly bear his weight, he returned to his old haunts with a mind full of new images and new theories.

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  • He was probably already regarded as the leading exponent of the Roman discipline in England when his speech at the council of Whitby determined the overthrow of the Celtic party (664).

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  • Wilfrid's is a memorable name in English history, not only because of the large part he played in supplanting the Celtic discipline and in establishing a precedent of appeal to papal authority, but also by reason of his services to architecture and learning.

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  • When our records first begin the western and southern portions of Germany seem to have been inhabited by Celtic peoples (see below Ethnography).

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  • La Tne, in Switzerland, has given its name to the period, of which the earlier part corresponds to the time of Celtic supremacy.

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  • It is interesting to note how the Celts absorb Roman and still more Greek culture, even imitating foreign coins, and pass on their new arts to their Teutonic neighbors; but in spite of the strong foreign influence the Celtic civilization can in some sort be termed national.

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  • It would therefore seem that the name Germani originally denoted certain Celtic tribes to the east of the Rhine, and that it was then transferred to the Teutonic tribes which subsequently occupied the same territory.

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  • There is little doubt that during the last century before the Christian era the Celtic peoples had been pushed considerably fartherwest by the Teutonic peoples, a process which Their was still going on in Caesars time, when we hear of ments.

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  • It has been thought that they inhabited the basin of the Weser, and a number of place-names in this district are supposed to be of Celtic origin.

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  • Farther to the south and west Ptolemy mentions a number of place-names which are certainly Celtic, e.g.

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  • There is therefore great probability that a large part of western Germany east of the Rhine had formerly been occupied by Celtic peoples.

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  • We find the same custom in the Celtic church of St Columba.

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  • The southern part of the country now called Austria was inhabited before the opening of the Christian era by the Taurisci, a Celtic tribe, who were subsequently called the Norici, Early in- and who were conquered by the Romans about 14 B.C. habitants.

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  • From the Greeks of southern Gaul Hellenic influences penetrated the Celtic races so far that imitations of Greek coins were struck even on the coasts of the Atlantic.

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  • In that part of Phrygia, which by the settlement of the Celtic invaders became Galatia, the larger towns seem to have become Hellenized by the time of the Christian era, whilst the Celtic speech maintained itself in the country villages till the 4th century A.D.

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  • In 1888 he was encouraged by Oscar Wilde to try his fortune in London, where he published in 1889 his first volume of verse, The Wanderings of Oisin; its original and romantic touch impressed discerning critics, and started a new interest in the "Celtic" movement.

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  • In 1892 he published another volume of verse, including The Countess Kathleen (a romantic drama), which gave the book its title, and in 1893 The Celtic Twilight, a volume of essays and sketches in prose.

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  • Whether or not "Celtic" is the right word for it, Mr Yeats's art was quickly identified by enthusiasts with the literary side of the new Irish national movement.

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  • It is in this reign that Asser applies to Alfred the unique title of secundarius, which seems to indicate a position analogous to that of the Celtic tanist, a recognized successor, closely associated with the reigning prince.

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  • His relations to the Celtic princes in the southern half of the island are clearer.

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  • The Celtic principality in Cornwall, which seems to have survived at least till 926, must long have been practically dependent on Wessex.

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  • The name - which Bede (730) wrote Mailros and Simeon of Durham (1130) Melros - is derived from the Celtic maol ros, " bare moor," and the town figures in Sir Walter Scott's Abbot and Monastery as "Kennaquhair."

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  • Throughout, Scotland remained substantially untouched by Roman influences, and its Celtic art, though perhaps influenced by Irish, remained free from Mediterranean infusion.

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  • The curious carvings and ramparts, at Burghead on the coast of Elgin, and the underground stone houses locally called "wheems," in which Roman fragments have been found, may represent the native forms of dwelling, &c., and some of the "Late Celtic" metal-work may belong to this age.

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  • The fertile low grounds on the east have offered facilities for the invasions of Romans, Norsemen and English, while the mountain fastnesses of the interior and the west have served as secure retreats for the older Celtic population.

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  • The central, southern and eastern Highlands are occupied by metamorphosed sedimentary and igneous rocks, to which has been provisionally assigned the name of Dalradian, from the old Celtic kingdom of Dalriada.

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  • After 1841, however, the population in several Highland shires-in which the clearance of crofters to make way for deer was one of the most strongly-felt grievances among the Celtic part of the people-in the islands, and in some of the southern counties, diminished.

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  • In later days the Celtic kings of northern and western Scotland succeeded in holding, on vague conditions of homage to the English crown, the English-speaking region of historic Scotland.

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  • That region was the most fertile, had the best husbandry, and possessed the most civilized population, a people essentially English in language and institutions, but indomitably attached to the Celtic dynasties of the western and northern part of the island.

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  • This English element, in a nation ruled by a Celtic dynasty, prevented Scotland from becoming, like Wales, a province of England.

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  • About the same date (573) the king of Cymric Strathclyde summoned, from exile in Wales, St Kentigern, the patron saint of Glasgow, who restored a Christianity almost or quite submerged in paganism, Celtic and English.

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  • The Celtic church, unluckily, differed from the Roman on the question of the method of calculating the date of Easter, the form of the tonsure, and other usages, one of them apparently relating to a detail in the celebration of the Holy Communion.

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  • Meanwhile Rome was too strong, and in 604, in a synod held at Whitby, St Wilfrid procured the acceptance of Roman as against Celtic doctrine in the questions th.en at issue.

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  • The English Christians overcame the Celtic divines of Iona, and in 710 even in Pictland they came into the customs of western Christianity.

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  • The church of the Celtic tribe thus yielded to the church of the Roman empire.

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  • The English or anglicized element in Scotland was never subjugated by England, save during the few years of the Cromwellian Commonwealth, and was supported (with occasional defections, and troubles caused by dynastic Celtic risings) by the Celtic element in the kingdom during the long struggle for national independence.

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  • Such were the consequences, in the sequel, of what seemed a disastrous event, the absorption, by a Celtic kingdom, of a large and fertile region of northern England.

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  • From Lulach descended a line of Celtic pr tendants, and for a century the dynasty violently founded by Malcolm II.

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  • Thus Celtic principles, as opposed to the western principles of chartered feudalism, did not perish in Scotland without a long and severe struggle.

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  • Margaret, in fact, completed the reduction of the Celtic church in Scotland to conformity with western Christendom, and some recent presbyterian writers have not forgiven her.

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  • The last Celtic " bishop of Alban " died at this time; and when the dynasty of Malcolm Canmore was established after an interval of turmoil, English ecclesiastics began to oust the Celtic Culdees from St Andrews.

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  • He put out the eyes of his uncle, Donald Ban, and in unsaintly ways established the dynasty of the English St Margaret and of the Celtic Malcolm.

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  • With Anglo-Norman aid he repelled a Celtic rising - the right of the claimants to represent the blood of Lulach is exquisitely complex and obscure in this case - but in the end David annexed to the crown the great old sub-kingdom or province of Moray, and made grants therein to English, Norman and Scottish followers.

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  • His charters to landowners and burghs (charters not being novel in Scotland, but now more lavishly conferred) substituted written documents for the unwritten customs of Celtic tenure, and converted the under kings of provinces into earls of the king, while vice-comites, or sheriffs, administered local justice in the king's name, though Celtic custom still prevailed, under a thin veneer of law, in the Celtic regions, as in Galloway.

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  • Malcolm the Maiden, before his early death in 1165, had put down the menacing power of Somerled, lord of the Isles, a chief apparently of mixed Celtic and Scandinavian blood, the founder of the great clan of Macdonald, whose chiefs, the lords of the Isles, were almost royal; Malcolm also subdued the Celts of Galloway, sometimes called Picts, but at this time Gaelic in speech.

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  • The capture of William at Alnwick, in July 1174, permitted a Celtic revolt in Galloway, and necessitated the Treaty of Falaise, by which for fifteen years Scotland was absolutely a fief of England, though the clergy maintained their independence of the see of York, which was recognized by Pope Clement III.

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  • The Celtic risings now were made in defence of the royal claims of a descendant of Duncan, son of Malcolm Canmore; there were also MacHeth claimants to the old rights of Lulach; Galloway and the Celtic north were ceaselessly agitated.

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  • In the reign of his successor, Alexander II., the risings of Celtic claimants died out; he converted Argyll into a sheriffdom, and (1237) resigned the claims to Northumberland, in exchange for lands in the northern English counties g g with a rental of £200 yearly.

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  • The Ragman's Roll contains sworn submissions of all probi homines outside of the western thoroughly Celtic region; and, in October 1296, Edward returned to England, with Baliol his prisoner, leaving Scotland in the hands of the earl of Surrey as guardian, Cressingham as treasurer, and Ormsby as justiciary.

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  • It appears, however, that he was, or was suspected of being, in treasonable alliance with the new earl of Crawford and the ever-turbulent Celtic lord of the Isles.

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  • Macbain (Stirling, 1902); other views are maintained in Rhys's Celtic Britain (1884).

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  • That the Romans had borrowed some things in the art of hunting from the Gauls may be inferred from the name canis gallicus (Spanish galgo) for a greyhound, which is to be met with both in Ovid and Martial; also in the words (canis) vertragus and segusius, both of Celtic origin.'

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  • The Romans founded, in the 2nd century A.D., on the right bank of the Danube, on the site of the actual O-Buda, a colony, on the place of a former Celtic settlement.

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  • This colony was named Aquincum, a transformation from the former Celtic name of Ak-ink, meaning "rich waters."

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  • About half a mile to the west of Boroughbridge there are three upright stones called the Devil's Arrows, which are of uncertain origin but probably of the Celtic period.

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  • He was sprung from a race the heads of which had been Celtic chiefs, had lost their lands in the wars of Ireland, and had felt the full weight of the harsh penal code which long held the Catholic Irish down.

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  • Some considerable number of tin drinkingcups and bowls of the Celtic period have been found in Cornwall in the neighbourhood of the celebrated tin and copper mines, which have been worked from a very early period.

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  • The megalithic monuments of Iberia and Celtic Europe have their counterparts in northern Africa, and it is suggested that these were all erected by the same race, by whatever name they be known, Berbers and Libyans in Africa, Iberians in Spain, Celts, Gauls and Picts in France and Britain.

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  • The name Borbetomagus indicates a Celtic origin for the town, which had, however, before Caesar's time become the capital of a German tribe, the Vangiones.

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  • In the neighbourhood is the celebrated Celtic burial ground, where a great number of very interesting antiquities have been found.

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  • Authorities dispute as to the origin of the name, some tracing it to Ara Lunae, a temple of Diana having been erected here, while others more plausibly derive it from the Celtic words ar (mount) and lun (wooded).

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  • From this system probably developed the ogam writing employed among the Celtic peoples of Britain and Ireland.

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  • During the 3rd century, 278-277 B.C., certain Gallic tribes crossed the Bosporus and Hellespont, and established a Celtic power in central Asia Minor.

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  • In the crannog of Lisnacroghera, county Antrim, iron swords, with sheaths of thin bronze ornamented with scrolls characteristic of the Late Celtic style, iron daggers, an iron spear-head 162 in.

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  • Besides the implements and weapons of iron there are fibulae and brooches of bronze, weaving combs and spindle-whorls, a bronze mirror and tweezers, wheel-made pottery as well as hand-made, ornamented with Late Celtic patterns, a bowl of thin bronze decorated with bosses, the nave of a wooden wheel with holes for twelve spokes, and a dug-out canoe.

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  • Bochart was a man of profound erudition; he possessed a thorough knowledge of the principal Oriental languages, including Hebrew, Syriac, Chaldaic and Arabic; and at an advanced age he wished to learn Ethiopic. He was so absorbed in his favourite study, that he saw Phoenician and nothing but Phoenician in everything, even in Celtic words, and hence the number of chimerical etymologies which swarm in his works.

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  • In the 12th century the Celtic Church was completely metamorphosed on the Roman pattern, and in the process the Culdees also lost any distinctiveness they may formerly have had, being brought, like the secular clergy, under canonical rule.

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  • In northern Gaul, early in 68, the standard of revolt was raised by Julius Vindex, governor of Gallia Lugdunensis, and himself the head of an ancient and noble Celtic family.

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  • Though they defeated Vindex and his Celtic levies at Vesontio (Besancon), their next step was to break the statues of Nero and offer the imperial purple to their own commander Virginius Rufus.

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  • It is most probably the British Cadman, intermediate between the Old Celtic Catumanus and the modern Welsh Cadfan.

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  • In other languages, like Oscan and Umbrian which are closely akin to Latin, or the Welsh branch of the Celtic languages, p occurs regularly without regard to the nature of the vowel following.

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  • Among the early Teutonic and Celtic races, especially from the 8th to the 11th centuries, both in Britain and other countries, niello was ' Div.

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  • It was the common belief that they had been driven from their homes on the North Sea by inundations, but, whatever the cause of their migration, they had been wandering along the Danube for some years warring with the Celtic tribes on either bank.

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  • We detect them in the Celtic church of St Patrick, and, as late as the 7th century, among the Celtic elders of the north of France.

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  • Nantygof, the blacksmith's brook; Trefecca, the house of Rebecca; Llwyn Madoc, Madoc's grove; Pantsaeson, the Saxons' glen, &c. An historical origin is frequently commemorated, notably in the many foundations of the Celtic missionaries of the 5th, 6th and 7th centuries, wherein the word llan (church) precedes a proper name; thus every Llanddewi recalls the early labours of Dewi Sant (St David); every Llandeilo, those of St Teilo; and such names as Llandudno, Llanafan, Llanbadarn and the like commemorate SS.

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  • Tudno, Afan, Padarn, &c. To the second division - those place-names which have been corrupted by English usage - belong most of the older historic towns, in striking contrast with the rural villages and parishes, which in nearly all cases have retained unaltered their original Celtic names.

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  • Anglicized in spelling and even to some extent changed in sound are Carmarthen (Caerfyrddin); Pembroke (Penfro); Kidwelly (Cydweli); Cardif f (Caerdydd); Llandovery (Llanymddyfri); while Lampeter, in Welsh Llanbedrpont-Stephan, affords an example of a Celtic place-name both Anglicized and abbreviated.

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  • Holyhead is Caergybi (fort of Cybi, a Celtic missionary of the 6th century); Presteign is Llanandras (church of St Andrew, or Andras); St Asaph is Llanelwy; the English name commemorating the reputed founder of the see, and the Welsh name recalling the church's original foundation on the banks of the Elwy.

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  • Cardigan, in Welsh Aberteifi, from its situation near the mouth of the Teifi, and Brecon, in Welsh Aberhonddu, from its site near the confluence of the Usk and Honddu, are examples of corrupted Welsh names in common use - Ceredigion, Brychan - which possess in addition pure Celtic forms. In the third division, English place-names are tolerably frequent everywhere and predominate in the Marches and on the South Wales coast.

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  • Hybrid place-names are occasionally to be met with in the colonized portions of Wales, as in Gelliswick (a combination of the Celtic gelli, a hazel grove, and the Norse wick, a haven), and in Fletherhill, where the English suffix hill is practically a translation of the Celtic prefix.

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  • A notable example of this curious nomenclature occurs in Bethesda, Carnarvonshire, where the name of the Congregational chapel erected early in the 10th century has altogether supplanted the original Celtic place-name of Cilfoden.

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  • But although English and foreign place-names are fairly numerous throughout Wales, yet the vast majority remain Celtic either in a pure or in a corrupted form, so that some knowledge of the Celtic language is essential to interpret their meaning.

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  • Wy, or gwy, an obsolete Celtic word for water, preserved in the names of many Welsh rivers - Elwy, Gwili, Wye or Gwy.

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  • With the accession of Constantine, Christianity was introduced by the Romans into the parts of Wales already colonized, and the efforts of the Roman priests were later supplemented during the 5th, 6th and 7th centuries by the devoted labours of Celtic missionaries, of whom nearly five hundred names still remain on record.

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  • With the withdrawal of the Roman legions, the recognized powers of the Dux Britanniarum, the Roman official who governed the upper province of Britain, were in the 5th century assumed by the Celtic prince Cunedda under the title of Gwledig (the Supreme), who fixed his court and residence at Deganwy, near the modern Llandudno.

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  • Welsh, the Celtic language spoken by the ancient Britons, is the domestic tongue of the majority of the inhabitants of the Principality.

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  • Primitive Celtic split up, as already shown, into two dialects, represented in modern times by two groups of languages - (i) the Goidelic group, comprising Irish, Scottish, Gaelic and Manx.

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  • Gaulish, which was supplanted in France by Latin, had p, as in petor-ritum, " fourwheeled car," and is thus allied to the Brythonic group; but it is believed that remains of a continental Celtic qu- dialect appear in such names as Sequani, and in some recently discovered inscriptions.

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  • In Brythonic, primitive Celtic qu became p, as above noted.

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  • Probably also Celtic u was advancing or had advanced to a forward position, for it appears in Welsh as I, as in din, " stronghold," from Celtic *dun-on, cognate with Eng.

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  • In Welsh the name is Ynys yr Afallon, usually interpreted "Isle of Apples," but possibly connected with the Celtic tradition of a king over the dead named Avalloc (in Welsh Afallach).

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  • A similar idea also occurs in legends of world-wide currency, the best known of these being the Greek, and the medieval Norse, Celtic and Arab legends which describe an earthly Paradise in the Western or Atlantic Ocean (see Atlantis).

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  • The lake-village discovered in 1892 proves that there was a Celtic settlement about 300-200 B.C. on an island in the midst of swamps, and therefore easily defensible.

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  • Antigonus' preoccupation during the Celtic invasions, Sparta's prostration after the Chremonidean campaigns, the wealth amassed by Achaean adventurers abroad and the subsidies of Egypt, the standing foe of Macedonia, all enhanced the league's importance.

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  • The philologists have added to the confusion by classing as " Celtic " the speeches of the darkcomplexioned races of the west of Scotland and the west of Ireland.

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  • But, though usage has made it convenient in this work to employ the term, " Celtic " cannot be properly applied to what is really " Gaelic."

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  • This race is often termed `` Celtic " or " Alpine " from the fact of its occurrence all along the great mountain chain from south-west France, in Savoy, in Switzerland, the Po valley and Tirol, as well as in Auvergne, Brittany, Normandy, Burgundy, the Ardennes and the Vosges.

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  • Thus the " Celtic " ox (Bos longifrons), from remote ages the common type in the Alpine regions, is characterized by the height of its forehead above the orbits, by its highly-developed occipital region, and its small horns.

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  • But as the most dreaded of these Celtic tribes came down from the shores of the Baltic and Northern Ocean, the ancients applied the name Celt to those peoples who are spoken of as Teutonic in modern parlance.

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  • Nor was it only towards the south and the Hellespont that the Celtic tide ever set.

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  • It is not unlikely that, as tradition states, there were incursions of Celts from central Gaul into Ireland during the general Celtic unrest in the 6th century B.C. It is certain that at a later period invaders from the continent, bringing with them the later Iron Age culture, commonly called La Tene, which had succeeded that of Hallstatt, had settled in Ireland.

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  • The Celts are thus clearly distinguished from the Gaelic-speaking dark race of Britain and Ireland, and in spite of usage it must be understood that it is strictly misleading to apply the term Celtic to the latter language.

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  • The Celtic language is still spoken in lower Brittany.

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  • In the 5th century numbers of the Celtic inhabitants of Britain, flying from the Angles and Saxons, emigrated to Armorica, and populated a great part of the peninsula.

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  • The Celtic immigrants formed the counties of Vannes, Cornouaille, Leon and Domnonee.

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  • Some derive it from Celtic roots - ber, small, short, and lyn, a lake; others regard it as a Wend word, meaning a free, open place; others, again, refer it to the word werl, a river island.

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  • By Celtic usage abbesses presided over joint-houses of monks and nuns.

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  • This custom accompanied Celtic monastic missions to France and Spain, and even to Rome itself.

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  • He was educated at Edinburgh High School, in Germany and at the university of St Andrews, taking an especial interest in the study of Celtic philology and literature.

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  • His chief work, however, is his Celtic Scotland, a History of Ancient Alban (3 vols.,, Edinburgh, 1876-1880), perhaps the most important contribution to Scottish history written during the 19th century.

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  • Littre, however, takes the word to be Old Celtic, and meaning "genius," and states that it occurs in such forms as sulfa, sylfi, &c., in inscriptions, or latinized as sulevae or suleviae.

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  • The Roman settlement of Vitudurum [Celtic dur, water] was a.

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  • The people of the more rugged and remoter groups of this division are by race survivors of the early Celtic stock, which, being driven by successive invaders from the open and fertile country of the Eastern Division, found refuges in the less inviting but more easily defended lands of the west.

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  • The unity and ruggedness of the highlands of Wales have proved sufficient to isolate the people from those of the rest of South Britain, and to preserve a purely Celtic race, still very largely of Celtic speech.

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  • The Celtic influence is to be found scattered evenly up and down the country so far as names of rivers and mountains are concerned; in names of towns it is chiefly confined to the west.

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  • In modern place-names the suffix don often goes back to the Celtic dun, a hill, e.g.

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  • Of river-names the vast majority are Celtic (possible exceptions will be named later), and the same is true of mountains and hills.

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  • The forests of Wyre, Elmet and Sel (wood), and the districts of the Wrekin and the Peak are probably Celtic.

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  • In Lincoln we have a compound of the Celtic Lindum and the Latin colonia.

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  • His assertion that the Celtic race was incapable of assimilating the highest forms of civilization excited "violent disgust," but the Enquiry was twice reprinted, in 1794 and 1814, and is still of value for the documents embodied in it.

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  • The name Boudicca seems to mean in Celtic much the same as Victoria.

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  • It consisted of a small MS. of the Gospels in the Vulgate, fragments of the liturgy of the Celtic church, and notes, in the Gaelic script of the 12th century, referring to the charters of the ancient monastery, including a summary of that granted by David I.

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  • The supersession of the Celtic Cornish by English, and of the Slavonic Old-Prussian by German, are but examples of a process which has for untold ages been supplanting native dialects, whose very names have mostly disappeared.

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  • Since the 8th century three tonsures have been more or less in use, known respectively as the Roman, the Greek and the Celtic. The first two are sometimes distinguished as the tonsure of Peter and the tonsure of Paul.

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  • In the Celtic tonsure (tonsure of St John, or, in contempt, tonsure of Simon Magus) all the hair in front of a line drawn over the top of the head from ear to ear was shaven (a fashion common among the Hindus).

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  • The question of the Roman or Celtic tonsure was one of the points in dispute in the early British Church, settled in favour of the Roman fashion at the Council of Whitby (664).

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  • The direction of events towards the formation of serfdom is already clearly noticeable in Celtic communities.

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  • Some measure of success appears to have attended the efforts of Ambrosius, and it has been suggested that Amesbury in Wiltshire is connected with Emrys, the Celtic form of his name.

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  • That used by the sovereign dates from the time of Edward I., and contains beneath its seat the stone of Scone, or stone of destiny, on which the Celtic kings were crowned.

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  • It is probable that the conquest of the Celtic kingdom of Elmet, a district in the neighbourhood of the modern Leeds,, ruled over by a king named Cerdic (Ceredig) is to be referred to this period, and this may have led to the later quarrel with Cadwallon, king of Gwynedd.

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  • He produced letters which he had procured from all the leading Celtic scholars in Europe as to the value of the language and literature, and the publication of these letters and his own evidence saved the language on the Intermediate Board, and attracted a great deal of attention throughout Ireland.

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  • It was probably owing to Dr. Hyde's influence with his fellow commissioners that Trinity College, following their recommendations, established a moderatorship and gold medal in Celtic studies.

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  • This is the case, for instance, in the Celtic languages; and the Breton or Gaulish names have affected the Latin system, so that the French names for some numbers are on the vigesimal system.

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  • The original population appears to have consisted of Illyrians, who after the great emigration of the Gauls became subordinate to various Celtic tribes, chief amongst them being the Taurisci, probably called Norici by the Romans from their capital Noreia (Neumarkt).

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  • Noricum was the southern outpost of the northern or Celtic peoples and the starting-point of their attacks upon Italy.

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  • It is in Noricum that we first hear of almost all these Celtic invaders.

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  • The text and earlier commentaries are in the - the most archaic form of the Celtic or Gaelic language.

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  • Though their wars with the Welsh were not conducted with such ferocious cruelty as of old, and though (as the laws of Inc show) the Celtic inhabitants of newlywon districts were no longer exterminated, but received as the kings subjects, yet the hatred between Welsh and English did not cease because both were now Christians.

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  • The statute of Wales, issued at Rhuddlan in 1284, provided for the introduction of English law into the country, though a certain amount of Celtic customs was allowed to survive.

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  • They even made a great expedition to Ireland, where Bruces brother Edward was proclaimed king by the rebellious Celtic septs, and rode across the whole island, exterminating the Anglo-Irish population in many districts (1315-1317).

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  • Some reckless enthusiasts for truth set four trustworthy hospital nurses to watch her; the Celtic obstinacy of the parents was roused, and in defence of their imposture they allowed death to take place in eight days.

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  • The history of Dunfermline goes back to a remote period, for the early Celtic monks known as Culdees had an establishment here; but its fame and prosperity date from the marriage of Malcolm Canmore and his queen Margaret, which was solemnized in the town in 1070.

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  • Some authorities derive it from a proper name, Wiruto or Wirtino; others from a Celtic place-name, Virolunum or Verdunum.

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  • However he gave a great impetus to Celtic and anthropological studies.

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  • While shrewdness, plain straightforwardness, and a certain stern way of looking at life are common to both, the Icelandic school adds a complexity of structure and ornament, an elaborate mythological and enigmatical phraseology, and a regularity of rhyme, assonance, luxuriance, quantity and syllabification, which it caught from the Latin and Celtic poets, and adapted with exquisite ingenuity to its own main object, that of securing the greatest possible beauty of sound.

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  • Men of good birth (nearly always, too, of Celtic blood on one side at least), they leave Iceland young and attach themselves to the kings and earls of the north, living in their courts as their henchmen, sharing their adventures in weal and woe, praising their victories, and hymning their deaths if they did not fall by their sides - men of quick passion, unhappy in their loves, jealous of rival poets and of their own fame, ever ready to answer criticism with a satire or with a sword-thrust, but clinging through all to their art, in which they attained most marvellous skill.

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  • The site of Strassburg was originally occupied as a Celtic settlement, which was captured by the Romans, who replaced it by the fortified station of Argentoratum, afterwards the headquarters of the eighth legion.

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  • The name of Llanbedr-pont-Stephan goes to prove the early foundation of the place by St Pedr, a Celtic missionary of the 6th century, while one Stephen was the original builder of the bridge over the Teifi.

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  • At any rate it was not until well on in the Bronze Age, perhaps about 600 or 500 B.C., that the Goidels, the first invaders speaking a Celtic language, set foot in Ireland.

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  • The colonists were strong enough to send large forces to the king in his Scottish wars, but as there was no corresponding immigration this really weakened the English, whose best hopes lay in agriculture and the arts of peace, while the Celtic race waxed proportionally numerous.

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  • But Tyrone and Tyrconnel, and the mountains everywhere, sheltered the Celtic race, which, having reached its lowest point under Edward I., began to recover under his son.

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  • The Barretts, Condons, Courcies, Savages, Arundels, Carews and others had disappeared or were merged in the Celtic mass.

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  • The lands of the earl of Shrewsbury and other absentees, who had performed no duties, were resumed; and both Celtic and feudal nobles were encouraged to come to court.

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  • Between churchmen of Irish and English race there was bitter rivalry; but the theory that the ancient Celtic church remained independent, and as it were Protestant, while the English colony submitted to the Vatican, is a mere controversial figment.

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  • Both Celtic chiefs and Norman nobles founded convents after Henry II.'s time, but the latter being wealthier were most distinguished in this way.

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  • Tyrone submitted at last, craving pardon on his knees, renouncing his Celtic chiefry, and abjuring all foreign powers, but still retaining his earldom, and power almost too great for a subject.

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  • The " flight of the earls," as it is called, completed the ruin of the Celtic cause.

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  • O'Donovan (1851), compiled in Donegal under Charles I., gives a continuous account of Celtic Ireland down to 1616.

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  • The Annals of Clyn, Dowling and Grace have been printed by the Irish Archaeological Society and the Celtic Society.

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  • Greece, India and Scandinavia will supply a fair example of Aryan mythology (without entering on the difficult Slavonic and Celtic fields).

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  • For centuries they had been silently massing themselves around ancient Europe, whether Iberian, Celtic or Roman.

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  • Vizcaya (Biscay)a tongue which is utterly unlike Celtic or Italian or any Indo-Germanic languagesuggests that the Iberians may have been an older people than the Celts and alien from them in race, though the attempts hitherto made to connect Basque with ancient traces of strange tongues in the Basque lands have not yielded clear results.

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  • Sir Robert Gordon of Gordonstown used one as a stable in the rebellion of 1745; weapons of prehistoric man were found in another, and the roof of a third is carved with ornaments and emblems of early Celtic art.

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  • According to Ridgeway, the original source of the finest equine blood is Africa, still the home of the largest variety of wild Equidae; he concludes that thence it passed into Europe at an early time, to be blended with that of the indigenous Celtic species, and thence into western Asia into the veins of an indigenous Mongolian species, still represented by " Przewalski's horse "; not till a comparatively late period did it reach Arabia, though the " Arab " now represents the purest form of the Libyan blood.

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  • Native ponies include those variously known as Welsh, New Forest, Exmoor, Dartmoor, Cumberland and Westmorland, Fell, Highland, Highland Garron, Celtic, Shetland and Connemara.

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  • In addition to his achievements in black-letter bibliography he threw great light on ancient Celtic language and literature by the discovery, in 1857, of the Book of Deer, a manuscript copy of the Gospel in the Vulgate version, in which were inscribed old Gaelic charters.

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  • Bradshaw also discovered some Celtic glosses on the MS. of a metrical paraphrase of the Gospels by Juvencus.

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  • The old Celtic religion was also supplanted by the Roman.

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  • He is a passionate Celtic supporter, where he is also an investor.

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  • The Celtic artists drew inspiration from the infinitely subtle mutability of nature.

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  • There are red herrings even in the Celtic afterworlds.

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  • Beside the scenery, part of the region's allure is its distinct Celtic culture.

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  • A physical and on-line gallery featuring the artworks and calligraphy of Mary Fleeson, based on celtic inspired artwork and the Lindisfarne Gospels.

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  • Our product range includes bangles, bracelet s, brooches, celtic jewelry, earrings, pendants, necklaces and more.

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  • But speaking of the Celtic bard, I feel a little of the difficult pressing upon me.

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  • The most vehement agitation seized the length and breadth of the great Celtic land; the patriots everywhere bestirred themselves.

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  • The Celtic boss has moved for the former Rennes star after PSV Eindhoven demanded £ 5m for Jan Vennegoor of Hesselink.

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  • It is sometimes commented that there are so few relics of communion chalices from early Celtic times.

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  • By then, however, he had become much more English than Scottish, which did not commend him to the Celtic chieftains.

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  • The name Cocker is a fairly common river and stream name of Celtic origin which means crooked.

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  • The Red Dragon of Wales and the cloven Celtic cross of Cadw now fly from the Edwardian castles.

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  • I have also seen ' stone Celtic crosses ' just down the road at Margam Abbey, Port Talbot.

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  • Show Quality discus We offer show quality Discus from top breeder... Celtic discus Quality discus at discounted prices strains i.. .

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  • In the Celtic Tradition, the year begins at Samhain, this is the most powerful night of the year to perform divination.

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  • Celtic druids were among the first identifiable religious tribes to inhabit the area.

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  • Their leather jackets all emblazoned with a purple celtic cross show them most likely to own the bikes upfront.

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  • Immersed in Celtic myths & legends, hear about the Selkies, the mischievous faeries and learn the secret of eternal youth!

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  • The Pope hoped to replace the pagan Celtic festival with a church-sponsored holiday.

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  • Within the wells of Celtic folklore, the mystery of Loch Ness has baffled scientists for decades.

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  • Labor were kept in by the Celtic fringe; they are no longer a legitimate English government.

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  • Contact may have been minimal but the Celtic goalkeeper had invited the penalty.

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  • Many of the Celtic goddesses are linked with the raven or crow.

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  • It is in the form of a celtic crosshead of rough hewn granite in the center of which is a carved wreath.

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  • This is in origin a Celtic name perhaps meaning ' yew grove ' .

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  • Of particular concern are the northern hake and cod in the Celtic Sea area.

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  • Once I graduated I followed my hobby as my career and became a professional singer and Celtic harpist.

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  • Celtic feast day of ' Brynach ', sixth century Irish man who became a solitary hermit.

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  • Many local bands are taking their contemporary Celtic sound to foreign shores where it's proving infectious.

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  • The Gauls were the Celtic inhabitants of what is now France, and which was known as Gallia to the Romans.

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  • Love and friendship intertwined in the Celtic symbols on the ring have relevance to every couple contemplating marriage.

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  • About half of the population of Skye can speak the Gaelic language and the native islanders are very proud of their Celtic heritage.

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  • July 2001 Feeding the Celtic tiger Paul Walsh explores the Irish actuarial jungle where the tiger makes its home.

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  • The secret of a good Celtic knot is regularity.

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  • Its central theme is that of the mystical landscape of megaliths, burial mounds and Celtic legend.

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  • The History of longboat Rowing The Celtic Longboat is a 4 person coxed rowing boat used for racing, training and recreation.

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  • Celtic lore says rubbing primrose flowers over your eyelids can gie you a way into the fairy word.

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  • The Abbey was to become the Mausoleum of the early Celtic Kings of Scotland who wished to be buried near to St. Columba.

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  • Who sailed across the Celtic Sea on a granite millstone in the 5th Century, well at least that is how legend tells it.

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  • It opens with an X-Files effect - Celtic mysticism, anyone?

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  • Celtica Celtica is a unique attraction telling the story of Celtic myths and legends.

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  • An American, he moved to Britain to research Celtic mythology.

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  • For the first time, the Celtic style " woven texture " accompaniment unique to the instrument is fully notated.

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  • The Celtic pantheon certainly exists, but not in the regular manner defined by classical studies.

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  • A course in comparative Celtic philology is available in Part II (Paper 12 ).

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  • So is Celtic's Japanese playmaker Shunsuke Nakamura who had a big influence in his team's first match until Australia turned the tide.

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  • As one delicately plucks the strings of her Celtic harp, the other performs a captivating show with her crystal balls.

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  • The sole survivor of the ancient Celtic line was an infant Norwegian princess.

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  • Typical gifts include quality wooden boxes to any size, plaques and clocks decorated with locally-inspired or Celtic pyrography and painting.

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  • English is now the premier world language but miraculously its closest neighbor Welsh prospers and inspires revivals in all other Celtic languages.

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  • Make your own Celtic roundhouse with our easy to follow instructions.

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  • Our product range includes bangles, bracelet s bangles, bracelet s, brooches, celtic jewelry, earrings, pendants, necklaces and more.

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  • Such extravagant tales about the early Celtic saints were very common.

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  • This traditional design features celtic knot scrollwork on the handle, topped with faux amber, held in a silver colored clasp.

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  • No, the only truly shameful thing you can do in this city is to wear a Rangers shirt in a Celtic pub.

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  • All of Celtic sheepskin's huge range of Celt boots are made in Newquay from 100% real sheepskin.

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  • It is even seen in some representations of what is called " Celtic spirituality " .

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