How to use Cavendish in a sentence

cavendish
  • Cavendish, who had isolated the nitrogen of the atmosphere, had failed to decide conclusively what had really happened to the air which disappeared during combustion.

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  • Henry Cavendish, from which it appeared that Cavendish, already famous by many other researches (such as the mean density of the earth, the composition of water, &c.), must be looked on as, in his day, a man of Maxwell's own stamp as a theorist and an experimenter of the very first rank.

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  • Cavendish's brief Life, which is almost contemporary, has been often edited.

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  • In 1784 Henry Cavendish thoroughly examined hydrogen, establishing its elementary nature; and he made the far-reaching discovery that water was composed of two volumes of hydrogen to one of oxygen.

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  • Cavendish (1896-1897) followed somewhat in Donaldson Smith's steps, and the last named traveller again crossed Somaliland in his journey from Berbera via Lake Rudolf to the Upper Nile (1899-Igoo).

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  • The combination of nitrogen with oxygen was first effected by Cavendish in 1785, who employed a spark discharge.

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  • He then joined Cavendish, Birch, Hampden, Powell, Lyttleton and others in vehement antagonism to the court.

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  • In January 1680 Russell, along with Cavendish, Capell, Powell, Essex and Lyttleton, tendered his resignation to the king, which was received by Charles "with all my heart."

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  • A suggestion of escape from Lord Cavendish he refused.

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  • In 1586 Witherington plundered Bahia; E and i n 1591 Cavendish made an abortive attack on Santos; French in 1595 Lancaster attacked Olinda.

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  • It is mainly a rich residential quarter; the most fashionable part is found in the south, in the vicinity of Cavendish and Portman Squares, but there are numerous fine houses surrounding Regent's Park and in the north-western district of St John's Wood.

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  • Harley Street, between Marylebone Road and Cavendish Square, is noted as the residence of medical practitioners.

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  • Darwin's work shows, however, the tendency to connect medicine with physical science, which was an immediate consequence of the scientific discoveries of the end of the 18th century, when Priestley and Cavendish in England exercised the same influence as Lavoisier in France.

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  • Both cake and roll tobacco are equally used for smoking and chewing; for the latter purpose the cake is frequently sweetened with liquorice, and sold as honey-dew or sweet cavendish.

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  • On the 6th of May 1882 the newly appointed chief secretary for Ireland, Lord Frederick Cavendish, and his under-secretary, Mr Burke, were stabbed to death in the Phoenix Park at Dublin.

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  • Cavendish proved it by enclosing a metal sphere in two hemispheres of thin metal held on insulating supports.

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  • I It is an interesting fact that Cavendish measured capacity in " globular inches," using as his unit the capacity of a metal ball, in.

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  • Cavendish and subsequently Faraday discovered this fact, and the latter gave the name " specific inductive capacity," or " dielectric constant," to that quality of an insulator which determines the charge taken by a conductor embedded in it when charged to a given potential.

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  • The Cavendish dock adjoining the Ramsden dock on the E., 146 ac. in extent, has been leased by the Furness Railway Cp. to the firm of Vickers Ltd.

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  • Following the suggestion of Cavendish, Irving made observations of deep temperature on Phipps's Spitsbergen voyage of 1773 with a valved water-bottle, insulated by non-conducting material.

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  • Cavendish, Priestley, Lavoisier and others contributed to this result.

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  • He married in 1766 Lady Dorothy Cavendish (1750-1794), daughter of the 4th duke of Devonshire, and was succeeded as 4th duke by his son William Henry (1768-1854), who married a daughter of the famous gambler, General John Scott, and was brother-in-law to Canning.

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  • His son, the 5th duke, William John Cavendish Bentinck-Scott (1800-1879) died unmarried.

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  • In the following year he showed that plumbago consists essentially of carbon, and he published a record of estimations of the proportions of oxygen in the atmosphere, which he had carried on daily during the whole of 1778 - three years before Cavendish.

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  • On account of the descent from Henry VII., the jealousy of Elizabeth had already caused her to imprison Arabella's mother Elizabeth, daughter of Sir William Cavendish, on learning that she had presumed to marry Lennox.

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  • Henry Cavendish had before 1773 discovered that glass, wax, rosin and shellac have higher specific inductive capacities than air, and had actually determined the numerical ratios of these capacities, but this was unknown both to Faraday and to all other electricians of his time, since Cavendish's Electrical Researches remained unpublished till 1879.

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  • In 1883 he was appointed lecturer in Trinity College, and in the following year Cavendish professor of experimental physics in the university of Cambridge, a position he occupied until his resignation in 1918.

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  • In 1918 he was appointed master of Trinity College, Cambridge, and in the following year was elected to a newly established professorship of physics in the Cavendish Laboratory, where he continued to prosecute his researches.

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  • Since the time of Henry Cavendish no one seemed even to have asked the question whether the residue was, in truth, all capable of conversion into nitric acid.

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  • Reference to Cavendish showed that he had already raised this question in the most distinct manner, and indeed, to a certain extent, resolved it.

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  • Although, as was natural, Cavendish was satisfied with his result, and does not decide whether the small residue was genuine, it is probable that his residue was really of a different kind from the main bulk of the "phlogisticated air," and contained the gas afterwards named argon.

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  • Of these the first is merely a development of that of Cavendish.

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  • Cavendish determined its constitution and showed that it could be synthesized by passing a stream of electric sparks through moist air.

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  • See Henry, Life of Dalton, Cavendish Society (1854); Angus Smith, Memoir of John Dalton and History of the Atomic Theory (1856), which on pp. 253-263 gives a list of Dalton's publications; and Roscoe and Harden, A New View of the Origin of Dalton's Atomic Theory (1896); also Atom.

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  • A memoir in the volume for 1783 relates to the production of water by the combustion of hydrogen; but Monge's results had been anticipated by Henry Cavendish.

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  • Cavendish, who showed that it was formed when various metals were acted upon by dilute sulphuric or hydrochloric acids.

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  • Cavendish called it "inflammable air," and for some time it was confused with other inflammable gases, all of which were supposed to contain the same inflammable principle, "phlogiston," in combination with varying amounts of other substances.

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  • He tells how, when he had slowly taken in the doctrine of logical figures and moods, he put it aside and would prove things only in his own way; how he then heard about bodies as consisting of matter and form, as throwing off species of themselves for perception, and as moved by sympathies and antipathies, with much else of a like sort, all beyond his comprehension; and how he therefore turned to his old books again, fed his mind on maps and charts of earth and sky, traced the sun in his path, followed Drake and Cavendish girdling the main, and gazed with delight upon pictured haunts of men and wonders of unknown lands.

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  • In the same year Hobbes was recommended by Wilkinson as tutor to the son of William Cavendish, baron of Hardwick (afterwards 2nd earl of Devonshire), and thus began a lifelong connexion with a great and powerful family.

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  • Young Cavendish was hardly younger than Hobbes, and had been married, a few months before, at the instance of the king, to Christiana, the only daughter of Edward, Lord Bruce of Kinloss, though by reason of the bride's age, which was only twelve years, the pair had no establishment for some time.

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  • Baille about 1870 a repetition of Cavendish's experiment for determining the mean density of the earth, his original work was mainly concerned with.

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  • The church of St Mary is of Norman and later date; it contains some interesting early stone-carving, and monuments to the family of Cavendish, who acquired the castle in the 16th century.

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  • It was not till the 25th of June 1783 that in conjunction with Laplace he announced to the Academy that water was the product formed by the combination of hydrogen and oxygen, but by that time he had been anticipated by Cavendish, to whose prior work, however, as to that of several other investigators in other matters, it is to be regretted that he did not render due acknowledgment.

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  • That year he accompanied Wolsey on his important diplomatic mission to France, the splendour and magnificence of which are so graphically described by Cavendish.

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  • With his relatives he had little intercourse, and even Lord George Cavendish, whom he made his principal heir, he saw only for a few minutes once a year.

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  • Cavendish's scientific work is distinguished for the wideness of its range and for its extraordinary exactness and accuracy.

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  • Starting from an experiment, narrated by Priestley, in which John Warltire fired a mixture of common air and hydrogen by electricity, with the result that there was a diminution of volume and a deposition of moisture, Cavendish burnt about two parts of hydrogen with five of common air, and noticed that almost all the hydrogen and about one-fifth of the common air lost their elasticity and were condensed into a dew which lined the inside of the vessel employed.

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  • It may be noted here that, while Cavendish adhered to the phlogistic doctrine, he did not hold it with anything like the tenacity that characterized Priestley; thus, in his 1784 paper on "Experiments on Air," he remarks that not only the experiments he is describing, but also "most other phenomena of nature seem explicable as well, or nearly as well," upon the Lavoisierian view as upon the commonly believed principle of phlogiston, and he goes on to give an explanation in terms of the antiphlogistic hypothesis.

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  • Early in his career Cavendish took up the study of heat, and had he promptly published his results he might have anticipated Joseph Black as the discoverer of latent heat and of specific heat.

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  • Cavendish also had a taste for geology, and made several tours in England for the purpose of gratifying it.

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  • A life by George Wilson (1818-1859), printed for the Cavendish Society in 1851, contains an account of his writings, both published and unpublished, together with a critical inquiry into the claims of all the alleged discoverers of the composition of water.

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  • Some of his instruments are preserved in the Royal Institution, London, and his name is commemorated in the Cavendish Physical Laboratory at Cambridge, which was built by his kinsman the 7th duke of Devonshire.

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  • Ann., 1803) pursued the subject with success; and Henry Cavendish (Phil.

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  • The work of Henry Cavendish (1731-1810) entitles him to a high place in the list of electrical investigators.

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  • A considerable part of Cavendish's work was rescued from oblivion in 1879 and placed in an easily accessible form by Professor Clerk Maxwell, who edited the original manuscripts in the possession of the duke of Devonshire.'

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  • Amongst Cavendish's important contributions were his exact measurements of electrical capacity.

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  • Cavendish compared the capacity of different bodies with those of conducting spheres of known diameter and states these capacities in " globular inches," a globular inch being the capacity of a sphere 1 in.

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  • Cavendish measured the capacity of disks and condensers of various forms, and proved that the capacity of a Leyden pane is proportional to the surface of the tinfoil and inversely as the thickness of the glass.

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  • Cavendish meant by the term " velocity " what we now call the current, and by " resistance " the electromotive force which maintains the current.

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  • Cavendish also enunciated in 1776 all the laws of division of electric current between circuits in parallel, although they are generally supposed to have been first given by Sir C. Wheatstone.

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  • The accuracy of his measurement, by which he established within 2% the above law, was only limited by the sensibility, or rather insensibility, of the pith ball electrometer, which was his only means of detecting the electric charge.2 In the accuracy of his quantitative measurements and the range of his researches and his combination of mathematical and physical knowledge, Cavendish may not inaptly be described as the Kelvin of the 18th century.

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  • Coulomb (1736-1806), who in France addressed himself to the same kind of exact quantitative work as Cavendish in England.

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  • Coulomb has made his name for ever famous by his invention and application of his torsion balance to the experimental verification of the fundamental law of electric attraction, in which, however, he was anticipated by Cavendish, namely, that the force of attraction between two small electrified spherical bodies varies as the product of their charges and inversely as the square of the distance of their centres.

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  • Coulomb's work received better publication than Cavendish's at the time of its accomplishment, and provided a basis on which mathematicians could operate.

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  • He ascertained the distribution of electricity among several spheres (whether equal or unequal) placed in contact in a straight line; and he measured the distribution of 2 In 1878 Clerk Maxwell repeated Cavendish's experiments with improved apparatus and the employment of a Kelvin quadrant electrometer as a means of detecting the absence of charge on the inner conductor after it had been connected to the outer case, and was thus able to show that if the law of electric attraction varies inversely as the nth power of the distance, then the exponent n must have a value of 2 t Isua.

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  • These two gases, as Cavendish and James Watt had shown in 1784, were actually the constituents of water.

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  • This discovery was made in November 1837 when Faraday had no knowledge of Cavendish's previous researches into this matter.

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  • Succeeding Maxwell as Cavendish professor of physics at Cambridge in 1880, he soon devoted himself especially to the exact redetermination of the practical electrical units in absolute measure.

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  • The Cavendish Terrace forms a fine promenade, and the neighbourhood of the town is rich in objects of interest.

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  • He was elected a fellow of the Royal Society in the same year as Henry Cavendish (1760).

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  • His laborious operations for determining the mean density of the earth, carried on by Henry Cavendish's method (1838-1842), yielded for it the authoritative value of 5.66.

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  • In the same year he married Arabella, daughter of Henry Cavendish, 2nd duke of Newcastle; she died in 1698 and in 1700 he married Anne Churchill, daughter of the famous duke of Marlborough.

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  • On the 2nd of May Mr Gladstone announced that the government intended to release Mr Parnell and his fellow-prisoners in Kilmainham, and that both Lord Cowper and Mr Forster had in consequence resigned; and the following Saturday Forster's successor, Lord Frederick Cavendish, was, with Mr Burke, murdered in Phoenix Park.

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  • It was an odd commentary on parliamentary government that a Liberal ministry should be in power, and that Irish members should be in prison; and early in 1882 Gladstone determined to liberate the prisoners on terms. The new policyrepresented by what was known as the Kilmainham Treatyled to the resignation of the viceroy, Lord Cowper, and of Forster, and the appointnient of Lord Spencer and Lord Frederick Cavendish as their successors.

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  • Lord Cowper and Forster at once resigned, and were succeeded by Lord Spencer and Lord Frederick Cavendish, who entered Dublin on the 6th of May.

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  • He took a leading part in the foundation of the London Chemical and the Cavendish societies, and served as first president of both, in 1841 and 1846.

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  • Another luxury deal handled by Cavendish was the sale of jewelry chain Mappin & Webb to the highly acquisitive Icelandic investor Baugur.

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  • Mr Garrett was one of the leading agriculturists in the district, farming extensively in Cavendish and the neighborhood for 40 years.

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  • For his doctoral research in high-energy astrophysics he studied at the Cavendish Laboratory under Nobel Laureate Sir Martin Ryle FRS.

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  • Cavendish rejected atomism in 1655 because it might level the hierarchical order in which she believed; it could also threaten political stability.

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  • September 3 rd 1919 There was a rather hurried meeting called at Cavendish to discuss the proposed war memorial.

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  • February 11 th 1824 Valuable Estate called Motts situated near Cavendish church, comprising messuage, barn, cowhouse, stables, 36 acres.

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  • Hobbes and Cavendish shared pessimism about human nature, and an anxiety about ethical and linguistic relativism.

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  • Moreover, by positing the ontological primacy of potentiality, Cavendish is proposing a model which accommodates more highly differentiated, multi-dimensional thinking.

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  • George Cavendish was gentleman usher to the famous Wolsey, and his brother, William, was the founder of the Dukedom of Devonshire.

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  • It was spurred into renewed activity by the audacity of Sir John Hawkins in the West Indies, and by the appearance of Drake, Cavendish and Richard Hawkins in the Pacific.

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  • The colony which he afterwards took out from Spain was a complete failure, and is only remembered now from the name of " Port Famine," which Cavendish gave to the site at which he found the starving remnant of Sarmiento's settlers.

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  • The synthesis of nitric acid by passing electric sparks through moist air by Cavendish is a famous piece of experimental work, for in the first place it determined the composition of this important substance, and in the second place the minute residue of air which would not combine, although ignored for about a century, was subsequently examined by Lord Rayleigh and Sir William Ramsay, who showed that it consists of a mixture of elementary substances - argon, krypton, neon and xenon (see Argon).

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  • For the proof of the converse proposition we must refer the reader to the Electrical Researches of Cavendish, p. 419, or to Maxwell's Treatise on Electricity and Magnetism, 2nd ed., vol.

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  • In 1572 and 1578, however, Drake took abundant and Organi- vengeance, and in 1587 Cavendish captured the Manila galleon - a success repeated in the next century.

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  • Thomson, the successor of Maxwell and Lord Rayleigh in the Cavendish chair of physics in the university of Cambridge, began about the year 1899 a remarkable series of investigations on the cathode discharge, which finally enabled him to make a measurement of the ratio of the electric charge to the mass of the particles of matter projected from the cathode, and to show that this electric charge was identical with the atomic electric charge carried by a hydrogen ion in the act of electrolysis, but that the mass of the cathode particles, or " corpuscles " as he called them, was far less, viz.

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  • From 1879 to 1884 he was Cavendish professor of experimental physics in the university of Cambridge, in succession to Clerk Maxwell; and in 1887 he accepted the post of professor of natural philosophy at the Royal Institution of Great Britain, which he resigned in 1905.

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  • Thomas Cavendish, emulous of Drake's example, fitted out three vessels for an expedition to the South sea in 1586.

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  • From Cape San Lucas Cavendish steered across the Pacific, seeing no land until he reached the Ladrone Islands.

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  • Cavendish (1641, rep. Harleian Misc. 1810 v.); C. Wriothesley's Chronicle (Camden Soc., 1875-1877); Notes and Queries, 8 ser., viii.

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  • He was summoned from his seclusion in 1871 to become the first holder of the newly founded professorship of Experimental Physics in Cambridge; and it was under his direction that the plans of the Cavendish Laboratory were prepared.

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  • At Limington he came into conflict with law and order as represented by the sheriff, Sir Amias Paulet, who is said by Cavendish to have placed Wolsey in the stocks; Wolsey retaliated long afterwards by confining Paulet to his chambers in the Temple for five or six years.

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  • Klaproth and the German Academy, and by most English chemists except Cavendish, who rather suspended his judgment, and Priestley, who stubbornly clung to the opposite view.

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