Cause sentence example

cause
  • He probably hasn't had any cause to speak French.
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  • He was quiet long enough to rouse her interest, and she glanced up to determine the cause of his silence.
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  • All I do is cause pain.
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  • You've never given us cause to punish you.
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  • In the next few minutes she had reason to believe that wasn't his only cause for concern.
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  • Does human activity cause the planet to warm?
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  • The cause of the destruction of the French army in 1812 is clear to us now.
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  • It would only cause him more trouble, both with the trip and wagging tongues.
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  • Miss Keller's reading of the manual alphabet by her sense of touch seems to cause some perplexity.
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  • But it hardly seems possible that any mere words should convey to one who has never seen a mountain the faintest idea of its grandeur; and I don't see how any one is ever to know what impression she did receive, or the cause of her pleasure in what was told her about it.
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  • She was the cause of it all.
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  • He drew back and looked down at her with troubled eyes, seeking the cause for her lack of response.
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  • A third asserts that the cause of its movement lies in the smoke which the wind carries away.
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  • It's too bad he's convinced it's your tests that cause the visions.
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  • He met her gaze soberly, probably seeking the cause of her distress.
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  • We all serve the same cause of protecting those weaker than us from evil.
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  • He must have sensed the cause of her sudden withdrawal, and spoke gently.
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  • Betty-Boop or whatever your name is, if you tarry much longer I may be forced to introduce myself, though taking you, at least at this time, would cause a mild alteration to my carefully formulated plans.
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  • Whatever the European sovereigns and commanders may do to countenance Bonaparte, and to cause me, and us in general, annoyance and mortification, our opinion of Bonaparte cannot alter.
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  • All nature is your congratulation, and you have cause momentarily to bless yourself.
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  • It's for a good cause.
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  • He very readily took up Boris' cause and went with him to Dolgorukov.
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  • Pierre's insanity consisted in not waiting, as he used to do, to discover personal attributes which he termed "good qualities" in people before loving them; his heart was now overflowing with love, and by loving people without cause he discovered indubitable causes for loving them.
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  • I hope it didn't cause you too much trouble.
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  • The cause of this is my egotism.
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  • The cause of the delay was Natasha's skirt, which was too long.
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  • But even if we admitted that Kutuzov, Chichagov, and others were the cause of the Russian failures, it is still incomprehensible why, the position of the Russian army being what it was at Krasnoe and at the Berezina (in both cases we had superior forces), the French army with its marshals, kings, and Emperor was not captured, if that was what the Russians aimed at.
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  • Dean's past involvements with Sheriff Weller had always managed to cause the lawman untold grief.
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  • Katie was probably the cause for this latest change.
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  • Many attempts were made to shake his fidelity to the lost cause of the Stuarts, but he continued indomitable to the end.
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  • We have intuitions of cause, of infinity, of good and Flint.
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  • Prince Andrew talked incessantly, arguing now with his father, now with the Swiss tutor Dessalles, and showing an unnatural animation, the cause of which Pierre so well understood.
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  • That arousing of the people by their sovereign and his call to them to defend their country--the very incitement which was the chief cause of Russia's triumph in so far as it was produced by the Tsar's personal presence in Moscow--was suggested to the Emperor, and accepted by him, as a pretext for quitting the army.
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  • Go when you please, and I give you my word of honor that no one shall dare to cause you annoyance if only you will allow me to act as your escort.
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  • The chief cause of the wastage of Napoleon's army was the rapidity of its movement, and a convincing proof of this is the corresponding decrease of the Russian army.
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  • Yes, but it's a secret society and therefore a hostile and harmful one which can only cause harm.
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  • Peasants having no clear idea of the cause of rain, say, according to whether they want rain or fine weather: "The wind has blown the clouds away," or, "The wind has brought up the clouds."
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  • In the second case, if freedom were possible without inevitability we should have arrived at unconditioned freedom beyond space, time, and cause, which by the fact of its being unconditioned and unlimited would be nothing, or mere content without form.
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  • Even Katie noticed the change in him and asked Carmen about the cause.
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  • Russie is a lost cause.
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  • I can't even picture the bedlam making this public would cause.
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  • When it happens, it matters little which was the cause.
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  • She could now feel everything around her, and she assumed whatever her father unlocked was the cause.
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  • He'd let her live, knowing she was obligated to report everything to Damian and powerful enough to be dismissive of any threat she might cause.
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  • Tests gave no indication of an underlying cause.
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  • Despite his demon powers, despite his wildness, despite his struggle to remain dutiful to their cause, he was a danger to anyone around him.
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  • "She's a good girl," Giovanni said, "but she's a bit of a lost cause.
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  • Katie pushed herself to her feet, remembering what pain a pissed-off Hell-creature could cause.
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  • No matter how badly Kris had hurt him, it hadn.t been for a selfish cause like Sasha.s.
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  • "You took an oath to serve the Immortals, their cause, and be a member of this Council," Kris grated.
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  • Rhyn was a lost cause from the beginning.
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  • I still don.t want to lose you, but all I do is cause you trouble.
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  • While Kris would love to sacrifice a certain infuriating mortal to further his cause, he wouldn.t even sacrifice her, let alone allow Darkyn.s to wipe out a village.
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  • At first glance, Lishana did not seem the kind of mother-in-law that might cause Evelyn problems.
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  • What would cause her to run away from all of that?
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  • Look, I'll be quiet as a mouse and cause no trouble.
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  • What could happen so terrible to cause you to do something you felt so strongly against?
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  • Usually I enjoy seeing the gentle flakes and they cause me little aggravation with their accumulation as I seldom travel more than a block or two when I secure provisions.
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  • Now, given that, wouldn't you say whoever did the cutting might suspect it would cause Mr. Shipton a bit of bodily harm?
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  • Lord knows what he did to Donnie over the years to cause the boy to despise him so.
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  • When no response was forthcoming, he continued, If she were to leave me, it would cause every bit as much pain as leaving my family did.
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  • For all I know, you stole something that'll cause your enemies to destroy my people, he said.
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  • I turned her into something I could use in my office to open more doors for our cause.
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  • The strikes were enough to cause disarray among the men.
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  • Lana shifted, sensing she'd said something to cause the silent communication between Kelli and Mike.
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  • She'd expected his voice to cause more confusion after she learned what he was, but she felt only comfort and hope.
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  • He was far enough away from the Sanctuary's fortress not to cause a threat to those there, so long as the two people buffering him stayed close.
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  • It would be a noble death for a good cause, if it came to that.
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  • "You sound like Andre," Rhyn said and scowled, wondering how a long-dead woman and a newly dead woman could still cause him such grief.
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  • It was a noble death for a good cause.
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  • He bristled at the mention of Rhyn in the same sentence as Andre.  One half-brother had been noble, courageous, honorable, willing to sacrifice himself for their cause.  Rhyn was the opposite.
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  • It would be a noble death for a good cause.
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  • The 32-year-old detective with bright red crew cut and opened-collar sports shirt looked as if nothing short of a catastrophe would cause him a lick of concern.
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  • "I don't have no gun, Mr. Policeman," and he added, "you don't have no 'probable cause' now, do you?"
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  • How can I drag out a pile of maybes and cause her to spend the rest of her days wondering if hubby will jump out from behind some bush?
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  • I'm not going to open this up—to anyone— and cause Cynthia Byrne years of doubt on suspicions, no matter how strong our feelings become.
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  • I don't want to ever cause you a moment of worry.
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  • The swift change of expression might have been comical had she not been the cause.
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  • He had done nothing to cause her to doubt him.
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  • Is it possible that something else could cause a false test?
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  • Of course Mums would immediately know the cause.
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  • How could having a baby cause so much sadness for two people who wanted one so badly?
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  • If the child picked up on her fear, it could cause him worse problems.
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  • Her implication that a lost love was the cause of a lost life was painful.
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  • I know he's a lost cause, she replied.
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  • At least I serve a higher cause than myself.
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  • "There's only one thing that can cause that," he said.
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  • Fear trickled through her as she recalled the amount of pain trusting someone could cause.
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  • Taran knew instinctively what could cause such a reaction from Sirian, and it involved the foolish woman.
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  • Then again, if she gained more confidence, maybe it would make both Alex and Katie feel that she wasn't a lost cause.
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  • What made a man act jealous when he had no cause to be?
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  • Continuing to let Alex treat her and others this way could cause their children to be intimidated by others the way Felipa was.
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  • Alex was hurting, and even though she wasn't the cause, there was nothing she could do to help.
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  • Perhaps I am the cause of this.
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  • At the first sight of weakness, her cause would be lost.
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  • The obvious cause of his hesitation was disinterest.
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  • Now it would be a trip to Fayetteville so the rental agency could verify the cause of damage - and then a call to her auto insurance company.
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  • Could he have been the cause of her screams?
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  • She remembered the strong, thoughtful little boy whose life she decided to sacrifice for her cause.
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  • I held two things dear: my cause and my Xander.
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  • Never considered myself enslaved to my cause.
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  • "Please don't," she said, the touch enough to cause tears of pain.
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  • "At least I'm doing it for a good cause, instead of being motivated to fill my bed with a new lover every night," she retorted.
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  • I could cause some major damage, but I can't kill them like the Grey God can.
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  • If she made the wrong choice, there would be nothing standing between him and the will of those who wanted to cause irreparable harm to the human world.
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  • Our cause is much better, and the benefits are guaranteed for life.
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  • Yes, she'd taken off the ruby, but it was for a damned good cause.
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  • Glancing around at the men with purple eyes, she began to suspect that good cause was going to kill her.
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  • Addresses were presented to him at Southampton, Birmingham and other towns; he was officially entertained by the lord mayor of London; at each place he pleaded the cause of his unhappy country.
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  • They upheld the cause of the people against the moneyed interests, but the charge was often brought that they appealed to the baser passions.
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  • Traube (1858), the active cause of fermentation is due to the action of different enzymes contained in yeast and not to the yeast cell itself.
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  • In October 1847 he wrote to Pius IX., offering his services to the Church, whose cause he for a moment believed to be that of national liberty.
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  • The loss of charge is due to more than one cause, and it is difficult to attribute an absolutely definite meaning even to results obtained with the cover on.
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  • A good palliative is sweet oil; this will allay any corrosive irritation of the throat and stomach, and at the same time cause vomiting.
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  • The equable temperature of these cellars and their freedom from drought is one cause of their great success; to this must be added the natural virgin spawn, for by continually using spawn taken from mushroom-producing beds the potency for reproduction is weakened.
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  • Alexius rejoiced at this welcome change, but he had cause rather to fear it.
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  • Children may be disinherited with or without cause.
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  • While governor he was a frequent contributor to the New Jersey Gazette, and in this way he greatly aided the American cause during the war by his denunciation of the enemy and appeals to the patriotism of his countrymen.
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  • One cause of this separation was the rigid adherence to precedent on the part of the common law courts.
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  • Such roofs are not suitable for cold climates, for accumulations of snow might overburden the structure and would also cause the wet to penetrate through any small crevices and under flashings.
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  • Hastings always maintained that he did not cause the charge to be instituted, and the legality of Nuncomar's trial is thoroughly proved by Sir James Stephen.
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  • Gascoigne was killed at the battle of Marston Moor on the 2nd of July 1644, in the twenty-fourth year of his age, and his untimely death was doubtless the cause that delayed the publication of a discovery which anticipated, by twenty years, the combined work of Huygens, Malvaison, Auzout and Picard in the same direction.
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  • The remedy proposed by Repsold for this proved fault is to cause the whole slide to tilt instead of the microscope only; this should prove a complete remedy.
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  • He had no artistic appreciation of the subject he discussed, and he mistook cause for effect in asserting that the decline in public morality was due to the flagrant indecency of the stage.
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  • Slight shocks are very frequent, some of them severe enough to cause considerable damage to the buildings.
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  • Artisans came from a great distance to view and honour the image of the popular writer whose best efforts had been dedicated to the cause and the sufferings of the workers of the world; and literary men of all opinions gathered round the grave of one of their brethren whose writings were at once the delight of every boy and the instruction of every man who read them.
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  • But in addition to bringing forward a fundamental and philosophical view of morbid processes, which probably contributed more than any other single cause to vindicate for pathology the place which he claimed for it among the biological sciences, Virchow made many important contributions to histology and morbid anatomy and to the study of particular diseases.
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  • The new pope, Gelasius II., and also his successor, Calixtus II., espoused the cause of the stubborn archbishop, and in October 1119, in spite of promises made to Henry I., he was consecrated by Calixtus at Reims. Enraged at this the king refused to allow him to enter England, and he remained for some time in the company of the pope.
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  • A fire without light, compared to the heat which gathers in a haystack when the hay has been stored before it was properly dry - heat, in short, as an agitation of the particles - is the motive cause of the contraction and dilatations of the heart.
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  • But, on the other hand, the vital spirits cause a movement in the gland by which the mind perceives the affection of the organs, learns that something is to be loved or hated, admired or shunned.
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  • After Cimon's death he renounced the war against Persia, and the collapse of 447-445 had the effect of completing his change ' The general impression in Greece was that this decree was the proximate cause of the war.
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  • The cause of this long duration, and at the same time the secret of its history, is to be found in the isolated position of Trebizond and its district, between the mountains and the sea, which has already been described.
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  • In theory the game of bowls is very simple, the aim of the player being to roll his bowl so as to cause it to rest nearer to the jack than his opponent's, or to protect a well-placed bowl, or to dislodge a better bowl than his own.
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  • With God as "First Cause" or "Moral Legislator" theology has no concern; nor is it interested in the "speculative" problems indicated by the traditional doctrine of the Trinity.
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  • The kings of Taxila and Porus were at enmity, and for this cause the invader could reckon upon Omphis as a firm ally.
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  • Guy found his cause espoused in 1191 by the overlord of his house, Richard I.
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  • But a positive identity of pitch cannot be claimed for any period of time, and certainly not for the early organs; the foot-rule of the organ-builder, which had to do with the lengths of the pipes, and which varied in every country and province, could easily cause a difference of a semitone.
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  • This rapid absorption of the khanates brought Russia into close proximity to Afghanistan, and the reception of Kaufmann's emissaries by the Amir was a main cause of the British war with Afghanistan in 1878.
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  • In 1865 the synod of that province, in an urgent letter to the archbishop of Canterbury (Dr Longley), represented the unsettlement of members of the Canadian Church caused by recent legal decisions of the Privy Council, and their alarm lest the revived action of Convocation "should leave us governed by canons different from those in force in England and Ireland, and thus cause us to drift into the status of an independent branch of the Catholic Church."
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  • The cause of rupture was the attack on Pontic territory by Nicomedes at the instigation of the Romans.
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  • Unless suitable fresh air inlets are provided, this form of stove will cause the room to be draughty, the strong current of warm air up the flue drawing cold air in through the crevices in the doors and windows.
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  • With closed stoves much less heat is wasted, and consequ;ntly less fuel is burned, than with open grates, but they often cause an unpleasant sensation of dryness in the air, and the products of combustion also escape to some extent, rendering this method of heating not only unpleasant but sometimes even dangerous.
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  • The materials mixed with the iron borings cause them to rust into a solid mass, and in doing so a slight expansion takes place.
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  • For several centuries before 1740 the fisheries were the cause of constant dispute between Lowestoft and Yarmouth.
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  • The cause of these evils he declared to be the unrepresentative character of the Irish constitution; and among the remedies he proposed was the shortening of parliaments.
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  • It is a very rapid river, and subject to sudden swellings and overflowings, which cause great damage to the surrounding country.
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  • The debts of the two nations resulted largely from this one cause.
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  • Its greatest defect is the cold southerly and westerly storms, which cause great losses in cattle and sheep. The Patagonian coast-line and mountainous region are also healthy, having a dry and bracing climate.
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  • The establishment of the Napoleonic dynasty at Madrid was the actual cause which brought about the disturbances which were to end in separation.
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  • In return for this aid the younger Henry granted to William the earldom of Northumberland, a possession which the latter had vainly sought from the English king, and which was possibly the cause of their first estrangement.
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  • It is, however, less liable to cause confusion, and in many other ways more convenient to employ the better known term Marsupialia in both senses.
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  • When the insurrectionary movements of 1848 broke out in Italy, his known zeal for the cause of legitimacy, as much as his reputation as an officer, marked him out for command.
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  • His successes against the declining revolutionary cause were numerous and rapid.
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  • It is quite possible that shabattum and nubattum are from the same root and originally denoted much the same thing - a pause, abstention, from whatever cause or for ceremonial purposes.
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  • The cause of the son was taken up by the Aragonese, and the king's attempt to join his second wife in the lieutenant-generalship was set aside.
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  • The Catalans, who had adopted the cause of Charles and who had grievances of their own, called in a succession of foreign pretenders.
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  • There is, besides, a powerful determining cause in the uniform character and undivided extent of its dry interior.
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  • While Cook was speculating on the cause of this phenomenon, and was in the act of ordering out the boats to take soundings, the " Endeavour " struck heavily, and fell over so much that the guns, spare cables, and other heavy gear had at once to be thrown overboard to lighten the ship. As day broke, attempts were made to float the vessel off with the morning tide; but these were unsuccessful.
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  • The list of explorers since 1875 is a long one; but after Forrest's and Giles's expeditions the main object ceased to be the discovery of pastoral country: a new zest had been added to the cause of exploration, and most of the smaller expeditions concerned themselves with the search for gold.
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  • For elections to the Senate the governors of states, and for general elections of the House of Representatives the governor-general, would cause writs to be issued.
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  • Probably owing to the same cause, there is less cut stone in the walls, the Palenque builders using plaster to obtain smooth surfaces.
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  • He voted consistently on the Radical side, but his chief energies were devoted to promoting the cause of Italian unity.
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  • At the same time negotiations were successfully carried on with John Casimir, with Elizabeth and with Henry of Navarre, and their help secured for the national cause.
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  • Farnese at once set to work with subtle skill to win over to the royalist cause the Catholic nobles of the south.
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  • Saigo's patriotism and his great services in the cause of the restoration of the administrative power to the throne were so fully recognized that his son was raised to the peerage with the title of marquess, and his own memory was honoured by the erection of a bronze statue in Tokyo.
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  • Naïve materialism is due to a cause which still, perhaps, has no small power, the natural difficulty which persons who have had no philosophic training experience in observing and appreciating the importance of the immaterial facts of consciousness.
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  • The cause of medical materialism is the natural bias of physicians towards explaining the health and disease of mind by the health and disease of body.
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  • Occasional outbreaks of cholera occur from time to time, and in the independent states these cause terrible loss of life, as the natives fly from the disease and spread the infection in every direction.
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  • Like the rest of his family, he belonged to the Federalist party, and his appointment in 1889 as governor of Bohemia was the cause of grave dissatisfaction to the German Austrians.
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  • The plaintiff must have resided in the state for at least the year preceding the application, and if the cause accrued in some other state or country before the parties lived together in Vermont and while neither party lived there, the plaintiff must have been a resident at least for two years preceding the action.
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  • Ethan Allen (q.v.) and some of the other leaders seemed inclined to accept these overtures, but for various reasons, the chief of which was the general success of the American cause, the scheme was soon abandoned.
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  • Subsequently he actively supported in the Senate the free-state cause in Kansas.
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  • A physical occurrence is but the occasion (opportunity, occasional cause) on which God excites in me a corresponding mental state; the exercise of my will is the occasion on which God moves my body.
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  • God, who is the cause of the concomitance of bodily and mental facts, is in truth the sole cause in the universe.
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  • You must get men of a spirit that is likely to go as far as gentlemen will go or you will be beaten still."The royalists were fighting for a great cause.
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  • He declared, when answering a complaint that a certain captain in his regiment was a better preacher than fighter, that he who prayed best would fight best, and that he knew nothing could" give the like courage and confidence as the knowledge of God in Christ will."The superiority of these men - more intelligent than the common soldiers, better disciplined, better trained, better armed, excellent horsemen and fighting for a great cause - not only over the other parliamentary troops but over the royalists, was soon observed in battle.
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  • The estates of only twenty-four leaders of the defeated cause were forfeited by Cromwell, and the national church was left untouched though deprived of all powers of interference with the civil government, the general assembly being dissolved in 1653.
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  • Cromwell wisely inclined towards France, for Spain was then a greater menace than France alike to the Protestant cause and to the growth of British trade in the western hemisphere; but as no concessions could be gained from either France or Spain, the year 1654 closed without a treaty being made with either.
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  • Enormous numbers of ale-houses were closed - a proceeding which excited intense resentment and was probably no slight cause of the royalist reaction.
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  • On the 31st of August he seemed to rally, and one who slept in his bedchamber and who heard him praying, declared, "a public spirit to God's cause did breathe in him to the very last."
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  • The professional soldiers of the Continent could rarely be brought to force a decision; but the English, contending for a cause, were imbued with the spirit of the modern "nation in arms"; and having taken up arms wished to decide the quarrel by arms. This feeling was not less conspicuous in the far-ranging rides, or raids, of the Cromwellian cavalry.
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  • According to contemporary republicans he was a mere selfish adventurer, sacrificing the national cause "to the idol of his own ambition."
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  • In his later years he overcame the drunkenness that was habitual to him in youth; he developed seriousness of character and unselfish devotion to what lie believed was the cause of patriotism; and he won the respect of men of high character and capacity in France and Holland.
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  • On the arrival of Alva at Brussels, Count Louis, with his brother William, withdrew from the Netherlands and raised a body of troops in defence of the patriot cause.
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  • Thus perished at the age of thirty-six one of the most chivalrous and gifted of a gallant band of brothers, four of whom laid down their lives in their country's cause.
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  • Melody must not make more than one wide skip in the same direction, because by so doing it would cause an awkward change of vocal register.
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  • If the mancipium died a natural death while in the creditor's possession no claim could lie against the latter; but if he was the cause of death by cruelty, he had to give son for son, or pay for a slave.
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  • To cause loss of liberty or property by false witness was punished by the penalty the perjurer sought to bring upon another.
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  • This cone is driven by gearing from the wire drum, so that it rotates at the speed of the outgoing wire, the direction of rotation being such as to cause the nut to travel towards the smaller end of the cone.
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  • In depths beyond the reach of wave motion, and apart from suspension across a submarine gully, which will sooner or later result in a rupture of the cable, the most frequent cause of interruption is seismic or other shifting of the ocean bed, while in shallower waters and near the shore the dragging of anchors or 40 fishing trawls has been mostly responsible.
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  • It consists in punching, by means of " a puncher," a series of holes in a strip of paper in such a way that, when the strip is sent through another instrument, called the " transmitter," the holes cause the circuit to be closed at the proper times and for the proper proportionate intervals for the message to be correctly printed by the receiving instrument or recorder.
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  • Since each letter is represented by a specific combination of positive and negative currents, it is possible, by means of the combinations, to close a local circuit at any given interval, and so cause the paper to be pressed against the periphery of the type-wheel at the time when the letter required is opposite.
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    0
  • The indicator was connected with a Ruhmkorff coil or other equivalent apparatus, designed to cause a continual succession of sparks to pass between the indicator and a metal plate situated beneath it and having a plane surface parallel to its line of motion.
    0
    0
  • A further cause has been competition offered by the telephone service, but against this the Post Office has received royalties from telephone companies and revenue from trunk telephone lines.
    0
    0
  • But, as Branly showed, it is not universally true that the action of an electric wave is to reduce the resistance of a tube of powdered metal or cause the particles to cohere.
    0
    0
  • When the oscillations pass through the coil they annul the hysteresis and cause a change of magnetism within the coil connected to the telephone.
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    0
  • Operating mistakes also cause interruptions to conversations, as it is possible, by the insertion of a plug in a multiple jack, to disconnect the circuit between two talking subscribers.
    0
    0
  • The cause of the republic was brilliantly advocated by Fra Paolo Sarpi, counsellor of state; the defenders of the papal theory were Cardinals Baronius and Bellarmine.
    0
    0
  • It was only at the close of the 19th century that the true cause of malariathe conveyance of the infection by the bite of the Malaria..
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  • The law of 1877 rendering education compulsory for children between six and nine years of age has been the principal cause of the spread of elementary education.
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  • She escaped to the castle of Canossa, where the great count of Tuscany espoused her cause, and appealed in her behalf to Otto the Saxon.
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    0
  • In the next place, the antagonism of the popes to the emperors, whicl became hereditary in the Holy College, forced the former tc - assume the protectorate of the national cause.
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    0
  • The cause of his son Conrad was sustained in Lower Italy by Manfred, one of Fredericks many natural children; and, when Frede- Conrad died in 1254, Manfred still acted as vicegerent ricks for the Swabians, who were now represented by a boy SUCCCS Conradin.
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  • This tyrant had made himself justly odious; and when he was hunted to death in 1259, the triumph was less for the Guelph cause than for humanity outraged by the iniquities of such a monster.
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    0
  • Castruccio dominated Tuscany, where the Guelph cause, in the weakness of King Robert, languished.
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  • Here he pleaded his own cause so powerfully, and proved so incontestably the advantage which might ensue to the Visconti from his alliance, if he held the regno, that he obtained his I release and, recognition as king.
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    0
  • When the Visconti dynasty ended by the dukes death in 1447, he pretended to espouse the cause of the Milanese republic, which was then re-established; but he played his cards so subtly as to make himself, by the help of Cosimo de Medici in Florence, duke de facto if not de jure.
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  • The king of Naples was his natural enemy, and he had cause to suspect that Piero de Medici might abandon his alliance.
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  • The liberators of Rome thereupon proceeded to plunder the city in a way which brought shame on their cause and disgrace (perhaps not wholly deserved) on the general left in command, Massna.
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    0
  • The heroism of the prisoners, and Silvio Pellicos account of his imprisonment (Le mie Prigioni), did much to enlist the sympathy of Europe for the Italian cause.
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  • The Italian cause had been crushed, but revolution and war had strengthened the feeling of unity, for Neapolitans had fought for Venice, Lombards for Rome, Piedmontese for all Italy.
    0
    0
  • Meanwhile France provided Italy with fresh cause for uneasiness by abating her hostility to Germany.
    0
    0
  • These proposals met with opposition so fierce as to cause a cabinet crisis, but Sonnino who resigned office as minister of finance~
    0
    0
  • The prime cause in most cases was the unsatisfactory economic condition of the working classes, which they realized all the more vividly for the very improvements that had been made in it, while education and better communications enabled them to organize themselves.
    0
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  • Unfortunately these genuine grievai~ces were taken advantage of by the Socialists for their own purposes, and strikes and disorders were sometimes promoted without cause and conciliation impeded by outsiders who acted from motives of personal ambition or profit.
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    0
  • In the spring of 1908 there were agrarian strikes at Parma; the labor contracts had pressed hardly on the peasantry, who had cause for complaint; but while some improvement had been effected in the new contracts, certain unscrupulous demagogues, of whom Alceste De Ambris, representing the syndacalist wing of the Socialist party, was the chief, organized a widespread agitation.
    0
    0
  • A further cause of resentment was Austrias attitude towards the Vatican, inspired by the strong clerical tendencies of the imperial family, and indeed of a large section of the Austrian people.
    0
    0
  • Danby had rendered extremely important services to William's cause.
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  • Immediately afterwards he was sent to plead the cause before a more powerful if not a higher tribunal.
    0
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  • This is what may conveniently be called the Prajapati theory, by which the "Lord of Creatures," the efficient cause of the universe, is identified with both the sacrifice;(yajna) and the sacrificer (yajamana).
    0
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  • Its leading argument is the cosmological, concluding to " God as cause " (Martineau).
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  • But intuitionalism claims to allege a higher certainty; everything (or every change) must have a cause - this is not merely actual fact but necessary truth.
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  • The universe exists - or, as otherwise stated, the universe is " contingent " - therefore, even without detailed knowledge of different universes, we can affirm that it must be caused, and in its " Great First Cause " we recognize God.'
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  • Still the main weight of intuitionalist theism rests upon the conception of God as First Cause.
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  • 2 Any attempt to treat " cause " as pointing to a truth here, but inadequately, would lead us beyond intuitionalism into some phase of idealism.
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  • It is a mental " impotence " that makes us believe in such a law as Cause and Effect.
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  • Again, in the scheme of mechanism, everything is determined by everything else - in 5 Aristotle and the schoolmen meant by a proof a priori reasoning from cause to effect.
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  • Bradley's Logic: " If " or " As often as you have the cause working unimpeded, you get the effect."
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  • Pure scientific theory cannot tell you when you have got such a cause, or whether you ever get it at all.
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  • 6 There must be a cause for nature, but particularly for the idea of perfection in us - that cause must be God.
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  • The Schoolmen sought to establish other divine attributes by negation of human weaknesses and by finding in God the cause of the varied phenomena of creation.
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  • He admits two sources of knowledge - sensation and refiexion; and God is to him the Great First Cause, especially of our own existence (or of the existence of finite minds).
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  • Perhaps the attack on cause as used in the cosmological argument is independent of Kant's philosophical peculiarities.
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  • The argument affirms a first cause, or uncaused cause.
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  • If the God of the cosmological argument is the " Great First Cause," we have no right to identify him with the " Most real being " of the Ontological argument.
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  • Trace out the clue of causation to the end, says Hegel in effect, and it introduces you, not to a single first cause beyond nature, but to the totality of natural process - a substance, as it were, in which all causes inhere.
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  • The Cosmological argument proves, with the help of the first-named intuition, that there is one great First Cause; and the Design argument shows the First Cause to be intelligent or personal.
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  • It has two parts: " God as cause " and " God as - perfection."
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  • The only ultimate cause is God.
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  • Ultimately, he argues, if not immediately, there must be a rational cause to account for so rational an effect.
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  • At least forty days' notice of the meeting must be given, and the cause thereof specified.
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  • An anthropomorphic deity, Puluga, is the cause of all things, but it is not necessary to propitiate him.
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  • In the doctrines of the Neoplatonists, of whom Plotinus is the most important, we have the worldprocess represented after the example of Plato as a series of descending steps, each being less perfect than its predecessors, since it is further removed from the first cause.'
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  • Experience forbids our excluding organic activity from natural causes, also our excluding intelligence from purposeful (zwecktdtigen) causes; hence experience forbids our defining the fundamental force or first cause out of which living creatures arose.'
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  • Bonnet affirms that, before fecundation, the hen's egg contains an excessively minute but complete chick; and that fecundation and incubation simply cause this germ to absorb nutritious matters, which are deposited in the interstices of the elementary structures of which the miniature chick, or germ, is made up.
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  • But a little consideration showed that, though Lamarck had seized what, as far as it goes, is a true cause of modification, it is a cause the actual effects of which are wholly inadequate to account for any considerable modification in animals, and which can have no influence at all in the vegetable world; and probably nothing contributed so much to discredit evolution, in the early part of the 29th century, as the floods of easy ridicule which were poured upon this part of Lamarck's speculation.
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  • Few can doubt that, if not the whole cause, it is a very important factor in that operation; and that it must play a great part in the sorting out of varieties into those which are transitory and those which are permanent.
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  • The judicial authorities requested a rescript from the emperor Aurelian for the decision of the cause.
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  • By a capitulary he provided that either litigant, without the consent of the other party, and not only at the beginning of a suit but at any time during its continuance, might take the cause from lay cognizance and transfer it to the bishop's tribunal.
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  • The synod may restore them if convinced of the justice of their cause (and not merely in cases of ajbia).
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  • If a provincial synod be divided as to the guilt of a bishop, the metropolitan is to convene bishops from the neighbouring provinces to decide the cause jointly with the bishops of the original province.
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  • If that prelate think the cause should be heard again, he is to appoint judges; if otherwise, the original judgment is to be confirmed.
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  • The pope received the appeal, absolved him and restored him to the rank of priest, and sent a bishop and two priests as legates to Africa with instructions to them to hear the cause of Apiarius anew and for execution of their sentence to crave the prefect's aid; moreover, they were to summon the bishop of Sicca to Rome and to excommunicate him, unless he should amend those things which the legates deemed wrong.
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  • The canon provides that any clerk having a complaint against another clerk must not pass by his own bishop and turn to secular tribunals, but first lay b a re his cause before him, so that by the sentence of the bishop himself the dispute may be settled by arbitrators acceptable to both parties.
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  • If any clerk have a complaint against his own bishop, he shall have his cause adjudicated upon by the synod of the province.
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  • If the cause be ecclesiastical, the civil judges are to take no part in the inquiry.
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  • After legates came special delegates appointed by the pope to hear a particular cause.
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  • These might sub-delegate the whole cause or any part of it as they pleased, ibid.
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  • The foreseen adverse termination of this long-drawn cause led to Henry's legislation.
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  • In the absence of such consent, the bishop may hear the cause with three assessors, of whom one shall be a barrister of seven years' standing and another the dean of the cathedral, or one of the archdeacons, or the chancellor.
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  • But the bishop may instead send the cause, in first instance, to the old provincial court, to which appeal lies, if it be not so sent.
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  • Over the members of these orders their superiors have jurisdiction and not the bishop. Otherwise if they live out of their monastery, or even within that enclosure so notoriously offend as to cause scandal.
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  • The cause of Ignatius and Photius was dealt with in the 9th century by various synods; those in the East agreeing with the emperor's view for the time being, while those in the West acted with the pope.
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  • The king or the ministry do not, however, rehear the cause by way of appeal, but merely restrain severity of sentence (ib.).
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  • Far more comprehensive was the second charter, granted by Philip's widow Mathilda, after his death on crusade in 1191, as the price paid for the faithfulness of the city to her cause.
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  • From the manner, however, in which he seeks to distinguish between matter and cause or reason, and from the earnestness with which he advises men to examine all the impressions on their minds, it may be inferred that he held the view of Anaxagoras - that God and matter exist independently, but that God governs matter.
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  • The latter function has been found to be of extreme importance in the case of plants exposed to the direct access of the suns rays, the heat of which would rapidly cause the death of the protoplasts were it not employed in the evaporation of the water.
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  • Multitudes of such hairs on the branches of the roots cause the entry of great quantities of water, which by a subsequent similar osmotic action accumulates in the cortex of the roots.
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  • They often cause a considerable hypertrophy of the tissue.
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  • These are: (I) That the green plant is so stimulated by the symbiotic association which leads to the hypertrophy, that it is able to fix the nitrogen or cause it to enter into combination.
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  • It is the immediate cause of the phenomena of circumnutation, each cell of the circumnutating organ showing a rhythmic enlargement and decrease of its dimensions, due to the admission of more and less water into its interior.
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  • As regards water, its deficiency or excess is a relative matter, and although many of the minor maladies of pot-plants in windows and greenhouses controlled by amateurs depend on its misuse, water alone is probably never a primary cause of disease.
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  • Its over-supply is, however, a frequent cause of predisposition to the attacks of parasitic Fungie.g.
    0
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  • The Vertebrata come within the scope of our subject, chiefly as destructive agents which cause wounds or devour young shoots and foliage, &c. Rabbits and other burrowing animals injure roots, squirrels and birds snip off buds, horned cattle strip off bark, and so forth.
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  • Experience with epidemics, dearly bought in the past, has shown that one fruitful cause is the laying open to the inroads of some Fungus or insect, hitherto leading a quiet endemic life in the fields and forests, large tracts of its special food, along which it may range rampant without check to its dispersal, nutrition and reproduction.
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  • This so-called direct effect of external conditions upon the form and structure of the body differs from the indirect effect in that the resulting variations bear a relation, of the nature of adaptation, to those conditions; the effect of the conditions is not only to cause variation, but to cause variation in a particular direction.
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  • Material Cause of DifferentiationIt may be inquired, in conclusion, if there are any facts which throw light upon the internal mechanism of differentiation, whether spontaneous or induced; if it is possible to refer it to any material cause.
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  • The cause of such agreement is, according to Grisebach, shrouded in the deepest obscurity, but it finds its obvious and complete explanation in the descent from a common ancestor which he would unhesitatingly reject.
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  • Geomorphology is concerned, however, in the suggestions which have been made as to the cause of the distribution of heap and hollow in the larger features of the crust.
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  • In any case it is fully recognized that the plan of the earth is so clear as to leave no doubt as to its being due to some general cause which should be capable of detection.
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  • The ultimate cause of the predominant form of federal government may be the geographical diversity of the country.
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  • In his speech Cicero briefly dismisses the charge of assassination, the main question being the distribution of the provinces, which was the real cause of the quarrels between DeIotarus and his relatives.
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  • Athens, the headquarters of the Mithradatic cause, was taken and sacked in 86; and in the same year, at Chaeroneia, the scene of Philip II.
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  • Internally they are found to consist of a lamina twisted upon itself, and externally they generally exhibit a tortuous structure, produced, before the cloaca was reached, by the spiral valve of a compressed small intestine (as in skates, sharks and dog-fishes); the surface shows also vascular impressions and corrugations due to the same cause.
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  • When the port of Boston was closed by Great Britain in 1774 the bell of the old First Parish Church (Unitarian) of Portland (built 1740; the present building dates from 1825) was muffled and rung from morning till night, and in other ways the town showed its sympathy for the patriot cause.
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  • The ulna is curved and rather stout; it articulates with both carpal bones; the cubital quills often cause rugosities on its dorsal surface.
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  • When, however, Dbllinger and his school in their turn started the Old Catholic movement, Frohschammer refused to associate himself with their cause, holding that they did not go far enough, and that their declaration of 1863 had cut the ground from under their feet.
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  • 8) and here, finally, for some cause, now obscured, Moses and his brother Aaron incurred Yahweh's displeasure (Num.
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  • Large doses also depress the nervous system, weakening the anterior horns of grey matter in the spinal cord so as ultimately to cause complete paralysis, and also causing a partial insensibility of the cutaneous nerves of touch and pain.
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  • His whole tendency was as conservative as that of Maimonides was liberal, and like all conservatives he may be said to represent a lost though not necessarily a less desirable cause.
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  • The south-east winds which sweep over Table Mountain frequently cause the phenomenon known as "The Table-cloth."
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  • He first devoted his attention to painting, but afterwards took up the serious study of music. He entered the Paris Conservatoire, but did not remain there long, because he had espoused too warmly the cause of Wagner against his professor.
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  • One of his first acts after entering on the duties of his office was to cause the parlement of Paris to register the edict of Romorantin, of which he is sometimes, but erroneously, said to have been the author.
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  • The renewal of the religious war in September 1567, however, was at once a symptom and a cause of diminished influence to L'Hopital, and in February 1568 he obtained his letters of discharge, which were registered by the parlement on the IIth of May, his titles, honours and emoluments being reserved to him during the remainder of his life.
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  • After the Revolution of 1830 Enfantin resigned his office of cashier, and devoted himself wholly to his cause.
    0
    0
  • The cause of this he did not long seek in vain.
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    0
  • Possibly the same cause may have kept the chronicler from enlarging on their religious character; yet in Sicily at least they might pass for crusaders.
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    0
  • The cause of the difference seems to be that, while the origin of the patriciate was exactly the same at Rome and at Athens, the origin of the commons was different.
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    0
  • But perhaps no cause was more important than the growth of the peerage.
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  • She finds that he believes that God rules the world, but does not know what he himself is; and this absence of self-knowledge is the cause of his weakness.
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    0
  • This discovery was followed by that of the calculus of partial differences, the first trials of which were published in his Reflexion sur la cause generale des vents (1747).
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  • The cause was the outbreak of the Thirty Years' War (1618).
    0
    0
  • Maori tradition is explicit as to the cause of the exodus from Samoa, gives the names of the canoes in which the journey was made and the time of year at which the coast of New Zealand was sighted.
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  • The flagellants reappeared, and made the state of religious trouble in Germany, provoked by the struggle between the papacy and Louis of Bavaria, subserve their cause.
    0
    0
  • In 1417, however, the Spanish Dominican St Vincent Ferrer pleaded the cause of the flagellants with great warmth at the council of Constance, and elicited a severe reply from John Gerson 29 ` ' '?
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  • His position was assured, at least temporarily, in 617, when he decided to espouse the cause of the Northumbrian prince Edwin, then a fugitive at his court, and defeated zEthelfrith of Northumbria on the banks of the Idle, a tributary of the Trent, in Mercian territory.
    0
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  • A later king named Eohric took up the cause of zEthelwald, the son of 'Ethelred I., and was slain in the fight with the Kentish army at the Holm in 905.
    0
    0
  • Such are the habits of the cockchafer (Melolontha vulgaris) and other species that often cause great injury to farm and a FIG.
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    0
  • All of them lie in a state of ruin, and, from the disposition of the drums of the columns, it is impossible to suppose that their fall was due to any other cause than an earthquake.
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  • Henry Percy (Hotspur) and his father, the earl of Northumberland, thought their services ill-requited, and finally made common cause with the partisans of Mortimer and the Welsh.
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    0
  • If parallel lines compete at all points, they cause ruin to the investors.
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    0
  • The department is authorized, on receipt of such report, to direct an inquiry to be made into the cause of any accident so reported, and the inspector appointed to make the inquiry is given power to enter any railway premises for the purposes of his inquiry, and to summon any person engaged upon the railway to attend the inquiry as a witness, and to require the production of all books, papers and documents which he considers important for the purpose.
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  • The inspector, after making his investigation, is required to make a report to the Board of Trade as to the causes of the accident and the circumstances attending the same, with any observations on the subject which he deems right, and the Board " shall cause every such report to be made public in such manner as they think expedient."
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  • Being struck or run over by a train while standing or walking on the track is the largest single cause of " railway accidents."
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    0
  • The weight required to cause the downward motion is obtained either by means of the material which has to be transported to the bottom of the hill or by water ballast, while to aid and regulate the motion generally steam or electric motors are arranged to act on the main drums, round which the cable is passed with a sufficient number of turns to prevent slipping.
    0
    0
  • The opening of the doors was apt to cause a disagreeable draught through the car in cold weather, and passengers occasionally fell from the open platform, or were blown from it, when the train was moving.
    0
    0
  • Routed at the siege of Winchester, she was compelled to release Stephen in exchange for Earl Robert, and thenceforward her cause steadily declined in England.
    0
    0
  • The earliest of these phenomena were the raps already spoken of and other sounds occurring without apparent physical cause, and the similarly mysterious movements of furniture and other objects; and these were shortly followed by the ringing of bells and playing of musical instruments.
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    0
  • By the rain wash and wind action detritus from the mountains is carried to these valley floors, raising their level, and often burying low mountain spurs, so as to cause neighbouring valleys to coalesce.
    0
    0
  • It is these heavy rains, of brief duration, when great volumes of water rapidly run off from the barren slopes, that cause the deep channels, or arroyas, which cross the desert.
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  • His whole heart was enlisted in the anti-slavery cause, and during the second year of the war he accepted a commission from the governor of the state as secondlieutenant and speedily raised a regiment.
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    0
  • It was founded by Dr John Phillips (1719-1795), a graduate of Harvard College, who acquired considerable wealth as a merchant at Exeter and gave nearly all of it to the cause of education.
    0
    0
  • The special quality which distinguished these prophetic gilds or companies was an intense patriotism combined with enthusiastic devotion to the cause of Yahweh.
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    0
  • The cause was soon known.
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    0
  • To the Republicans (Democratic Republicans) they seemed intended to cause a usurpation of powers ungranted.
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    0
  • Then in 1763 was delivered his speech in "The Parson's Cause" - a suit brought by a clergyman, Rev. James Maury, in the Hanover County Court, to secure restitution for money considered by him to be due on account of his salary (16,000 pounds of tobacco by law) having been paid in money calculated at a rate less than the current market price of tobacco.
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  • In The Idea of God as affected by Modern Knowledge (1885) Fiske discusses the theistic problem, and declares that the mind of man, as developed, becomes an illuminating indication of the mind of God, which as a great immanent cause includes and controls both physical and moral forces.
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  • Dr Park's sermon, "The Theology of the Intellect and that of the Feelings," delivered in 1850 before the convention of the Congregational ministers of Massachusetts, and published in the Bibliotheca sacra of July 1850, was the cause of a long and bitter controversy, metaphysical rather than doctrinal, with Charles Hodge.
    0
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  • Schwenkfeld's mysticism was the cause of his divergence from Protestant orthodoxy and the root of his peculiar religious and theological position.
    0
    0
  • With regard to the parasites, which are the actual cause of malaria in man, an account of them is given under the heading of Parasitic Diseases, and little need be said about them here.
    0
    0
  • In Italy the annual mortality from this cause averages 15,000, which is estimated.
    0
    0
  • Apparently the parasites may remain quiescent in the blood for years and may cause relapses by fresh sporulation.
    0
    0
  • Since thermochemical measurements of this type may be frequently performed with an error due to other causes of much less than i per cent., the error introduced by either of these assumptions is the chief cause of uncertainty in the method.
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    0
  • The dissatisfaction displayed shortly after by the government obliged the university to give up this scheme, and was probably the cause of Pierre d'Ailly's temporary retirement to Noyon, where he held a canonry.
    0
    0
  • It was not till after the cardinals of the two colleges had led to the convocation of the general council of Pisa that Pierre d'Ailly renounced the support of Benedict XIII., and, for want of a better policy, again allied himself with the cause which he had championed in his youth.
    0
    0
  • Hermon Husband (c. 1724-1795) was the chief agitator of measures for relief, but, since, as a Quaker, he discouraged violence, the cause was left without a recognized leader.
    0
    0
  • Although the foregoing account of the temperatures of Asia supplies the main outline of the observed phenomena, a very important modifying cause, of which more will be said hereafter, comes into operation over the whole of the tropical region, namely, the periodical summer rains.
    0
    0
  • It is to the greatly reduced fall of snow on the northern faces of the highest ranges of the Himalaya that is to be attributed the higher level of the snow-line, a phenomenon which was long a cause of discussion.
    0
    0
  • The weak parts of this story are the sudden and unexplained departure of the Simons; the subsequent useless cruelty of treating the child like a wild beast and keeping him in a dark room practically out of sight (unless any doubt of his identity was possible), while his sister was in comparative comfort; the cause of death, declared to be of long standing, but in fact developed with such rapidity; the insufficient excuse provided for the child's muteness under Gomin's regime (he had answered Barras) and the irregularities in the formalities in attending the death and the funeral, when a simple identification of the body by Marie Therese would have prevented any question of resuscitated dauphins.
    0
    0
  • The choice of Jerusalem, standing on neutral ground, may be regarded as a stroke of genius, and there is nothing to show that the king exercised that rigour which was to be the cause of his grandson's undoing.
    0
    0
  • Hegius's chief claim to be remembered rests not upon his published works, but upon his services in the cause of humanism.
    0
    0
  • The pressing need for Seleucus once more to take the field against Antigonus was at any rate in large measure the cause of his abandonment of India.
    0
    0
  • Only in Asia Minor, where the Seleucid cause was represented by the king's cousin, the able Achaeus, was its prestige restored and the Pergamene power driven back to its earlier limits.
    0
    0
  • Animals suffer from the ravages of bot flies (Oestridae) and gad flies (Tabanidae); while the tsetse disease is due to the tsetse fly (Glossina morsitans), carrying the protozoa that cause the disease from one horse to another.
    0
    0
  • Hundreds of acres of wheat are lost annually in America by the ravages of the Hessian fly; the fruit flies of Australia and South Africa cause much loss to orange and citron growers, often making it necessary to cover the trees in muslin tents for protection.
    0
    0
  • The ostensible cause of a modern labour dispute is frequently not the real or the most important cause.
    0
    0
  • Whatever the cause, the complete restatement of economic theory, which some heroic persons demand, is clearly impossible, except on conditions not likely to be realized in the immediate future.
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  • It is therefore extraordinarily difficult at present to know what happens, or rather what would happen if it were not prevented, when a country reaches " the stage of diminishing returns "; what precisely it is which comes into operation, for obviously the diminishing returns are the results, not the cause; or how commodities " obey " a law which is always " suspended."
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  • But, while apparently aiding Edward, Bruce had taken a step which bound him to the patriotic cause.
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  • Prompted alike by patriotism and ambition, at the prime of manhood he chose the cause of national independence with all its perils, and stood by it with an unwavering constancy until he secured its triumph.
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  • Bruce's rapidity of movement was one cause of his success.
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  • The enthusiasm of the nation he had saved forgot his tardy adhesion to the popular cause, and at the parliament of Ayr on the 25th of April 1315 the succession was settled by a unanimous voice on him, and, failing males of his body, on his brother Edward and his heirs male, or failing them on his daughter Marjorie and her heirs, if she married with his consent.
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  • Neither the rotation of the shell as a whole nor its helicoid spiral coiling is the immediate cause of the torsion of the body in the individual, for the direction of the torsion is indicated in the segmentation of the ovum, in which there is a complete A B From Lankester's Treatise on Zoology.
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  • These facts afford strong support to the hypothesis that the weight of the shell is the original cause of the torsion of the dorsal visceral mass in Gastropods.
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