How to use Cattle in a sentence

cattle
  • I lose some cattle every year.

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  • I could run a passel of cattle on that land.

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  • The town has large cattle markets and an agricultural trade.

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  • Do you lose many cattle to wolves?

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  • Large numbers of horses, cattle, swine and poultry are reared.

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  • Originally the cattle were nearly all of the long-horned Spanish breed and of little value for their meat, except to the saladero establishments.

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  • Cattle have to be housed for the winter.

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  • The industries include cotton-spinning, weaving, nail-making and oilworks, and there are frequent markets for cattle and sheep. Lanark is a place of considerable antiquity.

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  • The majority of the species of Acacia are edible and serve as reserve fodder for sheep and cattle.

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  • You know Cade; you could make a profit off this ranch other ways than running cattle.

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  • The chief manufactures are boots and shoes, tobacco and machinery; there is also some trade in cattle.

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  • Gyula-Fellavar carries on an active trade in cereals, wine and cattle.

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  • There are large herds of cattle and flocks of sheep and goats.

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  • In 1909 the number of sheep in Montana was 5,747,000, being exceeded only by the number in Wyoming; the number of cattle was 922,000, only 80,00o being milch cows, and the number of horses 319,000.

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  • In 1884, partly because his political life seemed at least for the immediate present to be at an end, partly on account of the freedom and activity of out-of-door life, he bought two cattle ranches near Medora on the Little Missouri river in North Dakota, where he lived for two years, becoming intimately associated with the life and spirit of the western portion of the United States.

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  • The valley was speckled with healthy Angus cattle.

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  • So far, deer and rabbits are easier for a few wolves to pull down than a healthy cow, but if the pack gets too big they may go after cattle.

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  • I agreed because I figured goats would be easier to handle than cattle.

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  • The native Sardinian cattle are small, but make good draught oxen.

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  • Its general character was such that cattle could not stand on it, and a piece of iron would sink in it.

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  • Cattle are abundant.

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  • The east is devoted chiefly to stock raising; for cattle, horses and sheep thrive well on the bunch grass except when it is covered with snow.

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  • Beet is chiefly grown as feeding stuff for cattle, and not for sugar.

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  • Cattle rearing, which has been an industry since the advent of the Wends in the 6th century, is important on the extensive pastures of the Erzgebirge and in the Vogtland.

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  • He visited all parts of the country himself, and personally encouraged agriculture; he introduced a more economical mode of mining and smelting silver; he favoured the importation of finer breeds of sheep and cattle; and he brought foreign weavers from abroad to teach the Saxons.

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  • In former times large quantities of it were imported in a dry state into Europe for officinal purposes, the drug having the reputation of being efficacious in diseases of the skin and lungs; and even now it may be found in apothecaries' shops in the south of Europe, country people regarding it as a powerful aphrodisiac for cattle.

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  • In spite of a certain industrial activity and the periodical bustle of its cattle and dairy markets, Leiden remains essentially an academic city.

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  • Few cattle, but numbers of sheep, goats and swine are reared.

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  • For instance, in weighing live cattle, owners of markets are now required to provide adequate accommodation.

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  • There is also a considerable trade in cattle.

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  • The Spaniards found no indigenous domestic animals in the country, and introduced their own horses, cattle, sheep and swine.

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  • The horses and cattle are of a degenerate type, small, ungainly and inured to neglect and hard usage.

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  • The varying climatic conditions of Mexico have produced breeds of cattle that have not only departed from the original Spanish type, but likewise present strikingly different characteristics among themselves.

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  • According to this report, which is not strictly trustworthy, there were in the republic 5,142,457 cattle, 859,217 horses, 334,435 mules, 287,991 asses, 3,424,430 sheep, 4,206,011 goats and 616,139 swine.

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  • Two years later home consumption returns noted the slaughter of 958,058 cattle (129,938 in the Federal District), 561,982 sheep, 992,263 goats and 887,130 hogs - the last item being larger than the census return of 1902.

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  • The greater part is consumed in the country, but there is a considerable export of cattle to the United States, Cuba and Central America, and of hides and skins to the United States and Europe.

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  • As to sacrifice, maize and other vegetables were offered, and occasionally rabbits, quails, &c., but, in the absence of cattle, human sacrifice was the chief rite, and cannibalism prevailed at the feasts.

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  • Monmouth is situated in a good farming region, and cattle, swine and ponies are raised in the vicinity.

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  • Cattle and horses are bred.

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  • Potatoes, however, are grown in large quantities north and west of the White Mountains; and this district leads in the number of cattle and sheep, and in the production of all the cereals except Indian corn.

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  • The wealth of the Bechuana consists principally in their cattle, which they tend with great care, showing a shrewd discrimination in the choice of pasture suited to oxen, sheep and goats.

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  • The first regular expedition to ry penetrate far inland was in 1801-1802, when John (afterwards Sir John) Truter, of the Cape judicial bench, and William Somerville - an army physician and afterwards husband of Mary Somerville - were sent to the Bechuana tribes to buy cattle.

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  • Swine, which are reared in great numbers in the plains, yield the famous Westphalian hams; and the rearing of cattle and goats is important.

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  • There are also large horse and cattle markets held here.

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  • The jaguar is usually found singly (sometimes in pairs), and preys upon such quadrupeds as the horse, tapir, capybara, dogs or cattle.

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  • Manufacture of woollens, cottons, Russia leather and embroidery is carried on, and there is trade in cattle, wine, tobacco, hemp, hides and grain.

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  • An extensive trade is carried on in peltry, silk goods, iron and wooden wares, salt fish, grain, cattle and horses.

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  • They are dipped in water, which is given to ailing cattle and human beings as a sovereign remedy for diseases.

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  • First, there is timber, such as gates, stiles and rails; the first two are, nine times out of ten, awkward jumps, as the take off is either poached by cattle, or else is on the ascent or descent.

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  • Its trade in timber, salt, textiles, cattle, wine and agricultural produce of all kinds is very considerable.

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  • Occasionally it is carried to the homestead, and used with other forage in carrying out the system of soiling cattle.

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  • The lava plains are treeless and for the most part too dry for agriculture; but they support many cattle and horses.

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  • The pastures of the neighbourhood support a breed of Aquitaine cattle, which is most highly valued in south-western France.

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  • In the hilly districts the inhabitants mainly follow pastoral pursuits, possessing much cattle of all kinds.

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  • Horse and cattle ranching is practised in Alberta, where the milder winters allow of the outdoor wintering of live stock to a greater degree than is possible in the colder parts of Canada.

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  • Cattle, sheep, swine and poultry are reared in abundance.

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  • In 1910 there were 495,000 neat cattle (285,000 milch cows), 94,000 horses (average value, $106), 229,000 sheep and 95,000 swine.

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  • There is a trade in beer, cattle and grain, sold at eleven annual fairs, three of which last for ten days each.

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  • In the interior cattle and sheep are plentiful, on the plateau horses and donkeys.

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  • It has iron foundries, machinery factories, railway workshops and a considerable trade in cattle, and among its other industries are weaving and malting and the manufacture of cloth.

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  • The public buildings include the town hall, court house and orphan hospital; and the industries are mainly connected with the cattle trade and the distilling of whisky.

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  • In the desert tracts fine breeds of camels, cattle, horses and sheep are to be found wherever there is pasturage.

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  • The landlord found land, labour, oxen for ploughing and working the wateringmachines, carting, threshing or other implements, seed corn, rations for the workmen and fodder for the cattle.

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  • The principal industry is stock-raising, which dates from the first settlement in 1674 by Domingos Affonso Mafrense, who established here a large number of cattle ranges.

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  • Oats, cultivated in the Roman and Tuscan maremma and in Apulia, are used almost exclusively for horses and cattle.

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  • The breed of cattle most widely distributed is that known as the Podolian, usually with white or grey coat and enormous horns.

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  • In upper Italy cattle are principally reared in pens and stalls; in central Italy cattle are allowed to run half wild, the stall system being little practised; in the south and in the islands cattle are kept in the open air, few shelters being provided.

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  • In 1905 Italy exported 32,786 and imported 17,766 head of cattle; exported 33,574 and imported 6551 sheep; exported 95,995 and imported 1604 swine.

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  • In addition, the communes have a right to levy a, surtax not exceeding 50% of the quota levied by the state upon lands and buildings; a family tax, or fuocatico, upon the total incomes of families, which, for fiscal purposes, are divided into various categories; a tax based upon the rent-value of houses, and other taxes upon cattle, horses, dogs, carriages and servants; also on licences for shopkeepers, hotel and restaurant keepers, &c.; on the slaughter of animals, stamp duties, one-half of the tax on bicycles, &c. Occasional sources of interest are found in the sale of communal property, the realization of communal credits, and the contraction of debt.

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  • A large annual horse and cattle fair is held.

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  • Of imported animals, cattle, goats, asses and dogs thrive well, ponies and horses indifferently, and sheep badly, though some success has been achieved in breeding them.

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  • He can farm, keep cattle, and marry or send for his family, but he cannot leave the settlement or be idle.

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  • Appingedam and Winschoten are very old towns, having important cattle and horse markets.

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  • The word signifies horned cattle, and is found in Shakespeare's own writing, in the restored line "It is the pasture lards the rother's sides" (Timon of Athens), '' where "brother's" was originally the accredited reading.

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  • The Vertebrata come within the scope of our subject, chiefly as destructive agents which cause wounds or devour young shoots and foliage, &c. Rabbits and other burrowing animals injure roots, squirrels and birds snip off buds, horned cattle strip off bark, and so forth.

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  • Here the climate is temperate, the country watered by many rivers and lakes, the soil fertile, the vegetation rich, the cattle numerous.

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  • It has an active trade in cereals and cattle.

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  • East of the Ain, forests of fir and oak abound on the mountains, the lower slopes of which give excellent pasture for sheep and cattle, and much cheese is produced.

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  • There is trade in walnuts, walnut-oil, silk, cattle, &c.

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  • Live-stock breeding is very extensively carried on by the Kirghiz, namely, horses, cattle, sheep, camels, goats and pigs.

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  • The cattle are destined chiefly for the saladero establishments for the preparation of tasajo, or jerked beef, for the Brazilian and Cuban markets, and for the Liebig factory, where large quantities of extract of meat are prepared for the European trade.

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  • In the southern districts, where the farmers are Europeans, the breed of cattle is being steadily improved by the introduction of Durham and Hereford bulls.

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  • Year by year the influence of the Mahommedan tribes on the north leads to the cutting down of the forest, the extension of both planting and pasture and the introduction of cattle and even horses.

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  • Paper-making, milling, and the making of mineral waters are the chief manufactures, but the town is an important centre of the cattle trade with London, markets being held at frequent intervals.

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  • A Runic sculptured stone, believed to be of the 8th century, and the old town cross stand in High Street, but the great cattle fair, for which Crieff was once famous, was removed to Falkirk in 1770.

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  • The arrears increase every year; one-fifth of the inhabitants have left their houses; cattle are disappearing.

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  • The principal types to be found in the United Kingdom and on the continent of Europe are open wagons (the lading often protected from the weather by tarpaulin sheets), mineral wagons, covered or box wagons for cotton, grain, &c., sheep and cattle trucks, &c. The principal types of American freight cars are box cars, gondola cars, coal cars, stock cars, tank cars and refrigerator cars, with, as in other countries, various special cars for special purposes.

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  • Hubert and Mauss interpret this to mean that the sanctity of the remainder of the herd was concentrated on a single animal; the god, incarnate in the herd, was eliminated by the sacrifice, and the cattle saved from the dangers to which their association with the god exposed them.

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  • Some herds of cattle and horses run wild; but these were, of course, introduced, as were also the wild hogs, the numerous rabbits and the less common hares.

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  • It forms excellent fodder for cattle, and is regularly gathered for that purpose.

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  • Lafone, a wealthy cattle and hide merchant on the river Plate, obtained from government a grant of the southern portion of the island, a peninsula 600,000 acres in extent, and possession of all the wild cattle on the island for a period of six years, for a payment of £10,000 down, and £20,000 in ten years from January 1, 1852.

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  • Its auction marts for sheep and cattle sales are the largest in the south-west of Scotland; at an autumn sale as many as 15,000 sheep and 1400 cattle are disposed of in one day.

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  • Similarly in the earlier pre-exilian period of Israel's occupation of Canaanite territory the Hebrews were always subject to this tendency to worship the old Baal or `Ashtoreth (the goddess who made the cattle and flocks prolific).3 A few years of drought or of bad seasons would make a Hebrew settler betake himself to the old Canaanite gods.

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  • Flour-milling and tanning are industries, and monthly cattle fairs are held.

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  • That conditions are favourable to the animal industry is shown by the fact that in 1897 the valleys of northern Nevada were so overrun with wild horses, to the detriment of the grazing grounds for cattle, that the legislature authorized the killing of such animals.

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  • This, as well as the word pecunia for money (pecus, cattle), indicates the fact of cattle having been the earliest Italian medium of exchange.

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  • Gorinchem possesses a good harbour, and besides working in gold and silver, carries on a considerable trade in grain, hemp, cheese, potatoes, cattle and fish, the salmon fishery being noted.

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  • Sugar-cane, Indian corn and cotton are also produced in abundance, and cattle are raised.

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  • There is also considerable trade in cattle.

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  • The most petty limitations of Jewish commercial activity continued; thus at about this period the community of Prague, in a petition, " complain that they are not permitted to buy victuals in the market before a certain hour, vegetables not before 9 and cattle not before II o'clock; to buy fish is sometimes altogether prohibited; Jewish druggists are not permitted to buy victuals at the same time with Christians " (op. cit.).

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  • The city is situated in a rich agricultural region, and is a market for grain, neat cattle, horses and swine.

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  • Farmers of the Piedmont Plateau formerly kept large numbers of horses and cattle from April to November in ranges in the Mountain Region, but with the opening of portions of that country to cultivation the business of pasturage declined, except as the cotton plantations demanded an increased supply of mules; there were 25,259 mules in 1850, 110,011 in 1890, 138,786 in 1900, and 181,000 in 1910.

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  • The relation between ants and aphids has often been compared to that between men and milch cattle.

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  • Agriculture and grazing have become the main dependence of the population - the former in the lower, forested region of the south-east, where coffee and sugar-cane - are the principal products, and the latter on the higher campos and river valleys, and on the mountain slopes, where large herds of cattle are to be found, and milk, butter and cheese are produced.

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  • The chief manufactures are silk, confectionery and earthenware; and there is besides a considerable trade in fruit, grain and cattle.

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  • The only industry of importance is grazing, cattle being raised for export to Chile, and a few sheep for their wool.

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  • In Mongolia the population is essentially nomadic, its wealth consisting in herds of horned cattle, sheep, horses and camels.

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  • The horned cattle include the humped oxen and buffaloes of India, and the yak of Tibet.

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  • A hybrid between the yak and Indian cattle, called zo, is commonly reared in Tibet and the Himalaya.

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  • Feudal in origin, Dunster's later importance was commercial, and the port had a considerable wool, corn and cattle trade with Ireland.

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  • Large flocks of sheep are kept, both for their flesh and their wool, and there are in the province large numbers of horned cattle and of pigs, Geese and goose feathers form lucrative articles of export.

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  • Tampa is an important shipping point for naval stores and phosphate rock, for vegetables, citrus fruit and pineapples, raised in the vicinity, and for lumber, cattle and fuller's earth.

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  • Cattle and pine lumber are sent to Cuba, and Havana tobacco and fine grades of Cuban timber are imported.

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  • Next came the successful attempt to deal with the fatal cattle scourge known as anthrax.

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  • Dumfries markets for cattle and sheep, held weekly, and for horses, held five times annually, have always ranked with the best, and there is also a weekly market for pork during the five months beginning with November.

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  • They carry on agriculture wheat-growing on a large scale - with the aid of modern agricultural machines, and breed cattle and horses.

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  • The slopes of the Armenian highlands are clothed with fine forests, and the vine is grown at their base, while on the wide-stretching steppes the Turko-Tatars pasture cattle, horses and sheep. The lower part of the Kura valley assumes the character of a dry steppe, the rainfall not reaching 54 in.

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  • Dandolo published in Italian several treatises on agriculture, vine-cultivation, and the rearing of cattle and sheep; a work on silk-worms, which was translated into French by Fontanelle; a work on the discoveries in chemistry which were made in the last quarter of the 18th century (published 1796); and translations of several of the best French works on chemistry.

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  • During the middle ages cattle and sheep were the chief farm animals, but the intermixture of stock consequent on the common-field system was a barrier to improvement in the breed and conduced to the propagation of disease.

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  • His remarks on horses, cattle, &c., are not less interesting; and there is a very good account of the diseases of each species, and some just observations on the advantage of mixing different kinds on the same pasture.

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  • The famous meadows near Salisbury are mentioned, where, when cattle have fed their fill, hogs, it is said, " are made fat with the remnant - namely, with the knots and sappe of the grasse."

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  • In the first edition of the Improver Improved no mention is made of clover, nor in the second of turnips, but in the third, clover is treated of at some length, and turnips are recommended as an excellent cattle crop, the culture of which should be extended from the kitchen garden to the field.

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  • From the third edition of Hartlib's Legacie we learn that clover was cut green and given to cattle; and it appears that this practice of soiling, as it is now called, had become very common about the beginning of the 18th century, wherever clover was cultivated.

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  • Turnips were hand-hoed and extensively employed in feeding sheep and cattle.

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  • Bakewell's fame as a breeder was for a time enhanced by the improvement which he effected on the Long-horned cattle, then the prevailing breed of the midland counties of England.

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  • The foot-and-mouth disease first appeared about 1840, having been introduced, as is supposed, by foreign cattle.

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  • In 1865 the rinderpest, or steppe murrain, originating amongst the vast herds of the Russian steppes, had spread westward over Europe, until it was brought to London by foreign cattle.

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  • In 1883 the veterinary department of the Privy Council - which had been constituted in 1865 when the country was ravaged by cattle plague - was abolished by order in council, and the " Agricultural Department " was substituted, but no alteration was effected in the work of the department, so far as it related to animals.

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  • In the same year was passed the Markets and Fairs (Weighing of Cattle) Act.

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  • In Great Britain in 1905, for every head of cattle there were about four head of sheep, whereas in Ireland the cattle outnumbered the sheep. Again, whilst Great Britain possessed only half as many cattle more than Table XiiI.-Numbers of Horses, Cattle, Sheep and Pigs in the United Kingdom in 1905.

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  • Ireland, she possessed six times as many sheep. The cattle population of England alone slightly exceeded that of Ireland, but cattle are more at home on the broad plains of England than amongst the hills and mountains of Wales and Scotland, which are suitable for sheep. Hence, whilst in England sheep were not three times as numerous as cattle, in Wales they were nearly five times, and in Scotland nearly six times as many.

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  • Up to 1896 store cattle were admitted into the United Kingdom for the purpose of being fattened, but under the Diseases of Animals Act of that year animals imported since then have to be slaughtered at the place of landing.

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  • An increase in live cattle accompanied a decrease in live sheep and pigs, but the imports of dead meat expanded fifteen-fold over the period.

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  • In connexion with the internal live stock trade of Great Britain attention must be directed to the Markets and Fairs (Weighing of Cattle) Act 1891.

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  • The grazier buys and sells cattle much less frequently than the butcher buys them, so that the latter is naturally more skilled in estimating the weight of a beast through the use of the eye and the hand.

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  • The numbers of cattle (both fat and store) weighed at scheduled places in 1893 and 1905 2 were respectively 7.59 and 18% of those entering those markets.

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  • The numbers for Scotland are greater throughout than those for England, 72% of the fat cattle entering the scheduled markets in Scotland in 1905 2 having been weighed, while in England the proportion was only 20 7 0.

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  • If the sole purpose for which an animal is reared is to prepare it for the block - and this is the case with steers amongst cattle and with wethers amongst sheep - the sooner it is ready for slaughter the less should be the outlay involved.

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  • This body was instituted in 1798 as the Smithfield Cattle and Sheep Society, the title being [[Table Xix]].

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  • The original object - the supply of the cattle markets of Smithfield and other places with the cheapest and best meat - is still kept strictly in view.

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  • In 1839 the classes comprised seven for cattle, six for sheep, and one for pigs, with prizes to the amount of £300.

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  • By 1862 the classes had risen to 29 for cattle, 17 for sheep and 4 for pigs, and the prize money to 2072.

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  • At the centenary show in 1898 provision was made for 40 classes for cattle, 29 for sheep, 18 for pigs, and 7 for animals to be slaughtered, whilst to mark the importance of the occasion the prizes offered amounted to close upon 5000 in value.

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  • The sections provided for cattle are properly restricted to what may be termed the beef breeds; in the catalogue order they are Devon, South Devon, Hereford, Shorthorn, Sussex, Red Polled, Aberdeen-Angus, Galloway, Welsh, Highland, Cross-bred, Kerry and Dexter, and Small Cross-bred.

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  • In the cattle classes, aged beasts of huge size and of considerably over a ton in weight used to be common, but in recent years the tendency has been to reduce the upper limit of age, and thus to bring out animals ripe for the butcher in a shorter time than was formerly the case.

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  • The single exception is provided by the slowly-maturing Highland breed of cattle, for which classes were allotted to (I) steers not exceeding three years old, (2) steers or oxen above three years old (with no maximum limit), and (3) heifers not exceeding four years old.

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  • As illustrating heavy weights, there were in the 1893 show, out of 310 entries of cattle, four beasts which weighed over a ton.

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  • In the 1895 show, out of 356 entries of cattle, there were seven beasts of more than a ton in weight.

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  • In the 1899 show, with 311 entries of cattle, and the age limited to three years, no beast reached the weight of a ton, the heaviest animal being a crossbred(Aberdeen-Angus and Shorthorn)which,at three years old, turned the scale at 19 cwt.

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  • The three-year-old wethers and older oxen that used to be common in the fat stock markets are now rarely seen, excepting perhaps in the case of mountain breeds of sheep and Highland cattle.

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  • At Deptford, for example, large numbers of cattle and sheep which thus arrive - mainly from Argentina, Canada and the United States - are at once slaughtered, and so furnish a steady supply of fresh-killed beef and mutton.

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  • In 1900 the discovery early in the year of the existence of foot-and-mouth disease amongst cattle and sheep shipped from Argentina to the United Kingdom led to the issue of an order by which all British ports were closed against live animals from the country named.

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  • This order came into force on the 30th of April, and the result was a marked decline in the shipments of live cattle and sheep from the River Plate, but a decided increase in the quantity of frozen meat sent thence to the United Kingdom.

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  • The re-introduction of cattle plague into England in 1877 led to the passing of the Act 41 & 42 Vict.

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  • Cattle plague, or rinderpest, has not been recorded in Great Britain since 1877.

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  • In that year there were 47 outbreaks distributed over five counties and involving 263 head of cattle.

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  • Between 1870 and 1889 the annual outbreaks had ranged between a minimum of 312 in 1884 and a maximum of 3262 in 1874, the largest number of cattle attacked in any one year being 7983 in 1872.

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  • Calves constitute about one-twelfth of the total number of cattle.

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  • The export trade in cattle, sheep and pigs is practically restricted to pedigree animals required for breeding purposes, and though its aggregate value [[Table Xxvi]].-Quantities and Value of Home-bred Live Stock exported from the United Kingdom, 1900-1905.

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  • In 1887, at Newcastle-on-Tyne, a prize of 200 went to a compound portable agricultural engine, one of £loo to a simple portable agricultural engine, and lesser prizes to a weighing-machine for horses and cattle, a weighing-machine for sheep and pigs, potato-raisers and one-man-power cream separators.

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  • It has been stated on good evidence that a loss of £7,000,000 per annum was caused by the attack of the ox warble fly on cattle in England alone.

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  • In America cattle suffer much from the horn fly (Haematobia serrata).

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  • There is a thriving trade in wine, fruit, wheat, cattle, brandy, chalk and soap.

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  • The mountaineers breed some cattle and sheep, and cultivate small fields on the mountain-sides.

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  • The state includes the oldest settlements in Venezuela, and was once very prosperous, producing cattle and exporting hides, but wars and political disorders have partly destroyed its industries and impeded their development.

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  • The soil is an oozy mud which can only be made capable of carrying buildings by the artificial means of pile-driving; there is no land fit for agriculture or the rearing of cattle; the sole food supply is fish from the lagoon, and there is no drinking-water save such as could be stored from the rainfall.

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  • The number of cattle was 1,358,947 in 1850; 2,117,925 in 1900; and 1,925,000 in 1910.

    0
    0
  • In Russia the domovoi (house spirit) is an important personage in folk-belief; he may object to certain kinds of animals, or to certain colours in cattle; and must, generally speaking, be propitiated and cared for.

    0
    0
  • Large numbers of horses, cattle and' sheep are bred, the cattle being famous.

    0
    0
  • An active trade is carried on with Austria, especially through the Isakovets and Gusyatin custom-houses, corn, cattle, horses, skins, wool, linseed and hemp seed being exported, in exchange for wooden wares, linen, woollen stuffs, cotton, glass and agricultural implements.

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    0
  • Another reason is found in the absence of cattle in the south to eat it.

    0
    0
  • They are used on a very large scale in the vicinity of oil mills in southern cities like Memphis, New Orleans, Houston, and Little Rock, from Soo to s000 cattle being often collected in a single yard for this purpose.

    0
    0
  • Many thousands of cattle are fattened annually in this way at remarkably low cost.

    0
    0
  • Accordingly a selection of particular plants to breed from, because they possess certain desirable characteristics, is as rational as the selection of particular animals for breeding purposes in order to maintain the character of a herd of cattle or of a flock of sheep.

    0
    0
  • The chief business is in butter, eggs, cattle and pigs, while bleaching, dyeing and shipbuilding are also carried on here.

    0
    0
  • In summer the country appears as one waving field of wheat, millet and mealies; whilst on the mountain slopes and on their flat tops are large flocks of sheep, cattle and goats, and troops of ponies.

    0
    0
  • The chief exports are wheat, mealies, Kaffir corn, wool, mohair, horses and cattle.

    0
    0
  • The Basuto acquired an unenviable notoriety as a race of bold cattle lifters and raiders, and the emigrant Boers found them extremely troublesome neighbours.

    0
    0
  • At the same time, if the Basuto were eager for cattle, the Boers were eager for land; and their encroachments on the territories of the Basuto led to a proclamation in 1842 from Sir George Napier, the then governor of Cape Colony, forbidding further encroachments on Basutoland.

    0
    0
  • It possesses distilleries and brick-making factories, and has trade in cereals and cattle.

    0
    0
  • Fishing is extensively carried on and cattle fairs are held.

    0
    0
  • About 13,000 head of cattle were exported annually from 1901 to 1905, but much of the best grazing land has since been devoted to the cultivation of sugar-cane.

    0
    0
  • Indian corn, flour, cattle, horses, mules and hides are exported to the neighbouring states.

    0
    0
  • Sales of meat products in 1919 were $128,000,000; hog receipts, 3,650,534; head cattle receipts, 1,500,000.

    0
    0
  • It has long been famous for its cattle and sheep sales, but more particularly for the great August lamb fair, the largest in Scotland, at which as many as 126,000 lambs have been sold.

    0
    0
  • Cattle and horses are bred and wild deer are still found.

    0
    0
  • Ibn Dasta found amongst them agriculture besides cattle breeding.

    0
    0
  • Among the ruder or savage tribes they possess but one form; but the ingenuity of man has devised many inventions to increase his comforts; he has varied and multiplied the characters and kinds of domestic animals for the same purpose, and hence the various breeds of horses, cattle and dogs.

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    0
  • The bark is completely dog-like, and the primitive hunting instincts have been cultivated into a marvellous aptitude for herding sheep and cattle.

    0
    0
  • The extensive meadows supply pasturage for a large number of cattle and sheep, and the horses raised in the Perche have a wide reputation as draught animals.

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    0
  • The Somali have also large herds of cattle - oxen, sheep and goats.

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    0
  • Ivory, cattle, butter, coffee, cotton, myrrh, gums and skins are exported from the Benadir country.

    0
    0
  • It is connected with Ponce by railway (1910), and with the port of Arroyo by an excellent road, part of the military road extending to Cayey, and it exports sugar, rum, tobacco, coffee, cattle, fruit and other products of the department, which is very fertile.

    0
    0
  • The appearance of the prairie section of the province is that of undulating meadows, with rounded sloping ridges covered with shorter grasses, which serve for the support of great herds of cattle and horses.

    0
    0
  • Cattle, horses and sheep are largely reared in the southern prairie region on ranches or smaller holdings.

    0
    0
  • The male slaves were employed in the tillage of the land and the tending of cattle, and the females in domestic work and household manufactures.

    0
    0
  • Under him were the several groups employed in the different branches of the exploitation and the care of the cattle and flocks, as well as those who kept or prepared the food, clothing and tools of the whole staff and those who attended on the master in the various species of rural sports.

    0
    0
  • They were not even adscripti glebae, though forbidden to migrate; an imperial ukase of 1721 says, " the proprietors sell their peasants and domestic servants, not even in families, but one by one, like cattle."

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    0
  • The devil-worshippers, at their sacrifices, slay the ox; and this the daevas favour, for they are foes to the cattle and to cattlebreeding, and friends to those who work ill to the cow.

    0
    0
  • To these ecclesiastical precepts and expiations belong in particular the numerous ablutions, bodily chastisements, love of truth, beneficial works, support of comrades in the faith, alms, chastity, improvement of the land, arboriculture, breeding of cattle, agriculture, protection of useful animals, as the dog, the destruction of noxious animals, and the prohibition either to burn or to bury the dead.

    0
    0
  • The native cattle, also diminutive in size, with small horns and short legs, furnish beef of remarkable tenderness and flavour; while the cows, when well fed, yield a plentiful supply of rich milk.

    0
    0
  • It is the centre of a thriving agricultural district and has a considerahle trade in wool, grain, cattle and horses with Basutoland, Pondoland and the neighbouring regions of Natal.

    0
    0
  • The mark set upon Cain is usually regarded as some tribal mark or sign analogous to the cattle marks of Bedouin and the related usages in Europe.

    0
    0
  • Where the marsh is open and grassy, flooded only at high tides or in rainy seasons, and the ground firm enough to bear cattle, it is used as range.

    0
    0
  • Dairying interests are not largely developed, and in Texas and the adjoining states the " Texas fever " and " charbon " have done great damage to cattle.

    0
    0
  • Grasses grow luxuriantly, and the savannahs of central Cuba are, in this respect, excellent cattle ranges.

    0
    0
  • It has been authoritatively estimated, for example, that from 90 to 95% of all horses, neat cattle and hogs in the entire island were lost in the war years of 1895-1898.

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    0
  • According to these statistics the most important articles of export are coal and turf, fruit, minerals, soda, iron and steel, and cattle.

    0
    0
  • The surrounding district is mainly agricultural and pastoral, producing oats, maize, cotton, olive oil, cattle, sheep, skins, hides and butter.

    0
    0
  • The chief articles of commerce are fattened poultry, prunes (pruneaux d'Agen) and other fruit, cork, wine, vegetables and cattle.

    0
    0
  • A grant of a market was obtained in 1247, and this is still of importance as regards both cattle and corn.

    0
    0
  • The landing of foreign cattle is permitted by the Board of Trade, and there are cattle lairs and abattoirs near the Cardiff wharf.

    0
    0
  • They kept horses (though in small numbers), sheep and goats, but no traces of their rearing horned cattle have yet been found.

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    0
  • The Kaibals, or Koibals, can hardly be distinguished from the Minusinsk Tatars, and support themselves by rearing cattle.

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    0
  • The gaur, which extends into Burma and the Malay Peninsula, where it is known as seladang, is the typical representative of an Indo-Malay group of wild cattle characterized by the presence of a ridge on the withers, the compressed horns, and the white legs.

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    0
  • Water is plentiful in the Elburz, and situated in well-watered valleys and gorges are innumerable flourishing villages, embosomed in gardens and orchards, with extensive cultivated fields and meadows, and at higher altitudes small plateaus, under snow until March or April, afford cool camping grounds to the nomads of the plains, and luxuriant grazing to their sheep and cattle during the summer.

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    0
  • Important cattle and horse fairs are held here.

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    0
  • Stock-raising receives some attention and hides and cattle are exported.

    0
    0
  • More dreaded than the frosts are the terrible burans or snowstorms, which occur in early spring and destroy thousands of horses and cattle that have been grazing on the steppes throughout the winter.

    0
    0
  • Although very heavy falls of snow take place in the alpine tracts - especially about Lake Baikal - on the other side, in the steppe regions of the Altai and Transbaikalia and in the neighbourhood of Krasnoyarsk, the amount of snow is so small that travellers use wheeled vehicles, and cattle are able to find food in the steppe.

    0
    0
  • A considerable quantity of timber is grown on the high lands, and the rich valley pastures support large herds of cattle, while the abundance of oaks and chestnuts favours the rearing of swine.

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    0
  • The chief trade is in corn, wine, cattle and timber.

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    0
  • The fertility of the pasture-land in Romney Marsh to the south and east of Ashford caused the cattle trade to increase in the latter half of the 18th century, and led to the establishment of a stock market in 1784.

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    0
  • In the Vivarais cattle are reared, while on the slopes of the Beaujolais excellent wines are grown.

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    0
  • The Turkomans possess a famous breed of horses and keep camels, sheep, cattle, asses and mules.

    0
    0
  • The business of the town is chiefly connected with the interests of the sheep and cattle farmers of the Riverina district, a plain country, in the main pastoral, but suited in some parts for cultivation.

    0
    0
  • In 1920 there were 238,736 horses, 730,421 cattle, 934,084 sheep and 457,052 pigs, against 297,- 645 horses, 940,319 cattle, 1,100,481 sheep and 538,920 pigs in 1913.

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    0
  • Extending across the great central valley of Chile, the province has a considerable area devoted to agriculture, but much attention is given to cattle and mining.

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    0
  • Next Ahriman sent a deluge, from which one man escaped in a boat with his cattle.

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    0
  • Cattle, phosphate of lime and salt, manufactured from a lake in the interior, are the principal exports, the market for these being the neighbouring island of St Thomas.

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    0
  • Another highly useful palm is the carnauba or carnahuba (Copernicia cerifera) which supplies fruit, medullary meal, food for cattle, boards and timber, fibre, wax and medicine.

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    0
  • Modern industrial development in some of the states has greatly increased the importation of machinery, electric supplies, materials for construction, coal, &c. Kerosene oil also figures among the principal imports, and beef cattle are imported for consumption by some cities.

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    0
  • It was estimated that there were 30,000,000 head of cattle in the republic in 1904, but the estimate was unquestionably too large.

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    0
  • A very large part of the jerked beef consumed in Brazil is imported from Argentina and Uruguay, and some beef cattle also are imported.

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    0
  • These importations at Rio de Janeiro in 1906 were 12,464,170 kilograms of jerked beef and 12, 575 head of cattle.

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    0
  • In the Rio Branco region of Amazonas and in Piauhy, where the national government has long been the owner of extensive cattle ranges, the industry is in a state of decadence.

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    0
  • Cattle-raising was once a flourishing industry on the island of Marajo, at the mouth of the Amazon, and it is followed to some extent at Alemquer and other points along the Amazon, but the cattle are small, and commonly in bad condition.

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    0
  • Minas Geraes produces cheese, butter and milk, as well as beef cattle for neighbouring cities.

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    0
  • Goats have been found highly profitable in many of the middle Atlantic states, where the long dry seasons render the campos unsuitable for cattle pasturage.

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    0
  • Cattle and the sugar-cane were at an early period introduced from Madeira, and here the other captaincies supplied themselves with both.

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    0
  • They were rich in cattle, and had commenced the discovery of the mines.

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    0
  • Slaughter-houses, cattle markets and grain markets have been erected at Gorgie, thus obviating the driving of clocks and herds through the streets, which was constantly objected to.

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    0
  • Cattle-breeding is probably the most lucrative branch of stock-farming, the country being pre-eminently adapted for horned cattle.

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    0
  • The chief market for cattle is Johannesburg.

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    0
  • In 1908 Europeans were returned as owning 32,000 horses, 220,000 horned cattle, 765,000 sheep, 68,000 goats, 25,000 pigs, 960 ostriches and 384,000 poultry.

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    0
  • Large herds of cattle - over 500,000 in the aggregate - are owned by the natives, who also possess vast flocks of goats and sheep. The dairy industry is well established, and Natal butter commands a ready sale.

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    0
  • The British settlers had, characteristically, reached Natal mainly by way of the sea; the new tide of immigration was by land - the voortrekkers streamed through the passes of Arrival the Drakensberg, bringing with them their wives and of the children and vast herds of cattle.

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  • This feeling was, however, changed by what Sir George (and many of the Dutch in Natal also) thought a wilful and unjustifiable attack (December 1840) on a tribe of Kaffirs on the southern, or Cape Colony, frontier by a commando under Andries Pretorius, which set out, nominally, to recover stolen cattle.

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    0
  • The principal occupation of the Mongols is cattle-breeding, and Russian writers estimate that on an average each yurta, or family, has about 50 sheep, 25 horses, 15 horned cattle and io camels.

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    0
  • Sheep are not stocked so extensively as cattle, and are tending rapidly to decrease, a result due to the spread of intensive cultivation and the rise in value of the soil.

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    0
  • The exports, which show plainly the prevailing agricultural character of the country, are flour, wheat, cattle, beef, barley, pigs, wine in barrels, horses and maize.

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    0
  • The wines of Hungary were already renowned throughout Europe, and cattle breeding was conducted on a great scale.

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    0
  • The principal products are rubber, cacao and nuts; cattle are raised on the elevated plains of the north, while curing fish and collecting turtle eggs for their oil give occupation to many people on the rivers.

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    0
  • Schweinfurt carries on an active trade in the grain, fruit and wine produced in its neighbourhood, and it is the seat of an important sheep and cattle market.

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    0
  • The Scyths lived upon the produce of their herds of cattle and horses, their main food being the flesh of the latter, either cooked in a cauldron or made into a kind of haggis, and the milk of mares from which they made cheese and kumiss (a fermented drink resembling buttermilk).

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  • These were drawn by their cattle, and were the homes of each fam11lly.

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    0
  • Both these and many other plants such as gift-blaar and drouk-gras are poisonous to cattle.

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    0
  • The Africander breed of cattle is a well-marked variety, and a characteristic native domestic animal.

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    0
  • Six species of tick, including the blue tick common throughout South Africa, are found, especially in the low veld, where they are the means of the transmission of disease to cattle.

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  • The banken veld is also unsuited in summer for horses and sheep, though cattle thrive.

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  • Sechele was regarded by the Boers as owing them allegiance, and in August 1852 Pretorius sent against him a commando (in which Paul Kruger served as a field cornet), alleging that the Bakwena were harbouring a Bakatla chief who had looted cattle belonging to Boer farmers.

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    0
  • The manufacture of morocco leather goods and the quarrying of the lithographic stone of the vicinity are carried on, and there is trade in cattle, grain, wine, truffles and dressed pork.

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    0
  • Cattle are reared in great quantity and are of excellent quality.

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    0
  • The principal exports were coffee, cacau, divi-divi, rubber, hides and skins, cattle and asphalt.

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    0
  • In colonial times the llanos were covered with immense herds of cattle and horses and were inhabited by a race of hardy, expert horsemen, the llaneros.

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    0
  • The public revenues are derived from customs taxes and charges on imports and exports, transit taxes, cattle taxes, profits on coinage, receipts from state monopolies, receipts from various public services such as the post office, telegraph, Caracas waterworks, &c., and sundr y taxes, fines and other sources.

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    0
  • Importance attaches to the horse fair, held in in the week before Whitsuntide and now on the second Thursday in May and on July 25, and to the cattle fair in the beginning of August.

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    0
  • Saturday was market day in 1792; a corn market is now held on Saturday, a cattle market on Thursday and Saturday.

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    0
  • The exports include cattle, hides, coffee, rubber, fruit and salt.

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    0
  • The vertebrae, the ribs, and the bones in general, are given to their cattle by the Icelanders, and by the Kamtchatdales to their dogs.

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    0
  • Cattle kept within-doors are in a large proportion of cases tubercular, while those leading an outdoor life are much less liable to infection.

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    0
  • The survival of names of obliterated physical features or characteristics is illustrated in Section I.; but additional instances are found in the Strand, which originally ran close to the sloping bank of the Thames, and in Smithfield, now the central meat market, but for long the " smooth field " where a cattle and hay market was held, and the scene of tournaments and games, and also of executions.

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    0
  • A market for horses and cattle existed here at least as early as the time of Henry II.

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    0
  • The Zulu possess an elaborate system of laws regulating the inheritance of personal property (which consists chiefly of cattle), the complexity arising from the practice of polygamy and the exchange of cattle made upon marriage.

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    0
  • Their main wealth consists in their herds of cattle and flocks of sheep. They raise, however, crops of maize, millet, sweet potatoes and tobacco.

    0
    0
  • There is considerable traffic in grain and cattle brought from the surrounding districts; and twice a year there are large horse fairs.

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    0
  • It is a rich and well-watered country, producing abundance of grain and hops, and yielding excellent pasture for cattle.

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    0
  • They also punished those who had too large a share of the ager publicus, or kept too many cattle on the state pastures.

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    0
  • There is also an important camel and cattle market.

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    0
  • Market gardening, the rearing of cattle, for which the district is widely famed, and fishing, form the chief occupations of the rural population.

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    0
  • Regulations are issued about the sale of cattle in the presence of witnesses.

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    0
  • Therefore, roughly speaking, one ton of beetroot may be considered 'to-day as of the same value as one ton of canes; the value of the refuse chips in one case, as food for cattle, being put against the value of the refuse bagasse, as fuel, in the other.

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    0
  • These cakes, sold as food for cattle, fetch as much as £4 per ton in Rumania, where four or five beetroot factories are now at work.

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    0
  • It is an important river port for the export of corn, wool, fruit, wine and cattle.

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    0
  • The first of these is prevalent in countries where much and imperfectly cooked beef is eaten, and where cattle in their turn are exposed to the infection of the tapeworm ova.

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    0
  • In Berlin the proportion of cattle said to be found infected on inspection in 1893 was i in 672.

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    0
  • Many horses, cattle and sheep have been imported, and the meat-preserving industry is prosecuted.

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    0
  • His work Cattle and Cattlebreeders (1867) passed into a fourth edition in 1886.

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    0
  • Lastly there is a form " soil," used by agriculturists, of the feeding and fattening of cattle with green food such as vetches.

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    0
  • Cattle and swine are reared, and dairy produce is largely exported; but the sheep of the province are small and their wool indifferent.

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    0
  • It was plundered, although Totila did not carry out his threat to make it a pasture for cattle, and when the Gothic army withdrew into Apulia it was from a scene of desolation.

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    0
  • Except in the settled districts horned cattle are not numerous; they are similar to the Indian humped cattle, but are greatly superior in milking qualities.

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    0
  • All matters affecting the community are discussed in the majlis or assembly, to which any tribesman has access; here, too, are brought the tribesmen's causes; both sides plead and judgment is given impartially, the loser is fined so many head of small cattle or camels, which he must pay or go into exile.

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    0
  • The soil of both islands is fertile, potatoes and barley being raised and cattle pastured.

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    0
  • Here Krishna and his brother Balarama fed their cattle upon the plain; and numerous relics of antiquity in the towns of Muttra, Gobardhan, Gokul, Mahaban and Brindaban still attest the sanctity with which this holy tract was invested.

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    0
  • Vienna carries on an extensive trade in corn, flour, cattle, wine, sugar and a large variety of manufactured articles.

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    0
  • They formed an independent community and in 1854 obtained, in exchange for a hundred head of cattle, formal cession of the territory from Panda, the Zulu king.

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    0
  • Cabinet woods, fruit, tobacco, sugar, wax, honey and cattle products are the leading exports.

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    0
  • As early as the close of the 17th century Watertown was the chief horse and cattle market in New England and was known for its fertile gardens and fine estates.

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    0
  • It includes within its limits the once famous district of the "Kroumirs," 2 a tribe whose occasional thefts of cattle across the frontier gave the French an excuse to invade Tunisia in 1881.

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    0
  • The woods of algarrobo are used for pasture, cattle and horses enjoying the pendulous yellow pods.

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    0
  • There are good pastures in the sierras, and cattle have been successfully reared in some of the departments since the early years of Spanish occupation, chiefly in Ancachs, Cajamarca, Junin, Ayacucho, Puno, and some parts of Cuzco.

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    0
  • The cattle are commonly small and hardy, and, like the Mexican cattle, are able to bear unfavourable conditions.

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    0
  • There are large copper-smelting establishments in the city, which exports a very large amount of copper, some gold and silver, and cattle and hay to the more northern provinces.

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    0
  • It is less arid than the province of Atacama, the surface near the coast being broken by well-watered river valleys, which produce alfalfa, and pasture cattle for export.

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    0
  • Other products are rice, corn, copra, cacao, sugar, cattle and horses.

    0
    0
  • The exports mainly consist of grain, cattle, fish, dairy produce and potatoes; the imports of coal and timber.

    0
    0
  • The value of trade probably exceeds 2,000,000, principal exports being rice, raw silk, dry fruit, fish, sheep and cattle, wool and cotton, and cocoons, the principal imports sugar, cotton goods, silkworm "seed" or eggs (70,160 worth in 1906-7), petroleum, glass and china., The trade in dried silkworm cocoons has increased remarkably since 1893, when only 76,150 lb valued at 6475 were exported; during the year 1906-7 ending 10th March, 2,717,540 lb valued at 238,000 were exported.

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    0
  • The principal exports are grain, eggs, cattle, linen cloth and flax, and the imports include timber, groceries and coal.

    0
    0
  • Pastoral interests are largely in feeding cattle for the Chilean markets, for which large areas of alfalfa are grown in the irrigated valleys of the Andes.

    0
    0
  • Forests cover nearly r z million acres, yielding valuable timber (teak, sandalwood, &c.), and affording grazing-ground for cattle.

    0
    0
  • Cereals, cotton, forest products, cattle, and hides, and brass and copper vessels are the chief exports from the district.

    0
    0
  • The total number of neat cattle on farms decreased from 36,262 in 1850 to 30,696 in 1900, but the number of dairy cows increased from 18,698 to 23,660.

    0
    0
  • The principal industries are flax, sugar, tobacco and machinery, and there is a trade in cattle and horses.

    0
    0
  • A large trade is carried on in grain, flour, alcohol, cattle and wood.

    0
    0
  • The number of lives lost was 461; four hamlets were completely Bandai-san (Iwashiro) entombed with their iiihabitants and cattle; 6o37(cont.).

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    0
  • There is a considerable extent of pasture land, and the rearing of cattle, sheep, pigs and goats is largely practised.

    0
    0
  • Cattle, sheep, pigs and poultry show a general increase in numbers.

    0
    0
  • Stock-raising receives considerable attention; there are about a score of large cattle ranges, and there is a considerable export of live cattle to Texas and to various Mexican states.

    0
    0
  • A prominent feature in its trade is the shipment of live cattle.

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    0
  • But the island continued for some centuries to serve as a pasturage for cattle, giving its name to a well-known description of cheese.

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    0
  • In 1672 John Ford was granted a Tuesday market for the sale of wool and woollen goods made from English yarn, and in 1705 Andrew Quicke obtained two annual fairs, on the first Thursdays in March and June, for the sale of cattle, corn and merchandise.

    0
    0
  • Cattle fairs are now held on the last Wednesday in February and November, and a cheese fair on the last Wednesday in September.

    0
    0
  • There is also a Saturday cattle market.

    0
    0
  • Cautin lies within the temperate agricultural and forest region of the south, and produces wheat, cattle, lumber, tan-bark and fruit.

    0
    0
  • Cattle and sheep are pastured in great numbers on its slopes.

    0
    0
  • The chief exports are linen, whisky, aerated waters, iron ore and cattle.

    0
    0
  • There are exceptionally fine breeds of cattle, asses and goats; cows of a large and very powerful build are used for ploughing.

    0
    0
  • It is an important trade centre, the chief articles of commerce being gum, ivory, cattle and ostrich feathers.

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    0
  • These strange plants usually grow in rocky places with little or no earth to support them; and it is said that in times of drought the cattle resort to them to allay their thirst, first ripping them up with their horns and tearing off the outer skin, and then devouring the moist succulent parts.

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    0
  • Cattle and sheep are also raised for the coast markets.

    0
    0
  • The majority of the population is devoted to pastoral, and in some degree to agricultural pursuits, the cattle, as in other Alpine lands, being the mainstay of the peasants.

    0
    0
  • Holguin has trade in cabinet woods, tobacco, Indian corn and cattle products, which it exports through its port Gibara, about 25 m.

    0
    0
  • The second plan was largely adopted in Switzerland and on the Rhine, where measures resembling those taken with cattle suspected of anthrax were applied to all diseased vineyards.

    0
    0
  • The chief industries are weaving, spinning, dyeing, brewing and milling; there is also a trade in horses and cattle.

    0
    0
  • Besides coffee there is a large trade in durra, the kat plant (used by the Mahommedans as a drug), ghee, cattle, mules and camels, skins and hides, ivory and gums. The import trade is largely in cotton goods, but every kind of merchandise is included.

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    0
  • Zwolle has a considerable trade by river, a large fish market, and the most important cattle market in Holland after Rotterdam.

    0
    0