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Catkin sentence examples

catkin
  • The catkin falls off in a mass, separating from the branch by an articulation.

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  • The male flowers are in small clusters on the usually slender and pendent stalk, forming an interrupted catkin; the stamens vary in number, usually six to twelve.

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  • 4, Female catkin.

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  • - Catkin of Male ing pendulous anthers and pro Flowers of Hazel.

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  • - 1, Female catkin (enlarged); 2, Pair of fruits (nuts) each enclosed in its involucre (reduced).

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  • - Catkin of Hazel (Corylus Avellana), consisting of an axis covered with bracts in the form of scales, each of which covers a male flower, the stamens of which are seen projecting beyond the scale.

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  • a, Male flower and young cones; b, male catkin; c, d, outer and inner side of anther-scale.

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  • a, Fertile flower of mature cone; b, winged seed; c, fertile catkin.

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  • Male catkin.

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  • Female flowers arranged, two to three together on scale-like structures formed by the union of bracts, in catkins; ovary two-celled; fruit small, flattened, protected between the ripened scales of the catkin.

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  • - Amentum or catkin of Hazel (CorylusAvellana), consisting of an axis or rachis covered with bracts in the form of scales, each of which covers a male flower, the stamens of which are seen projecting beyond the scale.

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  • (Amentum, Catkin), Willow, Hazel.

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  • - A, Male catkin in longitudinal section: a, axis; b, bracts; c, d, filaments of stamens, bearing the pollen-sacs (e and f) at the top; v, apex of axis.

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  • catkin; a, (X about io.) B, C. Grand' Euryi.

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  • In the catkin shown in longitudinal section in fig.

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  • catkin s each scale of which held two dark brown seeds.

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  • catkin s when they appear in July.

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  • The male inflorescence is often a pendulous catkin, as in hazel and many native English trees (fig.

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  • 13), it is an amentum or catkin, hence such trees are called amentiferous; at other times it becomes succulent, bearing numerous flowers, surrounded by a sheathing bract or spathe, and then it constitutes a spadix, which may be simple, as in Arum maculatum (fig.

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  • The catkin falls off entire, separating from the branch by an articulation.

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