Cathedrals sentence examples

  • Amiens and Chartres, at three churches in Rome, and in certain cathedrals elsewhere in Italy.

  • The cathedrals at Trani and Ravello also have bronze doors by the same sculptor.

  • The cathedrals of Amiens, Sens and Rheims are decorated in the same way.

  • As to vestments, in the choir offices, the surplice only was to be used; the hood being added in cathedrals and colleges; and by all graduates when preaching, everywhere.

  • Linz possesses two cathedrals, one built in1669-1682in rococo style, and another in early Gothic style, begun in 1862.

  • In the English Church in cathedrals of the "Old Foundation" the precentor is a member of the cathedral chapter and officially ranks next to the dean.

  • Sir Frederick Gore Ouseley (vide Ellis's lecture) regarded the French ton de chapelle as being about a minor third below the Diapason Normal, a' 435, and said that most of the untouched organs in the French cathedrals were at this low pitch.

  • This is most clearly recognizable in the case of churches which arose alongside the episcopal cathedrals.

  • The cathedral of Christ Church, or Holy Trinity, the older of the two Protestant cathedrals in the possession of which Dublin is remarkable, was founded by Sigtryg, a Christ Christianized king of the Danes of Dublin, in 1038, Church.

  • The most notable churches apart from the cathedrals are Roman Catholic and principally modern.

  • to abbots or to the cardinal priests of important cathedrals.

  • Several anthems composed by him are extant; and one at least, 0 Lord, the Maker of all Things, is still occasionally rendered in English cathedrals.

  • In the Russian Orthodox Church the term "ambo" is used of the semicircular steps leading to the platform in front of the iconostasis, but in cathedrals the bishop has an ambo in the centre of the church.

  • Thirteen churches, including the Troitskiy (Trinity) and Uspenskiy cathedrals, a bell-tower, a theological academy, various buildings for monks and pilgrims, and a hospital stand within the precincts, which are two-thirds of a mile in circuit.

  • The almuce has now been almost entirely superseded by the mozzetta, but it is still worn at some cathedrals in France, e.g.

  • In cathedrals of the "New Foundation" the "precentor" is not a member of the chapter, but is one of the minor canons.

  • From the Restoration onwards the use of ceremonial lights, though far from universal, was not unusual in cathedrals and collegiate churches.

  • A very large proportion of the great Perpendicular churches of England date back to this age, and in the cathedrals also much work was going on.

  • For further information the reader should consult the Parentalia, published by Wren's grandson in 1750, an account of the Wren family and especially of Sir Christopher and his works; also the two biographies of Wren by Elmes and Miss Phillimore; Milman, Annals of St Paul's (1868); and Longman, Three Cathedrals dedicated to St Paul in London (1873), pp. 77 seq.

  • Other noteworthy buildings are the konak or governor's residence, the Roman Catholic and Orthodox cathedrals, the hospital, the townhall and the museum, with fine antiquarian and natural history collections.

  • The Troitsk or Trinity monastery is the most sacred spot in " middle Russia, the Great Russians regarding it with more veneration than even the cathedrals and relics of the Kremlin at Moscow.

  • The insistence on an inward spiritual experience was the great contribution made by Friends ' At the time referred to, and during the Commonwealth, the pulpits of the cathedrals and churches were occupied by Episcopalians of the Richard Baxter type, Presbyterians, Independents and a few Baptists.

  • The cathedral of St Peter, commonly known as the minster, has no superior in general dignity of form among English cathedrals.

  • At Bethersden, between Ashford and Tenterden, marble quarries were formerly worked extensively, supplying material to the cathedrals of Canterbury and Rochester, and to many local churches.

  • Lemberg is the residence of Roman Catholic, Greek Catholic and Armenian archbishops, and contains three cathedrals.

  • A relic of pre-Reformation times, these old men still figure in the accounts of English cathedrals.

  • In practice it restored the former range of papal reservations, and extended the papal right of appointment to all benefices (except the higher offices in cathedrals and collegiate churches) which fell vacant during the odd months.

  • The clergy of some cathedrals (in England, Carlisle), and of a great number of collegiate churches all over western Europe, responded to the appeal; and the need of a rule of life suited to the new regime produced, towards the end of the 11 th century, the so-called Rule of St.

  • Nearly all the French cathedrals of the 12th and 13th centuries exhibit on their portals a species of rural calendar, in which each month and sign has its corresponding labour.

  • Bathurst has broad streets, crossing one another at right angles, with a handsome park in the centre of the town, while many of the public buildings, specially the town hall, government buildings, and Anglican and Roman Catholic cathedrals, are noteworthy.

  • This, the primary meaning, survives in the chapels usually placed in the aisles of cathedrals and large churches.

  • It was the introduction of the apsidal chapels in the churches of France which eventually led to the chevet or cluster of eastern chapels in many of the great cathedrals, and also sometimes to the extension of the transept so as to include additional apsidal chapels on the east side.

  • - Illustrations of the biretum from monuments in the cathedrals of a, Brandenburg (1281).

  • There are Anglican and Roman Catholic cathedrals.

  • The modern buildings of Allahabad include Government House, the High Court, the Mayo memorial and town hall, the Muir central college, the Thornhill and Mayne memorial library and museum, the Naini central jail, and the Anglican and Roman Catholic cathedrals.

  • At Laon and Amiens there are sculptured Jesses over the central west doorways of the cathedrals.

  • As the ecclesiastical metropolis and seat of an archbishop (Primate of all Ireland) in both the Protestant and Roman organizations, it possesses two cathedrals and two archiepiscopal palaces.

  • They studied art, and fostered the study in the long vacations by tours among the English churches and the Continental cathedrals.

  • The king also worked with great zeal for the care of monuments, and the cathedrals of Spires and Cologne enjoyed his special care.

  • In the English Church these priest-vicars remain in the cathedrals of the old foundations as beneficed clergy on the foundation; in the cathedrals of the new foundation they are paid by the chapters.

  • In cathedrals, monastic churches and the larger parish churches the stalls are fixed seats enclosed at the back and separated at the sides by high projecting arms, and placed in one or more rows on the north and south sides of the choir or chancel, running from the sanctuary to the screen or chancel arch.

  • beten), the formula of prayer or exhortation to prayer said in England before the sermon in cathedrals, at university sermons, in the Inns of Court and elsewhere on special occasions.

  • The candlesticks in the Certosa near Pavia, and in the cathedrals of Venice and Padua, are the finest examples of these.

  • Magnificent works in silver, such as shrines, altar crosses and church vessels of all kinds, were produced in Spain from the 14th to the 16th century - especially a number of sumptuous tabernacles (custodia) for the host, magnificent examples of which still exist in the cathedrals of Toledo and Seville.

  • of Spain; they are sometimes of bronze, as the pairs in Burgos and Toledo cathedrals, or in wrought iron, like those at Zamora and in the church of San Gil, Burgos.

  • high, with eleven towers; it contains the lawcourts, the governor's residence, the arsenal, barracks, the military gymnasium of Count Arakcheev (transferred from old Novgorod), a small museum and two cathedrals, Preobrazhenski and Arkhangelski.

  • The church is one of the four Palatine churches of Apulia (the others being the cathedrals of Acquaviva and Altamura, and the church of Monte S.

  • Among country palaces or mansions that of Gripsholm is notable, overlooking Lake Malar, the shores of which are specially rich in historic sites and remains In ecclesiastical architecture Sweden possesses the noble cathedrals of Lund, Upsala and Linkoping; while that of Skara, near the southern shore of Lake Vener, dates originally from 1150, and that of Strengn: s on Lake Molar was consecrated in 1291.

  • humanists, such as Damiao de Goes, and scientists, such as the astronomer Pedro Nunes (Nonius), played conspicuous parts in the great intellectual movements of the time; a distinctive school of painters arose, chief among them being the so-called " Grao Vasco " (Vasco Fernandes of Vizeu); in architecture the name of King Emanuel was given to a new and composite style (the Manoeline or Manoellian), in which decorative forms from India and Africa were harmonized with Gothic and Renaissance designs; palaces, fortresses, cathedrals, monasteries, were built on a scale never before attempted in Portugal; and even in the minor arts and handicrafts - in goldsmith's work, for example, or in pottery - the influence of the East made itself felt.

  • Since the introduction of stone and brick, the whole city has been rebuilt and now contains numerous structures of some architectural pretension, the royal palaces, the houses formerly belonging to the prime minister and nobles, the French residency, the Anglican and Roman Catholic cathedrals, several stone churches, as well as others of brick, colleges, schools, hospitals, courts of justice and other government buildings, and hundreds of good dwellinghouses.

  • The numerous class of ecclesiastical seals comprised episcopal seals of all kinds, official and personal; seals of cathedrals and chapters; of courts and officials, &c. The monastic series is one of the largest, and, from an artistic point of view, one of the most important.

  • In ecclesiastical seals generally, in the seals of religious foundations, cathedrals, monasteries, colleges and the like, sacred subjects naturally find a place among other designs.

  • Those in which the foundations of modern Europe were laid, which produced parliaments, cathedrals, cities, Dante and Chaucer, were grouped alike on one dismal level and christened the middle ages.

  • Medieval archaeology has, since Quicherat, revealed how men were living while the monks wrote chronicles, and now cathedrals and castles are studied as genuine historic documents.

  • The numerous ancient churches and the cathedrals of Ely and Peterborough bear witness to the share taken by religious communities in the reclamation and cultivation of the land.

  • Neagoe was a great builder of monasteries; he founded the cathedrals of Curtea de Argesh (q.v.) and Tirgovishtea, and adorned Mount Athos with his pious works.

  • In conventual cathedrals, where the bishop occupied the place of the abbot, the functions usually devolving on the superior of the monastery were performed by a prior.

  • In 1666 he was made bishop of Rochester, and in 168 3 archbishop of York; he distinguished himself by reforming the discipline of the cathedrals in these dioceses.

  • that some of the most splendid of the English cathedrals, Salisbury (1220-1258) and Wells (1230-1239), were built.

  • The right to wear a violet cappa magna is conceded by the popes to the chapters of certain important cathedrals, but the train in this case is worn folded over the left arm or tied under it.

  • There are cathedrals at Perth, Inverness, Edinburgh and Cumbrae; the sees of Aberdeen, Brechin and Glasgow have no cathedrals.

  • Many Irish Separa- monasteries admitted no Englishmen, and at least one tion of attempt was made, in 1250, to apply the same rule to cathedrals.

  • This elevated region is broken in all directions by mountains, from which the crystalline rocks show most frequently as huge bosses, and in certain regions present very varied and picturesque outlines, resembling Titanic castles,cathedrals,domes, pyramids and spires.

  • The church of St John the Evangelist, commonly called Beverley Minster, is a magnificent building, exceeding in size and splendour some of the English cathedrals.

  • In the domain of intellect the advance of the French showed a no less dazzling and a no less universal activity; they sang Intel- as well as they fought, and their epics were worthy Iectual of their swordsmanship, while their cathedrals were develop- hymns in stone as ardent as their soaring flights of inent, devotion.

  • There are two cathedrals, Church of England and Roman Catholic, and a Presbyterian church, besides the cantonment church buildings for worship. Religious buildings and lands, indeed, occupy an area in Rangoon out of all p oportion to its size.

  • Cathedrals in Scotland became redundant with the abolition of Scottish bishoprics.

  • The towering medieval cathedrals were in fact heaps of stone without any significant tensile stresses.

  • Many former choristers from all cathedrals go on to high profile jobs later in life.

  • choristers from all cathedrals go on to high profile jobs later in life.

  • dematerialized cathedrals of consumption.

  • evensong in cathedrals, including St Paul's Cathedral.

  • marvel at the stunning cathedrals of Norwich and Ely and be inspired by the historic college buildings in Cambridge.

  • An odd feature of the medieval Church in England was that a number of cathedrals were also monastic churches.

  • At first it was envisaged that the Welsh cathedrals would be confiscated and become national monuments.

  • What would the German emperors of the Middle Ages be without their cathedrals and their imperial palaces?

  • romanticism of a bygone age as you step aboard the Cathedrals Express.

  • Castles, churches and cathedrals, market towns, and the seaside that can be seen by holders of railroad holiday runabout tickets.

  • The shops that we have in London around our cathedrals that sell plaster saints and souvenirs are not present here.

  • This book presents a new look at cathedrals, abbeys and churches through the eyes of experienced stonemason, Thomas Maude.

  • Magnificent Cathedrals and great churches are largely urban developments.

  • The city is rich in works of art, for Milan, with the introduction of the early Renaissance style by Filarete and Michelozzo after 1450, became the home of a Lombard school of sculpture, among the chief masters of which may be mentioned Giovanni Antonio Amadeo, or Omodeo, 1 of Pavia (1447-1522), Cristoforo Solari, and, the last of them, Agostino Busti, known as Bambaia (c. 1480-1548), whose work may be seen in the cathedrals of Como and Milan and in the Certosa di Pavia.

  • On the same prelate fell the task of conducting a public controversy with the archbishop of Armagh, George Dowdall, which of course ended in the conversion [From Anglo-Norman Invasion] him as lord-lieutenant, the litany was chanted in English, both cathedrals having been painted, and scripture texts substituted for " pictures and popish fancies."

  • There were bazaars, shops, warehouses, market stalls, granaries--for the most part still stocked with goods-- and there were factories and workshops, palaces and wealthy houses filled with luxuries, hospitals, prisons, government offices, churches, and cathedrals.

  • Steam Train Dining Experience for Two - £ 375 Experience the romanticism of a bygone age as you step aboard the Cathedrals Express.

  • We enjoy a guided walk where we'll see numerous governmental buildings, gold-domed cathedrals and the tsar bell.

  • Many cathedrals across Europe had whole ' unicorn horns ' on public display.

  • Martinique: The birthplace of Napoleon's wife, Empress Josephine, this royal island features stunning cathedrals, championship golf courses, and exotic snorkeling opportunities.

  • Architecture Cruises: From ancient temples and medieval cathedrals to modern masterpieces, interested travelers can explore the stunning architecture of the region with visits to key ports.

  • Shore excursions might include tours to castles, vineyards, famous cathedrals, markets or chateaux.

  • Cruise companies offer a variety of shore trips to tour cathedrals, castles and historic villages.

  • Gothic cathedrals feature round stained glass windows within entrances, which are known as rose windows, and the prayer aid, the rosary, is attributed to Mary.

  • They also are planning on building various Wilderness Cathedrals around the world which will serve as plant and animal refuges.

  • It is called a cathedral setting since it mimics the arches seen in cathedrals.

  • A.) Fleche (French for "arrow"), the term generally used in French architecture for a spire, but more especially employed to designate the timber spire covered with lead, which was erected over the intersection of the roofs over nave and transepts; sometimes these were small and unimportant, but in cathedrals they were occasionally of large dimensions, as in the fleche of Notre-Dame, Paris, where it is nearly ioo ft.

  • The two other sealed copies belong to the cathedrals of Lincoln and of Salisbury.

  • The city has, besides, numerous fine office buildings, including that of the Society for Savings (an institution in which each depositor is virtually a stockholder), the Citizens', Rose, Williamson, Rockefeller, New England and Garfield buildings; and several beautiful churches, notably the Roman Catholic and Trinity cathedrals, the First Presbyterian ("Old Stone"), the Second Presbyterian, the First Methodist and Plymouth (Congregational) churches.

  • The Priory church of St John, a massive cruciform building, originally Norman with Early English and Decorated additions, is the finest parish church in Wales, and even taking into account the cathedrals it is according to E.

  • This was the case in all the English conventual cathedrals, e.g.

  • The father, who made long tours on business, took his wife, child and nurse year after year across England as far as Cumberland and Scotland, visiting towns, cathedrals, castles, colleges, parks, mountains and lakes.

  • Except at royal coronations, however, the use of the cope, even in cathedrals, had practically ceased in England before the ritual revival of the 19th century restored its popularity.

  • There are many handsome churches, including St Joseph's (Roman Catholic) and St Paul's (Protestant Episcopal) cathedrals, and Trinity (Protestant Episcopal), the Westminster Presbyterian, the Delaware Avenue Baptist, and the First Presbyterian churches.

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