Cathedral sentence example

cathedral
  • There were three bedrooms and an open concept kitchen dining area with a cathedral ceiling.

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  • At last four men in uniforms and sashes emerged from the cathedral doors.

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  • This soldier was looking at the cathedral and crossing himself.

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  • Thus the cathedral was built except the roof.

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  • He rebuilt the cathedral of his see, and may perhaps have commissioned the unknown artist of the celebrated Bayeux tapestry.

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  • Muron has an old cathedral.

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  • On a third hill are the cathedral and mission buildings of the Roman Catholics.

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  • The cathedral, erected after 1517 by Tullio Lombardo, was much damaged by the earthquake of 1873, which.

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  • In 1740, on the recommendation of the Dean of Hainburg, Haydn obtained a place in the cathedral choir of St Stephen's, Vienna, where he took the solo-part in the services and received, at the choir school, some further instruction on the violin and the harpsichord.

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  • In this direction the principal buildings are the Wolfendahl church, a massive Doric building of the Dutch (1749); the splendid Roman Catholic cathedral of St Lucia (completed in 1904); and St Thomas's College (1851), which follows the lines of an English public school.

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  • Its chief buildings are the cathedral, originally a mosque, and the ruined castle, which is the chief among many interesting relics of Moorish rule.

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  • The cathedral, remarkable in having three towers over the transept, one of which is surmounted by a fine spire, dates from the 14th and 15th centuries.

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  • In England, a detached baptistery is known to have been associated with the cathedral of Canterbury.

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  • The cathedral possesses a fine Exultet roll.

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  • Victrix was situated near the site of the cathedral, and a municipality (colonia) grew up, near where the railway station now is, on the opposite side of the Ouse.

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  • Chartres is built on the left bank of the Eure, on a hill crowned by its famous cathedral, the spires of which are a landmark in the surrounding country.

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  • The cathedral of Notre-Dame, one of the finest Gothic churches in France, was founded in the 11th century by Bishop Fulbert on the site of an earlier church destroyed by fire.

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  • Though there have been numerous minor additions and alterations since that time, the general character of the cathedral is unimpaired.

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  • The cathedral is also renowned for the beauty and perfect proportions of its western towers.

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  • In length the cathedral measures 440 ft., its choir measures 150 ft.

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  • The more conspicuous buildings are the ancient Gothic cathedral (restored in 1866, and again in 1870 after the interior was destroyed by fire), with its lofty tower, the cavalry barracks, the ex-convent of the Capuchins at a little distance from the city, and the seminary in which are preserved the famous Oscan inscription known as the Cippus Abellanus (from Abella, the modern Avella, q.v.) and some Latin inscriptions relating to a treaty with Nola regarding a joint temple of Hercules.

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  • The sculptor Giovanni Marliano was a native of the city; and some of his works are preserved in the cathedral.

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  • Leon is essentially a manufacturing and commercial city; it has a cathedral and a theatre, the latter one of the largest and finest in the republic. The city is regularly built, with wide streets and numerous shady parks and gardens.

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  • The cathedral, one of the finest early Gothic buildings in Germany, stands on the Schlossberg, 160 ft.

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  • The cathedral also contains works by Peter Vischer and Lucas Cranach and several other interesting monuments.

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  • Adjoining the cathedral is the castle, dating from 1471-1483, but restored and named the Albrechtsburg about 1676.

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  • The cathedral was burnt down by the French in 1789 and restored in 1831.

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  • Arequipa is the seat of a bishopric created in 1609-1612, and possesses a comparatively modern cathedral, its predecessor having been destroyed by fire in 1849.

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  • Among its buildings are the cathedral, dating from 1553 and once noted for its wealth; the president's palace and halls of congress, which are no longer occupied as such by the national government; the cabildo, or town-hall; a mint dating from 1572; the courts of justice, and the university of San Xavier, founded in 1624, with faculties of law, medicine and theology.

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  • The chief building in Agen is the cathedral of St Caprais, the most interesting portion of which is the apse of the 12th century with its three apse-chapels; the transept dates from the 12th and 13th centuries, the nave from the 14th to the 16th centuries; the tower flanking the south facade is modern.

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  • The town itself is a pleasant residence, and contains a 16th century cathedral church, an 18th century bishop's palace, a 14th-16th century castle (formerly the residence of the counts of the Genevois), and the reconstructed convent of the Visitation, wherein now reposes the body of St Francois de Sales (born at the castle of Sales, close by, in 1567; died at Lyons in 1622), who held the see from 1602 to 1622.

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  • The Dynamics of a Particle was written on the occasion of the contest between Gladstone and Mr Gathorne Hardy (afterwards earl of Cranbrook); and The New Belfry in ridicule of the erection put up at Christ Church for the bells that were removed from the Cathedral tower.

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  • Of the thirty-five churches existing in Hamburg (the old cathedral had to be taken down in 1805), the St Petrikirche, Nikolaikirche, St Katharinenkirche, St Jakobikirche and St Michaeliskirche are those that give their names to the five old city parishes.

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  • Archbishop Unwan of Hamburg-Bremen (1013-1029) substituted a chapter of canons for the monastery, and in 1037 Archbishop Bezelin (or Alebrand) built a stone cathedral and a palace on the Elbe.

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  • The cruciform cathedral, with a low pinnacled tower, stands on the site of a church which the English destroyed in 1071 (dedicated to, and perhaps founded, about 525, by St Deiniol).

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  • Scott restored the present cathedral, 1866-1875, after it had been burned in the time of Owen Glendower, destroyed in 1211, and, in 1102 and 1212, severely handled.

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  • It has a cathedral and a fortress, built on an island in the Neva, which is now used as a political prison.

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  • In the additional explanatory notes at the end of the book, after directions as to the wearing of surplice and hood in quire, in cathedral and collegiate churches (they are not made obligatory elsewhere), bishops are directed to wear, besides the rochet, a surplice or alb, and a cope or vestment, with a pastoral staff borne either by themselves or their chaplains.'

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  • He declined invitations from Cambridge, but accepted from Archbishop Laud a prebend in Canterbury cathedral without residence, and went to England to be installed in 1629, when he was made LL.D.

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  • There were, in 1900, four Servian Orthodox churches, including the cathedral, one Roman Catholic chapel, one Evangelical chapel (German), two synagogues and one mosque.

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  • The cathedral church of the Holy Trinity belongs to the 13th century.

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  • Immediately adjoining the cathedral to the southwest stands the Round Tower, built about 1000.

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  • Near the same site there stood an older town, which, together with a bishop's see, was founded in 1152 by the Englishman Nicholas Breakspeare (afterwards Pope Adrian IV.); but both town and cathedral were destroyed by the Swedes in 1567.

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  • The cathedral, originally Romanesque, but restored after 1300 is in the Gothic style; the façade is good, and so is the ciborium.

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  • The magnificent early Gothic cathedral is capable of containing 30,000 people.

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  • Ulm cathedral has double aisles and a pentagonal apsidal choir, but no transepts.

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  • The massive and richly decorated square tower in the centre of the west façade, which for centuries terminated in a temporary spire, was completed in 1890, according to the original plans, by the addition of an octagonal storey and a tall open spire (528 ft.), the loftiest ecclesiastical erection in the world, outstripping the twin spires of Cologne cathedral by 21 ft.

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  • The cathedral contains some fine stained glass, the largest organ in Germany (1856), and a number of interesting old paintings and carvings by Jorg Syrlin the elder, Jorg Syrlin the younger, Burkhard Engelberger, and other masters of the Swabian school.

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  • At Rome, in the Jubilee year 1500, he himself lectured with applause; but having been nominated in 1497 canon of the cathedral of Frauenburg, he recrossed the Alps in 1501 with the purpose of obtaining further leave of absence for the completion of his academic career.

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  • In 1666 he was appointed to the abbey church, Bath; in 1678 he became prebendary of Worcester Cathedral, and acted as chaplain in ordinary to Charles II.

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  • The cathedral (dedicated to St Nicholas the Pilgrim, a Greek assassinated at Trani in 1094 and canonized by Urban II.), on a raised open site near the sea, was consecrated, before its completion, in 1143; it is a basilica with three apses, a large crypt and a lofty tower, the latter erected in1230-1239by the architect whose name appears on the ambo in the cathedral of Bitonto, Nicolaus Sacerdos.

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  • The interior of the cathedral has been barbarously modernized, but the crypt is fine.

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  • It contains fine buildings of the Renaissance, especially the palaces of the Vitelli, and the cathedral, originally Romanesque.

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  • The first consists of a group of no less than seven different buildings, of different dates; the earliest of which, the former cathedral of SS.

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  • The beautiful cloisters on the south side of the cathedral, and the chapter-house beyond them, as well as the old churches of San Saturnino (Gothic) and San Nicolas (Romanesque), are also of interest to the student of architecture.

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  • As early as 729 - some authorities fix the date a hundred and fifty years before - the Culdees possessed a monastery at Dunkeld, which was converted into a cathedral by David I.

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  • One of the most heroic exploits in the annals of warfare is associated with the cathedral.

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  • Adjoining the cathedral is Dunkeld House, a seat of the duke of Atholl, the grounds of which are estimated to contain 50 m.

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  • On the lawn near the cathedral stand two of the earliest larches grown in Great Britain, having been introduced from Tirol by the 2nd duke in 1738.

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  • The most imposing structure belonging to the Scottish Episcopal Church is St Mary's cathedral, built on ground and chiefly from funds left by the Misses Walker of Coates, and opened for worship in 1879.

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  • The old-fashioned mansion of East Coates, dating from the 17th century, still stands in the close, and is occupied by functionaries of the cathedral.

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  • During the establishment of Episcopacy in Scotland, Edinburgh was the seat of a bishop, and the ancient collegiate church of St Giles rose to the dignity of a cathedral.

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  • Opposite the Palazzo Ducale is the cathedral, dedicated to SS.

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  • The cathedral pavement is almost unique.

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  • The church of San Giovanni, the ancient baptistery, beneath the cathedral is approached by an outer flight of marble steps built in 1451.

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  • The Opera del Duomo contains Duccio's famous Madonna, painted for the cathedral in 1308-1311, and other works of art.

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  • There may, also be mentioned many sculptors and architects, such as Lorenzo Maitani, architect of Orvieto cathedral (end of 13th century); Camaino di Crescentino; Tino di Camaino, sculptor of the monument to Henry VII.

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  • The cathedral of St Jean, the chief of the numerous churches of the town, was founded in the 4th century but has often undergone reconstruction and restoration; it resembles the Rhenish churches of Germany in the possession of apses at each of its extremities.

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  • The archiepiscopal palace adjoining the cathedral is a building of the 18th century., The church of Ste.

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  • Close to the cathedral there is a triumphal arch decorated with bas-reliefs known as the Porte Noire, which is generally considered to have been built in commemoration of the victories of Marcus Aurelius over the Germans in 167.

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  • Adjoining the town hall is the Anglican cathedral of St Andrew, in the Perpendicular style; it has two towers at the west end and a low central tower above the intersection of the nave and transepts, with a very handsome chapter house.

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  • The Roman Catholic Cathedral of St Mary lies on the north-east side of Hyde Park; it is a splendid Gothic structure, the finest in Australia.

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  • By these men Hungary was divided into dioceses, with a metropolitan see at Esztergom (Gran), a city originally founded by Geza, but richly embellished by Stephen, whose Italian architects built for him there the first Hungarian cathedral dedicated to St Adalbert.

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  • When the cathedral chapter found courage to oppose this and opened suit to recover the ecclesiastical revenues for ecclesiastical purposes, Richelieu's mother proposed to make her second son, Alphonse, bishop. He defeated this scheme, however, by becoming a monk of the Grande Chartreuse, and Armand, whose health was rather feeble in any case for a military career, was induced to propose himself for the priesthood.

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  • The Roman Catholic cathedral was finished by Casimir IV.

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  • The Greek cathedral, built in1740-1779in the Basilica style, is situated on a height which dominates the town.

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  • The Armenian cathedral was built in 1437 in the ArmenianByzantine style.

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  • At Alet, which has hot springs of some note, there are ruins of a fine Romanesque cathedral destroyed in the religious wars of the 16th century.

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  • It is regularly built with long and straight streets, and contains the parliament buildings, government house, the Anglican cathedral, the provincial university and several other educational establishments.

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  • The modern town, close to the ancient, is unimportant, though the canons of the cathedral have the privilege of wearing the mitre and cap pa magna at great festivals.

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  • In 1875 his " Warrior Bearing a Wounded Youth from the Field of Battle " gained the gold medal at the Royal Academy schools, and when exhibited in 1876 it divided public attention with the "Tennyson " of Woolner and " Wellington monument " sculptures of Alfred Stevens, now in St Paul's Cathedral.

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  • Among the sculptor's principal statues are " The Bishop of Carlisle " (1895; Carlisle Cathedral), " General Charles Gordon " (Trafalgar Square, London), " Oliver Cromwell " (Westminster), " Dean Colet " (a bronze group - early Italianate in feeling - outside St Paul's School, Hammersmith), " King Alfred " (a colossal memorial for Winchester), the " Gladstone Monument " (in the Strand, London) and " Dr Mandell Creighton, Bishop of London " (bronze, erected in St Paul's Cathedral).

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  • The first mention of his name occurs in the accounts of the church of St Maclou at Rouen in the year 1540, and in the following year he was employed at the cathedral of the same town, where he added to the tomb of Cardinal d'Amboise a statue of his nephew Georges, afterwards removed, and possibly carved portions of the tomb of Louis de Breze, executed some time after 1 545.

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  • Ranking as a papal cathedral, this became a much-favoured place of assembly for ecclesiastical councils both in antiquity (313, 487) and more especially during the middle ages.

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  • Other churches in the heart of the town include the Anglican cathedral, dedicated to St Alban, and the Presbyterian Church, both in Schoemans Street, the Roman Catholic Church in Koch Street with schools, convent buildings and extensive grounds, and the new Dutch Reformed Church in Vermeulen Street.

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  • Born at Ansbach on the 16th of May 1490, he was intended for the church, and passed some time at the court of Hermann, elector of Cologne, who appointed him to a canonry in his cathedral.

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  • The finest building is the cathedral, in the Lombard Romanesque style, begun in 1107 and consecrated in 1190.

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  • The main facade of the cathedral was largely altered in 1491, to which date the statues upon it belong; the portico in front was added in 1497.

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  • The choir has fine stalls of 1489-1490, upon one of which there is a view of the facade of the cathedral before its alteration in 1491.

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  • Adjacent to the cathedral is the octagonal baptistery of 1167,_ 9 2 ft.

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  • The so-called Campo Santo, close to the baptistery, contains a mosaic pavement with emblematic figures belonging probably to the 8th and 9th centuries, and running under the cathedral.

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  • On the side of the Piazza del Comune opposite to the cathedral are two 13th-century Gothic palaces in brick, the Palazzo Comunale and the former Palazzo dei Giureconsulti, now the seat of the commissioners for the water regulation of the district.

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  • From 1512 to 1514 it was the capital of the island, and from 1518 to 1522 its church was the cathedral of the island's first diocese.

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  • The other temple, into which the cathedral was built in A.D.

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  • To such work Benson at once devoted himself; and did more perhaps than any other man to reinvigorate cathedral life in England.

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  • Moreover, the bishop at once set to work to build a cathedral.

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  • The direct line of the thoroughfare is interrupted after Piccadilly Circus (the term " circus " is frequently applied to the open space - not necessarily round - at the junction of several roads), but is practically resumed in the Strand, with its hotels, shops and numerous theatres, and continued through the City in Fleet Street, the centre of the newspaper world, and Ludgate Hill, at the head of which is St Paul's Cathedral.

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  • While stone is the material used in the construction of the majority of great buildings of London, some modern examples (notably the Westminster Roman Catholic cathedral) are of red brick with stone dressings; and brick is in commonest use for general domestic building.

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  • Portland stone is frequently employed in the larger buildings, as in St Paul's Cathedral, and under the various influences of weather and atmosphere acquires strongly contrasting tones of light grey and black.

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  • St Saviour's in Southwark (q.v.), the cathedral church of the modern bishopric of Southwark, was the church of the priory of St Mary Overy, and is a large cruciform building mainly Early English in style.

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  • It is characteristic of London that St Paul's Cathedral (q.v.) should be closely hemmed in by houses, and its majestic west front approached obliquely by a winding thoroughfare.

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  • The cathedral is Wren's crowning work.

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  • A Gothic style has been most commonly adopted in building modern churches; but of these the most notable, the Roman Catholic Westminster Cathedral (see Westminster), is Byzantine, and built principally of brick, with a lofty campanile.

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  • Paternoster Row, still occupied by booksellers, takes name from the sellers of prayer-books and writers of texts who collected under the shadow of St Paul's Cathedral.

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  • What became of the cathedral which we may suppose to have existed in London during the later Roman period we cannot tell, but we may guess that it was destroyed by the heathen Saxons.

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  • Bede records that the church of St Paul was built by lEthelbert, and from that time to this a cathedral dedicated to St Paul has stood upon the hill looking down on Ludgate.

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  • He died on the 30th of April 693, a day which was kept in memory in his cathedral for centuries by special offices.

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  • In 1083 the old cathedral of St Paul's was begun on the site of the church which ZEthelbert is said to have founded in 610.

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  • The cost of these two marches in the year was very considerable, and, having been suspended in 1528 on account of the prevai 1 " A map of London engraved on copper-plate, dated 1497," which was bought by Ferdinand Columbus during his travels in Europe about 1518-1525, is entered in the catalogue of Ferdinand's books, maps, &c., made by himself and preserved in the Cathedral Library at Seville, but there is no clue to its existence.

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  • After the Restoration a fence was erected on the inside of the great north door to hinder a concourse of rude people, and when the cathedral was being rebuilt Sir Christopher Wren made a strict order against any profanation of the sacred building.

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  • Evelyn's plan differed from Wren's chiefly in proposing a street from the church of St Dunstan's in the East to the cathedral, and in having no quay or terrace along the river.

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  • Wren's great work was the erection of the cathedral of St Paul's, and the many churches ranged round it as satellites.

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  • On the 8th February the body of Nelson was borne with great pomp from the Admiralty to St Paul's Cathedral, where it was interred in the presence of the prince of Wales and the royal dukes.

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  • Temesvar is the seat of a Roman Catholic and a Greek Orthodox bishop. Amongst its principal buildings are the Roman Catholic cathedral, built (1735-57) by Maria Theresa; the Greek Orthodox cathedral; a castle built by Hunyady Janos in 1442, now used as an arsenal; the town and county hall, the museum and large barracks.

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  • It is, however, a Roman Catholic archbishopric. The Protestant cathedral is also the parish church, and was to a great extent rebuilt c. 1861 from plans by Sir Thomas Deane.

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  • The modern Roman Catholic cathedral is Perpendicular in style and cruciform in plan.

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  • Altenburg is the seat of the higher courts of the Saxon duchies, and possesses a cathedral and several churches, schools, a library, a gallery of pictures and a school of art, an infirmary and various learned societies.

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  • The cathedral of San Pietro, dating from 1141 and restored and enlarged in the i 5th century by Pietro Lombardo, with a classical facade of 1836, has five domes.

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  • He devoted himself in_ 1335 to the completion of the choir of Beauvais Cathedral, the enormous windows of which were filled with the richest glass, But this building activity, which has left one of the most notable Gothic monuments in Europe, was broken into by the Hundred Years' War.

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  • Being intended for the church, he obtained a benefice in the cathedral of Fermo.

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  • Ordained in 1662, he successively held the livings of Little Easton in Essex, Brighstone (sometimes called Brixton) in the Isle of Wight, and East Woodhay in Hampshire; in 1672 he resigned the last of these, and returned to Winchester, being by this time a prebendary of the cathedral, and chaplain to the bishop, as well as a fellow of Winchester College.

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  • It has a cathedral, being an archiepiscopal see of the Orthodox Greek Church, a school of gardening and sericulture, a public library, and a few distilleries, tanneries and oil works.

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  • The Opera del Duomo contains models and pieces of sculpture connected with the cathedral; the Etruscan and Egyptian museum, the gallery of tapestries, the Michelangelo museum, the museum of natural history and other collections are all important in different ways.

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  • The word had a special sense as the name for those almsmen attached to cathedral and other churches, whose duty it was to pray for the souls of deceased benefactors.

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  • Of the latter, the most prominent are the military barracks on the north bank of the river, the Protestant church, the Roman Catholic cathedral and St Colman's Roman Catholic college.

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  • The cathedral, which is Italian Gothic, dating mainly from the 13th century, consists of a nave with eight chapels on each side, and a very high Renaissance domed choir; it contains examples of the Montagnas and of Lorenzo da Venezia.

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  • Corona (1260-1300), both of brick, are better examples of Gothic than the cathedral; both contain interesting works of art - the latter a very fine "Baptism of Christ," by Giovanni Bellini.

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  • Corona, and the cathedral, and several pictures also in the picture gallery; while his son Benedetto had greater merits as an engraver than a painter.

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  • Coutances is beautifully situated on the right bank of the Soulle on a granitic eminence crowned by the celebrated cathedral of Notre-Dame.

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  • The prime object of interest is the cathedral of St Magnus, a stately cruciform red sandstone structure in the severest Norman, with touches of Gothic. It was founded by Jarl Rognvald (Earl Ronald) in 1137 in memory of his uncle Jarl Magnus who was assassinated in the island of Egilshay in 1115, and afterwards canonized and adopted as the patron saint of the Orkneys.

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  • The remains of St Magnus were ultimately interred in the cathedral.

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  • Saving that the upper half of the original spire was struck by lightning in 1671, and not rebuilt, the cathedral is complete at all points, but it underwent extensive repairs in the 19th century.

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  • Adjoining the cathedral are the ruins of the bishop's palace, in which King Haco died after his defeat at Largs in 1263.

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  • The cathedral was built between 973 and loos; the gallery round the back of the apse and the crypt have plain cubical capitals of this period.

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  • It has a cathedral, St Michael's, which also serves as a parish church.

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  • Among the relics of its former importance are the cathedral, built in1420-1424(though originally founded in 1188), restored in 1893 and now housing the archaeological collection of the Altmark, the Gothic church of St Mary, founded in 1447, a "Roland column" of 1535, and two fortified gateways, dating from the 13th century.

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  • The cathedral, which dated from the 17th century, and the ancient castle which rose above it, were wrecked.

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  • The principal building is the cathedral of the archbishopric of Acerenza and Matera, formed in 1203 by the union of the two bishoprics, dating respectively from 300 and 398.

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  • The western façade of the cathedral is plain, while the utmost richness of decoration is lavished on the south front which faces the piazza.

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  • After taking orders at Parma, when he was made canon of the cathedral, he studied jurisprudence at Bologna.

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  • Of the eleven churches, the most interesting is the cathedral of St Stephen, a florid, rococo edifice.

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  • Near the centre of the inner city, most of the streets in which are narrow and irregular, is the cathedral of St Stephen, the most important medieval building in Vienna, dating in its present form mainly from the 14th and 15th centuries, but incorporating a few fragments of the original 12th-century edifice.

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  • A little to the south-west of the cathedral is the Hofburg, or imperial palace, a huge complex of buildings of various epochs and in various styles, enclosing several courtyards.

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  • The museum and cathedral and some of the other churches contain pictures by the da Ponte family (16th and early 17th century), surnamed Bassano from their birth-place; Jacopo is the most eminent of them.

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  • The mountain is quarried, and from 1267 onward supplied stone (trachyte) for the building of Cologne cathedral.

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  • Many of the churches, convents and other ecclesiastical establishments were built in the second half of the 18th century, some in the first half; and some parts of the original cathedral of 1617 have probably survived later alterations and additions.

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  • The timber-work of the roof of Cordova cathedral, built eleven centuries ago, is composed of it.

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  • The architects of the cathedral were Boschetto and Rinaldo, both Italians, probably Pisans.

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  • The Campo Santo, lying to the north of the cathedral, owes its origin to Archbishop Ubaldo 1 In Strabo's time it was only 2 m.

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  • Here is the cathedral church of St Lucius (who is the patron of Coire, and is supposed to be a 2nd-century British king, though really the name has probably arisen from a confusion between Lucius of Cyrene - miswritten "curiensis" - with the Roman general Lucius Munatius Plancus, who conquered Raetia).

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  • One of the hospitals was founded by the famous Capuchin philanthropist, Father Theodosius Florentini (1808-1865), who was long the Romanist cure of Coire, and whose remains were in 1906 transferred from the cathedral here to Ingenbohl (near Schwyz), his chief foundation.

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  • The cathedral, an imposing building in the Romanesque Transition style (1207-1242), has a Gothic choir at each end, and contains some interesting medieval sculptures.

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  • On this square stands the Frauenkirche, the cathedral church of the archbishop of Munich-Freising, with its lofty cupola capped towers dominating the whole town.

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  • Justinus being the first bishop. The cathedral has been spoilt by restoration, and the decoration of the exterior is incomplete; the Gothic campanile of 1335 is, however, fine.

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  • The cathedral possesses two illuminated missals..

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  • Returning to Saxony, Frederick died at Altenburg on the 4th of January 1428, and was buried in the cathedral at Meissen.

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  • The cathedral of San Giusto was formed as it now stands by the union in the 14th century of three adjacent early Christian buildings of the 6th century; the tower incorporates portions of a Roman temple.

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  • The cathedral, founded in 1314, has a fine porch and Gothic facade.

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  • In 1491 he was invited to preach in the cathedral, Sta Maria del Fiore, and his rule over Florence may be said to begin from that date.

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  • Even now, when his authority was at its highest, when his fame filled the land, and the vast cathedral and its precincts lacked space for the crowds flocking to hear him, his enemies were secretly preparing his downfall.

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  • The public buildings include a cathedral, three churches, and several schools, including the "Escuela Sarmiento," a fine edifice with a Greek façade, named after President Domingo Faustino Sarmiento (1811-1886), who was a native of this city.

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  • The principal are the governor's residence and government offices, the barracks, the cathedral, the missionary institutions, the fruit market, Wilberforce Hall, courts of justice, the railway station and the grammar school.

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  • Soon after this he got an appointment at Riga, as assistant master at the cathedral school, and a few years later, became assistant pastor.

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  • His history of the cathedral church at Reims (Historia Remensis Ecclesiae) is one of the most remarkable productions of the 10th century.

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  • Pope Lucius III., who held a council at Verona in 1184, is buried in the cathedral, under the pavement before the high altar.

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  • A number of fine sculptures were found in the square in front of the cathedral in 1890, and architectural fragments belonging to some public building.

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  • In 1884-86 portions of a number of fine mosaic pavements were discovered extending over a very large area under the cloister and other parts of the cathedral, about 7 ft.

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  • Zeno and the cathedral, dating from the 12th century.

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  • Zeno and the cathedral, both of which were mainly rebuilt Arci?i in the 12th century, are noble examples of the Lombardic style, with few single-light windows, and with the walls decorated externally by series of pilasters, and by alternating bands of red and white, in stone or brick.

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  • Among the important buildings are the Cathedral (said to have been built originally about 1535, and subsequently restored at various times), the Iturbide theatre (in which occurred the trial of Maximilian), the government offices, the federal palace and the churches of Santa Rosa, Santa Clara and San Augustin.

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  • The remains were identified after Elizabeth's accession, mingled with the supposed relics of St Frideswide to prevent future desecration, and reburied in the cathedral.

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  • The principal ecclesiastical building in Frankfort is the cathedral (Dom).

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  • Excavations around the cathedral have incontestably proved that Frankfort-on-Main (Trajectum ad Moenum) was a settlement in Roman times and was probably founded in the 1st century of the Christian era.

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  • Arad is a modernbuilt town, and contains many handsome private and public buildings, including a cathedral.

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  • It has an Evangelical and seven Roman Catholic churches, among the latter the cathedral of St Wilibald (first bishop of Eichstatt), - with the tomb of the saint and numerous pictures and relics, - the church of St Walpurgis, sister of Wilibald, whose remains rest in the choir, and the Capuchin church, a copy of the Holy Sepulchre.

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  • The most prominent church is the cathedral, a Gothic building of the 14th century, restored in 1883-1886, with a tower 328 ft.

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  • The archbishop is the only one in the Austrian empire who is elected by the cathedral chapter.

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  • The cathedral, which was completely wrecked, was begun in 1098 and finished by Roger II.

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  • The most prominent members of the family were Mircea (1386-1418), who accepted Turkish suzerainty; Neagoe, the founder of the famous cathedral at Curtea de Argesh; Michael, surnamed the Brave (1592-1601); and Petru Cercel, famous for his profound learning, who spoke twelve languages and carried on friendly correspondence with the greater scholars and poets of Italy.

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  • The cathedral is a modern building.

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  • The cathedral of St Benigne, originally an abbey church, was built in the latter half of the 13th century on the site of a Romanesque basilica, of which the crypt remains.

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  • There are tribunals of first instance and of commerce, a board of trade-arbitrators, a chamber of commerce, an exchange (occupying the former cathedral of St Etienne), and an important branch of the Bank of France.

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  • It is the seat of a Roman Catholic bishop, and possesses a beautiful cathedral (1797-1821) with two towers, 180 ft.

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  • It contains a fine cathedral, with a Gothic facade, reconstructed in 1486, and is an important commercial centre.

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  • The cathedral of St Siegfrid dates from about 1300, but has been restored, the last time in 1898.

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  • Others were "Elijah in the Wilderness" (1879), "Elisha raising the Son of the Shunammite" (1881) and a design intended for the decoration of the dome of St Paul's Cathedral, "And the Sea gave up the Dead which were in it" (1892), now in the Tate Gallery, and the terrible "Rizpah" of 1893.

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  • The Duomo or cathedral church (dedicated to San Vigilio, the first bishop) was built in four instalments between the 11th and 15th centuries, and was restored in 1882-1889.

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  • In 1805 Britton published the first part of his Architectural Antiquities of Great Britain (9 vols., 1805-1814); and this was followed by Cathedral Antiquities of England (14 vols., 1814-1835).

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  • The archbishop holds a visitation of his diocese personally every three years, and he is the only diocesan who has kept up the triennial visitation of the dean and chapter of his cathedral.'

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  • A fragment of the ghastly structure is in the library of Lincoln cathedral.

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  • The Gothic cathedral, consecrated in 1222, on the site of another ruined by an earthquake in 1184, goes back to French models in Champagne, and is indeed unique in Italy.

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  • He was certainly known in Italy at a very early date; Professor Rajna has found the names of Arthur and Gawain in charters of the early 12th century, the bearers of those names being then grown to manhood; and Gawain is figured in the architrave of the north doorway of Modena cathedral, a 12thcentury building.

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  • The cathedral, originally a Tuscan Romanesque building of the 11th-12th centuries, is now a fine Renaissance basilica restored in the 18th century, containing some paintings by Luca Signorelli, a native of the place.

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  • The Roman Catholic Cathedral at Westminster is his joint memorial with his predecessor, Cardinal Wiseman.

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  • Fine cloisters, coeval with the cathedral, adjoin it.

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  • There are here a cathedral and a botanical garden.

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  • The cathedral, dedicated to San Cataldo, an Irish bishop, dating from the 11th century, has externally some remains of Saracenic Gothic; internally it has been completely modernized, and the shrine of the patron saint has been termed "an orgy of rococo."

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  • In the same line as the façade of the cathedral are the Broletto (in black and white marble), dating from 1215, the seat of the original rulers of the commune, and the massive clock-tower.

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  • The pulpit was formerly used in the nave of Westminster Abbey, being presented to Belfast cathedral by the dean and chapter of that foundation.

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  • The capital is named after its founder, the Grand Master de la Valette, but from its foundation it has been called Valletta (pop. 1901, 24,685); it contains the palace of the Grand Masters, the magnificent Auberges of the several " Langues " of the Order, the unique cathedral of St John with the tombs of the Knights and magnificent tapestries and marble work; a fine opera house and hospital are conspicuous.

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  • The old capital, near the centre of the island is variously called Notabile, Citta Vecchia, and Medina, with its suburb Rabat, its population in 1901 was 7515; here are the catacombs and the ancient cathedral of Malta.

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  • The site where the cathedral at Notabile now stands is reputed to have been the residence of Publius and to have been converted by him into the first Christian place of worship, which was rebuilt in 1090 by Count Roger, the Norman conqueror of Malta.

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  • The town is finely situated on and between the slopes of the two extremities of the promontory of Monte Conero, Monte Astagno to the S., occupied by the citadel, and Monte Guasco to the N., on which the cathedral stands (300 ft.).

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  • Among his colossal figures are the Twelve Apostles for the cathedral of St.

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  • Among its ecclesiastical edifices (nine Roman Catholic and four Protestant churches) the most noteworthy is the Roman Catholic cathedral, with huge pointed windows, slender columns and numerous flying buttresses, which, begun in the 13th century and consecrated in 1546, belongs to the period of the decadence of the Gothic style.

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  • The cathedral was erected in the 13th century, but subsequently restored, and contains the grave of Prince Roman.

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  • It has a zoological marine station (1897), a museum commemorative of the siege (1895), a cathedral of Classical design and another finished in 1888, monuments of Admirals Nakhimov (1898) and Kornilov (1895) and of General Todleben, and two navigation schools.

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  • At its southern end, by the quay, is a bronze statue of Thiers, and at the northern end, the cathedral of St Augustine, a large church built in quasi-Byzantine style.

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  • Only the cathedral, together with Augustine's library and MSS., escaped the general destruction.

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  • The cathedral is in origin Romanesque,' but has been much altered, and was restored in 1888 by Count Giuseppe Sacconi (1855-1905).

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  • The cope presented to the cathedral treasury by Pope Nicholas IV.

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  • In 1615 the cathedral was accidentally burnt and the bishop removed to Cordoba.

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  • He was interred in Canterbury cathedral four days later.

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  • The Gothic cathedral (now Protestant), dating from the 13th and 14th centuries, is remarkable for the majestic impression made by the great height of the interior, with its slender columns and lofty, narrow aisles.

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  • Close to the cathedral lies the house of the poet Gleim (q.v.), since 1899 the property of the municipality and converted into a museum.

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  • The cathedral is modern, but the crypt, with twenty columns, is old, and the campanile dates from the 13th century.

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  • This journey forms the subject of a window in the cathedral of Chartres, and there was originally a similar one at Saint-Denis.

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  • The former cathedral church was mainly built 1069-1089, but was later gothicized; near the west end of the nave a plate in the floor marks the spot where Huss stood when condemned to death, while in the midst of the choir is the brass which covered the grave of Robert Hallam, bishop of Salisbury, who died here in 1417, during the council.

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  • The 14th century Kaufhaus (warehouse for goods) was the scene of the conclave that elected Martin V., but the council really sat in the cathedral church.

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  • In 1870 he was made canon of St Paul's Cathedral, London.

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  • The cathedral has a fine polygonal apse of the r 6th century.

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  • The cathedral, though small, is a very interesting example of pure German Gothic. It was founded in 1275, and completed in 1634, with the exception of the towers, which were finished in 1869.

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  • Adjoining the cloisters are two chapels of earlier date than the cathedral itself, one of which, known as the "old cathedral," goes back perhaps to the 8th century.

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  • Besides a good picture gallery in the Ratshof, and the 13thcentury church of St John, Yuriev possesses a university, with an observatory, an art museum, a botanical garden and a library of 250,000 volumes, which are housed in a restored portion of the cathedral, burned down in 1624.

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  • In 1224 the town was seized by the Teutonic Knights, and in the following year Bishop Hermann erected a cathedral on the Domberg.

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  • His father, Captain Peter Garrick, who had married Arabella Clough, the daughter of a vicar choral of Lichfield cathedral, was on a recruiting expedition when his famous third son was born at Hereford on the 19th of February 1717.

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  • The crowns suspended in churches suggested doubtless the sumptuous pensile luminaries, frequently designated from a very early period as coronae, in which the form of the royal circlet was preserved in much larger proportions, as exemplified by the remarkable corona still to be seen suspended in the cathedral at Aix-laChapelle over the crypt in which the body of Charlemagne was deposited."

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  • Government Avenue contains, on the east side, the Houses of Parliament, government house, a modernized Dutch building, and the Jewish synagogue; on the west side are the Anglican cathedral and grammar schools, the public library, botanic gardens, the museum and South African college.

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  • The Anglican cathedral, begun in 1901 to replace an unpretentious building on the same site, is dedicated to St George.

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  • After its destruction steps were at once taken to rebuild the cathedral.

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  • St Michael's contains a Norman font of black marble, comparable with that in Winchester Cathedral.

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  • Three Switzer- ears later he became preacher in the cathedral of Zurich.

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  • The Roman Catholic cathedral of St Catherine dates from 1524 and has been restored in modern times.

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  • The aula (restored in 1879) was originally the chapter-house of the cathedral.

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  • In feudal subordination to him a royal count, who was also Vogt (advocatus) of the cathedral church of St Martin, had his seat at Utrecht as the chief town of the Gouw (Gau, pagus) of Ifterlake.

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  • His body was removed to Rouen, and a magnificent tomb, on which he is represented kneeling in the attitude of prayer, was erected to his memory in the cathedral of that town.

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  • Besides the cathedral the town has fourteen churches.

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  • On its eastern side it communicates with the left bank of the river by a handsome series of steps; on its north side rises the cathedral of SainteMarie.

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  • Sainte-Marie contains many artistic treasures, the chief of which are the magnificent stained-glass windows of the Renaissance which light the apsidal chapels, and the 113 choir-stalls of carved oak, also of Renaissance workmanship. The archbishop's palace adjoins the cathedral; it is a building of the 18th century with a Romanesque hall and a tower of the r4th century.

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  • Opposite the south side of the cathedral stands the lycee on the site of a former Jesuit college.

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  • The political and commercial centre of the city is the Plaza Mayor, or Plaza de la Constituc16n, on which face the cathedral, national palace, and municipal palace.

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  • The great cathedral stands on or near the site of the Aztec temple (teocalli) destroyed by Cortes in 1521.

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  • Standing close beside the cathedral is the highly ornamented facade of a smaller church called El Sagrario Metropolitano.

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  • Near the cathedral is the monte de piedad, or government pawnshop, endowed in 1775 by Pedro Romero de Terreros (conde de Regla) with £75,000, and at one time carrying on a regular banking business including the issue of banknotes.

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  • In former times Mexico was overrun with mendicants (pordioseros), vagrants and criminals (rateros), and the " Portales de las Flores " on the east of the Plaza Mayor was a favourite " hunting-ground " for them because of its proximity to the cathedral; but modern conditions have largely reduced this evil.

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  • Maximilian, archduke of Austria, was crowned emperor of Mexico in the cathedral in June 1864, and held possession of the capital until the 21st of June 1867, when it was captured by General Porfirio Diaz.

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  • It has also an orthodox bishop. The Roman Catholics, who constitute the majority of citizens, possess a lofty and beautiful cruciform cathedral, built entirely of stone and metal.

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  • The older part of the cathedral, dating from 1430 to 1441, and including the fine north doorway, is Italian Gothic. Giorgio Orsini of Zara, who had studied architecture in Venice and been strongly influenced by the Italian Renascence, carried on the work of construction until his death in 1475.

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  • It was finished early in the 16th century; and thus the cathedral belongs to two distinct periods and represents two distinct styles.

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  • It is the seat of a bishop and has a cathedral.

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  • Until its sale in the 19th century, the site of Dawlish belonged to Exeter cathedral, having been given to the chapter by Leofric, bishop of Exeter, in 1050.

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  • Besides the Gothic cathedral (1480-1511), with the tombs of the marquises, the churches of San Giovanni (formerly San Domenico), San Bernardo and the Casa Cavazza, now the municipal museum, are noteworthy.

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  • It possesses a fine Romanesque cathedral begun in 1232 and restored in 1 3 30 and 1531, the portal being especially remarkable.

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  • The castle was originally erected by Robert Guiscard, but as it now stands it is mainly the work of the Doria family, who have possessed it since the time of Charles V.; and the noble cathedral which was founded in 1153 by Robert's son and successor, Roger, has had a modern restoration (though it retains its campaniles) in consequence of the earthquake of 1851, when the town was ruined, over one thousand of the inhabitants perishing.

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  • Its chief buildings are the Johannisburg, built (1605-1614) by Archbishop Schweikard of Cronberg, which contains a library with a number of incunabula, a collection of engravings and paintings; .the Stiftskirche, or cathedral, founded in 980 by Otto of Bavaria, but dating in the main from the early 12th and the 13th centuries, in which are preserved various monuments by the Vischers, and a sarcophagus, with the relics of St Margaret (1540); the Capuchin hospital; a theatre, which was formerly the house of the Teutonic order; and several mansions of the German nobility.

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  • From the landing stage a short street leads into the broad Avenue Jules Ferry or de la Marine running east to west and ending in the Place de la Residence, on the north side of which is the Roman Catholic cathedral and on the south side the palace of the French resident-general, with a large garden.

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  • Behind the cathedral is a disused cemetery with a chapel, where the Christian slaves are supposed to have worshipped.

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  • On the 2nd of April 1524 the marriage of Zwingli with Anna Reinhard was publicly celebrated in the cathedral, though for some two years already he had had her to wife.

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  • It has a beautiful cathedral, built after a plan by Rastrelli in 1753, to which pilgrims resort to venerate an ikon of the Virgin.

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  • The most interesting is the Roman Catholic cathedral, which dates from the middle of the 11th century and occupies the site of a building founded by the emperor Louis the Pious early in the 9th century.

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  • In the cathedral also there is a bronze column 15 ft.

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  • Before the cathedral is the pretty cloister garth, with the chapel of St Anne, erected in 1321 and restored in 1888.

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  • He was afterwards rector of Abbreochy, Loch Ness, and later held a chantry in the cathedral of Norway.

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  • The Scot obeyed, and calling at Durham on his southward journey was present at the foundation of Durham Cathedral.

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  • The first foundation was Holy Trinity, Aldgate, by Queen Maud, in 1108; Carlisle was an English cathedral of Augustinian canons.

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  • In the crypt of St Paul's Cathedral a memorial has rightly been placed to him as a statesman, not merely of Canada, but of the empire.

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  • To this old track the name of " pilgrims' way " has been given, for along it passed the stream of pilgrims coming through Winchester from the south and west of England and from the continent of Europe by way of Southampton to Canterbury Cathedral to view the place of the martyrdom of Thomas Becket, in the north transept, to the relics in the crypt where he was first buried after his murder, in 1170, and the shrine in the Trinity Chapel which rose above his tomb after the translation of the body in 1220.

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  • In Westminster Abbey the space east of the transept is the presbytery, and the same arrangement is found in Canterbury Cathedral.

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  • The city has a Protestant Episcopal cathedral, the Grafton Hall school for girls, and St Agnes hospital and convent, and a public library with about 25,000 volumes in 1908.

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  • The Roman Catholic churches are the cathedral church of St George, a fine Gothic building founded in the 13th century, and the church of St Fides, dating from the iith century.

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  • It is the seat of a GreekCatholic bishop, and possesses a beautiful cathedral built in the 18th century in late Gothic style.

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  • Cathedral Park in the southern portion, Spearfish Canon in the north, and the extensive fossil forest at the foot of Mattie's Peak are noteworthy; while the Crystal Cave, near Piedmont, and the Wind Cave, near Hot Springs, are almost unrivalled.

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  • In Milwaukee are St John's Roman Catholic Cathedral and All Saints Protestant Episcopal Cathedral - the city is the see of a Roman Catholic archbishopric (established in 1892) and of a Protestant Episcopal bishopric. Among other church structures are Plymouth Congregational, Westminster Presbyterian, Church of Gesu (Roman Catholic) and Trinity Lutheran.

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  • The cathedral or Se Matriz, dating from 1601, was formerly a Jesuit college.

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  • Its main object was ecclesiastical reform, but the provision that a copy of Magna Carta should be hung in all cathedral and collegiate churches seemed to the king a political action, and parliament declared void any action of this council touching on the royal power.

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  • Remains of the medieval town are also visible, consisting of the walls (one-tenth the area of the Roman city), the castle, the cathedral (now covered by modern houses), and a church.

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  • Helena is delightfully situated with Mt Helena as a background in the hollow of the Prickly Pear valley, a rich agricultural region surrounded by rolling hills and lofty mountains, and contains many fine buildings, including the state capitol, county court house, the Montana club house, high school, the cathedral of St Helena, a federal building, and the United States assay office.

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  • The lofty campanile of the cathedral was erected in 1050 with fragments of Roman buildings.

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  • It has a cathedral, dating from 1596.

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  • Even apart from the cathedral churches of Canterbury and Rochester, the county is unsurpassed in the number of churches it possesses of the highest interest.

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  • The cathedral has not suffered fromrestoration.

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  • In 1888 the tide of persecution turned, and several chiefs embraced Christianity, and on Crowther's return from another visit to England, the large iron church known as "St Stephen's cathedral" was opened.

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  • The walls by which it is surrounded were erected in 1320 by Guido Tarlati di Pietramala, its warlike bishop, who died in 1327, and is buried in the cathedral; they were reconstructed by Cosimo I.

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  • The cathedral, close by, is a fine specimen of Italian Gothic begun in 1277, but not completed internally until 1511, while the facade was not begun until 1880.

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  • Opposite the cathedral is a fountain with bronze ornamentation of 1583-1621.

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  • In Italy the signs and works survive fragmentarily in the baptistery at Parma, completely on the porch of the cathedral of Cremona and on the west doorway of St Mark's at Venice.

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  • In the zodiac of Merton College, Oxford, Libra is represented by a judge in his robes and Pisces by the dolphin of Fitzjames, warden of the college, 1482-1507.6 The great rose-windows of the Early Gothic period were frequently painted with zodiacal emblems; and some frescoes in the cathedral of Cologne contain the signs, each with an attendant angel, just as they were depicted on the vault of the church at Mount Athos.

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  • It somewhat resembles the completed tower of Antwerp cathedral, and is crowned by a graceful octagonal lantern, the whole being nearly 290 ft.

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  • The cathedral of St Martin dates from the 13th century, with a tower of the 15th century.

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  • Jansen, bishop of Ypres and the founder of the Jansenist school, is buried in the cathedral.

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  • There is a Roman Catholic Cathedral, and the city is the see of a Roman Catholic and of a Protestant Episcopal bishop. The Prudential Life Insurance Company and the Mutual Benefit Life Insurance Company have fine office buildings.

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  • Kishinev is the seat of the archbishop of Bessarabia, and has a cathedral, an ecclesiastical seminary with Boo students, a college, and a gardening school, a museum, a public library, a botanic garden, and a sanatorium with sulphur springs.

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  • After studying under Anselm of Laon and Roscellinus, he taught in the school of the cathedral of Notre Dame, of which he was made canon in 1103.

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  • The only other buildings of importance dating from medieval times are the three churches of Ste Gudule (often erroneously called the cathedral), Notre-Dame des Victoires or Church of the Sablon, and Notre-Dame de la Chapelle, or simply la Chapelle, and the hotel de ville and the Maison du Roi on the Grand Place.

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  • Cartagena is an episcopal see, and its cathedral dates from colonial times.

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  • Within this circuit there are various open areas - the spacious Ippodromo in front of the citadel, the public gardens in the north-east of the city, the Piazza Grande in front of the cathedral, and the Piazza Reale to the south of the palace.

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  • Begun by the Countess Matilda of Tuscany in 1099, after the designs of Lanfranc, and consecrated in 1184, the Romanesque cathedral (S Geminiano) is a low but handsome building, with a lofty crypt, under the choir (characteristic of the Tuscan Romanesque architecture), three eastern apses, and a façade still preserving some curious sculptures of the 12th century.

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  • Though the cathedral crowns the hillock round which clusters the old part of the town, a large portion of the newer town is built on the alluvial flats on either bank of the Rhone.

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  • Freeman remarks, "it is an excellent example of a small cathedral of its own style and plan, with unusually little later alteration."

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  • Near the cathedral are the arsenal (now housing the historical museum, in which are preserved many relics of the "Escalade" of 1602, including the famous ladders), and the maison de ville or town hall.

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  • But the many Roman remains found on the original site (in the region of the cathedral) of the city show that it must have been of some importance, and that it possessed a considerable commerce.

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  • The new bishop, William of Conflans (1287-1295) could recover neither, and in 1290 had to formally recognize the position of Savoy (which was thus legalized) in his own cathedral city.

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  • Filled with joy at their rescue from this attack, the citizens crowded to their cathedral, where Beza (then 83 years of age) bid them to sing the 124th Psalm which has ever since been sung.

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  • In 1585 he was appointed treasurer of St Paul's cathedral, London, and in 1586 was made a member of the ecclesiastical commission.

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  • The Protestant St Janskerk, a Gothic building of the 13th and i 5th centuries, with a fine tower, was formerly the baptistery of the cathedral.

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  • The cathedral contains many interesting objects of art, but, with the exception of the Gothic Marienkirche of the 15th century, none of the churches is notable.

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  • The cathedral of St Sauveur, which dates from the 11th, 12th and 13th centuries, is situated in this portion of Aix.

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  • The archbishop's palace and a Romanesque cloister adjoin the cathedral on its south side.

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  • The handsome cathedral of white marble in the Gothic style, dating from 1355, was completed in 1474.

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  • Early in 1643 he was chosen chancellor of the cathedral of Salisbury, but of this preferment he was soon deprived as a "malignant."

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  • The cathedral of the 15th century contains an octagonal marble canopy with sculptures in relief, with a font below it belonging to the 8th century, but altered later.

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  • His stitution, promise was publicly proclaimed on the 25th of 1815' May, and was reaffirmed in the Zamok or palace at Warsaw and the cathedral of St John on the 10th of June.

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  • In the centre of the Old Town stands the cathedral of St Sophia, the oldest cathedral in the Russian empire.

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  • During the occupation of the church by the Uniats or United Greek Church in the 17th century these were covered with whitewash, and were only discovered in 1842, after which the cathedral was internally restored; but the chapel of the Three Pontiffs has been left untouched to show how carefully the old style has been preserved or copied.

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  • In this quarter, some distance back from the river, is the new and richly decorated Vladimir cathedral (1862-1896), in the Byzantine style, distinguished for the beauty and richness of its paintings.

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  • There is a fine cathedral, rebuilt in Gothic style after a fire in 1880.

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  • Here he repaired the fabric and changed the position of the communion table, a matter which aroused great religious controversy, from the centre of the choir to the east end, by a characteristic tactless exercise of power offending the bishop, who henceforth refused to enter the cathedral.

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  • In London he procured funds for the restoration of the dilapidated cathedral of St Paul's.

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  • St Peter's (Roman Catholic) cathedral (begun 1839, consecrated 1844), Grecian in style, is a fine structure, with a graceful stone spire 224 ft.

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  • Popayan is the seat of a bishopric dating from 1547, whose cathedral was built by the Jesuits; and in the days of its prosperity it possessed a university of considerable reputation.

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  • A hundred years later, all churches of any importance had similar indulgences; yet Englishmen were glad even then to earn a pardon of forty days by the laborious journey to the nearest cathedral, and by making an offering there on one of a few privileged feast-days.

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  • The cathedral at Axum is basilican, though the early basilicas are nearly all in ruins - e.g.

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  • In Farmington Avenue is St Joseph's cathedral (Roman Catholic), the city being the seat of the diocese of Hartford.

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  • Gyor is a well-built town, and is the seat of a Roman Catholic bishop. Amongst its principal buildings are the cathedral, dating from the 12th century, and rebuilt in 1639-1654; the bishop's palace; the town hall; the `Roman Catholic seminary for priests and several churches.

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  • There are a modern cathedral, a school of viticulture and a high school, besides an ancient clock-tower and the palace (Konak) formerly occupied by the Turkish pashas.

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  • The ancient collegiate church of San Maximo occupies the traditional site of a cathedral founded by the Visigothic king Reccared about 600, and afterwards converted into a mosque.

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  • The cathedral of St Christopher is also of note; on the top of the tower (246 ft.) is a copper statue of the saint, and the interior is adorned with paintings by Rubens, Jacob de Wit (1695-1754) and others.

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  • Herbert de Losinga (c. 1054-1119) granted its jurisdiction to the cathedral of Norwich but this right was resumed by a later bishop, John de Gray, who in 1204 had obtained from John a charter establishing Lynn as a free borough.

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  • The more conspicuous buildings are the cathedral, the exchange, the royal palace, now occupied by the captain-general, and the law courts, the episcopal palace, a handsome late Renaissance building (1616), the general hospital (1456), the town-house (end of the 16th century), the picture gallery, and the college.

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  • The cathedral was erected and dedicated to the Virgin by King James I.

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  • He all but completed the cathedral which his predecessor, William of St Carilef, had begun; fortified Durham; built Norham Castle; founded the priory of Mottisfout and endowed the college of Christchurch, Hampshire.

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  • From the architectural point of view the addition of chapels to a cathedral or large church assumes some historical importance in consequence of the changes it involved in the plan.

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  • The chapels of the colleges at Oxford and Cambridge are sometimes of large dimensions and architecturally of great importance, that of Christ Church being actually the cathedral of Oxford; among others may be mentioned the chapel of Merton College, and the new chapel of Exeter College, both in Oxford, and the chapel of King's College, Cambridge, which is roofed over with perhaps the finest fan-vault in England.

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  • For a brief period, in the 7th and 8th centuries, the conquering Sla y s made it one of their Zupanates, or governments; but in the 10th century it was sacked by the Magyars, and in 1092 its territories were bestowed upon the cathedral chapter of Agram by Ladislaus I., king of Hungary.

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  • Prato is said to be fir