How to use Cassino in a sentence

cassino
  • Having received his elementary education at the monastery of Monte Cassino, he studied for six years at the university of Naples, leaving it in his-sixteenth year.

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  • He refused the archbishopric of Naples and the abbacy of Monte Cassino.

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  • At Langres he discovered Cicero's Oration for Caecina, at Monte Cassino a MS. of Frontinus.

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  • Then appeared, under the influence of the school of law at Pavia, the Liber legis Langobardorum, also called Liber Papiensis (beginning of Tith century), and the Lombarda (end of 11th century) in two forms - that given in a Monte Cassino MS. and known as the Lombarda -Casinensis, and the Lombarda Vulgata.

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  • The study of Hippocrates, Galen, and other classics was recommended by Cassiodorus (6th century), and in the original mother-abbey of Monte Cassino medicine was studied; but there was not there what could be called a medical school; nor had this foundation any connexion (as has been supposed) with the famous school of Salerno.

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  • It contains numerous illustrations; maps of the routes of the ancient aqueducts and the city of Rome in the time of Frontinus; a photographic reproduction of the only MS. (the Monte Cassino); several explanatory chapters, and a concise bibliography, in which special reference is made to P. d Tissot, E tude sur la condition des agrimensores (1879).

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  • Afterwards giving up the direction of these, he migrated to Monte Cassino and there established the monastery which became the centre whence his Rule and institute spread.

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  • From Monte Cassino he founded a monastery at Terracina.

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  • There is some ground for believing that it was the third-abbot of Monte Cassino who began to spread a knowledge of the Rule beyond the circle of St Benedict's own foundations.

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  • About 580-590 Monte Cassino was sacked by the Lombards, and the community came to Rome and was established in a monastery attached to the Lateran Basilica, in the centre of the ecclesiastical world.

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  • Driven from Subiaco by the jealousy and molestations of a neighbouring priest, but leaving behind him communities in his twelve monasteries, he himself, accompanied by a small band of disciples, journeyed south until he came to Cassino, a town halfway between Rome and Naples.

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  • We have seen St Benedict evangelizing the pagan population round Monte Cassino; and a considerable time each day is assigned to the reading of the Fathers.

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  • More than ten years before Cassiodorus founded his monasteries in the south of Italy, Benedict of Nursia (480-543) had rendered a more permanent service to the cause of scholarship by building, amid the ruins of the temple of Apollo on the crest of Monte Cassino, the earliest of those homes of learning that have lent an undying distinction to the Benedictine order.

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  • In that year the monastery of Monte Cassino was founded in the West, while the school of Athens was closed in the East.

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  • Learning flourished at Monte Cassino under the rule of the Abbot Desiderius (afterwards Pope Victor III.).

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  • He became a monk of Monte Cassino, was taken to Rome by Urban II., and made chancellor and cardinal-deacon of Sta Maria in Cosmedin.

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  • His rule was diffused with miraculous rapidity from the parent foundation on Monte Cassino through the whole of western Europe, and every country witnessed the erection of monasteries far exceeding anything that had yet been seen in spaciousness and splendour.

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  • For all that, St Celestine, during his brief tenure of the papacy, tried to spread his ideas among the Benedictines, and induced the monks of Monte Cassino to adopt his idea of the monastic life instead of St Benedict's; for this purpose fifty Celestine monks were introduced into Monte Cassino, but on Celestine's abdication of the papacy the project fortunately was at once abandoned.

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  • Soon he entered a monastery on the lake of Como, and before 782 he had become an inmate of the great Benedictine house of Monte Cassino, where he made the acquaintance of Charlemagne.

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  • In 787 he returned to Italy and to Monte Cassino, where he died on the 13th of April in one of the years between 794 and 800.

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  • He executed this after his return to Monte Cassino, and it was largely used in the Frankish churches.

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  • At the dissolution of monasteries in 1866 Monte Cassino was spared, owing mainly to a remonstrance by English well-wishers of United Italy.

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  • The oldest is Aime or Amato of Monte Cassino, who exists only in an Old-French translation.

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  • Falling ill at the synod, Vicar returned to Monte Cassino, where he died on the 16th of September 1087.

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  • Victor III., while abbot of Monte Cassino contributed personally to the literary activity of the monastery.

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  • The great Benedictine abbey of Fulda occupies the place in the ecclesiastical history of Germany which Monte Cassino holds in Italy, St Gall in South Germany, Corvey in Saxony, Tours in France and Iona in Scotland.

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  • New styles were devised to express this new relation; thus the abbot of Monte Cassino was called abbas abbatum, while the chiefs of other orders had the titles abbas generalis, or magister or minister generalis.

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  • To secure his position he at once entered into relation with the Normans, now firmly established in southern Italy, and later in the year the new alliance was cemented at Melfi, where Nicholas II., accompanied by Hildebrand, Cardinal Humbert and the abbot Desiderius of Monte Cassino, solemnly invested Robert Guiscard with the duchies of Apulia, Calabria and Sicily, and Richard of Aversa with the principality of Capua, in return for 'oaths of fealty and the promise of assistance in guarding the rights of the Church.

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  • Philip was sent to his father's childless brother Romolo, a merchant at San Germano, a Neapolitan town near the base of Monte Cassino, to assist him in his business, and with the hope that he might inherit his possessions.

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