Carthaginian sentence example

carthaginian
  • In 480 B.C. Selinus took the Carthaginian side.
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  • It passed into Carthaginian hands by the treaty of 405 B.C., was won back by Dionysius in his first Punic war, but recovered by Carthage in 383.
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  • The Phoenician and old Carthaginian system was (18)--
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  • In 238 B.C. the Carthaginian mercenaries revolted, and the Romans took advantage of the fact to demand that the island should be given period.
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  • Cartagena was founded about the year 243 B.C. by the Carthaginian Hasdrubal, and was called Carthago Nova or New Carthage, to distinguish it from the African city of Carthage.
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  • It was conveniently situated opposite to the Carthaginian territory in Africa, and was early noted for its harbour.
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  • He set himself in opposition to Novatian, a presbyter of Rome, who advocated their permanent exclusion from the church; and it was his influence which guided the tolerant measures of the Carthaginian synods on the subject.
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  • His name occurs as an element in Carthaginian proper names (Hannibal, Hasdrubal, &c.), and a tablet found at Marseilles still survives to inform us of the charges made by the priests of the temple of Baal for offering sacrifices.
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  • The importance of the discoveries lies in the fact that the ditch which in later times divided the provinces of Africa vetus and Africa nova was at the time of the Third Punic War the boundary of Carthaginian territory (R.
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  • He is mentioned in a Carthaginian inscription as one of a board of three, perhaps an agricultural commission.
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  • In the oldest Roman ferial we already find festivals of Carthaginian martyrs, and similarly, in the Carthaginian calendar, Roman festivals, while Wright's Syriac Martyrology contains numerous traces of this exchange of festivals.
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  • It was shortly after this revolution, in 317, that Agathocles with a body of mercenaries from Campania and a host of exiles from the Greek cities, backed up by the Carthaginian Hamilcar, who was in friendly relations with the Syracusan oligarchy, became a tyrant or despot of the city, assuming subsequently, on the strength of his successes against Carthage, the title of king.
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  • popular outbreak and more bloodshed; the conspirators were put to death and Hiero's family was murdered; whilst the Carthaginian faction, under the pretence of delivering the city from its tyrants, got the upper hand and drew the citizens into open defiance of Rome.
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  • Marcellus had recourse to a blockade, but Carthaginian vessels from time to time contrived to throw in supplies.
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  • The "outer" and the "inner" city of Thucydides still held out, whilst a Carthaginian fleet was moored off Achradina and Carthaginian troops were encamped on the spot.
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  • 2 As to the question whether it was finished at the time of the Carthaginian invasion of 397 B.C., see Freeman, iv.
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  • It was long supposed that the apes encountered on an island off the west coast of Africa by Hanno, the Carthaginian, were gorillas, but in the XII.
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  • The town must have become a part of the Carthaginian dominion in 405 B.C. It was seized by Pyrrhus in 278 B.C., and was ceded to Rome at the end of the First Punic War.
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  • Soon after came the first Punic war, the principal scene of which was Sicily, where, from common hostility to the Carthaginian, Greek and Roman were brought into friendly relations, and the Roman armies must have become familiar with the spectacles and performances of the Greek theatre.
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  • For nearly five years (202-207) the Carthaginian Montanists strove to remain within the Church, which was as dear to them as it was to their opponents.
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  • In Carthage there existed down to the year 400 a sect called Tertullianists; and in their survival we have a striking testimony to the influence of the great Carthaginian teacher.
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  • Carthaginian times, continued in Malta under the Romans.
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  • Although his kingdom was nominally independent of Carthage, it really stood to it in a relation of vassalage; it was directly under Carthaginian influences, and was imbued to a very considerable extent with Carthaginian civilization.
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  • The defeat of the Carthaginian army in 206 led him to cast in his lot with Rome.
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  • Here occurs the romantic story of Sophonisba, daughter of the Carthaginian Hasdrubal, who had been promised in marriage to Massinissa, but had subsequently become the wife of Syphax.
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  • Massinissa, according to the story, married Sophonisba immediately after his victory, but was required by Scipio to dismiss her as a Carthaginian, and consequently an enemy to Rome.
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  • For his services he received the kingdom of Syphax, and thus under Roman protection he became master of the whole of Numidia, and his dominions completely enclosed the Carthaginian territories, now straitened and reduced at the close of the Second Punic War.
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  • Paul Gauckler, the director of the department of art and antiquities in the Tunisian government, has formed a magnificent collection of Carthaginian and Roman antiquities, especially Roman mosaics.
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  • It remained a Carthaginian colony, though thoroughly Greek' in character, until it was taken by Rome in the First Punic war.
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  • Thus the late Rabbinical picture of the calf-headed brazen image of Molech within which children were burned alive is pure fable, and with it falls the favourite comparison between Molech and the Carthaginian idol from whose brazen arms children were rolled into an abyss of fire, and whom Diodorus (xux.
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  • The Gambia was one of the rivers passed by Hanno the Carthaginian in his famous voyage along the west coast of Africa.
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  • Isole Egati; anc. Aegates Insulae), a group of small mountainous islands off the western coast of Sicily, chiefly remarkable as the scene of the defeat of the Carthaginian fleet by C. Lutatius Catulus in 241 B.C., which ended the First Punic War.
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  • The port of Agadir or Gaddir, now Cadiz, was founded as early as 1100 B.C. Later Carthaginian invaders came from their advanced settlements in the Balearic Islands, about 516 B.C. Greek merchants also visited the coasts.
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  • It is impossible to estimate the influence of the elder conquerors, Greek, Carthaginian and Roman; but there are clear traces of Moorish blood, with a less well-defined Jewish and gipsy strain.
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  • Carthage, of course, was governed by two suffetes, and these officers are frequently named in connexion with the Carthaginian colonies (NSI.
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  • Another goddess, specially honoured at Carthage, is Tanith (pronunciation uncertain); nothing is known of her characteristics; she is regularly connected with Ba'al on the Carthaginian votive tablets, and called " the face of Ba'al," i.e.
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  • In 408 the Carthaginian invading army under Hannibal, after capturing Selinus, in'vested and took Himera and razed the city to the ground, founding a new town close to the hot springs (Thermae Himeraeae), 8 m.
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  • Barcino, the ancient name of the city, is usually connected with that of the Carthaginian Hamilcar Barca, its traditional founder in the 3rd century B.C. After the Roman conquest, it received from Augustus (27 B.C.-A.D.
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  • The tale was probably invented by the annalists to excuse the cruel treatment of the Carthaginian prisoners by the Romans.
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  • Of the objects found in the oldest graves, and supposed to date from about the 7th century B.C., the cups of silver and silver-gilt and most of the gold and amber jewelry are Phoenician (possibly Carthaginian), or at least made on Phoenician models; but the bronzes and some of the ivory articles seem to.
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  • Originally Carthaginian mercenaries, they were induced to serve the Romans in a similar capacity, and Livy (xxiv.
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  • We must always remember that Carthage - the new city - was one of settle-'' the latest of Phoenician foundations, and that the days of the Carthaginian dominion show us only the latest form of Phoenician life.
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  • During this time of prosperity there was no dread of Carthaginian inroads.
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  • Almost at the same moment, the new 4 5 Carthaginian commander, Himilco, attacked Gela and Camarina.
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  • In the first war with Carthage the Greek cities under Carthaginian dominion or dependence helped him; so did Sicans and Sicels, which last had among them some stirring leaders; Elymian Segesta clave to Carthage.
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  • Between invasion and home discontent, the tyrant was all but lost; but the Spartan Pharacidas stood his friend; the Carthaginians again suffered from pestilence in the marshes of Lysimelia; and after a masterly combined attack by land and sea by Dionysius Himilco went away utterly defeated, taking with him his Carthaginian troops and forsaking his allies.
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  • The Carthaginian dominion was cut down to what it had been before Hannibal's invasion.
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  • The Carthaginian war of 392-391 was not very memorable.
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  • Most of them joined the Carthaginian leader Mago; but he was successfully withstood at Agyrium by Agyris, the ally of Dionysius, who is described as a tyrant second in power to Dionysius himself.
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  • The master of the barbarians fell below the lowest Hellenic level when he put the brave Rhegine general Phyton to a lingering death, and in other cases imitated the Carthaginian cruelty of crucifixion.
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  • In the last years of his reign we hear dimly of both Syracusan and Carthaginian operations in southern Italy.
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  • The Carthaginian Hamilcar won many Greek cities to the Punic alliance.
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  • Agathocles, however, with Syracuse blockaded by a Carthaginian fleet, formed the bold idea of carrying the war into Africa.
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  • But he now relieved Syracuse from the Carthaginian blockade; his mercenaries gained a victory over Acragas; and he sailed again for Africa, where fortune had turned against his son Archagathus, as it now did against himself.
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  • He left his sons and his army to death, bondage or Carthaginian service, and came back to Sicily almost alone.
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  • Carthaginian troops held the Messanian citadel against Hiero, while another party in Messana craved the help of the head of Italy.
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  • It formed, as it had even from the Carthaginian period, a closed customs district.
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  • of Val di Mazzara answers roughly to the old Carthaginian possessions.
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  • The philosopher Clitomachus, who presided over the Academy at Athens in the 2nd century, was a Carthaginian.
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  • And yet the Romans, when threatened by the Carthaginian power, built in one year a fleet capable of holding its own against the, till then, greatest maritime nation in the world.
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  • The rowers in each vessel, though among the northern folk these were free men and warriors, not slaves as in the Roman and Carthaginian galleys, would yet need to be supplemented by a contingent of fighting men, marines, in addition to their crew.
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  • above the railway station, and was founded by the Carthaginian Himilco in 397 B.C. for a friendly tribe of Sicels, after the destruction, by Dionysius the Elder of Syracuse, of the neighbouring city of Naxos.
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  • As the name suggests, it had previously been a Carthaginian settlement.
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  • J.) History Throughout the centuries which witnessed the destruction of Carthaginian power by Rome, the establishment and decline of Latin civilization, the invasion by Alani, Suevi and other barbarian races, the resettlement under Visigothic rule and the overthrow of the Visigoths by Arab and Berber tribes from Africa, Portugal remained an undifferentiated part of Hispania, without sign of national consciousness.
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  • It was built in 1693, after the destruction by an earthquake of the old town of Occhiala to the north; the latter, on account of the similarity of name, is generally identified with Echetla, a frontier city between Syracusan and Carthaginian territory in the time of Hiero II., which appears to have been originally a Sicel city in which Greek civilization prevailed from the 5th century onwards.
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  • Towards the middle of the 6th century a Carthaginian deacon, Fulgentius Ferrandus, drew up a Breviatio canonum, 2 a methodical arrangement of the African collection, in the order of the subjects.
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  • Like the other Phoenician colonies in the west, Panormus came under the power of Carthage, and became the head of the Carthaginian dominion in Sicily.
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  • Under the Carthaginian it was the head of the Semitic part of Sicily; when, under the Saracen all Sicily came under Semitic rule, it was the chief seat of that rule.
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  • Other Carthaginian synods concerning the lapsi were held in 252 and 254.
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  • The island of Aiolie, the home of Aiolos, lord of the winds, which Ulysses twice visited in his wanderings, has generally been identified with one of this group. A colony of 'Cnidians and Rhodians was established on Lipara in 580-577 B.0 1 The inhabitants were allied with the Syracusans, and were attacked by the Athenian fleet in 427 B.C., and by the Carthaginians in 397 B.C., while Agathocles plundered a temple on Lipara in 301 B.C. During the Punic wars the islands were a Carthaginian naval station of some importance until the Romans took possession of them in 252 B.C. Sextus Pompeius also used them as a naval base.
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  • Novatian has sometimes been confounded with his contemporary Novatus, a Carthaginian presbyter, who held similar views.
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  • of Oran, to the frontier of the Carthaginian territory, which nearly coincided with the modern regency of Tunis.
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  • At the end of the war the victorious Romans confiscated the dominions of Syphax, and gave them to Massinissa, whose sway extended from the frontier of Mauretania to the boundary of the Carthaginian territory, and also south and east as far as the Cyrenaica (Appian, Punica, 106), so that the Numidian kingdom entirely surrounded Carthage except towards the sea.
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  • Early in the First Punic War, however, the inhabitants, having massacred the Carthaginian garrison and allied themselves with Rome, had to stand a severe siege from the Carthaginians.
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  • Carthaginian factories were planted on many Spanish coasts: a Nova Carthago (New Carthage, mod.
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  • Cartagena) formed a Carthaginian fortress with the best harbour of south-eastern Spain.
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  • The expansion is attributed chiefly to the second half of the 3rd century B.C., and to the genius of the Carthaginian statesman, Hamilcar Barca, who, seeing his country deprived by Rome of her trading dominion in Sicily and Sardinia, used Spain, not only~ as a source of commercial wealth, but as an inexhaustible supply of warlike troops to serve in.
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  • the Carthaginian armies.
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  • The hill occupied by the Pisan fortifications and the medieval town within them must have been the acropolis of the Carthaginian settlement; it is impossible to suppose that a citadel presenting such natural advantages was not occupied.
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  • Hannibal On The East Coast Reorganization Of The Carthaginian Army But Hannibal was more farsighted than king Pyrrhus.
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  • It was to this that Massinissa owed his fame and success; he was a barbarian at heart, but he had a varnish of culture, and to this he added the craft and cunning in which Carthaginian statesmen were supposed to excel.
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  • The origin of the name Baleares is a mere matter of conjecture; it is obvious, however, that the modern Majorca and Minorca are obtained from the Latin Major and Minor, through the Byzantine forms Macoptac and Mcvopuca; while Iviza is plainly the older Ebusus, a name probably of Carthaginian origin.
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  • He was one of the commanders in the Punic naval expedition which shattered the Carthaginian fleet at Ecnomus, and landed an army on Carthaginian territory (see Punic Wars).
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  • Wunsch, Sethianische Verfluchungstafeln (Leipzig, 1898), Ioo sqq., and for a Carthaginian triad of the under world (cf.
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  • After the Athenian debacle, the Segestans turned to Carthage; but when Hannibal in 409 B.C. firmly established the Carthaginian power in western Sicily, Segesta sank to the position of a dependent ally, and was indeed besieged by Dionysius in 397, being at last relieved by Himilco.
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