Carteret sentence example

carteret
  • In 1767 Samuel Wallis worked through the central part of the Paumotus, and visited Tahiti and the Marianas, while his companion Philip Carteret discovered Pitcairn, and visited Santa Cruz, the Solomons and New Pomerania.
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  • Philip Carteret first observed this settlement in May 1767, and on account of the hostility of the Spaniards preferred to put in at Masa-Fuera.
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  • The expedition, consisting of the " Dolphin " commanded by Wallis, and the " Swallow " under Captain Philip Carteret, sailed in September 1766, but the ships were separated on entering the Pacific from the Strait of Magellan.
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  • Carteret discovered the Charlotte and Gloucester Islands, and Pitcairn Island on the 2nd of July 1767; revisited the Santa Cruz group, which was discovered by Mendafia and Quiros; and discovered the strait separating New Britain from New Ireland.
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  • Wallis and Carteret were followed very closely by the French expedition of Bougainville, which sailed from Nantes in November 1766.
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  • The family of Carteret was settled in the Channel Islands, and was of Norman descent.
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  • John Carteret was educated at Westminster, and at Christ Church, Oxford.
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  • Throughout life Carteret not only showed a keen love of the classics, but a taste for, and a knowledge of, modern languages and literatures.
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  • Harte, the author of the Life of Gustavus Adolphus, acknowledged the aid which Carteret had given him.
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  • Though his family, on both sides, had been devoted to the house of Stuart, Carteret was a steady adherent of the Hanoverian dynasty.
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  • A somewhat partisan life of Granville was published in 1887, by Archibald Ballantyne, under the title of Lord Carteret, a Political Biography.
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  • In 1742 Walpole fell, and Carteret was his real, though not his nominal successor.
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  • In 1744 the king was compelled to abandon Carteret, and the coalition or " Broad Bottom" party, led by Chesterfield and Pitt, came into office.
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  • On the 4th of September 1665 Pepys writes an interesting letter to Lady Carteret from Woolwich: " I have stayed in the city till above 7400 died in one week, and of them about 6000 of the plague, and little noise heard day or night but tolling of bells."
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  • The separation from it of what is now New Jersey (q.v.) was begun by the duke's conveyance, in the preceding June, of that portion of his province to Berkeley and Carteret, and among numerous changes from Dutch to English names was that from Fort Orange to Fort Albany.
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  • In 1664 the duke of York became proprietor of the newly erected province of New York and by his grant in the same year to Berkeley and Carteret of all that portion which lay west of the Hudson river, Staten Island became properly a part of New Jersey, but in 1668 the duke decided that all islands within New York Bay which could be circumnavigated in twenty-four hours should be adjudged to New York.
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  • In 1870 the Radicals regained the supremacy under their new chief, Antoine Carteret (1813-1889) and kept it till 1878.
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  • Jacob Lemaire and Willem Cornelis Schouten sighted New Mecklenburg in 1616, but it was only recognized as part of an island separate from New Guinea by William Dampier in 1700, and as separate from New Pomerania in 1767 by Philip Carteret.
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  • Stone axes, remains of carved stone pillars similar to those of Easter Island, and skeletons with a pearl-mussel beneath the head have been found in the island, though it was uninhabited when discovered by Philip Carteret in 1767.
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  • The Solomon Islands were thus lost sight of until, in 1767, Philip Carteret lighted on their eastern shores at Gower Island, and passed to the north of the group, without, however, recognizing that it formed part of the Spanish discoveries.
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  • He was the son of Helier de Carteret of St Ouen, and in his youth was trained to follow the sea.
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  • In 1643 he succeeded by reversion from his uncle, Sir Philip Carteret, to the post of bailiff of Jersey, and in the same year was appointed by the king lieutenant-governor of the island.
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  • His rule in Jersey was severe, but profitable to the island; he developed its resources and made it a refuge for Royalists, among whom in 1646 and again in1649-1650was Prince Charles, who created Carteret a knight and baronet.
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  • In 1650, in consideration of Carteret's services, Charles granted to him "a certain island and adjacent islets near Virginia, in America," which were to be called New Jersey; but no settlement upon this grant was made.
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  • In 1651 Carteret, after a seven weeks' siege, was compelled to surrender Jersey to a Parliamentary force; he then joined the Royalist exiles in France, where for a time he held a command in the French navy.
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  • In 1664 James, duke of York, granted that part of his American territory between the Hudson and Delaware rivers to Sir George Carteret and John, Lord Berkeley, and in Carteret's honour this tract received the name of New Jersey.
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  • Philip Carteret was restored to his office in 1674.
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  • With them Carteret agreed (1676) upon a boundary line which divided the colony into East and West Jersey.
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  • The city has a good public school system and various private schools, including the DearbornMorgan School (for girls) and the Carteret Academy (for boys).
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  • In 1742 Walpole was at last forced to succumb to the longcontinued attacks of opposition, and was succeeded as prime minister by the earl of Wilmington, though the real power in the new government was divided between Carteret and the Pelhams. Pitt's conduct on the change of administration was open to grave censure.
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  • The so-called "broad-bottom" administration formed by the Pelhams in 1744, after the dismissal of Carteret, though it included several of those with whom he had been accustomed to act, did not at first include Pitt himself even in a subordinate office.
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  • To this tract the name of Nova Caesarea, or New Jersey, was given, as the same name had been given in a patent to Carteret issued in 1650, to " a certain island and adjacent islets" near Virginia, in America, which were never settled - in honour of Carteret, who governed the isle of Jersey in1643-1651and there entertained Prince Charles during his exile from England.
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  • In the meantime Governor Nicolls of New York, ignorant of the grant to Berkeley and Carteret, had approved certain Indian sales of land to settlers within New Jersey, and had confirmed their titles to tracts in what later became Elizabethtown, Middletown and Shrewsbury.
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  • In August 1665 Philip Carteret, a relative of Sir George, arrived in the province as its first governor.
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  • The disaffection soon spread and led to the so-called " disorganizing" assembly in 1672, which went so far as to choose James Carteret, a landgrave of Carolina and presumably a natural son of Sir George, as " President."
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  • Philip Carteret returned to England and laid the case before the proprietors; they ordered President Carteret to continue on his way to Carolina and confirmed as governor John Berry, whom Governor Carteret had left behind as deputy.
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  • Sir George Carteret again sent over his kinsman Philip Carteret to be governor of the eastern part of New Jersey, and the two governors arrived in October 1674 in the same ship. A disagreement arose as to 3 It has been supposed that Fenwicke and Byllynge intended to establish in America a retreat for those who desired religious and political freedom.
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  • Meanwhile the trustees of Byllynge were seeking a division of the province more to their advantage and, Sir George Carteret having been persuaded by the duke of York to surrender his grant of July 1674, the so-called " quintipartite deed " was executed on the 1st of July 1676.
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  • The Quakers' title to West Jersey, however, still bore the cloud resulting from the Dutch conquest, and the duke of York had desired to recover all of his original grant to Berkeley and Carteret ever since Governor Nicolls had protested against it.
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  • In East Jersey, after the return of Governor Carteret, there was a period of quiet, until the death of Sir George Carteret in 1680 gave the zealous Andros another chance to further the supposed interests of his ducal master.
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  • Claiming jurisdiction over New Jersey by the terms of his commission, he issued a proclamation in March 1680 ordering Philip Carteret and his " pretended " officers to cease exercising jurisdiction within the duke's dominions unless he could show warrant.
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  • To this Carteret made a spirited reply, and on the 30th of April a detachment of soldiers dragged the governor of East Jersey from his bed and carried him prisoner to New York.
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  • Philip Carteret reassumed the duties of his office, but his administration, now that Andros was no longer feared, was again marked by much friction with the assembly.
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  • Sir George Carteret had bequeathed his province to eight trustees, who were to administer it for the benefit of his creditors, and for the next two years the government was conducted in the name of his widow and executrix, Lady Elizabeth.
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  • The first grant of land within the present limits of Nyack was made by Governor Philip Carteret, of New Jersey, to one Claus Jansen, in 1671, but the permanent settlement apparently dates from about 1700.
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  • The town was named in honour of Elizabeth, wife of Sir George Carteret, and was first known as Elizabethtown.
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  • The islands were discovered by the Dutch in 1616, and visited in 1767 by Philip Carteret; but no landing seems to have been effected, owing to the surrounding reefs, until the arrival of the "Challenger" in 1875.
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  • Lady Carteret died during childbirth in 1736 and supposedly haunts the corridors looking for her lost love.
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  • Actor Anna Carteret, who one played policewoman Juliet Bravo on TV, was allowed to leave around now - her statement is here.
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  • Lord Carteret refused to sell and continued to hold a one-eighth undivided share until 1744, when he gave up his claim in return for a large strip of land in North Carolina lying between latitude 35° 34' and the Virginia line (36° 30').
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  • When, therefore, the violent agitation in Ireland against Wood's halfpence (see Swift, Jonathan) made it necessary to replace the duke of Grafton as lord lieutenant, Carteret was sent to Dublin.
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  • But about the same time the duke conveyed the entire province to John, Lord Berkeley, and Sir George Carteret, and these two conflicting grants gave rise to a long-continued controversy (see NEW Jersey).
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  • Carteret's interests were however in foreign, and not in domestic policy.
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  • To Walpole, who looked upon every able colleague, or subordinate, as an enemy to be removed, Carteret was exceptionally odious.
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  • The lord lieutenant had a strong personal liking for Swift, who was also a friend of Lady Carteret's family.
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  • It is highly doubtful whether Carteret could have reconciled his duty to the crown with his private friendships, if government had persisted in endeavouring to force the detested coinage on the Irish people.
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  • Carteret was a profuse and popular lord lieutenant who pleased both the "English interest" and the native Irish.
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  • He had the full confidence of Queen Caroline, whom he prejudiced against Carteret.
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  • Till the fall of Walpole in 1742, Carteret could take no share in public affairs except as a leader of opposition of the Lords.
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  • Carteret took the popular side in the outcry against Walpole for not making war on Spain.
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  • A few years later Pitt adopted an identical policy, and professed that whatever he knew he had learnt from Carteret.
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  • On the 18th of October 1744 Carteret became Earl Granville on the death of his mother.
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