Cars sentence example

cars
  • Behind it, sixteen cars were jammed together all the way back to the highway.
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  • She gripped the armrest as he passed two cars at a time.
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  • We had to change cars at Philadelphia; but we did not mind it much.
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  • Water streamed through the gutters, and those cars out in the storm crawled block-to-block.
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  • Go up the hill and watch for cars so you can warn anyone before they get to the curve.
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  • The first cars were called "horseless carriages."
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  • The guest room was redone in race cars and Disney characters.
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  • I read somewhere they swipe cars and ship 'em down to South America where the druggies buy 'em. Maybe that's it.
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  • Half the cars down there have USA license plates, and the models are so new they practically still have the family pet in the back seat.
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  • He didn't come back until morning and there were police cars all over the place.
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  • The ride took about forty minutes and as we arrived, two patrol cars were pulling away from the scene.
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  • The couple drove over the narrow wooden bridge that spanned Red Mountain Creek, and joined two other cars in the small parking area.
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  • The startings and arrivals of the cars are now the epochs in the village day.
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  • Damian had a lot of cars, and she found the black BMW whose lights flashed when she clicked the key fob.
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  • Several cars were on fire, and black smoke spiraled toward the sky.
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  • The street below was narrower than it appeared on TV and packed with cars and elegantly dressed men and women walking to a gathering across the street --probably the soiree Andre had mentioned.
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  • I watch the passage of the morning cars with the same feeling that I do the rising of the sun, which is hardly more regular.
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  • Still, years of warnings about getting into cars with strangers compelled her to hesitate.
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  • Of course, she didn't leap cars with motorcycles or sky dive, but in retrospect, she had always been attracted to danger – at least to some degree.
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  • The scene was defined by a cluster of police cars and fire engines bathed in rotating lights.
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  • As she stared, the silver seemed to flare into a deep glow and swirl around her irises like cars around a racetrack.
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  • She went to the key locker and chose one of Damian's sports cars, her instincts urging her to go somewhere, though she didn't know where.
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  • Lydia turned off the engine and they sat there alone with no other cars in sight.
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  • The yard was filling up with vehicles as two police cars and finally an ambulance arrived.
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  • There were thugs in the streets, bars on the windows of sagging houses, and cars on blocks.
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  • He glared at the ocean and strode up the beach littered with wood, boats, and cars, to the highway.
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  • He continued at his quick pace into the town, glancing over the quaint downtown strip lined with small cars and pubs.
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  • Dusty groused, taking in the lopsided posters of cars and beer bottle décor.
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  • Dean smiled at neighbors as they brushed last night's snow from cars and walkways and went about their lives.
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  • Two cars were parked off the edge of the road and as they passed, Cynthia looked back with a start.
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  • By the time he looked back, they were around a curve and the cars were no longer visible.
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  • Usually there were few cars at the site but now, with the early festival climbers in town, the parking lot at the curve of the county road was filled.
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  • About 1889 separators and the whole-milk system were introduced, and about the same time began the service of refrigerator cars on the railways; the hand separator became common about 1901.
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  • Among its manufactures in 1905 were flour and grist mill products (value, $2,638,914), furniture ($1,655,246), lumber and timber products ($1,229,533), railway cars ($1,118,376), packed meats ($99 8, 4 2 8), woollen and cotton goods, cigars and cigarettes, malt liquors, carriages and wagons, leather and canned goods.
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  • Among the other important manufactures in 1905 were: malt liquors ($28,692,340) and malt ($8,740,103, being 113.7% more than in 1900); flour and grist-mill products ($28,352,237; about 60% was wheat flour); leather ($25,845,123); wholesale slaughtering and meat-packing ($16,060,423); agricultural implements ($10,076,760); carriages and wagons ($7,511,392); men's clothing ($6,525,276); boots and shoes ($6,513,563); steam railway cars, constructed and repaired ($6,511,731); hosiery and knit goods ($4,941,744); cigars ($4,37 2, 1 39); mattresses and spring beds ($3,5 2 7,5 8 7); and electrical machinery, apparatus and supplies ($3,194,132).
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  • There were so many people and cars.
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  • He faked me out at first 'cause I was only looking at passenger cars.
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  • He started the car again and drove through a series of tunnels and intersections, a virtual underground street grid, before arriving at a large garage filled with gleaming cars.
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  • As Dean peddled up to Bird Song, he saw no unfamiliar cars.
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  • He avidly collected exotic, fast cars.
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  • When he hit the master switch that bathed all the cars at once in light, he turned to watch her reaction.
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  • Well, you'll just have to give me my pick of your cars while this one is repaired.
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  • Elisabeth and Miriam drove separate cars to Fairhaven.
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  • Jackson noted the two cars and held Elisabeth back a bit, whispering, "Does this mean I won't have to spend another interminable night in an empty bed?"
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  • Lana replaced the micro, looking anew at the green cars and their silent occupants.
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  • The eerie hulls of burnt-out cars up the road had been creepy even to Brady.
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  • A scattering of cars dotted the parking lot but due to the late hour the avenue beyond was nearly devoid of traffic.
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  • It's after midnight and you can't drive two cars.
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  • Milage logs were kept not with the drivers but with the pool cars, and World Wide must have more than 100.
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  • The balance goes in a slush fund—to fix wind­shields of government cars that get smashed by trashcans—stuff like that.
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  • She was relieved when he started looking at pre-owned cars.
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  • Using his own parameters about mileage and age of the vehicle, he found several cars that fit her criteria.
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  • Several cars were already parked beside the walkway, though the party didn't officially start until seven thirty.
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  • At the gas station there were only two cars.
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  • I can cover up the girls who accidentally get hit by cars.
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  • He led her down into the basement of the gated apartment building, where the wealthy residents of the apartment kept their expensive cars.
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  • He appeared unconcerned, gaze on the cars she wove between.
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  • Expensive cars lined the long drive to the mansion overlooking the hills.
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  • Vancouver has well-paved streets and is well supplied with water, electric lighting, electric cars and all the improvements of a modern city.
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  • It is reported to have hauled 40 or 50 passengers in 4 or 5 cars at a speed of 16-21 m.
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  • The number of locomotives increased 12,407, or 35%, and the number of freight cars, 545,222, or 42%.
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  • It extended the meaning of the term " railroad " to include switches, spurs and terminal facilities, and the term " transportation " to include private cars, and all collateral services, such as refrigeration, elevation and storage.
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  • Apart from collisions and derailments, a large proportion of all accidents is found to be due primarily to want of care on the part of the victims. Accidents to workmen in marshalling, shunting, distributing and running trains, engines and cars, may be taken as the most important class, after train accidents, because this work is necessary and important and yet involves considerable hazard.
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  • The use of automatic couplers for freight cars throughout the United States, introduced in 1893-1900, greatly reduced the number of deaths and injuries in coupling, and the use of air brakes on freight cars, now universal, has reduced the risk to the men by making it less necessary for them to ride on the roofs of high box-cars, while at the same time it has made it possible to run long trains with fewer men; but except in these two features the freight service in America continues to be a dangerous occupation.
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  • The high and heavy cars, the high speeds, the severe weather in the northern states in winter, the fluctuating nature of the business, resulting often in the employment of poorly qualified men and in other irregularities, are among the causes of this state of things.
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  • In the Langen mono-rail the cars are hung from a single overhead rail; a line on this system works between Barmen and Elberfeld, about 9 m., the cars for a portion of the distance being suspended over the river Wupper.
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  • In the system devised by Mr Louis Brennaxi the cars run on a single rail laid on the ground, their stability being maintained by a heavy gyrostat revolving at great speed in a vacuum.
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  • In the United Kingdom it is now possible to travel by every train, with very few exceptions, and in many cases to have the use of restaurant cars, for id.
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  • But the extra charges levied for the use of parlour, sleeping and other special cars, of which some of the best trains are exclusively composed, in practice constitute a differentiation of class, besides making the real cost of travelling higher than the figures just given.
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  • In America and other countries where distances are great and passengers have to spend several days continuously in a train sleeping and restaurant cars are almost a necessity, and accordingly are to be found on most important through trains.
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  • Such cars in the United States are largely owned, not by the railway companies over whose lines they run, but by the Pullman Car Company, which receives the extra fees paid by passengers for their use.
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  • In the United Kingdom, where the distances are comparatively small, sleeping and dining cars must be regarded rather as luxuries; still even so, they are to be met with very frequently.
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  • The first English sleeping cars made their appearance in 1873, but they were very inferior to the vehicles now employed.
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  • To some extent cars divided into separate compartments are also in use in that country.
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  • In America the long open double-bogie passenger cars, as originally introduced by Ross Winans on the Baltimore & Ohio railway, are universally in use.
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  • The cars are entered by steps at each end, and are provided with lavatories and a supply of iced water.
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  • Cars of this saloon type have been introduced into England for use on railways which have adopted electric traction, but owing to the narrower loading gauge of British railways it is not usually possible to seat four persons across the width of the car for its whole length, and at the ends the seats have to be placed along the sides of the vehicle.
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  • Cars built almost entirely of steel, in which the proportion of wood is reduced to a minimum, are used on some electric railways, in order to diminish danger from fire, and the same mode of construction is also being adopted for the rolling stock of steam railways.
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  • To remedy these defects vestibules were introduced, to enclose the platform with a housing so arranged as to be continuous when the cars are made up into trains, and fitted with side doors for ingress and egress when the trains are standing.
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  • A second advantage of the vestibule developed in use, for it was found that the lateral swaying of the cars was diminished by the friction between the vestibule frames.
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  • In the United States the danger of the stoves that used to be employed for heating the interiors of the cars has been realized, and now the most common method is by steam taken from the locomotive boiler and circulated through the train in a line of piping, rendered continuous between the cars by flexible coupling-hose.
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  • In all countries passenger trains must vary in weight according to the different services they have to perform; suburban Weight trains, for example, meant to hold as many pas ah d sengers as possible, and travelling at low speeds, do not weigh so much as long-distance expresses, which include dining and sleeping cars, and on which, from considerations of comfort, more space must be allowed each occupant.
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  • The vehicles used for the transportation of goods are known as goods wagons or trucks in Great Britain, and as freight cars in America.
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  • The principal types to be found in the United Kingdom and on the continent of Europe are open wagons (the lading often protected from the weather by tarpaulin sheets), mineral wagons, covered or box wagons for cotton, grain, &c., sheep and cattle trucks, &c. The principal types of American freight cars are box cars, gondola cars, coal cars, stock cars, tank cars and refrigerator cars, with, as in other countries, various special cars for special purposes.
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  • The gondola or flat car corresponds to the European open wagons and is used to carry goods not liable to be injured by the weather; but in the United States the practice of covering the load with tarpaulins is unknown, and therefore the proportion of box cars is much greater than in Europe.
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  • The long hauls in the United States make it specially important that the cars should carry a load in both directions, and so bcx cars which have carried grain or merchandise one way are filled with wool, coal, coke, ore, timber and other coarse articles for the return journey.
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  • On this account it is common to put small end doors, in American box cars, through which timber and rails may be loaded.
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  • American cars, on the other hand, have long bodies mounted on two swivelling bogie-trucks of four wheels each, and are commonly constructed of steel.
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  • For years the standard freight cars have held 60,000 lb and now many carry 80,000 lb or 100,000 lb; a few coal cars have even been built to contain 200,000 lb.
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  • It is sometimes argued that if these things are true for one country they must be true for another, and that in Great Britain, for example, the use of more capacious cars would bring down.
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  • This arrangement is only partly automatic, since it often happens that when two cars are brought together to couple the knuckles are closed and must be opened by hand.
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  • There are various contrivances by which this may be done by a man standing clear of the cars, but often he must go in between their ends to reach the knuckle.
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  • This body pursued the subject with more or less diligence, and in 1884 laid down the principle that the automatic coupler should be one acting in a vertical plane - that is, the engaging faces should be free to move up and down within a considerable range, in order to provide for the differences in the height of cars.
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  • Many different couplers of the Janney type are patented and made by different firms, but the tendency is to equip new cars with one of only four or five standard makes.
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  • In the United States the Safety Appliance Act of 1893 also forbade the railways, after the 1st of January 1898, to run trains which did not contain a " sufficient number " of cars equipped with continuous brakes to enable the speed to be controlled from the engine.
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  • This law, however, did not serve in practice to secure so general a use of power brakes on freight trains as was thought desirable, and another act was passed in 1903 to give the Interstate Commerce Commission authority to prescribe what should be the minimum number of power-braked cars in each train.
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  • Other leading manufactures are malt liquors ($21,620,794 in 1905), railway rolling-stock consisting largely of cars ($21,428,227), men's clothing ($18,496,173), planing mill products ($17,725,711), carriages and wagons ($16,096,125), distilled liquors ($15,976,523), rubber and elastic goods ($15,963,603), furniture ($13,322,608), cigars and cigarettes ($13,241,230), agricultural implements ($12,891,197), women's clothing ($12,803582), lumber and timber products ($12,567,992), soap and candles.
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  • There is an elevated road whose trains, like the surface cars, are accommodated in the centre of the city by the subway.
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  • Bulk barges were soon introduced on the larger rivers, but the use of these was partially rendered unnecessary by the introduction of railways, when the oil was at first transported in barrels on freight cars, but later in tank-cars.
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  • The city is well built, has many fine churches and good public buildings, street cars and electric lights.
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  • There are large slaughtering establishments, and factories for the refining of sugar and for the manufacture of tobacco goods, soap and perfumery, lead pencils, iron and steel, railway cars, chemicals, rubber goods, silk goods, dressed lumber, and malt liquors.
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  • Coaches and cars traverse the main roads during the summer, but many of the finest dales and passes are accessible only on foot or by ponies.
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  • The sulphur is dissolved by superheated water forced down pipes, and the water with sulphur in solution is forced upward by hot air pressure through other pipes; the sulphur comes, 99% pure, to the surface of the ground, where it is cooled in immense bins, and then broken up and loaded directly upon cars for shipment.
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  • Other manufactures with a product value in 1905 of between $4,000,000 and $1,000,000 were: bags (not paper); foundry and machine-shop products; planing-mill products; railway cars, construction and repairs; malt liquors; men's clothing; cooperage; food preparations; roasted and ground coffee and spice; fertilizers; cigars and cigarettes; cotton goods; and manufactured ice.
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  • Mobs attacked the cars, and cars were blown up by dynamite.
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  • Other manufactures of importance are butter, cheese and condensed milk, packed meats and other slaughter-house products, steam railway cars, foundry and machine-shop products, linseed oil, malt liquors, planing-mill products, sash, doors and blinds, boots and shoes, and agricultural implements.
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  • The use of locomotives, motor cars and other vehicles on highways is regulated by acts of 1861-1903.
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  • In steep pitching beds sufficient excavated material is allowed to remain in the stope for the support of the machines and men, the excess being drawn out from time to time and loaded into cars.
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  • Steam shovels are not well adapted to deep excavation unless provision is made for the rapid handling of the cars when filled.
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  • The excavated material is brought to the hoisting shaft, or sometimes directly to the surface, in small mine cars, moved by men or by animals, or by locomotives or wire-rope haulage.
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  • The size, shape and design of the cars depend on the size of the mine passage and of the hoisting compartments of the shafts; on whether the cars are to be trammed by hand or hauled in trains; whether they are loaded by shovel or by gravity from a chute; and whether they are to be hoisted to the surface or used only for underground transport.
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  • The cost of underground haulage is lessened by the use of cars of large capacity.
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  • In the United States cars in the coal and iron mines hold from 2 to 4 tons.
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  • In Europe the capacity ranges from 1000 to Isoo lb, though the tendency is to increase the size of the cars used.
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  • In mines of copper, lead and the precious metals, in which the cars are moved by hand, the usual load is from 1200 to 3000 lb.
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  • These small cars are constructed so that the load may be dumped by pivoting the car bodies on the trucks.
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  • Larger cars are usually dumped by means of rotating or swinging cradles, the car bodies being rigidly attached to the axles or trucks.
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  • Grades are made, whenever possible, in favour of the load, and of such degree that the power required to haul out the loaded cars shall be approximately equal to that for hauling back the empties, viz.
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  • In metal mines, where, as a rule, mechanical haulage is inapplicable, the cars are moved by men (trammers).
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  • Animal haulage is employed chiefly in collieries and large metal mines; sometimes for main haulage lines, but oftener for distributing empty cars and making up trains for mechanical haulage.
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  • Mine cars are sometimes run long distances, singly or in trains, over roads which are given sufficient grade to impart considerable speed by gravity, say from I to 21%.
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  • The grades must not be too great for brake control nor for the hauling back of the empty cars.
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  • Cars may thus be run through long adits or through branch gangways to some central point for making up into trains.
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  • Near the top and bottom of hoisting shafts the tracks are usually graded to permit the cars to be run to and from the shaft by gravity.
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  • Locomotive haulage is applicable to large mines, where trains of cars are hauled long distances on flat or undulating roads of moderate gradients.
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  • Gravity or self-acting planes are for lowering loaded cars, one or more at a time, from a higher to a lower level.
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  • The minimum grade is that which will enable the loaded cars in travelling down the plane to pull up the empty cars.
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  • At the head of the plane is mounted a drum or sheave, and around it passes a rope, one end of which is attached to the loaded cars at the top, the other to the empty cars at the foot.
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  • There may be two complete lines of track or three lines of rails, one being common to both tracks, and the cars passing on a middle turnout or " parting "; or a single track with a parting.
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  • An engine plane is an inclined road, up which loaded cars are hauled by a stationary engine and rope, the empty cars running down by gravity, dragging the rope after them.
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  • By winding in the main rope the loaded cars are hauled towards the engine, dragging behind them the tail-rope, which unwinds from its drum.
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  • The line is double track and the rope constantly in motion, the cars being attached at intervals through its length by clips or clutches; the loaded cars move in one direction, the empties in the other.
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  • There are two modes of installing the system: either the rope passes above the cars and is carried by them, resting in the clips, or it is carried under the cars on rollers, the cars being attached by clips or a gripcarriage.
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  • In the endless-rope systems cars run singly or in short trains, curves are disadvantageous, unless of long radius, speed is relatively slow, and branch roads not so easily operated as with tail-rope.
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  • An advantage of the endless system is that the cars may be delivered at regular intervals.
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  • If, for a twocompartment shaft, a pair of drums (or a single wide drum) be keyed to the engine shaft, with the ropes wound in opposite directions, the hoisting is " in balance," that is, the cages and cars counterbalance each other, so that the engine has to raise only the useful load of mineral, plus the rope.
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  • A frame of wood or steel, erected at the shaft mouth, and rarely employed except for deep shafts of small cross-section or when the mine cars (tubs) are small, as in many parts of Europe.
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  • They may have one, two or more decks, usually carrying one or two cars on each deck.
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  • Such cars are in use at a number of deep inclined shafts in the Lake Superior copper district, where the depths range from 3000 to 5000 ft.
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  • For short periods the mineral may remain in the mine cars, or may be loaded into railway wagons held at the mine for this purpose.
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  • Cars, however, are too valuable to be used in this way for more than a few hours, and it is usual to erect large storage bins at the mine, at concentration works and metallurgical establishments, in which the mineral may be stored, permitting cars, wagons and vessels to be quickly emptied or loaded.
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  • Her woven and embroidered stuffs have always been beautiful; but in former times few pieces of size and splendour were produced, if we except the curtains used for draping festival cars and the hangings of temples.
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  • In addition to cash registers, the city's manufactured products include agricultural implements, clay-working machinery, cotton-seed and linseed oil machinery, filters, turbines, railway cars (the large Barney-Smith car works employed 1800 men in 1905), carriages and wagons, sewingmachines (the Davis Sewing Machine Co.), automobiles, clothing, flour, malt liquors, paper, furniture, tobacco and soap. The total value of the manufactured product, under the "factory system," was $31,015,293 in 1900 and $39,596,773 in 1905.
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  • Up to 1906 the trams were horse-drawn; in that year electric cars began running.
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  • This fact having been fully demonstrated, acetylene dissolved in this way was exempted from the Explosives Act, and consequently upon this exemption a large business has grown up in the preparation and use of dissolved acetylene for lighting motor omnibuses, motor cars, railway carriages, lighthouses, buoys, yachts, &c., for which it is particularly adapted.
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  • The values of other products in 1905 were as follows: slaughtering and meat packing (wholesale), $15,620,931; lumber and timber products (which employed the largest average number of wage-earners-13,332, or 27.2 per cent.), $16,278,240; cars and general shop construction and repairs by steam railway companies, $10,472,742; printing and publishing, $7,782,247; foundry and machine shop products, 1905, $4,952,827; malt liquors, $4,153,938; saddlery and harness, 1905, $3,251,525.
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  • The commonwealth joined the city of Boston in the construction of a subway beneath the most congested portion of the city for the passage of electric cars.
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  • Among Davenport's manufactures are the products of foundries and machine shops, and of flouring, grist and planing mills; glucose syrup and products; locomotives, steel cars and car parts, washing machines, waggons, carriages, agricultural implements, buttons, macaroni, crackers and brooms. The value of the total factory product for 1905 was $13,695,978, an increase of 38.7% over that of 1900.
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  • In 1906 sugar refineries were projected at Hamilton, Kalispell, Chinook, Laurel, Missoula, Dillon and Great Falls; and in 1907 the crop was so large that 12,000 freight cars were needed to carry it and the railways had a car and coal " famine."
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  • The products of greatest value in 5905 were: custom-made men's clothing; fruits and vegetables and oysters, canned and preserved; iron and steel; foundry and machine-shop products, including stoves and furnaces; flour and grist mill products; tinware, coppersmithing and sheet iron working; fertilizers; slaughtering and meat-packing; cars and repairs by steam railways; shirts; cotton goods; malt liquors; and cigars and cigarettes.
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  • Its manufactures include slaughtering and meat-packing products, cars and car repairing, linseed oil, bricks and tiles (made from excellent clay found in and near the city).
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  • Other important manufactures, with their product values in 1900 and in 1905, are iron and steel ($5,004,572 in 1900; $6,167,542 in 1905); railway cars ($4,248,029 in 1900; $5,739,071 in 1905); packed meats ($5, 1 77, 16 7 in 1900; $5, 6 93,73 1 in 1905); foundry and machine shop products ($4,434,610 in 1900; $4, 6 99,559 in 1905); planing mill products, including sash, doors and blinds ($1,891,517 in 1900; $4,593, 2 5 1 in 1905-an increase already remarked); carriages and wagons ($2,849,713 in 1900; $4,059,438 in 1905); tanned and curried leather ($3,757,016 in 1900; $3,952,277 in 1905); and malt liquors ($3,186,627 in 1900; $3,673,678 in 1905).
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  • Other important manufactures were furniture, ships and boats, railway cars (the Chicago, Milwaukee & Puget Sound and the Northern Pacific systems having shops here), engines, machinery, shoes, water pipes, preserves and beer.
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  • From them it is carried in refrigerator railway cars and in cold storage chambers on steamships to its ultimate destination.
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  • It also arranged with the various railway companies to run refrigerator cars weekly on the main lines leading to Montreal and other export points.
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  • The food-products from any shippers are received into these cars at the various railway stations at the usual rates, without extra charge for icing or cold-storage service.
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  • The principal manufactures are malt liquors, flour and gristmill products and steam railway cars.
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  • The value of the principal products in 1900 was as follows: slaughtering and meat packing, $9,631,187 (in 1905 slaughtering and meat-packing $ 12, 2 16,433, and slaughtering, not including meat-packing, $3,9 1 9,94 0); foundry and machine shop products, $6,816,057 (1905, $11,402,855); linseed oil, $6,271,170; cars and shop construction, $4,513,333(1905, $3,609,471); malt liquors, $4,269,973 (1905, $5,187,216); soap and candles, $3,818,571 (in 1905, soap $4,79 2, 9 1 5); flour and grist mill products, $3,263,697 (1905, $9,807,906); lumber and planing mill products, $3,095,760 (1905, $4,186,668); clothing, $3, 2 4 6, 7 2 3 (1905, $4,231,126); iron and steel products, $2,624,547.
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  • In 1905 the twelve leading manufactures, with the value of each, were: steel and malleable iron, $363,773,577; foundry and machineshop products, consisting most largely of steam locomotives, metalworking machinery and pumping machinery, $119,650,913; pigiron, $107,455,267; leather, $69,427,852; railway cars and repairs by steam railway companies, $61,021,374; refined petroleum, $47,459,5 02; silk and silk goods, $39,333,520; tobacco, cigars and cigarettes, $39,079,122; flour and grist-mill products, $38,518,702; refined sugar and molasses, $37,182,504; worsted goods, $35,683,015; and malt liquors, $34,863,823.
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  • The silk and cement industries are confined largely to the eastern cities and boroughs; the coke, tin and terne-plate, and pickling industries to the western; and the construction and repair of railway cars to Altoona, Meadville, Dunmore, and repair of railway cars to Altoona, Meadville, Dunmore, Chambersburg, Butler and Philadelphia.
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  • The latter was built with ten inclined planes, five on each side of the summit at Blair's Gap and cars were drawn up these by stationary engines.
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  • The railway riots of 1877, which centred at Pittsburg and Reading, resulted in the destruction of about two thousand freight cars and a considerable amount of other property.
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  • Aurora is an important manufacturing centre; among its manufactures are railway cars - the shops of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy railway being 927 here - flour and cotton, carriages, hardware specialties, corsets, suspenders, stoves and silver-plate.
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  • From A and B the materials are drawn as they are needed into large buckets D standing on cars, which carry them to the foot of the hoist track EE, up which they are hoisted to the top of the furnace.
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  • Wood, of Sparrows Point, Md., in which the moulds, while receiving the steel, stand on a train of cars, which are immediately run to the side of the soaking furnace.
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  • Here, as soon as the ingots have so far solidified that they can be lifted without breaking, their moulds are removed and set on an adjoining train of cars, and the ingots are charged directly into the soaking furnace.
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  • The difficulty in the way of this system was that, in pouring the steel from ladle to mould, more or less of it:occasionally spatters, and these spatterings, if they strike the rails or the running gear of the cars, obstruct and foul them, preventing the movement of the train, because the solidified steel is extremely tenacious.
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  • On account of this difficulty the moulds formerly stood, not on cars, but directly on the floor of a casting pit while receiving the molten steel.
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  • Mr Wood met this difficulty by the simple device of so shaping the cars that they completely protect both their own running gear and the track from all possible spattering, a device which, simple as it is, has materially lessened the cost of the steel and greatly increased the production.
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  • A locomotive carries a train of these cars to the track running beside a long line of open-hearth furnaces.
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  • Kingston's principal manufactures are tobacco, cigars and cigarettes, street railway cars and boats; other manufactures are Rosendale cement, bricks, shirts, lace curtains, brushes, motor wheels, sash and blinds.
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  • It was the centre of a system, established by Charles Bianconi (1786187S) in 1815 and subsequently, for the conveyance of travellers on light cars, extending over a great part of Leinster, Munster and Connaught.
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  • This system is also in use on the line which runs south fromRoskilde to the island of Falster, from the southernmost point of which, Gjedser, ferrysteamers taking railway cars serve Warnemunde in Germany.
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  • The city has street cars, electric-lights and telephone service, and the port has a shipping pier 1640 ft.
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  • In the same year there were 7279 persons employed in the making of cycles, motor cars, railway coaches and waggons and carriages and other vehicles.
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  • In the building of railway cars by manufacturing corporations, Illinois also led the states in 1900 and in 1905, the product being valued at $24,845,606 in 1900 and at $30,926,464 (an increase of nearly one-fourth) in 1905; and in construction by railway companies was second in 1900, with a product valued at $16,580,424, which had increased 53.7% in 1905, when the product was valued at $25,491,209.
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  • In April 1906 the first pipe lines for petroleum in Illinois were laid; before that time all shipments had been in tank cars.
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  • The tidal harbour is enclosed by stone breakwaters, and large vessels enter and load frozen meat direct from the refrigerator cars.
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  • In 1905 Laconia ranked first among the cities of the state in the manufacture of hosiery and knit goods, and the value of these products for the year was 48.4% of the total value of the city's factory product; among its other manufactures are yarn, knitting machines, needles, sashes and blinds, axles, paper boxes, boats, gas and gasolene engines, and freight, passenger and electric cars.
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  • Other manufactures are railway cars, casks, cooperage, saw and planing mill products, furniture, wooden ware, windmills, gas-engines, and mattresses and wire beds.
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  • In 1872 "by walking, begging rides both in wagons, and in the cars" he travelled 500 m.
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  • It has street cars, electric light and telephones.
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  • Among the city's manufactures are lumber, furniture, baskets, pearl buttons, cars, carriages and wagons, Corliss engines,waterworks pumps,metallic burial cases, desks, boxes, crackers, flour, pickles and beer.
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  • The leading industries in 1905 were the construction of cars and general railway shop and repair work by steam railway companies (value of product, $2,509,845), the manufacture of lumber and timber products (value $1,315,364) and of flour and grist mill products (value $388,124), and the printing and publishing of newspapers and periodicals (value $279,858).
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  • Traffic by street cars was made impossible by the twisting of the tracks.
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  • The other manufactures were of much less importance, the principal ones being cars and general shop construction, including repairs by steam railway companies ($1,329,308), lumber and timber products ($960,778), and flour and grist mill products ($743,124).
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  • Other manufactures valued in 1905 at more than $5,000,000 were: boots and shoes, cars and general railway shop work, illuminating and heating gas, lumber and planing mill products, phonographs, fertilizers, flour and grist mill products, iron and steel ships, refined lard and paper and wood pulp.
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  • The city is on one of the main lines of communication between the east and the west, is the centre of a vast railway system, and has freight yards with a total capacity for more than 60,000 cars.
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  • The most prominent items in this were slaughtering and meat-packing products (value $60,031,133 in 1905); tobacco (in 1905, $30,884,182), flour and grist-mill products (in 1905, $38,026,142), 1 malt liquors (in 1905, $24,154,264), boots and shoes (in 1905, $ 2 3,493,55 2), lumber and timber products (in 1905, $10,903,783), men's factory-made clothing (in 1905, $8,872,831), and cars and general shop construction and repairs by steam railways (1905, $8,720,433).
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  • But it is to be noted that St Louis is one of the leading producers of street-railway cars.
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  • Among the manufactures of Bloomsburg are railway cars, carriages, silk and woollen goods, furniture, carpets, wire-drawing machines and gun carriages.
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  • The first trolley sleeping cars were those used on the Ohio and Indiana interurban railways.
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  • A cargo of 200,000 bushels can thus be unloaded in two hours, while spouts on the other side of the elevator reload it into cars, five to ten at a time, filling a car in from five to ten minutes, or the largest canal boat in an hour.
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  • The official inspectors examine, grade and sample the wheat in the cars in which it is received at the great markets or elevators.
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  • The cars are sealed at the point of original shipment.
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  • After the inspector has finished his work the cars are resealed with the state seal, and await orders of the purchaser.
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  • At that rate the cargo of 250,000 bushels will fill 360 American cars, or 9 trains of 40 cars each.
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  • Other important manufactures in 1905 were: packed meats, particularly pork; men's clothing, especially "Kentucky jeans"; flour and grist mill products; cotton-seed oil and cake; leather, especially sole leather; foundry and machine shop products; steam-railway cars; cooperage; malt liquors; carriages and wagons, especially farm wagons; and carriage and wagon materials; agricultural implements, especially ploughs; and plumbers' supplies, including cast-iron gas and water pipes.
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  • Among the manufactures of Alton are iron and glass ware, miners' tools, shovels, coal-mine cars, flour, and agricultural implements; and there are a large oil refinery and a large lead smelter.
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  • Other important products were foundry and machine-shop products ($ 1, 749, 0 54); paper goods ($1,481,427, not including envelopes, which had an additional value of almost $700,000); cars, automobiles, firearms (besides the Federal arsenal there is the Smith & Wesson revolver factory); and printing and publishing ($1,165,544).
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  • More than half of the manufacturing establishments were engaged in the manufacture of cotton goods, of lumber and timber, of fertilizers, of cotton-seed oil and cake, of lumber and planing-mill products, of cars and general shop construction, and of hosiery and knit goods.
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  • The value of the products of other industries in 1900 and 1905 were as follows: Lumber and timber, $4,942,362 in 1900 and $6,791,451 in 1905; cotton-seed oil and cake, $3,103425 in 1900 and $5,462,818 in 1905; fertilizers, $4,882,506 in 1900 and $3,637,576 in 1905; lumber and planing-mill products, including sash, doors and blinds, $1,016,328 in 1900 and $1,478,581 in 1905; hosiery and knit goods, $392,237 in 1900 and $1,078,682 in 1905; cars and general shop construction and repairs by steam railway companies, $691,361 in 1900 and $1,080,990 in 1905.
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  • Of manufactures not dependent upon agriculture perhaps the most promising is that of brick and tile products (valued at $839,815 in 1900 and at $1,131,913 in 1905), and the largest in 1905 was the manufacture and repair of steam railway cars (valued at $2,624,461 in 1900 and at $4,394,685 in 1905).
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  • The leading manufactures of the city are flour and grist mill products (valued at $4,242,491 in 1905), lumber and timber products - Nashville is one of the greatest hard wood markets in the United States, and in 1905 the value of lumber and timber products was $1,119,162 and of planing-mill products, $1,299,066 - construction and repair of steam railway cars ($1,724,007 in 1905), tobacco ($1,311,019111 1905), fertilizers ($846,511 in 1905), men's clothing ($720,227 in 1905), saddlery, harness, soap and candles.
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  • Detroit is probably the largest manufacturer in the country of freight cars, stoves, pharmaceutical preparations, varnish, soda ash and similar alkaline products.
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  • In the automobile industry the state in 1905 ranked second (to Michigan) in capital invested; and was sixth in value of product, but first in the average value per car, which was $2354 ($2917 for gasoline; $2343 for electric; $673 for steam cars).
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  • Jonathan was playing cars with Destiny in the family room floor while Carmen straightened up the clutter left by so many people.
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  • Well sir, I don't judge people by the clothes on their backs and the cars they drive.
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  • Of course, she didn't leap cars with motorcycles or sky dive, but in retrospect, she had always been attracted to danger - at least to some degree.
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  • Dusty groused, taking in the lopsided posters of cars and beer bottle décor.
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  • The only décor consisted of international beer bottle displays and pictures of scantily clad women or cars.
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  • Armored cars, bodyguards … like we're famous or something.
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  • He avidly collected exotic, fast, cars.
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  • The balance goes in a slush fund—to fix wind­shields of government cars that get smashed by trashcans—stuff like that.
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  • What's the fascination with cars?
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  • The two other people in the aisle walking to their cars from the mall stopped to stare.
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  • Over the following years these emission limits will be lowered to further encourage the driving of cars which pollute the atmosphere less.
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  • The cars were not selling well, not a particularly auspicious start for a special edition.
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  • I don't want to condescend; but, what I mean is that it makes great little cars.
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  • He showed exemplary track manners, almost coming to a halt on occasion to let faster cars past.
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  • For Stubbs, brought up in the English town of Bedford, the overriding passion of his own adolescence was cars.
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  • Twenty years and 1.45 million cars later it was still technically advanced to most other cars.
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  • A license to build... Several BMC Rover cars have enjoyed an afterlife in far-flung territories.
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  • Four further Haganah armored cars were sent to the rescue, but were also ambushed and forced to retreat.
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  • Koppers makes carbon pitch, coal tar distillates, and phthalic anhydride and ships products to customers in rail cars.
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  • He says aging baby boomers will insist on cars and trucks that take their diminished hearing, vision and physical abilities into consideration.
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  • He got talking about cars to the mechanic who was hard at work on a real old banger - it had rust everywhere.
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  • Whilst transporting the heavy bouncy castle on the sack barrow across the car park going between various parked cars.
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  • All the cars ' ceiling panels have been fitted, and a start has been made on fitting the aluminum beading over the joins.
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  • And there will be industry as well, where we have some real world beaters from racing cars to pharmaceuticals.
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  • Pay some tax cars may decide two-ton behemoths and to undertake appropriate.
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  • I have not had problems using pressure bleeder in the past (on diverse cars ).
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  • This year the IRL is running a 90 percent methanol, 10 percent ethanol fuel blend in its cars.
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  • Beijing's wide new boulevards were clogged with cars, its skyline filled with gleaming office towers.. .
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  • Link bud vases 4 Cars Your vintage car is not complete without a pair of these beautiful hand blown glass bud vases.
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  • Move several bystanders on and also to redirect cars leaving the car park to give a wide berth of the landing site.
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  • It seems that the Police policy on pursuing stolen cars is more guidelines than Law.
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  • The Burnley and Pendle MGOC was formed in the late 1980's for local owners of these classic English sports cars.
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  • Cars with LPG engines give out 75% less carbon monoxide than normal gasoline engines and its 50% cheaper than gasoline.
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  • It took a Japanese carmaker to make the world realize it still wanted simple two-seater sports cars in the British idiom.
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  • Some booster car seats are built into vans and some cars.
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  • Sorry, there are no rental cars in San Pedro - only rental golf carts which are ideal on the sandy streets.
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  • In Germany there are specialists fitting catalytic converters to cars which didn't have them originally.
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  • Police Motorcycles guided the funeral cars through the mid-day traffic as a hovering helicopter kept a watchful eye on the proceeding cavalcade.
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  • Our wedding cars are driven by experienced chauffeurs in matching dark blue uniform with peaked caps.
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  • Local Members were on hand with their cars arranged in a semi circle for the photo call on the lawn.
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  • The time listed for cars to leave the clubhouse is, however, more based on experience rather than theory.
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  • The park tops an underground carpark for 10,000 cars, the revenues from which will return to the public coffers.
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  • The famous and very collectible sad face pedal cars of the late 1940s like the estate wagon and sedan inspired.. .
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  • Integrated in the front bumper structure, this device prevents passenger cars from being wedged under the truck in a frontal collision.
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  • This is observational comedy, Do you ever notice that most roads are gray, and that normally cars drive on them.
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  • Styling is handsome and overall it bears favorable comparison with more expensive executive cars.
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  • Thus liberation and escape are core values of the culture, including liberation form confinement, cars, offices, schedules, relationships.
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  • Nearly all cars are very considerate - I cant wait to get back!
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  • More than 5 million shipping containers, 2 million rail cars and some 11 million trucks go into the US every year.
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  • Cars were a highly controversial issue, he said.
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  • In the days when there were no cars, they used to have chicken coops on the grass verges!
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  • Six police motorcyclists will escort the cortege to Stormont with two police cars following at the rear.
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  • With all these options to purchase Coupe Cabriolets or any open top cars, please remember your sun cream!
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  • Which saw cubic rising he adds big safe cars which was a. Buy it the dollar you mail.
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  • The smallest elements, such as plastic hair curlers, toy cars, and a crushed tin can are nearest the center.
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  • Manufacturers should be encouraged to fit deadlocks more widely on the new car model range, particularly on cars produced in volume.
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  • During the Edwardian period, cars became more dependable.
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  • The contribution of walking to the Urban Renaissance, healthy living and reduced dependency on cars.
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  • I've personally never heard of anyone ever having a problem more serious than an oil leak from the rear differential on our cars.
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  • Find Cars in Our directory Compare the leading offers in our UK focused directory.
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  • Connection to the chargers is via a mast on the AGV, similar in principle to those found on fairground dodgem cars.
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  • Only nine cars are currently on the list for this weekend's double-header, and that really, really isn't enough.
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  • There were falls of 3.2 per cent in the output of cars and 1.8 per cent in the output of other durables.
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  • Cons: Tarmac surfaces where cars were left & collected, but not so good where cars were stored, hence returned rather dusty.
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  • Suitable for cars running 6 volt electrics, where starter motor cranking speeds require an engine to turn over with minimal drag.
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  • I am a good cook, I enjoy entertaining I am a bit of a car freak, older cars I mean.
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  • Our biggest asset at Gardiner & Theobald is not our office, our company cars or our computer equipment.
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  • All members would also be encouraged to carry a fire extinguisher in their units or cars.
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  • Automatic fire extinguishers Fires in cars are very rare.
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  • To sum up, all cars will have some amount of industrial fallout or ferrous metal contamination.
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  • Thanks again for giving us car fanatics a voice to say what we think and feel about the cars of all ages!
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  • The RAV4 is constantly fidgeting in a tiresome vertical bounce where most cars, even sporty ones, manage to flatten the contour lines.
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  • During the 1930's Sir Ronald could be found racing cars and drove for Lagonda in the 1935 Le Mons, finishing fifteenth.
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  • Limiting the top speed of cars gave a fillip to railroad travel.
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  • The irradiated fuel was carried in steel flasks on the vehicle deck of the ferry alongside passenger cars.
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  • Do not fly over people (including other fliers ), animals, buildings or cars.
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  • A lot of cars have their fog lights on when its not foggy, is it legal?
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  • The railroad had just been built, and the animals seemed terribly frightened at the cars.
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  • There are no fancy frills like offices, company cars or expense accounts for you to subsidize.
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  • If just 20 percent of cars used fuel cells, we could cut oil imports by 1.5 million barrels every day.
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  • I knew I wanted something funky, light, upbeat, modern and spacious, and we had to have parking for several cars.
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  • The cars and trucks behind us started beeping frantically and one driver looked at us with pure fury in his eyes.
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  • Other crews were having problems with water being forced into their cars through the gear change gaiters.
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  • Exterior - enclosed garden, parking for 3 cars.
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  • Gary son got family cars generally.
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  • Also, the diesel's six-speed gearbox has a sweeter gearshift than the gasoline cars ' five-speed transmission.
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  • It is great to have two cars qualifying so high at the first European grand prix, especially with Jenson's pole position.
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  • Society is too disposable yes new cars may be greener but consider greening what you have and cutting waste.
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  • Early cars used a large rubber grommet, later cars had a foam seal held in place by plate.
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  • These include mullet haircuts, crummy old cars, Y-fronts and old-fashioned mobile phones.
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  • The usage of reconfigurable hardware can be a solution for both problems in cars.
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  • The Gen-2 is neat and attractive, avoiding that heaviness of appearance that afflicts so many modern cars.
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  • RetroTouring offers self-drive hire of classic sports cars and luxury vehicles from their base in Fort William.
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  • Cars for Stars is a UK based franchise offering chauffeur driven cars and American limousine hire.
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  • Among cars tested better handling Hitchcock like most families is available through.
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  • Could be sold of inexpensive cars american life insurance HMO quot these.
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  • When you first arrive it is easy to see only traffic and hear only the hooters of vespers and cars.
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  • Rally cars buzz like angry hornets round the track.
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  • Where roads had been closed off cars were trapped for several hours.
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  • Given that he is a Liverpool fan, have you noticed him stealing hubcaps from cars or dipping in bins?
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  • Traffic wardens, road humps, speed cameras - any curb on cars makes us angry.
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  • He introduced Daimler cars to Britain and with Bosch he invented magneto ignition.
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  • Accidents There is now incontrovertible evidence that men in fast cars, particularly young men, cause a disproportionate number of road traffic accidents.
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  • Success takes shape Smooth finish with gas injection molding Even in economy-class cars, drivers are looking for elegance and substance.
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  • For example, the search: cars car automobile jaguar and jaguar cars car automobile look as tho they are the same search.
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  • I noticed she was also quite jumpy when she saw passing cars.
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  • Only in America do they leave cars worth thousands of dollars in the driveway and put useless junk in the garage.
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  • Race Cars: very fast go kart Racing Cars for Sale.. .
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  • Apart from being easier to wrap round a lamppost, fast cars are more likely to be stolen.
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  • Another factor common between owners of older and newer MGs is the time, effort and money lavished on the cars.
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  • Men with chamois leathers took the opportunity to clean parts of the cars, much to the delight of the crowd.
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  • However, America's car-orientated and car-dependent lifestyle goes beyond the culture of fast cars and freeways.
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  • Cars for Stars Ipswich - 0845 226 4207 Luxury American stretched limousines for hire and chauffeur driven cars within the IP postcode areas.
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  • Features a new black 2004 Ford Lincoln stretched limousine provided by Cars for Stars Limited.
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  • Spitfires and Hurricanes perform low-level flying displays, and the Bonhams Sale of fine cars and automobilia is held in the evening.
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  • Because of the expense of lowrider cars, kids could not afford to be a part of the lowrider cars, kids could not afford to be a part of the lowrider car movement.
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  • They have intersting cars for sale, including trials machinery and supply an extensive range of specialist lubricants.
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  • Other road defects that can cause damage to cars include sunken manholes and metal edges.
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  • I know people who will not go near a plane but drive their cars like suicidal maniacs.
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  • They do a lot of work on bmw, Aston martin, ferrari etc. but modern cars.
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  • Cameron's matchbox car Page - A web site for kids who like to collect matchbox cars.
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  • In the early 1990s, it was easy for one to get rather maudlin about the new cars that were being introduced.
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  • I knew these cars had grip but holy moly!
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  • In his wake, an absolutely monumental battle raged for second place, with up to seven cars involved at various stages.
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  • Cars don't require an mot, but they must be in a safe condition.
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  • Cars without a current mot are worth £ 400 Max.
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  • All of the cars in our Showrooms are fully serviced, PDI checked, with 12 month mot and three month manufacturer's warranty.
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  • We also have videos on classic cars, classic motorcycles, vintage busses and vintage motorbikes.
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  • Ah, non m'sieur, we don't repair cars.
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  • Sponsored by: http://uk.shopping.com 6. The Ugliest Cars in Britain Ford made a lot of cool mustangs until the mid 70s.
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  • Mostly those who ran their own cars would have older ones with a slightly naff image.
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  • Tire noise is especially noticeable from cars at speeds above 30mph.
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  • Cars spaces could then be arranged in chevron to get the maximum in and to look less obtrusive.
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  • So, my idea: Most cars these days have digital odometers.
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  • Huntley arrived in a marked police van escorted by five squad cars and two police motorcycle outriders shortly before the 10am hearing.
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  • They had about 20 cars, a few riot vans, sniffer dogs and a Police helicopter hovering overhead.
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  • Germany has high car ownership at 504 cars per 1000 inhabitants.
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  • With the rain easing, the 22 cars set off at a leisurely pace behind the safety car for three laps.
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  • Every summer a dozen or so babies die after being left in hot cars while their parents play pachinko.
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  • You can shop for everything from out-of-print books to vacation packages to luxury cars to collectibles.
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  • Thieves like to steal from cars parked in places where they run less risk of being seen.
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  • Once on the balcony we stood as the water swept past carrying cars and debris and rising all the time.
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  • Based near Radlett in Hertfordshire, Fleet Support looks after the 1200 mopeds and 65 Smart cars that deliver takeaway pizzas to our customers.
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  • He told me that he'd 'finished with cars ' and that he'd opened a pizzeria with his wife.
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  • Activities include painting, drawing, puppets, toy box, soft playrooms, cars, tricycles.
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  • Vintage cars are always 100% immaculate and freshly polished.
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  • Well, yes... reduce the number of cars, and try and use cars which do n't pollute.
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  • These days, most cars with serious sporting pretensions have some sort of fancy complicated gearbox.
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  • This was added to by the benefits of mass production, which reduced the costs of buying cars.
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  • Please note: SABER is neither a community about cars or driving, nor an anti-road protest site.
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