Carrion sentence example

carrion
  • Peccaries are omnivorous, living on roots, fallen fruits, worms and carrion, and often inflict great devastation upon crops.
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  • It is human, it is divine, carrion.
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  • It feeds chiefly on fruit and roots, but kills sheep, goats, deer, ponies and cattle, and sometimes devours carrion.
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  • Nauseous flowers, dull and yellowish and dark purple in colour and often spotted, with a smell attractive to carrion flies and dung flies, e.g.
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  • But, on the other hand, they largely help to clear the sea and other waters of refuse and carrion, and for fishes, seals and whales they are food desirable and often astoundingly copious.
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  • They grow very rapidly and will be full size within a about a week, and then they will normally leave the carrion.
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  • It has a habit of egg stealing - tho any animal food - including carrion - is taken.
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  • In the wild, tortoises are opportunistic feeders and they will on occasion tackle carrion and dung.
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  • Birds of prey are numerous and include eagles, vultures, kites, ravens and the carrion stork.
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  • Stephen Bathory, voivode of Transylvania and count of the Szeklers, for instance, ruled Transylvania like a Turkish pasha, and threatened to behead all who dared to complain of his exactions; " Stinking carrion," he said, was better than living Szeklers.
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  • The carrion hawks are represented by the Polyborus tharus, popularly called the " caracara," and the Phalcobaenus carunculatus; the falcons by the Aesalon columbarius; and the kites by the Gampsonyx swainsoni.
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  • Among plants remarkable in their appearance and structure may be noted the cactus-like Euphorbiae or spurge plants, the Stapelia or carrion flower, and the elephant's foot or Hottentots' bread, a plant of the same order as the yam.
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  • They showed themselves in battles hovering over the heads of the combatants in the form of a carrion crow.
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  • " They looked like anatomies of death; they did eat the dead carrion and one another soon after, insomuch as the very carcasses they spared not to scrape out of their graves; ...
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  • Eagles will usually hunt and kill live animals, but will often eat carrion such as dead hares and sheep.
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  • It may well be that T.rex was an opportunist flesh eater, combining scavenging carrion with active predation.
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  • They die if they fail to eat the next turn and become carrion.
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  • Soon a carrion crow which has been doing its rounds over the upland fields spots the spill.
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  • They are not repelled by any of the moral carrion in the world.
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  • A tide of traffic sweeps along the ring road, pigeons fly about over town, along with the odd carrion crow.
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  • These creatures feed chiefly on carrion, and thus perform useful service by devouring remains which might otherwise pollute the air.
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  • The blue-gray bandy legged dog ran merrily along the side of the road, sometimes in proof of its agility and self-satisfaction lifting one hind leg and hopping along on three, and then again going on all four and rushing to bark at the crows that sat on the carrion.
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  • Stray specimens of the great king penguin have been observed, and there are also mollymauks (a kind of albatross), Cape pigeons and many carrion birds.
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  • The carrion crow, or black vulture (Catharista atrata), is also common to every part of the country, and is the general scavenger.
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  • Armadillos are omnivorous, feeding on roots, insects, worms, reptiles and carrion, and are mostly, though not universally, Peba Armadillo (Tatusia novemcincta).
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  • There is much discrepancy as to the ordinary food of the lammergeyer, some observers maintaining that it lives almost entirely on carrion, offal and even ordure; but there is no question of its frequently taking living prey, and it is reasonable to suppose that this bird, like so many others, is not everywhere uniform in its habits.
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  • By preference the condor feeds on carrion, but it does not hesitate to attack sheep, goats and deer, and for this reason it is hunted down by the shepherds, who, it is said, train their dogs to look up and bark at the condors as they fly overhead.
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  • For this purpose a horse or mule is killed, and the carcase surrounded with palisades to which the condors are soon attracted by the prospect of food, for the weight of evidence seems to favour the opinion that those vultures owe their knowledge of the presence of carrion more to sight than to scent.
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  • This consists for the most part of the smaller mammals and poultry; although the association in packs enables these marauders to hunt down antelopes and sheep. When unable to obtain living prey, they feed on carrion and refuse of all kinds, and are thus useful in removing putrescent matter from the streets.
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