Carlyle sentence example

carlyle
  • The best account of the life, adventures and character of Giuseppe Balsamo is contained in Carlyle's Miscellanies.
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  • These crude ideas of Cromwell's character were extinguished by Macaulay's irresistible logic, by the publication of Cromwell's letters by Carlyle in 1845, which showed Cromwell clearly to be "not a man of falsehoods, but a man of truth"; and by Gardiner, whom, however, it is somewhat difficult to follow when he represents Cromwell as "a typical Englishman."
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  • Carlyle, ed.
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  • Carlyle's Hist.
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  • Carlyle, if bitterer still), Lactantius Firmianus, &c., &c.'
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  • Examples of this are men like Novalis, Carlyle and Emerson, in whom philosophy may be said to be impatient of its own task.
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  • Thomas Carlyle thus describes him as he appeared in London in 1839.
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  • In addition to the various works of Brewster already noticed, the following may be mentioned: - Notes and Introduction to Carlyle's translation of Legendre's Elements of Geometry (1824); Treatise on Optics (1831); Letters on Natural Magic, addressed to Sir Walter Scott (1831); The Martyrs of Science, or the Lives of Galileo, Tycho Brake, and Kepler (1841); More Worlds than One (1854).
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  • Their own Reform Bill came soon after and it is again characteristic of Mill - at once of his enthusiasm and of his steady determination to do work that nobody else seemed able or willing to do - that we find him in the heat of the struggle in 1831 writing: to the Examiner a series of letters on "The Spirit of the Age" which drew from Carlyle the singular exclamation "Here is a new mystic!"
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  • It is generally supposed that he writes with a lover's extravagance about this lady's powers when he compares her with Shelley and Carlyle.
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  • By far the most illuminating collection is that of Hugh Elliott, Letters of John Stuart Mill (2 vols., 1910), which contains letters to John Sterling, Carlyle, E.
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  • Maurice, Dean Stanley, Bishop Ewing, Dr John Brown and Thomas Carlyle.
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  • Stimulated by this, he brought out his Neun Bucher preussischer Geschichte (1847-48), a work which, chiefly owing to the nature of the subject, makes severe demands on the attention of the reader - he is the "Dryasdust" of Carlyle's Frederick; but in it he laid the foundation for the modern appreciation of the founders of the Prussian state.
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  • In addition to th e se residents or natives of the locality, Shelley, Scott, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Clough, Crabb Robinson, Carlyle, Keats, Tennyson, Matthew Arnold, Mrs Hemans, Gerald Massey and others of less reputation made longer or shorter visits, or were bound by ties of friendship with the poets already mentioned.
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  • Carlyle's Life of John Sterling was written through dissatisfaction with the "Life" prefixed to Archdeacon Hare's book.
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  • It was produced on the 14th of December 1756 with overwhelming success, in spite of the opposition of the presbytery, who summoned Alexander Carlyle to answer for having attended its representation.
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  • Carlyle (1904); Eng.
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  • In the Music Hall in George Street, Carlyle, as lord rector of the university, delivered his stimulating address on books to the students, and Gladstone addressed the electors in his Midlothian campaigns.
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  • Alexander Carlyle, the famous divine (1 77 2-1805), whose Memorials of his Times still affords fascinating reading, ministered for fifty-five years in the parish church, in the graveyard of which lies David Macbeth Moir (1798-1851), who under the pen-name of " Delta " wrote Mansie Wauch, a masterpiece of Scots humour and pathos.
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  • This Berlin visit is more or less familiar to English readers from the two great essays of Macaulay and Carlyle as well as from the Frederick 'of the ' latter.
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  • That he never, as Carlyle complains, gave utterance to one great thought is strictly true.
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  • But that he was merely a mocker, which Carlyle and others have also said, is not strictly true or fair.
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  • In English the essays of Carlyle and Viscount Morley (1872) are both in their way invaluable, and to a great extent correct one another.
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  • An article by Thomas Carlyle in the Edinburgh Review (July 1832) is the best criticism on Elliott.
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  • Carlyle was attracted by Elliott's homely sincerity and genuine power, though he had small opinion of his political philosophy, and lamented his lack of humour and of the sense of proportion.
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  • Among the friends whom he now made, or for the first time cultivated, were Carlyle, Rogers, Dickens, and Elizabeth Barrett.
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  • Carlyle and FitzGerald "gave up all hopes of him after The Princess," or pretended that they did.
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  • This condition was elegantly defined by Carlyle as "sitting on a dungheap among innumerable dead dogs."
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  • Of his figure at the age of thirty-three Carlyle has left a superb portrait: "One of the finest-looking men in the world.
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  • London, 1816); Alexander Carlyle, Autobiography (Edinburgh, 1860), which gives the account of an eye-witness of the execution of Wilson; pamphlets (2 vols.
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  • Apart from the Churches, men like Carlyle and Matthew Arnold - with whom he had much in common - influenced him; while Herbert Spencer in England and Comte in France afforded the antithesis needful to the dialectical development of his own views.
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  • Great numbers of European and American authors were rendered into JapaneseCalderon, Lytton, Disraeli, Byron, Shakespeare, Milton, Turgueniev, Carlyle, Daudet, Emerson, Hugo, Heine, De Quincey, Dickens, Krner, Goethetheir name is legion and their influence upon Japanese literature is conspicuous.
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  • Coleridge, Robert and Elizabeth Browning, Coventry Patmore, Henry Ward Beecher and Thomas Carlyle.
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  • Among its more famous contributors were Lord Brougham, Sir Walter Scott, Carlyle, Hazlitt and Macaulay.
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  • Many of Carlyle's and Thackeray's pieces first appeared in Fraser's Magazine (1830), long famous for its personalities and its gallery of literary portraits.
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  • As a model of historical work of a certain kind it is hardly surpassable, and many separate passages - accounts of battles and skirmishes - have never been equalled except by Carlyle.
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  • In 1859 appeared a life of Defoe by William Chadwick, an extraordinary rhapsody in a style which is half Cobbett and half Carlyle, but amusing, and by no means devoid of acuteness.
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  • For other accounts see Carlyle, Cromwell's Letters and Speeches, letter cxl.; Hoenig, Cromwell; Baldock, Cromwell as a Soldier; and Gardiner, Hist.
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  • ALEXANDER CARLYLE (1722-1805), Scottish divine, was born on the 26th of January 1722, in Dumfriesshire, and passed his youth and early manhood at Prestonpans, where he witnessed the battle of 1745.
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  • His influence was enhanced by his personal appearance, which was so striking as to earn him the name of "Jupiter Carlyle"; and his autobiography (published 1860), though written in his closing years and not extending beyond the year 1770, is abundantly interesting as a picture of Scottish life, social and ecclesiastical, in the 18th century.
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  • Carlyle's memory recalled the Porteous Riots of 1736, and less remotely his friendship with Adam Smith, David Hume, and John Home, the dramatist, for witnessing the performance of whose tragedy Douglas He Was Censured In 1757.
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  • Joseph Dacre Carlyle >>
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  • Carlyle, History of Frederick the Great (London, 1872-1873).
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  • From the side of literature the way was prepared for it by the genius of Coleridge, Wordsworth and Carlyle; from the side of morals and politics by the profound discontent of the constructive spirit of the century with the disintegrating conceptions inherited from utilitarianism.
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  • His character, with its mixture of greatness and gentleness, was thus read by Carlyle: "A right solid, honest-hearted man, full of knowledge and sense, and, in spite of his positive temper, almost timid."
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  • By that time his religious opinions had begun to change, he grew dissatisfied with the views of the High Church party, and came under the influence of Carlyle's teaching.
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  • He was one of Carlyle's literary executors, and brought some sharp criticism upon himself by publishing Carlyle's Reminiscences and the Memorials of Jane Welsh Carlyle, for they exhibited the domestic life and character of his old friend in an unpleasant light.
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  • Carlyle had given the manuscripts to him, telling him that he might publish them if he thought it well to do so, and at the close of his life agreed to their publication.
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  • Besides publishing these manuscripts he wrote a Life of Carlyle.
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  • Additional particulars are given in Brougham's Men of Letters and Science, Burton's Life of Hume and Alexander Carlyle's Autobiography; and some characteristic anecdotes of him will be found in Memoirs of the Life and Works of Sir John Sinclair (1837).
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  • The well-known sentence of Carlyle, that it is "as far as possible from meriting its high reputation," is in strictness justified, for all Thiers's historical work is marked by extreme inaccuracy, by prejudice which passes the limits of accidental unfairness, and by an almost complete indifference to the merits as compared with the successes of his heroes.
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  • But Carlyle himself admits that Thiers is "a brisk man in his way, and will tell you much if you know nothing."
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  • It was, as Carlyle wrote to the author, "a sermon in stones," "a singular sign of the times," "a new Renaissance."
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  • The first stage of his education was passed at a school kept by "Peggy Paine," a relation of the well-known author of the Age of Reason, after which he entered the Annan academy, taught by Mr Adam Hope, of whom there is a graphic sketch in the Reminiscences of Thomas Carlyle.
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  • In 1809 he graduated M.A.; and in 1810, on the recommendation of Sir John Leslie, he was chosen master of an academy newly established at Haddington, where he became the tutor of Jane Welsh, afterwards famous as Mrs Carlyle.
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  • It was Irving who in 1821 introduced Carlyle to her.
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  • The writings of Edward Irving published during his lifetime were For the Oracles of God, Four Orations (1823); For Judgment to come (1823); Babylon and Infidelity foredoomed (1826); Sermons, &c. (3 vols., 1828); Exposition of the Book of Revelation (1831); an introduction to a translation of Ben-Ezra; and an introduction to Horne's Commentary on the Psalms. His collected works were published in 5 volumes, edited by Gavin Carlyle.
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  • To secure business and to conduct his cases with adequate knowledge, he studied the forms of English law, he solicited William Strahan, the printer, "to get him employed in city causes," and he entered into social intercourse (as is noted in Alexander Carlyle's autobiography) with busy London solicitors.
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  • He obtained a considerable addition to his resources (Carlyle puts the amount at £10,000) on his marriage in 1767 to Betty Anne, sole child and heiress of John Dawson of Marly in Yorkshire.
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  • He was not only dull, but the cause of dulness in others, and even Alexander Carlyle confesses that in conversation his illustrious countryman was "stiff and pompous."
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  • Carlyle (1795-1881) laid more emphasis on Fichte.
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  • Carlyle (1899).
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  • Tyndall was to a large extent a self-made man; he had no early advantages, but with indomitable earnestness devoted himself to study, to which he was stimulated by the writings of Carlyle.
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  • The vigour of his thought won admiration from Henry James (father of the novelist) and from Emerson, through whom he became known to Carlyle and Froude; and his speculation further attracted Tennyson, the Oliphants and Edward Maitland.
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  • It is interesting to note that this was the only distinction which Thomas Carlyle would accept.
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  • Carlyle and Edward Irving were teachers in the town, where Irving spent seven years, and where he made the acquaintance of the lady he afterwards married.
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  • Graham's Social Life in Scotland and Scottish Men of Letters; " Jupiter " in Carlyle's Autobiography.
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  • Sir Walter Scott, Croker, Hayward, Macaulay, Thomas Carlyle (whose famous Fraser article was reprinted in 1853) and Whitwell Elwin have done as much as anybody perhaps to sustain the zest for Johnsonian studies.
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  • In modern times the chief exponents of panpsychist views are Thomas Carlyle, Fechner and Paulsen: a similar idea lay at the root of the physical theories of the Stoics.
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  • Among works belonging to this period may be mentioned Thomas Carlyle, History of Frederick II.
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  • THOMAS CARLYLE (1795-1881), British essayist, historian and philosopher,born on the 4th of December 1795 at Ecclefechan, in Annandale, was the eldest of the nine children of James Carlyle by his second wife, Janet Aitken.
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  • In 1814 Carlyle, still looking forward to the career of a minister, obtained the mathematical mastership at Annan.
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  • In 1816 he was appointed, through the recommendation of Leslie, to a school at Kirkcaldy, where Edward Irving, Carlyle's senior by three years, was also master of a school.
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  • Irving's severity as a teacher had offended some of the parents, who set up Carlyle to be his rival.
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  • A previous meeting with Irving, also a native of Annan, had led to a little passage of arms, but Irving now welcomed Carlyle with a generosity which entirely won his heart, and the rivals soon became the closest of friends.
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  • The intimacy, affectionately commemorated in the Reminiscences, was of great importance to Carlyle's whole career.
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  • Irving had a library, in which Carlyle devoured Gibbon and much French literature, and they made various excursions together.
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  • Carlyle did his duties as a schoolmaster punctiliously, but found the life thoroughly uncongenial.
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  • A passing admiration for a Miss Gordon is supposed to have suggested the " Blumine " of Sartor Resartus; but he made no new friendships, and when Irving left at the end of 1818 Carlyle also resigned his post.
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  • The conversion was coincident with Carlyle's submission to a new and very potent influence.
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  • Many of his contemporaries were awakening to the importance of German thought, and Carlyle's knowledge enabled him before long to take a conspicuous part in diffusing the new intellectual light.
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  • In many most important respects no two men could be more unlike; but, for the present, Carlyle seems to have seen in Goethe a proof that it was possible to reject outworn dogmas without sinking into materialism.
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  • Meanwhile, Carlyle's various anxieties were beginning to be complicated by physical derangement.
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  • Carlyle's confession of the radical difference of religious opinion had not alienated his friend, who was settling in London, and used his opportunities for promoting Carlyle's interest.
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  • In January 1822 Carlyle, through Irving's recommendation, became tutor to Charles and Arthur Buller, who were to be students at Edinburgh.
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  • Carlyle's salary was £200 a year, and this, with the proceeds of some literary work, enabled him at once to help his brother John to study medicine and his brother Alexander to take up a farm.
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  • Carlyle spent some time with the elder Bullers, but found a life of dependence upon fashionable people humiliating and unsatisfactory.
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  • Carlyle felt by this time conscious of having a message to deliver to mankind, and his comrades, he thought, were making literature a trade instead of a vocation, and prostituting their talents to frivolous journalism.
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  • Carlyle, conscious of great abilities, and impressed by such instances of the deleterious effects of the social atmosphere of London, resolved to settle in his native district.
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  • Goethe received Carlyle's homage with kind complacency.
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  • The gift of a seal to Goethe on his birthday in 1831 " from fifteen English friends," including Scott and Wordsworth, was suggested and carried out by Carlyle.
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  • The interest in German, which Carlyle did so much to promote, suggested to him other translations and reviews during the next few years, and he made some preparations for a history of German literature.
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  • Carlyle was meanwhile passing through the most important crisis of his personal history.
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  • Meanwhile he had brought Carlyle from Edinburgh and introduced him to the Welshes.
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  • Carlyle was attracted by the brilliant abilities of the young lady, procured books for her and wrote letters to her as an intellectual guide.
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  • Until 1909, when Mr. Alexander Carlyle published his edition of the " love-letters," the full material was not accessible; they had been read by Carlyle's biographer, Froude, and also by Professor Charles Norton, and Norton (in his edition of Carlyle's Early Letters, 1886) declared that Froude had distorted the significance of this correspondence in a sense injurious to the writers.
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  • She recognized Carlyle's vast intellectual superiority, and the respect gradually deepened into genuine love.
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  • In 1823 she made it over to her mother, but left the whole to Carlyle in the event of her own and her mother's death.
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  • Carlyle, accustomed to his father's household, was less frightened by the prospect of poverty.
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  • Miss Welsh replied by announcing her intention to marry Carlyle; and then told him the whole story, of which he had previously been ignorant.
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  • Carlyle had now to arrange the mode of life which should enable him to fulfil his aspiration.
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  • A passing suggestion from Mrs Carlyle that they might live with her mother was judiciously abandoned.
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  • Though Jeffrey had no intellectual sympathy with Carlyle, he accepted some articles for the Review and became warmly attached to Mrs Carlyle.
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  • Carlyle began to be known as leader of a new " mystic " school, and his earnings enabled him to send his brother John to study in Germany.
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  • In spite of support from Jeffrey and other friends, Carlyle failed in a candidature for a professorship at St Andrews.
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  • Carlyle, indomitably determined to make no concessions for immediate profit, wrote slowly and carefully, and turned out some of his most finished work.
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  • In spite of such drawbacks, Carlyle in later years looked back upon the life at Craigenputtock as on the whole a comparatively healthy and even happy period, as it was certainly one of most strenuous and courageous endeavour.
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  • The bleak climate, however, the solitude, and the necessity of managing a household with a single servant, were excessively trying to a delicate woman, though Mrs Carlyle concealed from her husband the extent of her sacrifices.
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  • Jeffrey, stimulated perhaps by his sympathy for Mrs Carlyle, was characteristically generous.
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  • Besides pressing loans upon both Thomas and John Carlyle, he offered to settle an annuity of £loo upon Thomas, and finally enabled John to support himself by recommending him to a medical position.'
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  • Carlyle's proud spirit of independence made him reject Jeffrey's help as long as possible; and even his acknowledgment of the generosity (in the Reminiscences) is tinged with something disagreeably like resentment.
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  • 1 John Aitken Carlyle (1801-1879) finally settled near the Carlyles in Chelsea.
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  • He began an English prose version of Dante's Divine Comedy - which has earned him the name of " Dante Carlyle "- but only completed the translation of the Inferno (1849).
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  • Jeffrey naturally declined to appoint a man who, in spite of some mathematical knowledge, had no special qualification, and administered a general lecture upon Carlyle's arrogance and eccentricity which left a permanent sense of injury.
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  • There Carlyle found materials in the Advocates' Library for the article on the Diamond Necklace, one of his most perfect writings, which led him to study the history of the French Revolution.
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  • They went to London in the summer of 1834, and took a house at 5 (now 24) Cheyne Row, Chelsea, which Carlyle inhabited till his death; the house has since been bought for the public. Irving, who had welcomed him on former occasions, was just dying, - a victim, as Carlyle thought, to fashionable cajoleries.
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  • Mill had made Carlyle's acquaintance in the previous visit to London, and had corresponded with him.
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  • Carlyle was charmed with Emerson, and their letters published by Professor Norton show that his regard never cooled.
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  • Emerson's interest showed that Carlyle's fame was already spreading in America.
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  • Carlyle's connexion with Charles Buller, a zealous utilitarian, introduced him to the circle of " philosophical radicals."
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  • Carlyle called himself in some sense a radical; and J.
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  • Carlyle had some expectation of the editorship of the London Review, started by Sir W.
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  • Meanwhile Mill, who had collected many books upon the French Revolution, was eager to help Carlyle in the history which he was now beginning.
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  • Mill induced Carlyle to accept in compensation £100, which was urgently needed.
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  • Carlyle took up the task again and finished the whole on the 12th of January 1837.
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  • Do what you like with it, you " The publication, six months later, of the French Revolution marks the turning-point of Carlyle's career.
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  • Many readers hold it to be the best, as it is certainly the most characteristic, of Carlyle's books.
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  • The mannerism, which has been attributed to an imitation of Jean Paul, appeared to Carlyle himself to be derived rather from the phrases current in his father's house, and in any case gave an appropriate dialect for the expression of his peculiar idiosyncrasy.
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  • In the French Revolution Carlyle had discovered his real strength.
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  • It was, of course, impossible for Carlyle to satisfy modern requirements of matter-of-fact accuracy.
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  • It was reviewed by Mill in the Westminster and by Thackeray in The Times, and Carlyle, after a heroic struggle, was at last touching land.
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  • Carlyle's conversational powers were extraordinary; though, as he won greater recognition as a prophet, he indulged too freely in didactic monologue.
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  • Carlyle was a " radical " as sharing the sentiments of the class in which he was born.
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  • Carlyle's doctrines, entirely opposed to the ordinary opinions of Whigs and Radicals, found afterwards an expositor in his ardent disciple Ruskin, and have obvious affinities with more recent socialism.
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  • The composition introduced Carlyle to the " Dryasdust " rubbish heaps of which he here and ever afterwards bitterly complained.
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  • For some years after Cromwell Carlyle wrote little.
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  • His growing acceptance by publishers, and the inheritance of her property by Mrs Carlyle on her mother's death in 1842, finally removed the stimulus of money pressure.
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  • Duffy's Conversations with Carlyle, 1892, for an interesting narrative).
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  • Carlyle's strong convictions as to the misery and misgovernment of Ireland recommended him to men who had taken part in the rising of 1848.
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  • The subject roused Carlyle's tenderest mood, and the Life is one of the most perfect in the language.
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  • Carlyle meanwhile was suffering domestic troubles, unfortunately not exceptional in their nature, though the exceptional intellect and characters of the persons concerned have given them unusual prominence.
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  • Carlyle's constitutional irritability made him intensely sensitive to petty annoyances.
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  • Mrs Carlyle had to pass many hours alone, and the management of the household and of devices intended to shield him from annoyances was left entirely to her.
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  • House-cleanings and struggles with builders during the construction of a " soundproof room " taxed her energy, while Carlyle was hiding himself with his family in Scotland or staying at English country houses.
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  • Mrs Carlyle was hurt by the fine lady's condescension and her husband's accessibility to aristocratic blandishments.
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  • Carlyle, as a wise man, should have yielded to his wife's wishes; unluckily, he was content to point out that her jealousy was unreasonable, and, upon that very insufficient ground, to disregard it and to continue his intimacy with the Ashburtons on the old terms. Mrs Carlyle bitterly resented his conduct.
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  • A journal written at the same time gives a painful record of her sufferings, and after her death made Carlyle conscious for the first time of their full extent.
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  • Meanwhile Carlyle had become absorbed in his best and most laborious work.
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  • The success was great from the first, though it did little to clear up Carlyle's gloom.
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  • Carlyle had spared no pains in research.
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  • The effort to fuse the masses of raw material into a well-proportioned whole is perhaps not quite successful; and Carlyle had not the full sympathy with Frederick which had given interest to the Cromwell.
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  • Carlyle's general conception of history made him comparatively blind to aspects of the subject which would, to writers of other schools, have a great importance.
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  • During the later labours Mrs Carlyle's health had been breaking.
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  • Carlyle, now that happier relations had been restored, did his best to give her the needed comforts; and in spite of his immersion in Frederick, showed her all possible attention in later years.
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  • He was still detained in Scotland when Mrs Carlyle died suddenly while driving in her carriage.
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  • Carlyle was overpowered by her loss.
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  • Carlyle's appearance has been made familiar by many portraits, none of them, according to Froude, satisfactory.
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  • During Carlyle's later years the antagonism roused by his attacks upon popular opinions had subsided; and upon his death general expression was given to the emotions natural upon the loss of a remarkable man of genius.
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  • Carlyle became the object of general condemnation.
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  • Froude's biography, and the Memorials of Mrs Carlyle, published soon afterwards, strengthened the hostile feeling.
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  • Carlyle had appended to the Reminiscences an injunction to his friends not to publish them as they stood, and added that no part could ever be published without the strictest editing.
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  • Froude in this and the later publications held that he was giving effect to Carlyle's wish to imitate Johnson's " penance."
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  • His admiration for Carlyle probably led him to assume too early that his readers would approach the story from the same point of view, that is, with an admiration too warm to be repelled by the admissions.
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  • The result was that Carlyle was too often judged by his defects, and regarded as a selfish and eccentric misanthrope with flashes of genius, rather than as a man with many of the highest qualities of mind and character clouded by constitutional infirmities.
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  • Through long years of poverty and obscurity Carlyle showed unsurpassed fidelity to his vocation and superiority to the lower temptations which have ruined so many literary careers.
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  • He is not the only man whom absorption in work and infirmity of temper have made into a provoking husband, though few wives have had Mrs Carlyle's capacity for expressing the sense of injustice.
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  • Carlyle was throughout a pessimist or a prophet denouncing a backsliding world.
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  • Carlyle was the exponent of many of the deepest convictions of his time.
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  • Though Carlyle, especially in his earlier years, could deliver an invigorating and encouraging, if not a sanguine doctrine, his utterances were more generally couched in the key of denunciation, and betrayed a growing despondency.
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  • S.) The chief authorities for Carlyle's life are his own Reminiscences, the Letters of Jane Welsh Carlyle, the Love Letters of Thomas Carlyle and Jane Welsh (ed.
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  • Carlyle), and the four volumes of J.
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  • Froude's biography; Froude was Carlyle's literary executor.
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  • Norton's edition of the Reminiscences and his collection of Carlyle's Early Letters correct some of Froude's inaccuracies.
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  • Among other authors may be noticed Henry James, sen., in Literary Remains; Prof. Masson, Carlyle, Personally and in his Writings; Conway, Thomas Carlyle; Larkin, The Open Secret of Carlyle's Life; Mrs Oliphant in Macmillan's Magazine for April 1881; G.
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  • A good deal of controversy has arisen relating to Froude's treatment of the relations between Carlyle and his wife, and during1903-1904this was pushed to a somewhat unsavoury extent.
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  • Those who are curious to pry into the question of Carlyle's marital capacity, and the issues between Froude's assailants and his defenders, may consult New Letters and Memorials of Jane Welsh Carlyle, with introduction by Sir James Crichton-Browne; My Relations with Carlyle, by J.
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  • Crichton-Browne and Alexander Carlyle; and articles in the Contemporary Review (June, July, August, 1903), and Nineteenth Century and After (May, July, 1903).
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  • The precise truth in these matters is hardly recoverable, even if it concerns posterity: and though Froude was often inaccurate, he was given full authority by Carlyle, he had all the unpublished material before him, and he was dead and unable to reply to criticism when the later attacks were made.
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  • Froude's famous portraiture of Henry is coloured by the ideas of hero-worship and history which the author imbibed from Carlyle, and the rival portraits in Lingard, R.
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  • The whole movement, intended as a return to the kirk of Knox and Melville and the Covenanters, was a not unneeded protest against the sleepy " moderation," and want of spiritual enthusiasm, which invaded the established kirk in the latter part of the 18th century, a period in which she possessed such distinguished writers as John Home, author of the drama of Douglas, Robertson, the historian, and Dr Carlyle, whose amusing autobiography draws a perfect portrait of an amiable and highly educated " Moderate " and man of the world.
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  • The later famous men of letters, Scott, Carlyle and R.
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  • In the spring of 1881 he preached funeral sermons in the abbey on Thomas Carlyle and Lord Beaconsfield, concluding with the latter a series of sermons preached on public occasions.
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  • Carlyle, Life of Friedrich Schiller (1824, German translation with an introduction by Goethe, 1830); Caroline von Wolzogen, Schillers Leben (1830, 5th ed.
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  • Art, science, literature - little escaped his ken - and that not merely in Germany: English writers, Byron, Scott and Carlyle, Italians like Manzoni, French scientists and poets, could all depend on friendly words of appreciation and encouragement from Weimar.
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  • As a moralist and a guide to the conduct of life - an aspect of Goethe's work which Carlyle, viewing him through the coloured glasses of Fichtean idealism, emphasized and interpreted not always justly - Goethe was a powerful force on German life in years of political and intellectual depression.
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  • Carlyle, Essays on Goethe (1828-1832); X.
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  • Both his collegiate and editorial duties stimulated his critical powers, and the publication in the two magazines, followed by republication in book form, of a series of studies of great authors, gave him an important place as a critic. Shakespeare, Dryden, Lessing, Rousseau, Dante, Spenser, Wordsworth, Milton, Keats, Carlyle, Thoreau, Swinburne, Chaucer, Emerson, Pope, Gray - these are the principal subjects of his prose, and the range of topics indicates the catholicity of his taste.
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  • One other great influence appears in the admirable Life of St Bernard, which he published in 1863 - that of his friend Carlyle, to whom the work is dedicated, and with whose style it is strongly coloured.
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  • Carlyle's tribute to him is interesting: "No king so furnished out with apparatus and arena, with personal faculty to rule and scene to do it in, has appeared elsewhere.
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  • At the Dutch university, where he matriculated on the 27th of October 1745, he associated with a small knot of English youths, afterwards well known in various circles of life, among whom were Dowdeswell, his subsequent rival in politics, Wilkes, the witty and unprincipled reformer, and Alexander Carlyle, the genial Scotchman, who devotes some of the pages of his Autobiography to chronicling their sayings and their doings.
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  • The portrait, which was unfortunately adopted by Carlyle, has neither pedigree nor probability.
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  • And since his 19th century biography by Dr Thomas McCrie, or at least since his recognition in the following generation by Thomas Carlyle, the same view has taken its place in literature.
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  • Carlyle, Cromwell's Letters and Speeches (London, 1897-1901).
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  • At a time when Ralph Waldo Emerson could write to Thomas Carlyle, "We are all a little wild here with numberless projects of social reform; not a reading man but has a draft of a new community in his waistcoat pocket," - the Brook Farm project certainly did not appear as impossible a scheme as many others that were in the air.
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  • Many of the most remarkable among the younger men of that period resorted to Highgate as to the shrine of an oracle, and although one or two disparaging judgments, such as that of Carlyle, have been recorded, there can be no doubt that since Samuel Johnson there had been no such power in England.
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  • As Carlyle has told in his Life of Sterling, the poet's distinction, in the eyes of the younger churchmen with philosophic interests, lay in his having recovered and preserved his Christian faith after having passed through periods of rationalism and Unitarianism, and faced the full results of German criticism and philosophy.
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  • If he is not a Villehardouin or a Carlyle, his battlepieces are vivid and truthful, and he has occasional passages of no small episodic importance, such as that dealing with the Old Man of the Mountain.
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  • Later, the names of Turner, Rossetti, Whistler, Leigh Hunt, Carlyle (whose house in Cheyne Row is preserved as a public memorial), Count D'Orsay, and Isambard Brunel, are intimately connected with Chelsea.
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  • Carlyle's "great man theory of history" is logically connected with the age of Scott.
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  • Carlyle stands to Bossuet as the sage to the myth.
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  • The strongest influences in his development about this time were the liberating philosophy of Coleridge, the mystical visions of Swedenborg, the intimate poetry of Wordsworth, and the stimulating essays of Carlyle.
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  • He travelled through Italy, visited Paris, spent two months in Scotland and England, and saw the four men whom he most desired to seeLandor, Coleridge, Carlyle and Wordsworth.
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  • His visit to Carlyle, in the lonely farm-house at Craigenputtock, was the memorable beginning of a lifelong friendship. Emerson published Carlyle's first books in America.
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  • Carlyle introduced Emerson's Essays into England.
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  • Emerson was a sweet-tempered Carlyle, living in the sunshine.
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  • Carlyle was a militant Emerson, moving amid thunderclouds.
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  • In 1847 Emerson visited Great Britain for the second time, was welcomed by Carlyle, lectured to appreciative audiences in Manchester, Liverpool, Edinburgh and London, made many new friends among the best English people, paid a brief visit to Paris, and returned home in July 1848.
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  • He said, "I am born a poet"; and again, writing to Carlyle, he called himself "half a bard."
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  • Sampson, in Bohn's "Libraries"; The Correspondence of Thomas Carlyle and Ralph Waldo Emerson, edited by Charles Eliot Norton (Boston, 1883); George Willis Cooke, Ralph Waldo Emerson: His Life, Writings and Philosophy (Boston, 1881); Alexander Ireland, Ralph Waldo Emerson: His Life, Genius and Writings (London, 1882); A.
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  • The Account of the Courts of Prussia and Hanover (1705) was used by Carlyle in his Life of Frederick the Great.
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  • Among its public buildings is the excellent academy of which Thomas Carlyle was a pupil.
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  • There is a review of it by Carlyle (Miscellanies), the first two parts of whose own history of the French Revolution are mainly drawn from it.
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  • In the choir is the tombstone which Carlyle erected over the grave of his wife, Jane Baillie Welsh (1801-1866), a native of the town.
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  • Carlyle's famous work, published in 1837, is more of a prose epic than a history, omitting all detail which would not heighten the imaginative effect and tinged by all the favourite ideas of the author.
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  • The state of parties at this period in Ireland has been graphically described by Carlyle.
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  • Carlyle (1904).
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  • It is said that on one occasion Auguste Comte, the French Philosopher met Thomas Carlyle, the Scottish essayist.
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  • While the excellent Carlyle and Fox are rather hapless heroes.
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  • He was an intimate friend of Principal Robertson, David Hume, Dr. Carlyle, and other literati of the time.
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  • Indeed Thomas Carlyle had numerous maidservants since he had a large house and only employed one at a time.
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  • It was founded by Aelred Carlyle, an Anglo-Catholic who was determined to restore Benedictine monasticism in the Anglican church.
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  • In this usage the word would be equivalent to the more recent and scarcely less abused term, transcendentalism, and as such it is used even by a sympathetic writer like Carlyle; but this looseness of phraseology only serves to blur important distinctions.
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  • But while the author deals with history philosophically, he does not, like Buckle, hurl at the reader's head huge generalizations, or, like Carlyle, preach him into somnolence.
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  • For a brilliantly satirical but not wholly fair reference to the part then played by Talleyrand, the reader should consult Carlyle's French Revolution, vol.
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  • " Philistine " thus became the name of contempt applied by the cultured to those whom they considered beneath them in intellect and taste, and was first so used in English by Carlyle, and Matthew Arnold (Essays in Criticism, " Heinrich Heine," 1865) gave the word its vogue and its final connotation, as signifying " inaccessible to and impatient of ideas."
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  • Carlyle's sarcastic remark on Lacretelle's history of the Revolution, that it " exists, but does not profit much," is partly true of all his books.
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  • Carlyle's influence on him may be traced both in his admiration for strong rulers and strong government, which led him to write as though tyranny and brutality were excusable, and in his independent treatment of character.
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  • See also the Selected Correspondence of Macvey Napier (1877); the sketch of Jeffrey in Carlyle's Reminiscences, vol.
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  • See also Hazlitt's Spirit of the Age; Coleridge's Notes on English Divines; Carlyle's Miscellanies, and Carlyle's Reminiscences, vol.
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  • Carlyle refers to the opinion of genealogists that Cromwell "was indubitably either the ninth or the tenth or some other fractional part of half a cousin of Charles Stuart," but this has been completely exploded by Walter Rye in the Genealogist (" The Steward Genealogy and Cromwell's Royal Descent," new series, vol.
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  • After a period of struggle, the influence of Kant gradually extended, and, as we see in the writings of Coleridge and Carlyle, of Hamilton and Mansel, of Green and Caird, of Laurie, Martineau and others, has secured an authority over English thought almost equal to that of Hume (see Idealism).
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  • Carlyle, History of Frederick the Great, vol.
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  • Frederick, riding forward, saw a caricature of himself: "King in very melancholy guise," says Preuss (as translated by Carlyle), "seated on a stool, a coffee-mill between his knees, diligently grinding with the one hand, and with the other picking up any bean that might have fallen.
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  • Carlyle had thought of occupying Craigenputtock, a remote and dreary farm belonging to Mrs Welsh.
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  • A list of many articles upon Carlyle is given by Mr Ireland in Notes and Queries, sixth series, vol.
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  • In actual picturesqueness as well as in general veracity of picture, the book cannot approach Carlyle's; while as a mere chronicle of the events it is inferior to half a dozen prosaic histories older and younger than itself.
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  • The supernatural coats and the quintessential loaf may be paralleled but cannot be surpassed; and the book is throughout a mine of suggestiveness, as, for example, in the anticipation of Carlyle's clothes philosophy within the compass of a few lines.
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  • As Scottish historian Thomas Carlyle once observed, "Man seldom, or rather never for a length of time and deliberately, rebels against anything that does not deserve rebelling against."
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  • Ian Somerhalder gained fame as Boone Carlyle on the ABC drama Lost.
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  • After working at the Terra Verde restaurant for over a year, he is now a chef at the Carlyle Club in Virginia.
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