Carbon-dioxide sentence examples

carbon-dioxide
  • He proceeds to give what has been quoted as his first table of atomic weights, but on p. 248 of his laboratory notebooks for 1802-1804, under the date 6th of September 1803, there is an earlier one in which he sets forth the relative weights of the ultimate atoms of a number of substances, derived from analysis of water, ammonia, carbon-dioxide, &c. by chemists of the time.

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  • Of these carbon dioxide and water are the most prominent.

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  • Terrestrial plants have a gaseous interchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide which is necessary for respiration and feeding.

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  • These show that a definite intake of carbon dioxide is always accompanied by an exhalation of an equal volume of oxygen.

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  • It possesses an alkaline reaction and absorbs carbon dioxide.

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  • All carbonates, except those of the alkali metals and of thallium, are insoluble in water; and the majority decompose when heated strongly, carbon dioxide being liberated and a residue of an oxide of the metal left.

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  • On heating with an oxide or carbonate they yield a trimetallic orthophosphate, carbon dioxide being evolved in the latter case.

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  • The original hypothesis of Baeyer suggested that the course of events is the following: the carbon dioxide is decomposed into carbon monoxide and oxygen, while water is simultaneously split up into hydrogen and oxygen; the hydrogen and the carbon monoxide unite to form formaldehyde and the oxygen is exhaled.

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  • One of the constant features of respirationthe exhalation of carbon dioxide can still be observed.

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  • A hydrated oxide, 2PbO H 2 O, is obtained when a solution of the monoxide in potash is treated with carbon dioxide.

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  • This substance absorbs and combines with water very greedily, at the same time becoming very hot, and falling into a fine dry powder,' calcium hydroxide or slaked lime, which when left in the open slowly combines with the carbon dioxide of the air and becomes calcium carbonate, from which we began.

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  • From Building for a Future Autumn 2003 Creating a low carbon economy calls for a 60% reduction in carbon dioxide emissions.

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  • Iridium sesquioxide, Ir 2 0 3, is obtained when potassium iridium chloride is heated with sodium or potassium carbonates, in a stream of carbon dioxide.

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  • They are accompanied by intercellular channels serving for the conduction of oxygen to, and carbon dioxide from, the living cells in the interior of the wood, which would otherwise be cut off from the means of respiration.

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  • It may lead to an incipient asphyxiation, as the supply of oxygen may be greatly interfered with and the escape of carbon dioxide may be almost stopped.

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  • Now, as the materials which plants absorb are carbon dioxide from the air, and various inorganic compounds from the soil, together with water, it is clear that if this view is correct, vegetable protoplasm must be fed in a very different way from animal, and on very different materials.

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  • If we examine the seat of active growth in a young root or twig, we find that the cells in which the organic substance, the protoplasm, of the plant is being formed and increased, are not supplied with carbon dioxide and mineral matter, but with such elaborated material as sugar and proteid substances, or others closely allied to them.

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  • Photosynthesis commences in the presence of light, carbon dioxide and when the plant is subjected to a suitable temperature.

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  • Another process depends upon the formation of lead chloride by grinding together litharge with salt and water, and then treating the alkaline fluid with carbon dioxide until it is neutral.

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  • It is the carboxylic acid corresponding to tropine, for it yields the same products on oxidation, and by treatment with phosphorus pentachloride is converted into anhydroecgonine, C9H13N02, which, when heated to 280° C. with hydrochloric acid, splits out carbon dioxide and yields tropidine, C8H13N.

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  • Gases, like atmospheric air, hydrogen or carbon dioxide do not become luminous if they are placed in tubes, even when heated up far beyond white heat as in the electric furnace.

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  • Paschen proved that the emission spectra of water vapour as observed in an oxyhydrogen flame, and of carbon dioxide as observed in a hydrocarbon flame may be obtained by heating aqueous vapour and carbon dioxide respectively to a few hundred degrees above the freezing point.

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  • It is a non-volatile and almost infusible white powder, which slowly absorbs moisture and carbon dioxide from air, and is readily soluble in dilute acids.

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  • The carbonate is not easily soluble in dilute acids, but is readily soluble in water containing carbon dioxide.

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  • On passing a current of dry carbon dioxide over the reagent,- the gas is absorbed and the resulting compound, when decomposed by dilute acids, yields an organic acid, and similarly with carbon oxysulphide a thio-acid is obtained: RMgX-R CO 2 MgX?R CO 2 H; COS-CS(OMgX) R--R Csoh.

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  • The operation is essentially a dissociation of alumina into aluminium, which collects at the cathode, and into oxygen, which combines with the anodes to form carbon monoxide, the latter escaping and being burnt to carbon dioxide outside.

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  • Nutrition (assimilation) by the leaves includes the inhalation of air, and the interaction under the influence of light and in the presence of chlorophyll of the carbon dioxide of the air with the water received from the root, to form carbonaceous food.

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  • It is marked by the constant and continuous absorption of a certain quantity of oxygen and bythe exhalation of a certain volume of carbon dioxide and water vapour.

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  • We find in nature two other unlike substances, marble and Iceland spar, each of which is wholly composed of carbon dioxide and lime.

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  • The hydrocarbon methane, CH 4, when completely burned to carbon dioxide and water, generates 213800 cal.

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  • Now we know the heats of formation of carbon dioxide (from diamond) and of liquid water to be 94300 cal.

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  • The acid melts at 132° C., and at a higher temperature it rapidly decomposes into acetic acid and carbon dioxide.

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  • These esters are readily hydrolysed and yield the monoand di-alkylimalonic acids which, on heating, are readily decomposed, with evolution of carbon dioxide and the formation of monoand di-alkyl acetic acids.

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  • It melts at 70° C.and at higher temperatures decomposes, with evolution of carbon dioxide and formation of aceto-nitrile, CH 3 CN.

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  • A higher temperature decomposes this body into carbon dioxide and itaconic acid, C 5 H 6 0 4, which, again, by the expulsion of a molecule of water, yields citraconic anhydride, C 5 H 4 0 3.

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  • without any valve between them - the space in the still and condenser not occupied by liquid being charged with air, carbon dioxide or other gas, under the required pressure, and the condenser being provided with a regulated outlet for condensed liquid.

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  • It burns with a pale blue flame to form carbon dioxide and sulphur dioxide.

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  • When heated with water in a sealed tube to 150° C. it yields carbon dioxide and sulphuretted hydrogen.

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  • When passed with carbon dioxide through a red-hot tube it yields carbon oxysulphide, COS (C. Winkler), and when passed over sodamide it yields ammonium thiocyanate.

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  • Carbon bisulphide slowly oxidizes on exposure to air, but by the action of potassium permanganate or chromic acid it is readily oxidized to carbon dioxide and sulphuric acid.

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  • Atmospheric air was carefully investigated by Cavendish, who showed that it consisted of two elementary constituents: nitrogen, which was isolated by Rutherford in 1772, and oxygen, isolated in 1774; and Black established the presence, in minute quantity, of carbon dioxide (van Helmont's gas sylvestre).

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  • of these three substances yielded the same weight of carbon dioxide on combustion.

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  • The prism formula also received support from the following data: protocatechuic acid when oxidized by nitrous acid gives carboxytartronic acid, which, on account of its ready decomposition into carbon dioxide and tartronic acid, was considered to be HO C(COOH) 3.

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  • to mix the substance with an oxidizing agent - mercuric oxide, lead dioxide, and afterwards copper oxide - and absorb the carbon dioxide in potash solution.

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  • The increase in weight of the calcium chloride tube gives the weight of water formed, and of the potash bulbs the carbon dioxide.

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  • The oxidation, which is effected by chromic acid and sulphuric acid, is conducted in a flask provided with a funnel and escape tube, and the carbon dioxide formed is swept by a current of dry air, previously freed from carbon dioxide, through a drying tube to a set of potash bulbs and a tube containing soda-lime; if halogens are present, a small wash bottle containing potassium iodide, and a U tube containing glass wool moistened with silver nitrate on one side and strong sulphuric acid on the other, must be inserted between the flask and the drying tube.

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  • The increase in weight of the potash bulbs and soda-lime tube gives the weight of carbon dioxide evolved.

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  • Bevan collected the carbon dioxide obtained in this way over mercury.

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  • Ulrich Kreusler generates the carbon dioxide in a separate apparatus, and in this case the tube is drawn out to a capillary at the end (a).

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  • This artifice is specially valuable when the substance decomposes or volatilizes in a warm current of carbon dioxide.

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  • The value of d can be evaluated by considering the combustion of amorphous carbon to carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide.

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  • Sodium phenolate is heated in a stream of carbon dioxide in an iron retort at a temperature of 180-220° C., when half the phenol distils over and a basic sodium salicylate is left.

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  • It sublimes, but on rapid heating decomposes into carbon dioxide and phenol.

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  • Potassium bichromate and sulphuric acid oxidize it to carbon dioxide and water; and potassium chlorate and hydrochloric acid to chloranil.

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  • In de Lambilly's process air and steam is led over white-hot coke, and carbon dioxide or monoxide removed from the escaping gases according as ammonium formate or carbonate is wanted.

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  • Haemoglobin is composed of a basic albumin and an acid substance haematin; it combines readily with oxygen, carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide to form loose compounds.

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  • It appears to be synthesized in the plant tissues from carbon dioxide and water, formaldehyde being an intermediate product; or it may be a hydrolytic product of a glucoside or of a polysaccharose, such as cane sugar, starch, cellulose, &c. In the plant it is freely converted into more complex sugars, poly-saccharoses and also proteids.

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  • It absorbs carbon dioxide from the air when moist.

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  • The Kassner process for the manufacture of oxygen depends upon the formation of calcium plumbate, Ca2Pb04, by heating a mixture of lime and litharge in a current of air, decomposing this substance into calcium carbonate and lead dioxide by heating in a current of carbon dioxide, and then decomposing these compounds with the evolution of carbon dioxide and oxygen by raising the temperature.

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  • These are knocked off, ground up with water, freed from metal-particles by elutriation, and the paste of white lead is allowed to set and dry in small conical forms. The German method differs from the Dutch inasmuch as the lead is suspended in a large chamber heated by ordinary means, and there exposed to the simultaneous action of vapour of aqueous acetic acid and of carbon dioxide.

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  • When carbon dioxide is passed into this solution the whole of the added oxide, and even part of the oxide of the normal salt, is precipitated as a basic carbonate chemically similar, but not quite equivalent as a pigment, to white lead.

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  • These esters on hydrolysis yield the free acids, which readily decompose, with loss of carbon dioxide and formation of an aldehyde, R /Crri /Crri Oc< +�Cl � CH � [[Cooc H - O I ?Ch Cooc H 0c Ch�Cooh - Co +Chrr I Cho]].

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  • It oxidizes readily: exposure to air giving acrylic acid, nitric acid giving oxalic acid, bichromate of potash and sulphuric acid giving carbon dioxide and formic acid.

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  • By this means, sodium aluminate is formed; it is then extracted with water and precipitated either by sodium bicarbonate or by passing a current of carbon dioxide through the solution.

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  • When heated in a current of carbon dioxide it forms the oxychloride CbOC1 3, and carbon monoxide.

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  • Stannous Oxide, SnO, is obtained in the hydrated form Sn20(OH)2 from a solution of stannous chloride by addition of sodium carbonate; it forms a white precipitate, which can be washed with air-free water and dried at 80° C. without much change by oxidation; if it be heated in carbon dioxide the black SnO remains.

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  • On oxidation with potassium permanganate it gives homovanillin, vanillin, &c.; with chromic acid in acetic acid solution it is converted into carbon dioxide and acetic acid, whilst nitric acid oxidizes it to oxalic acid.

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  • Another heat test, that of Will, consists in heating a weighed quantity of the guncotton in a stream of carbon dioxide to 130° C., passing the evolved gases over some red-hot copper, and finally collecting them over a solution of potassium hydroxide which retains the carbon dioxide and allows the nitrogen, arising from the guncotton decomposition, to be measured.

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  • For example, carbon dioxide occurs in some mines, and hydrogen sulphide, which is a poisonous gas, in others.

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  • The gases produced by such fire-damp or dust explosions contain carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide in large proportion, and the majority of the deaths from such explosions are due to this " after-damp " rather than to the explosion itself.

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  • Silicon tetraiodide, Si14, is formed by passing iodine vapour mixed with carbon dioxide over strongly-heated silicon (C. Friedel, Comptes rendus, 1868, 67, p. 98); the iodo-compound condenses in the colder portion of the apparatus and is purified by shaking with carbon bisulphide and with mercury.

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  • The acid carbonates of the alkali metals can be prepared by saturating an aqueous solution of the alkaline hydroxide with carbon dioxide, M OH+ C02= Mhco 3, and from these acid salts the normal salts may be obtained by gentle heating, carbon dioxide and water being produced at the same time, 2Mhco 3 = M2C03+H02+C02.

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  • The carbonates are decomposed by mineral acids, with formation of the corresponding salt of the acid, and liberation of carbon dioxide.

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  • Many carbonates which are insoluble in water dissolve in water containing carbon dioxide.

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  • Dumas obtained barium methyl carbonate by the action of carbon dioxide on baryta dissolved in methyl alcohol (Ann., 1840, 35, p. 283).

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  • 00 2 H 5, is obtained in the form of pearly scales when carbon dioxide is passed into an alcoholic solution of potassium ethylate, C02+KOC2H5 = KO CO.

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  • It is easily broken down by many substances (aluminium chloride, zinc chloride, &c.) into ethyl chloride and carbon dioxide.

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  • Sodium percarbonates of the formulae Na 2 CO 4, Na2C206, Na 2 C05, NaHCO 4 (two isomers) are obtained by the action of gaseous or solid carbon dioxide on the peroxides Na 2 0 2, Na 2 0 3, NaHO 2 (two isomers)in the presence of water at a low temperature (R.Wolffenstein and E.Peltner, Ber., 1908, 41, pp. 275, 280).

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  • It may be obtained from storax by distillation with water, and synthetically by heating cinnamic acid with lime, by the action of aluminium chloride on a mixture of vinyl bromide and benzene, by removing the elements of hydrobromic acid from bromethylbenzene by means of alcoholic potash, or, best, by treating (-bromhydrocinnamic acid with soda, when it yields styrolene, carbon dioxide and hydrobromic acid.

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  • This disintegration is brought about chiefly by changes in temperature, and by the action of the rain, the oxygen, and the carbon dioxide of the air.

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  • In the case of limestones the carbon dioxide of the air in association with rain and dew eats into them and leads to their disintegration.

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  • If the latter is too compact or has its interstices filled with carbon dioxide gas or with water - as is the case when the ground is water-logged - the roots rapidly die of suffocation just as would an animal under the same conditions.

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  • Pure carbonate of lime when heated loses 44% of its weight, the decrease being due to the loss of carbon dioxide gas.

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  • carbon from the carbon dioxide of the air, and builds it up Manuring.

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  • The oxygen, however, decreases with the depth, while the carbon dioxide increases.

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  • Oxide of zinc, like most heavy metallic oxides, is easily reduced to the metallic state by heating it to redness with charcoal; pure red zinc ore may be treated directly; and the same might be done with pure calamine of any kind, because the carbon dioxide of the zinc carbonate goes off below redness and the silica of zinc silicate only retards, but does not prevent, the reducing action of the charcoal.

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  • Rejecting the old notion that plants derive their nourishment from humus, he taught that they get carbon and nitrogen from the carbon dioxide and ammonia present in the atmosphere, these compounds being returned by them to the atmosphere by the processes of putrefaction and fermentation - which latter he regarded as essentially chemical in nature - while their potash, soda, lime, sulphur, phosphorus, &c., come from the soil.

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  • Of the carbon dioxide and ammonia no exhaustion can take place, but of the mineral constitutents the supply is limited because the soil cannot afford an indefinite amount of them; hence the chief care of the farmer, and the function of manures, is to restore to the soil those minerals which each crop is found, by the analysis of its ashes, to take up in its growth.

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  • It forms many crystalline salts and absorbs carbon dioxide.

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  • Sidney Young has suggested conducting the operation in a current of carbon dioxide which sweeps out the vapours as they are evolved, and also heating in a vapour bath, e.g.

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  • Operating in a current of carbon dioxide facilitates the process by preventing overheating.

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  • It is used in the extraction of sugar from molasses, since it combines with the sugar to form a soluble saccharate, which is removed and then decomposed by carbon dioxide.

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  • It loses carbon dioxide when heated to high temperature.

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  • Again, anode reactions, such as are observed in the electrolysis of the fatty acids, may be utilized, as, for example, when the radical CH3C02 - deposited at the anode in the electrolysis of acetic acid - is dissociated, two of the groups react to give one molecule of ethane, C 2 H 6, and two of carbon dioxide.

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  • The simplest syntheses are undoubtedly those in which a carboxyl group is obtained directly from the oxides of carbon, carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide.

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  • It may be obtained synthetically by heating sodium in a current of carbon dioxide to 360° C.; by the oxidation of ethylene glycol; by heating sodium formate to 400° C. (V.

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  • Potassium permanganate in acid solution oxidizes it to carbon dioxide and water; the manganese sulphate formed has a catalytic accelerating effect on the decomposition.

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  • Graham showed that gold is capable of occluding by volume 0.48% of hydrogen, 0.20% of nitrogen, 0.29% of carbon monoxide, and 0.16% of carbon dioxide.

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  • The ultimate term of bacterial activity seems to be the production of ulmic acid, containing carbon 65.31 and hydrogen 3.85%, which is a powerful antiseptic. By the progressive elimination of oxygen and hydrogen, partly as water and partly as carbon dioxide and marsh gas, the ratios of carbon to oxygen and hydrogen in the rendered product increase in the following manner: The resulting product is a brown pasty or gelatinous substance which binds the more resisting parts of the plants into a compact mass.

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  • Caesium hydroxide, Cs(OH) 2, obtained by the decomposition of the sulphate with baryta water,is a greyish-white deliquescent solid,which melts at a red heat and absorbs carbon dioxide rapidly.

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  • For its complete combustion a volume of acetylene needs approximately twelve volumes of air, forming as products of combustion carbon dioxide and water vapour.

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  • The tetroxide, 0s04, can be easily reduced to the metal by dissolving it in hydrochloric acid and adding zinc, mercury, or an alkaline formate to the liquid, or by passing its vapour, mixed with carbon dioxide and monoxide, through a red-hot porcelain tube.

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  • The protoxide, OsO, is obtained as a dark grey insoluble powder when osmium sulphite is heated with sodium carbonate in a current of carbon dioxide.

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  • This formula was very nearly confirmed for hydrogen, carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide.

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  • The dissipation of the dissolved carbon dioxide results in the formation of "fur" in kettles or boilers, and if the solution is falling, as from the roof of a cave, in the formation of stalactites and stalagmites.

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  • It is obtained as rhombic plates by mixing dilute solutions of calcium chloride and sodium phosphate, and passing carbon dioxide into the liquid.

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  • Ammonium bicarbonate, NH 4 �HCO 3, is formed as shown above and also by passing carbon dioxide through a solution of the normal compound, when it is deposited as a white powder, which has no smell and is only slightly soluble in water.

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  • The aqueous solution of this salt liberates carbon dioxide on exposure to air or on heating, and becomes alkaline in reaction.

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  • The aqueous solutions of all the carbonates when boiled undergo decomposition with liberation of ammonia and of carbon dioxide.

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  • It melts at 55° C. and boils at 115° C. It may also be obtained by elimination of carbon dioxide from the pyrazine dicarboxylic acid formed when quinoxaline is oxidized with alkaline potassium permanganate (S.

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  • Heated in a current of carbon dioxide sodamide yields caustic soda and cyanamide, and with nitrous oxide it gives sodium azoimide; it deflagrates with lead or silver nitrate and explodes with potassium chlorate.

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  • Dry carbon dioxide is decomposed by it, free carbon being produced; moist carbon dioxide, on the other hand, gives sodium formate.

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  • It absorbs moisture and carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.

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  • Acids yield a sodium salt and free oxygen or hydrogen peroxide; with carbon dioxide it gives sodium carbonate and free oxygen; carbon monoxide gives the carbonate; whilst nitrous and nitric oxides give the nitrate.

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  • We may here notice the "percarbonates" obtained by Wolffenstein and Peltner (Ber., 1908, 41, pp. 2 75, 280) on acting with gaseous or solid carbon dioxide on Na202, Na203 and NaHO 2 at low temperatures; the same authors obtained a perborate by adding sodium metaborate solution to a 50% solution of sodium peroxide previously saturated with carbon dioxide.

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  • I: Jahresb., 1849, 2231 by estimating the amount of carbon dioxide formed on burning graphite or diamond in a current of oxygen, the value obtained being 12.0 (o = 16).

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  • It may be prepared by passing carbon dioxide over red-hot carbon, or red-hot iron; by heating carbonates (magnesite, chalk, &c.) with zinc dust or iron; or by heating many metallic oxides with carbon.

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  • It may also be prepared by heating formic and oxalic acids (or their salts) with concentrated sulphuric acid (in the case of oxalic acid, an equal volume of carbon dioxide is produced); and by heating potassium ferrocyanide with a large excess of concentrated sulphuric acid, K 4 Fe(CN) 6 -i-6H2S04+6H20=2K2S04+FeS04+3(NH4)2S04+6C0.

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  • It burns with a characteristic pale blue flame to form carbon dioxide.

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  • The volume composition of carbon monoxide is established by exploding a mixture of the gas with oxygen, two volumes of the gas combining with one volume of oxygen to form two volumes of carbon dioxide.

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  • The volume composition of carbon dioxide is determined by burning carbon in oxygen, when it is found that the volume of carbon dioxide formed is the same as that of the oxygen required for its production, hence carbon dioxide contains its own volume of oxygen.

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  • Water decomposes it violently, with formation of carbon dioxide and hydrochloric acid.

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  • It Is Soluble In Water; The Aqueous Solution Gradually Decomposes On Standing, Forming Carbon Dioxide And Sulphuretted Hydrogen.

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  • When the dry salt is heated to 190° it decomposes into normal carbonate, carbon dioxide and water.

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  • The solution is strongly caustic. It turns yellow on exposure to air, absorbing oxygen and carbon dioxide and forming thiosulphate and potassium carbonate and liberating sulphuretted hydrogen, which decomposes into water and sulphur, the latter combining with the monosulphide to form higher salts.

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  • Zeit., 1889, 13, p. 1701; 17, p. 1712) adds calcium plumbate to a solution of potassium ferrocyanide and passes carbon dioxide through the mixture: 2K 4 Fe(NC) -f-Ca 2 PbO 4 -} 4C02= K3Fe(NC)6+ K2C03+PbC03+2CaC03.

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  • Geuther, Ann., 1880, 202, p. 317), or by the action of moist carbon dioxide on potassium (H.

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  • The free acid, when heated with concentrated sulphuric acid, is decomposed into water and pure carbon monoxide; when heated with nitric acid, it is oxidized first to oxalic acid and finally to carbon dioxide.

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  • The silver and mercury salts, when heated, yield the metal, with liberation of carbon dioxide and formation of free formic acid; and the ammonium salt, when distilled, gives some formamide, Hconh 2.

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  • This process, which is as yet imperfectly understood, is attended by the consumption of oxygen, the liberation of energy in the form of heat, and the exhalation of carbon dioxide and water vapour.

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  • But there is no good evidence for an excess of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere - an assumption founded on the luxuriance of the vegetation, coupled with the fact that volcanicity was active and wide-ranging.

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  • Dilute nitric acid oxidizes it to acetic and oxalic acids, while potassium permanganate oxidizes it to acetone, carbon dioxide and oxalic acid.

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  • The want of chlorophyll restricts their mode of life - which is rarely aquatic - since they are therefore unable to decompose the carbon dioxide of the atmosphere, and renders them dependent on other plants or (rarely) animals for their carbonaceous food-materials.

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  • so to break up its molecules that, apart from small quantities used for its own substance, masses of it out of all proportion to the mass of yeast used become resolved into other bodies, such as carbon dioxide and alcohol, the process requiring little or no oxygen.

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  • The following summary of some of the principal characteristics of half-a-dozen species will serve to show how such peculiarities can be utilized for systematic purposes: and others have shown that a ferment (zymase) can be extracted from yeast-cells which causes sugar to break up into carbon dioxide and alcohol.

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  • It may be prepared by passing a current of carbon dioxide through ice-cold water, to which small quantities of barium peroxide are added from time to time (F.

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  • Experiments on the combustion of diamond were made by Smithson Tennant (1797) and Sir Humphry Davy (1816), with the object of proving that it is pure carbon; they showed that burnt in oxygen it yields exactly the same amount of carbon dioxide as that produced by burning the same weight of carbon.

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  • Several basic carbonates are known, being formed by the addition of beryllium salts to solutions of the alkaline carbonates; the normal carbonate is prepared by passing a current of carbon dioxide through water containing the basic carbonate in suspension, the solution being filtered and concentrated over sulphuric acid in an atmosphere of carbon dioxide.

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  • The crystals so obtained are very unstable and decompose rapidly with evolution of carbon dioxide.

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  • Potassium bichromate and sulphuric acid oxidize it to carbon dioxide and acetic acid, while alkaline potassium permanganate oxidizes it to carbon dioxide.

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  • Heated with chromic acid solution to 140° C., it gives carbon dioxide and acetone.

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  • By continued boiling of its aqueous solution it is decomposed into carbon dioxide and glyoxylic acid, C2H404.

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  • Minute vesicular cavities are not infrequently present, sometimes as negative cubes, and these may contain saline solutions or carbon dioxide or gaseous hydrocarbons.

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  • Alkaline hypobromites or hypochlorites or nitrous acid decompose urea into carbon dioxide and nitrogen.

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  • It is also decomposed by warm aqueous solutions of caustic alkalis, with evolution of ammonia and carbon dioxide.

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  • When heated with alcohol in sealed tubes, it yields carbamic esters; with alcohol and carbon bisulphide at Ioo° C., carbon dioxide is liberated and ammonium sulphocyanide is formed.

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  • Acid potassium permanganate oxidizes it to carbon dioxide and nitrogen.

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  • Hydrochloric acid at 200° C. decomposes into oxalic acid, carbon dioxide and methylamine, whilst an alcoholic solution of a caustic alkali gives dimethyl urea and oxalic acid.

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  • Allophanic acid, NH 2 C0 NH CO 2 H, is not known in the free state, as when liberated from its salts, it is decomposed into urea and carbon dioxide.

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  • 1868, 148, p. 51); by hydrolysis of benzonitrile or of hippuric acid; by the action of carbon dioxide on benzene in the presence of aluminium chloride (C. Friedel and J.

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  • 1888 [6], 14, p. 44 1); by the action of carbon dioxide on monobrombenzene in the presence of sodium; by condensing benzene And carbonyl chloride in presence of aluminium chloride, the benzoyl chloride formed being subsequently hydrolysed; and similarly from benzene and chlorformamide: C6H6 +Cl Conh 2 = Hc1 -C6h,CONH2, the benzamide being then hydrolysed.

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  • The green solution is readily converted into a pink one of permanganate by a large dilution with water, or by passing carbon dioxide through it: 3K2Mn04+2C02= 2K2C03+2KMn04+Mn02.

    0
    0
  • The potassium salt, KMnO 4, may be prepared by passing chlorine or carbon dioxide through an aqueous solution of potassium manganate, or by the electrolytic oxidation of the manganate at the anode [German patent 101710 (1898)].

    0
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  • Barium Permanganate, BaMn 2 0 8, crystallizes in almost black needles, and is formed by passing carbon dioxide through water containing suspended barium manganate.

    0
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  • Knowing that the water produced by the combustion of alcohol was not pre-existent in that substance but was formed by the combination of its hydrogen with the oxygen of the air, he burnt alcohol and other combustible organic substances, such as wax and oil, in a known volume of oxygen, and, from the weight of the water and carbon dioxide produced and his knowledge of their composition, was able to calculate the amounts of carbon, hydrogen and oxygen present in the substance.

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  • It has strong basic properties, absorbs carbon dioxide readily, and forms welldefined crystalline salts.

    0
    0
  • For the manufacture of bleaching-powder, limestone of high degree of purity (especially free from magnesia and iron) is carefully burned so as to drive out nearly all the carbon dioxide without overheating the lime.

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  • The same apparatus is used for " oxidizing " by means of atmospheric air passed through by means of an injector; sometimes both air and carbon dioxide are passed in at the same time.

    0
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  • The wet alkali-waste as it comes from the lixiviating vats, is transferred into upright iron cylinders in which it is systematically treated with lime-kiln gases until the whole of the calcium sulphide has been converted into calcium carbonate, the carbon dioxide of the lime-kiln gases being entirely exhausted.

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  • ammonium salts, is first freed from these by moderate heating (of course taking care that the ammonia is completely recovered), and later on, by raising the temperature, it is decomposed into solid sodium carbonate and gaseous carbon dioxide.

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  • The former needs only grinding to constitute the final product, ammoniasoda ash; the latter is again employed in the process of treating the ammoniacal salt solution with carbon dioxide.

    0
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  • It begins, however, not with ready-made ammonium bicarbonate, but with the substances from which it is formed - ammonia, water and carbon dioxide - which are made to act on sodium chloride.

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  • The ammoniacal salt solution is now saturated with carbon dioxide.

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  • The ammonium carbonates are driven out from their solutions by mere prolonged boiling, being thereby decomposed into ammonia, carbon dioxide and water, but the ammonium chloride is not volatile under these conditions, and must be decomposed by milk of lime: 2NH 4 C1+Ca(OH) 2 = 2NH 3 +CaC1 2 +2H 2 0.

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  • Just below the top there is a cooling arrangement, so that nearly all the water is condensed and runs back into the column, while the ammonia, with the carbon dioxide formerly combined with part of it, passes on first through an outside cooler where the remaining water is condensed, and afterwards into the vessels, already described, where the ammonia is absorbed by a solution of salt and thus again introduced into the process.

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  • It combines with potassium to give (C 6 H 5) 3 CK, which with carbon dioxide gives potassium triphenylacetate, (C6H5)3C C02K.

    0
    0
  • The dichloride, WC1 2, is an amorphous grey powder obtained by reducing the hexachloride at a high temperature in hydrogen, or, better, by heating the tetrachloride in a current of carbon dioxide.

    0
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  • A mixture of chlorine peroxide and chlorine is obtained by the action of hydrochloric acid on potassium chlorate, and similarly, on warming a mixture of potassium chlorate and oxalic acid to 70° C. on the water bath, a mixture of chlorine peroxide and carbon dioxide is obtained.

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  • Aqueous solutions of the acid are decomposed in sunlight by uranium salts, with evolution of carbon dioxide and the formation of propionic acid.

    0
    0
  • Potassium permanganate, in acid solution, oxidizes it to carbon dioxide and water.

    0
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  • It does not yield an anhydride, but when heated loses carbon dioxide and leaves a residue of propionic acid.

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  • Ferrous chloride decomposes the copper oxide and carbonate with the formation of cuprous and cupric chlorides (which remain in solution), and the precipitation of ferrous oxide, carbon dioxide being simultaneously liberated from the carbonate.

    0
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  • It oxidizes carbon compounds to carbon dioxide and water, and therefore finds extensive application in analytical organic chemistry.

    0
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  • Copper rust has the same composition as malachite; it results from the action of carbon dioxide and water on the metal.

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  • It carbonizes when heated with strong sulphuric acid, giving, among other products, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide.

    0
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  • It is a white powder moderately soluble in cold water, readily soluble in hot water, the solution possessing an alkaline reaction and absorbing carbon dioxide readily.

    0
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  • The solution, known as baryta-water, finds an extensive application in practical chemistry, being used in gas-analysis for the determination of the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere; and also being used in organic chemistry as a hydrolysing agent for the decomposition of complex ureides and substituted aceto-acetic esters, while E.

    0
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  • From this iodide the trimethyl stibine may be obtained by distillation with an alloy of potassium and antimony in a current of carbon dioxide.

    0
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  • The stibonium iodide on treatment with moist silver oxide gives the corresponding tetramethyl stibonium hydroxide, Sb(CH 3)40H, which forms deliquescent crystals, of alkaline reaction, and absorbs carbon dioxide readily.

    0
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  • W.) to liquefy gelatine, to secrete coloured pigments, to ferment certain media with evolution of carbon dioxide or other gases, or to induce pathological conditions in animals.

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  • In other words these bacteria can build up organic matter from purely mineral sources by assimilating carbon from carbon dioxide in the dark and by obtaining their nitrogen from ammonia.

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  • The energy liberated during the oxidation of the nitrogen is regarded as splitting the carbon dioxide molecule, - in green plants it is the energy of the solar rays which does this.

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  • principally the result of chlorophyll action on the carbon dioxide of the atmosphere decomposed by energy derived from the sun; and although we know little as yet concerning the magnitude of other processes of carbon-assimilation - e.g.

    0
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  • There exist in the mud of marshes, rivers and cloacae, &c., however, other anaerobic bacteria which decompose cellulose, probably hydrolysing it first and then splitting the products into carbon dioxide and marsh gas.

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  • is usually stated that the carbon dioxide molecule is here.

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  • Reduction by sodium amalgam converts it into isopropyl alcohol; oxidation by chromic acid gives carbon dioxide and acetic acid.

    0
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  • #-Aminopyridine is obtained by heating a-pyridyl urethane with fuming hydrochloric acid until no more carbon dioxide is liberated (T.

    0
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  • Hantzsch (Ann., 1882, 215, p. I; Ber., 1882, 15, p. 2914) which consists in the condensation of two molecules of aceto-acetic ester with one of an aldehyde and one of ammonia: RO 2 C CH 2 R' CHO CH 2 CO 2 R RO 2 C C CHR' C C02R CH 3 CO + NH 3 + CO CH 3 -' CH3 C-NH-C CH3 The resulting dihydro-compound is then oxidized with nitrous acid, the ester hydrolysed and the resulting acid heated with lime; carbon dioxide is eliminated and a trisubstituted pyridine of the type CH C(CH3) is obtained.

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  • On heating with hydrochloric acid at 180-200° C. it is decomposed; the products of the reaction being glycocoll, ammonia, formic acid and carbon dioxide.

    0
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  • Chromic acid oxidizes it to acetic acid and carbon dioxide; potassium permanganate oxidizes it to pyruvic acid; nitric acid to oxalic acid, and a mixture of manganese dioxide and sulphuric acid to acetaldehyde and carbon dioxide.

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  • Usually these cavities contain a liquid (water, a saline solution, carbon dioxide or petroleum) and a movable bubble of gas.

    0
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  • The first is prepared by heating red phosphorus with finely powdered sulphur in a tube sealed at one end and filled with carbon dioxide.

    0
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  • The product is extracted with carbon disulphide and the residue distilled in carbon dioxide.

    0
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  • Oxidation by potassium permanganate gives phthalic acid; whilst chromic acid gives carbon dioxide and water.

    0
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  • It melts at about 200° C., and at 210° to 255° it is resolved into carbon dioxide and pyrogallol, C 6 H 3 (OH) 3.

    0
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  • It crystallizes in needles, which contain two molecules of water of crystallization, and melt at 156° C. When heated above the melting-point it loses carbon dioxide and yields quinoline.

    0
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  • It crystallizes in needles, which are easily soluble in alcohol, and 'v hen heated above 130° C. lose carbon dioxide and leave a residue of quinoline-fl-carboxylic acid.

    0
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  • Carbon decomposes hot strong sulphuric acid on long continued boiling, with the formation of carbon dioxide and sulphur dioxide.

    0
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  • The cis 1.2-cyclo-propane dicarboxylic acid is formed by eliminating carbon dioxide from cyclo-propane tricarboxylic acid -1.2.3 (from 43-dibrompropionic ester and sodio-malonic ester).

    0
    0
  • It melts at 154-156° C., losing carbon dioxide and passing into cyclo-butane carboxylic acid, C 4 H 7 CO 2 H.

    0
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  • van Helmont in his Ortus medicinae, posthumously published in 1648, in the course of his description of the gas now known as carbon dioxide.

    0
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  • This scheme is particularly applicable to coal-gas Carbon dioxide is absorbed by a potash solution containing one part of potash to between two and three of water; the stronger solution absorbs about 40 volumes of the gas.

    0
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  • When small in amount, it is better to estimate as carbon dioxide by burning with oxygen and absorbing in potash; when large in amount, the bulk is absorbed in ammoniacal cuprous chloride and the residue burned.

    0
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  • Methane cannot be burnt in this way even when there is much hydrogen present, and several other methods have been proposed, such as mixing with air and aspirating over copper oxide heated to redness, or mixing with oxygen and burning in a platinum tube heated to redness, the carbon dioxide formed being estimated by absorption in potash.

    0
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  • At this point in the manufacturing process the gas has already undergone some important changes in its composition, but there yet remain impurities which must be removed, these being ammonia, sulphuretted hydrogen, carbon disulphide and carbon dioxide.

    0
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  • As nearly as possible all the carbon dioxide is extracted, but most gas companies are now exempt from having to purify the gas from sulphur compounds other than sulphuretted hydrogen.

    0
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  • Atkinson Butterfield gives the composition of the gas at this It happens that ammonia, being a strong base, will effect the extraction of a certain proportion of such compounds as sulphuretted hydrogen, carbon dioxide and hydrocyanic acid, and the gas is now washed with water and ammoniacal liquor.

    0
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  • In this wet purifying apparatus the gas is almost wholly freed from ammonia and from part of the sulphuretted hydrogen, whilst carbon dioxide and carbon disulphide are also partially extracted.

    0
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  • When the gas had to be purified from carbon disulphide as well as from sulphuretted hydrogen, slaked lime was employed for the removal of carbon dioxide and the greater quantity of the sulphur compounds, whilst a catch box or purifier of oxide of iron served to remove the last traces of sulphuretted hydrogen.

    0
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  • l began to show signs of allowing carbon dioxide to pass through it unabsorbed, it was filled with fresh slaked lime and made the last of the series, the one which was second becoming first, and this procedure went on continuously.

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  • This operation was necessitated by the fact that carbon dioxide has the power of breaking up the sulphur compounds formed by the lime, so that until all carbon dioxide is absorbed with the formation of calcium carbonate, the withdrawal of sulphuretted hydrogen cannot proceed, whilst since it is calcium sulphide formed by the absorption of sulphuretted hydrogen by the slaked lime that absorbs the vapour of carbon disulphide, purification from the latter can only be accomplished after the necessary calcium sulphide has been formed.

    0
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  • The foul gas leaving the scrubbers contains, as a general average, 30 grains of sulphuretted hydrogen, 40 grains of carbon disulphide and zoo grains of carbon dioxide per Ioo cub.

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  • On entering the first purifier, which contains calcium thiocarbonate and other combinations of calcium and sulphur in small quantity, the sulphuretted hydrogen and disulphide vapour have practically no action upon the material, but the carbon dioxide immediately attacks the calcium thiocarbonate, forming calcium carbonate with the production of carbon disulphide vapour, which is carried over with the gas into the second box.

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  • ft., but no trace of carbon dioxide.

    0
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  • It will be noticed that in the earlier stages the quantity of sulphur impurities is actually increased between the purifiers - in fact, the greater amount of sulphiding procures the ready removal of the carbon disulphide, - but it is the carbon dioxide in the gas that is the disturbing element, inasmuch as it decomposes the combinations of sulphur and calcium; consequently it is a paramount object in this system to prevent this latter impurity finding its way through the first box of the series.

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  • The finding of any traces of carbon dioxide in the gas between the first two boxes is generally the signal for a new clean purifier being put into action, and the first one shut off, emptied and recharged with fresh lime, the impregnated material being sometimes sold for dressing certain soils.

    0
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  • Under these conditions producer gas ceases to exist as a by-product, and the gases of the blow consist merely of the incombustible products of com plete combustion, carbon dioxide and nitrogen, the result being that more than three times / the heat is developed for the combustion of the same amount of fuel, and nearly double the quantity of water gas can be made per pound of fuel than was before possible.

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  • The effect of this arrangement is that the great body of coal reaches a higher temperature than in an ordinary fireplace, and this, together with the reduction of the carbon dioxide formed immediately above the grate by the red-hot coal in the upper part of the furnace, leads to the formation of carbon monoxide which later on, on the spot where the greatest heat is required, is burned into dioxide by admitting fresh air, preferably pre-heated.

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  • y, the working of the producer would be wrong, as in this case the layer of coke at the front side would be too low, and carbon dioxide would be formed in lieu of monoxide.

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  • In practical work about 4 lb of steam is decomposed for each pound of anthracite consumed, and no more than 5% of carbon dioxide is found in the resulting gas.

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  • The blowing-up gas contains 17 or 18% carbon dioxide and 1.5% oxygen, with mere traces of carbon monoxide.

    0
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  • The solution is best prepared by dissolving the hydrate in hydrochloric acid and removing the excess of acid by evaporation, or by passing chlorine into the solution obtained by dissolving the metal in hydrochloric acid and removing the excess of chlorine by a current of carbon dioxide.

    0
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  • A soluble carbonate and a ferric salt give a precipitate which loses carbon dioxide on drying.

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  • The trichloride, VC1 31 is a deliquescent solid formed when the tetrachloride is heated in a retort as long as chlorine is given off (Roscoe), or by heating vanadium trisulphide in a current of chlorine and fractionally distilling the resulting product at 150° C. in a current of carbon dioxide (Halberstadt, Ber., 1882, 15, p. 1619).

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  • CARBONIC ACID, in chemistry, properly H2CO3, the acid assumed to be formed when carbon dioxide is dissolved in water; its salts are termed carbonates.

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  • The name is also given to the neutral carbon dioxide from its power of forming salts with oxides, and on account of the acid nature of its solution; and, although not systematic, this use is very common.

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  • This theory was controverted by Wyndham Dunstan, who attempted to prove that carbon dioxide was not necessary to rusting; and in place of the acid theory, he set up a scheme which involved the production of hydrogen peroxide.

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  • Moody has since shown that when all traces of carbon dioxide are removed (which is a matter of great experimental difficulty) iron may be left in contact with oxygen and water for long periods without rust appearing, but on' the admission of carbon dioxide specks are rapidly formed.

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  • [[Table V]].- Mollier's Table for Saturated Carbon Dioxide Vapour (C02) The action of a vapour compression machine is shown in fig.

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  • absorb carbon dioxide.

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  • Figure 2. Atmospheric carbon dioxide mirrors plankton abundance over much shorter timescale of hours in the Atlantic.

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  • High concentrations of carbon dioxide in the blood, causes the blood to become more acidic.

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  • Other physiological effects are not well defined but can involve reduced carbon dioxide assimilation and reduced protein synthesis.

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  • The majority of the pigs did not show aversion to the presence of 30 per cent carbon dioxide in air.

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  • For some ecosystem parameters, for example total above-ground biomass, temperature effects were stronger than carbon dioxide effects.

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  • The hydroxide can then be reacted with carbon dioxide to form calcium carbonate.

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  • calcium carbonate saturated with carbon dioxide creates an acidic medium in which the coral sand is dissolved as calcium hydrogen carbonate.

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  • Gas stunning or killing, using carbon dioxide or carbon dioxide or carbon monoxide.

    0
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  • magnesium carbonate can cause belching due to carbon dioxide being liberated from the compound in the stomach.

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  • carbonation of the lime with carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.

    0
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  • By absorbing carbon dioxide the oceans actually help stave off climate change.

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  • Boiling the water, which must also be cooled, will remove the dissolved carbon dioxide.

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  • Glossary Blood Blood supplies oxygen to the body and removes carbon dioxide.

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  • People exhale carbon dioxide at a level many times higher than background levels in the atmosphere.

    0
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  • Figure 1. atmospheric carbon dioxide mirrors plankton growth in inverse relationship.

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  • Clean technologies, including use of supercritical carbon dioxide in polymer technologies.

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  • Every ton of freight carried by rail, rather than road, produces at least 80% less carbon dioxide.

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  • They will also produce a lot more carbon dioxide which needs to be excreted by the lungs.

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  • The problem is that we are pumping out twice as much carbon dioxide as these natural systems can remove.

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  • collimated proportional counter filled with argon and carbon dioxide.

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  • Over expression of barley aquaporin gene in rice led to increased carbon dioxide conductance and assimilation [21] .

    0
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  • Second, we can reduce inputs of carbon dioxide by reducing wasteful energy consumption.

    0
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  • This produces a very narrow gap across which oxygen and carbon dioxide can rapidly diffuse.

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  • Gaseous exchange: diffusion, oxygen diffusion, carbon dioxide diffusion.

    0
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  • It must let oxygen in so you can breathe, and it must be able to expel carbon dioxide so you don't choke.

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  • Changes in the composition of soil-dwelling Collembola (springtail) communities in response to elevated carbon dioxide.

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  • They protect the environment by using oxygen to convert poisonous carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons into harmless carbon dioxide and water.

    0
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  • The partial pressure of carbon dioxide has a much smaller effect on the current voltage curves than the partial pressure of oxygen.

    0
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  • emissions of carbon dioxide will change over the next 100 years.

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  • Each stove reduces carbon dioxide emissions by around 1.5 tons per year, compared to an open wood fire.

    0
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  • emitted 212 million tons of carbon dioxide.

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  • emitter of carbon dioxide.

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  • The Reclaim Power group want to close Drax - claiming it is the UK's largest single emitter of carbon dioxide.

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  • Our projects also reduce emissions of greenhouse gases other than CO2, and convert these to carbon dioxide equivalents.

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  • exhale carbon dioxide at a level many times higher than background levels in the atmosphere.

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  • The coke (essentially impure carbon) burns in the blast of hot air to form carbon dioxide - a strongly exothermic reaction.

    0
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  • Foam or carbon dioxide extinguishers Use water spray to cool containers.

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  • It reduces by 13% on the ' technical fix ' scenario, cutting carbon dioxide emissions by around 9% .

    0
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  • The enzyme catalyzes the first step in carbon dioxide fixation in these plants and good inhibitors might be effective herbicides.

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  • freight carried by rail, rather than road, produces at least 80% less carbon dioxide.

    0
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  • In fact, the average home emits more harmful carbon dioxide gas than the average car every year.

    0
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  • In Britain, total emissions have fallen because electricity generation has switched from coal to gas which produces less Carbon Dioxide.

    0
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  • grammepassenger kilometer, cars put out 200-300 grams of carbon dioxide (the chief greenhouse gas ).

    0
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  • prolific green algae that capture carbon dioxide to make biodiesel.

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  • greenhouse gas is carbon dioxide which is released every time fossil fuels are burnt.

    0
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  • In this case it was the sin of releasing carbon dioxide into the atmosphere that offended our moral guardians.

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  • They deal with carbon monoxide and unburnt hydrocarbons which react with oxygen to produce carbon dioxide and water.

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  • This increase in CSF acidity causes hyperventilation which lowers the carbon dioxide concentration in the blood.

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  • Despite much research, the mechanism by which carbon dioxide levels were reduced during cold glacial periods relative to warm interglacials eludes us.

    0
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  • In bread making carbon dioxide causes the dough to rise giving lightness to the bread whilst the alcohol is driven off during baking.

    0
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  • limewater test for carbon dioxide.

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  • metric ton of carbon dioxide prevented from entering the atmosphere.

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  • misunderstandfoundly misunderstood phenomenon is the level of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere.

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  • oxidize>Oxidizing atmosphere A gas atmosphere which promotes oxidation by the predominance of carbon dioxide over carbon monoxide.

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  • The report says that the government's ability to reach the target on carbon dioxide is ' in grave peril ' .

    0
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  • Plants, including the phytoplankton, remove carbon dioxide for use in photosynthesis.

    0
    0
  • Mangroves in addition absorb more carbon dioxide per unit area than ocean phytoplankton, a critical factor in global warming.

    0
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  • dead phytoplankton and other marine organisms act as carbon dioxide vessels, driving this pump as they sink toward the bottom of the ocean.

    0
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  • In the oceans plankton soak up carbon dioxide and sink to the bottom.

    0
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  • potent than carbon dioxide.

    0
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  • The amount of carbon dioxide produced is directly proportionate to the oxygen consumed.

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  • reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 60% by 2050.

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  • reduction in carbon dioxide emissions by 2050.

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  • At the same time, carbon dioxide diffuses from the venous blood into the alveolar sacs.

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  • The voluntary scheme will calculate the carbon dioxide emissions created by official air travel.

    0
    0
  • sequestering carbon dioxide in the oceans by fertilizing them with iron.

    0
    0
  • sequester carbon dioxide directly from the atmosphere.

    0
    0
  • sequestration of carbon dioxide.

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  • sets a national target to reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 60% by 2050.

    0
    0
  • sorbent materials are used to remove gases such as carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and nitrogen.

    0
    0
  • The presence of carbon dioxide tends to raise the lower limit since it has a higher specific heat than nitrogen.

    0
    0
  • stabilize the carbon dioxide concentration in the atmosphere.

    0
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  • Also, leaves that live in areas with low levels of carbon dioxide have more stomata than those in areas with higher levels.

    0
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  • stroma of the chloroplasts and involve the fixation of carbon dioxide and the synthesis of glucose.

    0
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  • supercritical carbon dioxide in polymer technologies.

    0
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  • In keyhole surgery: the patientâs abdomen is inflated with carbon dioxide to give the surgeon room to operate.

    0
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  • The UK Energy White Paper sets a national target to reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 60% by 2050.

    0
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  • tenuous atmosphere composed of carbon dioxide.

    0
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  • tonneBritain, the average person creates around 10 tons of carbon dioxide every year, compared to the two tons produced by Africans.

    0
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  • tonne average house emits 8 tons of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere each year.

    0
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  • underutilized resources of carbon dioxide and nitrates, supporting Martin's Iron Hypothesis.

    0
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  • unicellular, microscopic plant that causes the fermentation of sugars to alcohol and carbon dioxide.

    0
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  • The test is based on the capacity of H. pylori to secrete the enzyme urease, which hydrolyses urea to ammonia and carbon dioxide.

    0
    0
  • vapour of the tests involved pure water vapor whilst others examined the effects of injection of carbon dioxide and air into the condensing vapor.

    0
    0
  • But analysis has failed to find such differences; the ratio of the weights of lime and carbon dioxide is found to be the same in all three substances.

    0
    0
  • This formula substantially holds good to the present day, although a number of definite bodies other than carbon dioxide and alcohol occur in small and varying quantities, according to the conditions of the fermentation and the medium fermented.

    0
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  • It burns with a purple flame, forming carbon dioxide and nitrogen; and may be condensed (by cooling to - 25° C.) to a colourless liquid, and further to a solid, which melts at - 34.4° C. (M.

    0
    0
  • When heated with hydrochloric acid to Ioo C. it yields carbon dioxide and pyrotartaric acid, C 5 H 8 0 4, and when warmed with dilute sulphuric acid to 150° C. it gives carbon dioxide and acetaldehyde.

    0
    0
  • In the terrestrial plants it differs in the subterranean and subaerial parts, being in the former preeminently absorptive, and in the latter protectiveprovision at the same time being made for the gaseous interchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide necessary for respiration and feeding.

    0
    0
  • The acid melts at 132° C., and at a higher temperature it rapidly decomposes into acetic acid and carbon dioxide.

    0
    0
  • It melts at 70° C.and at higher temperatures decomposes, with evolution of carbon dioxide and formation of aceto-nitrile, CH 3 CN.

    0
    0
  • When heated with water in a sealed tube to 150° C. it yields carbon dioxide and sulphuretted hydrogen.

    0
    0
  • The detection of carbon and hydrogen in organic compounds by the formation of carbon dioxide and water when they are burned was first correctly understood by Lavoisier, and as he had determined the carbon and hydrogen content of these two substances he was able to devise methods by which carbon and hydrogen in organic compounds could be estimated.

    0
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  • If twelve grammes of amorphous carbon be burnt to carbon dioxide under constant volume, the heat evolved (96.96 cal.) does not measure the entire thermal effect, but the difference between this and the heat required to break down the carbon molecule into atoms. If the number of atoms in the carbon molecule be denoted by n, and the heat required to split off each atom from the molecule by d, then the total heat required to break down a carbon molecule completely into atoms is nd.

    0
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  • Sodium phenolate is heated in a stream of carbon dioxide in an iron retort at a temperature of 180-220° C., when half the phenol distils over and a basic sodium salicylate is left.

    0
    0
  • Haemoglobin is composed of a basic albumin and an acid substance haematin; it combines readily with oxygen, carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide to form loose compounds (see Nutrition).

    0
    0
  • In the electrolysis of a concentrated solution of sodium acetate, hydrogen is evolved at the cathode and a mixture of ethane and carbon dioxide at the anode.

    0
    0
  • These esters on hydrolysis yield the free acids, which readily decompose, with loss of carbon dioxide and formation of an aldehyde, R /Crri /Crri Oc< +�Cl � CH � [[Cooc H - O I ?Ch Cooc H 0c Ch�Cooh - Co +Chrr I Cho]].

    0
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  • Nitroparaffins may also be obtained by the action of sodium nitrite on the a-halogen fatty acids, the a-nitro fatty acids first formed readily eliminating carbon dioxide (H.

    0
    0
  • Stannous Oxide, SnO, is obtained in the hydrated form Sn20(OH)2 from a solution of stannous chloride by addition of sodium carbonate; it forms a white precipitate, which can be washed with air-free water and dried at 80° C. without much change by oxidation; if it be heated in carbon dioxide the black SnO remains.

    0
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  • Another heat test, that of Will, consists in heating a weighed quantity of the guncotton in a stream of carbon dioxide to 130° C., passing the evolved gases over some red-hot copper, and finally collecting them over a solution of potassium hydroxide which retains the carbon dioxide and allows the nitrogen, arising from the guncotton decomposition, to be measured.

    0
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  • Percarbonates.-Barium percarbonate, BaCO 4, is obtained by passing an excess of carbon dioxide into water containing barium peroxide in suspension; it is fairly stable, and yields hydrogen peroxide when treated with acids (E.

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  • The simplest of all include: (z) the synthesis of sodium oxalate by passing carbon dioxide over metallic sodium heated to 3500 - 360'; (2) the synthesis of potassium formate from moist carbon dioxide and potassium, potassium carbonate being obtained simultaneously; (3) the synthesis of potassium acetate and propionate from carbon dioxide and sodium methide and sodium ethide; (4) the synthesis of aromatic acids by the interaction of carbon dioxide, sodium and a bromine substitution derivative; and (5) the synthesis of aromatic oxy-acids by the interaction of carbon dioxide and sodium phenolates (see Salicylic Acid).

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  • It may be obtained synthetically by heating sodium in a current of carbon dioxide to 360° C.; by the oxidation of ethylene glycol; by heating sodium formate to 400° C. (V.

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  • It loses its water of crystallization at loo C., and begins to sublime at about 150160° C., whilst on heating to a still higher temperature it partially decomposes into carbon dioxide and formic acid, or into carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide and water; the latter decomposition being also brought about by heating oxalic acid with concentrated sulphuric acid.

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  • Ammonium bicarbonate, NH 4 �HCO 3, is formed as shown above and also by passing carbon dioxide through a solution of the normal compound, when it is deposited as a white powder, which has no smell and is only slightly soluble in water.

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  • It melts at 55° C. and boils at 115° C. It may also be obtained by elimination of carbon dioxide from the pyrazine dicarboxylic acid formed when quinoxaline is oxidized with alkaline potassium permanganate (S.

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  • Its vapour density agrees with the molecular formula C302, and this formula is also confirmed by exploding the gas with oxygen and measuring the amount of carbon dioxide produced (see Ketenes).

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  • When the dry salt is heated to 190° it decomposes into normal carbonate, carbon dioxide and water.

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  • Moissan (Comptes rend., 1902, 134, p. 261) prepared potassium formate by passing a current of carbon monoxide or carbon dioxide over heated potassium hydride, KH+CO 2 = Khco 2 and KH-F2CO = Khco2+C.

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  • It is the carboxylic acid corresponding to tropine, for it yields the same products on oxidation, and by treatment with phosphorus pentachloride is converted into anhydroecgonine, C9H13N02, which, when heated to 280° C. with hydrochloric acid, splits out carbon dioxide and yields tropidine, C8H13N.

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  • The palisade layers of the mesophyll contain the larger number of chlorophyll grains (or corpuscles) while the absorption of carbon dioxide is carried on chiefly through the lower epidermis which is generally much richer in stomata.

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  • Heated with chromic acid solution to 140° C., it gives carbon dioxide and acetone.

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  • When heated with alcohol in sealed tubes, it yields carbamic esters; with alcohol and carbon bisulphide at Ioo° C., carbon dioxide is liberated and ammonium sulphocyanide is formed.

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  • Hydrochloric acid at 200° C. decomposes into oxalic acid, carbon dioxide and methylamine, whilst an alcoholic solution of a caustic alkali gives dimethyl urea and oxalic acid.

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  • Mallet, Comptes rendus, 1867, 64,' p. 226; 1868, 66, p. 349); by the electrolysis of solutions of sodium hydroxide, using nickel electrodes; by heating calcium plumbate (obtained from litharge and calcium carbonate) in a current of carbon dioxide (G.

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  • Various forms of apparatus are employed for this treatment of the crude bicarbonate - sometimes semi-circular troughs with mechanical agitators on the principle of the Thelen pan (see above) - all acting on the principle that the escaping ammonia and carbon dioxide must be fully utilized over again.

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  • A mixture of chlorine peroxide and chlorine is obtained by the action of hydrochloric acid on potassium chlorate, and similarly, on warming a mixture of potassium chlorate and oxalic acid to 70° C. on the water bath, a mixture of chlorine peroxide and carbon dioxide is obtained.

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  • On heating with hydrochloric acid at 180-200° C. it is decomposed; the products of the reaction being glycocoll, ammonia, formic acid and carbon dioxide.

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  • It melts at about 200° C., and at 210° to 255° it is resolved into carbon dioxide and pyrogallol, C 6 H 3 (OH) 3.

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  • It crystallizes in needles, which contain two molecules of water of crystallization, and melt at 156° C. When heated above the melting-point it loses carbon dioxide and yields quinoline.

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  • It crystallizes in needles, which are easily soluble in alcohol, and 'v hen heated above 130° C. lose carbon dioxide and leave a residue of quinoline-fl-carboxylic acid.

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  • It melts at 154-156° C., losing carbon dioxide and passing into cyclo-butane carboxylic acid, C 4 H 7 CO 2 H.

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  • The gases so formed vary in proportion with the temperature of the generator and .the amount of steam, but generally contain 32 to 38% of combustible gas, the remainder being the residual nitrogen of the air and carbon dioxide.

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  • In the Dellwik process, however, the main point is the adjustment of the air supplied to the fuel in the generator in such a way that carbon dioxide is formed instead of carbon monoxide.

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  • The trichloride, VC1 31 is a deliquescent solid formed when the tetrachloride is heated in a retort as long as chlorine is given off (Roscoe), or by heating vanadium trisulphide in a current of chlorine and fractionally distilling the resulting product at 150° C. in a current of carbon dioxide (Halberstadt, Ber., 1882, 15, p. 1619).

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  • Crace-Calvert in 1871 showed that the carbon dioxide of the atmosphere was a factor; and in 1888 Crum Brown published the theory - termed the "carbonic acid theory" - that water and carbon dioxide react with iron to form ferrous carbonate and hydrogen, the ferrous carbonate being subsequently oxidized by moist oxygen to ferric hydrate and regenerating carbon dioxide, which again reacts with more iron.

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  • Humans require relatively little oxygen, and plants are constantly transforming the carbon dioxide we exhale back into useful oxygen.

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  • The UK has set itself onto a path of a 60 per cent reduction in carbon dioxide emissions by 2050.

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  • One of the more fantastic possibilities given scientific attention has been sequestering carbon dioxide in the oceans by fertilizing them with iron.

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  • The cyanobacteria and algae that make up the crusts can fix atmospheric nitrogen and sequester carbon dioxide directly from the atmosphere.

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  • This is the reason that some of the global community is looks at the capture and sequestration of carbon dioxide.

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  • During hydrogen production, sorbent materials are used to remove gases such as carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and nitrogen.

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  • Ocean carbon sequestration is still one of important future options to stabilize the carbon dioxide concentration in the atmosphere.

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  • This stage takes place in the stroma of the chloroplasts and involve the fixation of carbon dioxide and the synthesis of glucose.

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  • Callisto has a very tenuous atmosphere composed of carbon dioxide.

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  • In Britain, the average person creates around 10 tons of carbon dioxide every year, compared to the two tons produced by Africans.

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  • Observations of phytoplankton blooms without the addition of iron supplements show underutilized resources of carbon dioxide and nitrates, supporting Martin 's Iron Hypothesis.

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  • Yeast - a simple, unicellular, microscopic plant that causes the fermentation of sugars to alcohol and carbon dioxide.

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  • Some of the tests involved pure water vapor whilst others examined the effects of injection of carbon dioxide and air into the condensing vapor.

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  • Plants can survive with water, sunlight, and carbon dioxide because of photosynthesis.

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  • Dry ice is frozen carbon dioxide useful for freezing things due to its temperature of -109 degrees Fahrenheit and is sometimes used in freezing and shipping items that should remain frozen.

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  • RealClimate, a website run by climate scientists, states that the rising temperatures affect the ocean's ability to absorb carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and this increases the acidity of the ocean waters.

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  • Plants take in carbon dioxide and release oxygen, thus transferring carbon from the atmosphere into the biosphere, where it stays until the plant dies.

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  • Studies have shown that biodiesel from virgin vegetable oil reduces carbon dioxide emissions and petroleum consumption when used in place of petroleum diesel.

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  • When B100 in urban transit buses is used, the result is a reduction of net carbon dioxide emissions by 78.45 percent.

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  • Since fossil fuels consist of carbon and hydrogen atoms, they create carbon dioxide when they are burned, or combusted.

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  • Oil burning is reportedly responsible for 30 percent of all carbon dioxide emissions.

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  • Purer coals do produce carbon dioxide but they also produce fewer bi-products.

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  • The burning of fossil fuels results in carbon dioxide and other particulates which are released into the air.

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  • Among the long list of pollutants that the burning of fossil fuels emits into the air are sulfur oxides, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide.

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  • Carbon monoxide is poisonous to humans and animals, and carbon dioxide is a primary greenhouse gas, contributing to global warming.

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  • In a larger environmental sense, landfills emit methane gas, which is a more dangerous greenhouse gas than carbon dioxide.

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  • One of the major problems stems from the fact that trees and other plants naturally convert harmful carbon dioxide in the air into oxygen.

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  • With the current rate of burning down trees in the rain forests as well as other instances of deforestation worldwide, we're seeing an overall increase in airborne carbon dioxide.

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  • Warmer global temperatures are causing the arctic tundra to begin emitting carbon dioxide.

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  • Carbon dioxide is the most significant cause of global warming, and most carbon dioxide emissions result from the burning of fossil fuels.

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  • Each time a fossil fuel burns, carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere increase.

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  • Electricity Production: Electricity generation through the burning of fossil fuels accounts for 40 percent of carbon dioxide emissions in the United States.

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  • Coal is the largest producer of carbon dioxide emissions, giving off nearly twice as much carbon per energy unit as natural gas.

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  • Pollution created by cars and light trucks accounts for nearly one-third of American carbon emission, and emissions of carbon dioxide from airplanes is responsible for an additional 3.5 percent of global warming.

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  • All living plants are capable of storing carbon, but as the number of plants on the planet declines, the amount of carbon dioxide free to build up in the atmosphere increases.

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  • As the ocean continues to become more acidic because of carbon dioxide emissions, coral reefs are becoming decimated.

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  • The burning of fossil fuels and the resulting increased levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere contribute to the greenhouse effect.

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  • Reduce, reuse, and recycle to minimize waste and reduce carbon dioxide emissions.

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  • Plant a tree to help absorb carbon dioxide from the environment.

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  • Moreover, traditional residential water heaters produce nearly half the total carbon dioxide emissions of an average car.

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  • Global warming occurs when greenhouse gases, such as carbon dioxide and methane, trap heat from the sun inside the atmosphere.

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  • Plant a tree to reduce carbon dioxide in the environment and replace trees lost to deforestation.

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  • Owning and driving a hybrid will cut down on emissions and carbon dioxide released into the air we all breathe.

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  • Greenhouse gases, like carbon dioxide and methane, help trap heat in the lower atmosphere, keeping the earth livable for human beings.

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  • The Environmental Defense Fund estimates that cars and trucks in the United States account for 45 percent of the world's entire carbon dioxide emissions.

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  • In 2004 that equaled 314 million metric tons of carbon dioxide released into the atmosphere just from the United States.

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  • Three percent of global carbon emissions come from airplanes, and while that doesn't seem like a big number, it is 600 million tons of carbon dioxide.

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  • Deforestation, particularly clear cutting forests by the lumber industry, accounts for nearly 25 percent of the carbon dioxide emitted every year around the globe.

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  • Trees collect and store carbon dioxide that is released immediately back into the atmosphere when they are cut down.

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  • The concerns with water temperatures lie with their role in the carbon dioxide exchange.

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  • Oceans are a major reservoir of carbon dioxide.

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  • The ability for oceans to absorb and store carbon dioxide decreases as water temperatures increase.

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  • Research has linked carbon dioxide emissions to some of the more serious environmental issues, including climate change and the greenhouse effect.

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  • As you learned in science class, trees remove carbon dioxide from the air and produce oxygen.

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  • By cutting down large quantities of trees, the balance of gases is thrown off and too much carbon dioxide remains in the atmosphere.

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  • Anytime gas, oil and other fossil fuels are burned, excess carbon dioxide is released, polluting the air.

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  • The Greenhouse Effect, also known as global warming, is the result of carbon dioxide collecting in the Earth's atmosphere.

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  • In a healthy environment, the planet's plant life would be able to convert the carbon dioxide back to oxygen.

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  • As the planet currently stands, the Earth's plants simply cannot process the abundance of carbon dioxide being produced, which leads to this problem.

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  • The impact of biodegradable bags yielded over 200 percent more carbon dioxide (CO2) equivalent tons than paper bags and over 400 percent for recyclable plastic bags.

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  • While strides have been made curbing pollutants, such as sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide gas emissions remain the greatest threat in terms of its potential to aid global warming.

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  • Once this oxidation process starts, what's left is converted into water, carbon dioxide and biomass.

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  • Since the majority of electricity used is generated by fossil fuels, using it causes the atmosphere becomes polluted with carbon dioxide (CO2), one of the substances many believe is linked to global warming.

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  • One of the biggest causes of global warming is the huge amount of carbon dioxide emissions released into the atmosphere each day.

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  • Not only do these chemicals cause cropland to store more heat due to the high percentage of nitrogen, they also create nitrogen oxides that are released into the air and mingle with the carbon dioxide to create greenhouse gasses.

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  • The problem is that trees actually remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and act as living air filters.

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  • This can happen either through burning trees that release carbon dioxide, or by cutting down trees so that they are no longer able to remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.

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  • Put simply, countries and individual companies can earn carbon credits, each of which allows the industry to produce one ton of carbon dioxide gas over and above their limits.

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  • Credits are awarded to countries and companies that take steps to lower their carbon dioxide emissions.

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  • They may produce more carbon dioxide one year than the following.

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  • Supporters also assert that their eating philosophy saves the lives of animals and reduces negative environmental effects, such as carbon dioxide emissions.

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  • The heart pumps blood into the tissues and also carries away carbon dioxide and toxins to the liver and kidneys to be eliminated from the body.

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  • The first is to act as the exchange mechanism for the body to allow it to intake oxygen and remove carbon dioxide.

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  • These are the air pockets where oxygen and carbon dioxide are exchanged in the blood.

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  • With a lower heating bill and less carbon dioxide released into the atmosphere, it's hard to see a downside to these units.

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  • Despite the natural caffeine content of these tea varieties all teas can be decaffeinated through a natural carbon dioxide process.

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  • When a person suffers from OHS and obstructive sleep apnea, they will find their daytime sleepiness increased due to high amounts of carbon dioxide in the blood.

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  • Too much carbon dioxide and a person will experience headaches, hypertension, depression and exhaustion (also known as CO2 narcosis).

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  • Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatments at night can help decrease the levels of carbon dioxide in the blood while increasing oxygen saturation.

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  • Most OHS patients are treated on an outpatient basis, but patients who are at severe risk due to levels of carbon dioxide in their blood and related issues (including liver damage) may be hospitalized for initial treatments.

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  • During sleep apnea episodes, throat tissues obstruct the airway, preventing breathing and causing a build-up of carbon dioxide.

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  • Méthode Champenoise is only one form of secondary fermentation that causes wines to bubble up with carbon dioxide.

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  • Over time, the yeast consumes the sugar, creating carbon dioxide bubbles that become trapped in the wine.

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  • When winemakers use gas injection, they essentially create wine soda by using a carbonater to inject carbon dioxide.

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  • The fermentation creates carbon dioxide gas, which is released into the air.

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  • Hemoglobin-An iron-containing pigment of red blood cells composed of four amino acid chains (alpha, beta, gamma, delta) that delivers oxygen from the lungs to the cells of the body and carries carbon dioxide from the cells to the lungs.

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  • The baby retains carbon dioxide and may lapse into unconsciousness unless stimulated to breathe.

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  • Taken together, pulmonary function tests give a good picture of how much air is moving in and out of the lungs and how efficiently oxygen is moved into the blood and carbon dioxide is moved out.

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  • Other tests may be used to measure how effectively oxygen and carbon dioxide are exchanged in the lungs.

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  • The alveoli, in which oxygen and carbon dioxide are exchanged, are clustered at the ends of the bronchioles.

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