Caprice sentence example

caprice
  • And who is in greater error than he who follows his own caprice without guidance from Allah.
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  • As generally understood, Duns makes caprice supreme in God.
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  • These fluctuations were owing partly to the character of Louis XV., and partly also to the fact that society in the 18th century was too advanced in its ideas to submit without resistance to the caprice of such a man.
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  • His conduct was evidently regulated by strict principle and not by mere caprice.
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  • With proclamations, placaats and statutes abundantly filling huge tomes, the caprice of the governor was in truth the law.
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  • Christian persecution under Nero was an imperial caprice.
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  • Examination of titles in the Prophets and the Psalms (to say nothing of Ecclesiastes and Wisdom of Solomon) makes it evident that these have been added by late editors who were governed by vague traditions or fanciful associations or caprice, and there is no reason to suppose the titles in Proverbs to be .exceptions to the general rule.
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  • The creation of a new capital by Constantine was not an act of personal caprice or individual judgment.
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  • He changed his ministers incessantly, and on mere caprice.
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  • If moon and sun, whose regular movements conveyed to the more intelligent minds the conception of the reign of law and order in the universe as against the more popular notion of chance and caprice, were divine powers, the same held good of the planets, whose movements, though more difficult to follow, yet in the course of time came to be at least partially understood.
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  • These are not mere mechanical rules, but neither are they simply fictions to conceal caprice.
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  • She took the veil without any reason, physical or moral; it was a mere caprice.
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  • It is not human caprice, but a principle of public order, which controls property.
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  • Her own life was by choice, and as far as her position would admit, one of almost austere simplicity and homeliness; and her subjects were proud of a royalty which involved none of the mischiefs of caprice or ostentation, but set an example alike of motherly sympathy and of queenly dignity.
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  • Whether due to passion or caprice this cost the duke his life, for John the Fearless had him assassinated in 1407, and thus let loose against one another the Burgundians and the Armagnacs, so-called because the son of the murdered duke was the son-in-law of the count of Armagnac (see ARaJAGNAc).
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  • In 462 B.C. a tribune proposed that the appointment of a commission to draw up a code expressing the legal principles of the administration was necessary to secure for the plebs a hold over magisterial caprice.
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  • The wretched inmates were dependent for food upon the caprice of their gaolers or the charity of the benevolent; water was denied them except in the scantiest proportions; their only bedding was putrid straw.
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  • These promises he observed more faithfully than Norman kings were wont to do; if the pledge was not redeemed in every detail, he yet kept England free from anarchy, abandoned the arbitrary and unjust taxation of his brother, and set up a government that worked by rule and order, not by the fits and starts of tyrannical caprice.
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  • The English nation began to have some conception of a rgime of fixed custom, in which its rights depended on some other source than the sovereigns personal caprice.
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  • Law has become something greater than, and independent of, royal caprice.
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  • It is true that Socrates brought into prominence the moral importance of rational and intelligent conduct as opposed to action which is the result of unintelligent caprice.
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  • "Yes, my dear friend," he began, "such is fortune's caprice.
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  • Sun kissed locks invoke an image of youthful caprice, and highlighting your hair is a convenient way of feigning time at the beach without the presence of harmful ultra-violet rays.
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  • The habit of absolute rule, always dangerous, was peculiarly corrupting when it penetrated every department of daily life, and when no external interference checked individual caprice in its action on the feelings and fortunes of inferiors.
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  • The famous Hirsch trial, and Voltaire's vanity and caprice, greatly lowered him in the esteem of the king, who, on his side, irritated his guest by often requiring him to correct bad verses, and by making him the object of rude banter.
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  • In the same year the changes which had occurred in the policy, or rather the caprice, of Queen Anne, brought about an approximation between England and France, and put an end to the influence which Marlborough had hitherto possessed.
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  • The free life of personal beings is no more to be mastered by a formula than it is to be assigned to caprice.
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  • The body or barrel should be moderately deep, long and straight, the length being really in the shoulders and in the quarters; the back should be strong Waxy* (1790) Penelope (1798) the shoulders and and muscular, with Wanderer (r790) loins running well Thalestris (1809) in at each end; Chanticleer (1787) Ierne (1790) the loins themEscape (1802) Young Heroine selves should have Waxy* (,790) great breadth and Penelope (1798) Octavian (1807) substance, this Caprice (1797) Whitelock (1803) being a vital neces Coriander mare (1799) sity for weightOrville: (1709) Minstrel (1803) carrying and pro Buzzard (1787) pelling power Alexander mare (1790) Williamson's Ditto (1800) uphill.
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  • For the police are likely to cost or a chevy caprice to drive the.
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  • It is also to be noted that he is here definitely opposing religion to magic, which he holds to be based on the (implicit) assumption " that the course of nature is determined, not by the passions or caprice of personal beings, but by the operation of immutable laws acting mechanically."
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  • But what it was, no one could tell: it might be some caprice of a sick and half-crazy man, or it might relate to public affairs, or possibly to family concerns.
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  • The further question whether the voluntary acts for which a man is ordinarily held responsible are really the outcome of his freedom of choice, is barely touched upon, and most of the problems which surround the attempt to distinguish human agency from natural and necessary causation and caprice or chance are left unsolved.
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  • - On the death of Peter (1725) the internal tranquillity and progress of the empire were again seriously threatened by the uncertainty of the order of succession, and the autocratic power which he had wielded so vigorously passed into the hands of a series of weak, indolent sovereigns who were habitually guided by personal caprice and the advice of intriguing favourites rather than by serious political considerations.
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  • Such indications of will were implicitly obeyed, or were translated by the worshippers as their own caprice or interest indicated.
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  • An officer whose nature, as the event showed, was interpenetrated with the spirit of legality was a fitting servant of a revolution whose aim it was to substitute legality for personal caprice as the dominant principle of affairs.
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  • This position, which, through his steadiness, scholarly conservatism and freedom from caprice as a critic, soon became one of great influence, he held until his death in New York City on the 4th of July 1880.
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  • The country, in the words of an expert sent to report on the subject by the French government, " can produce an infinite variety of wines suitable to every constitution and to every caprice of taste."
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  • A mockery of popular institutions, under the name of a burgher council, indeed existed; but this was a mere delusion, and must not be confounded with the system of local government by means of district burgher councils which that most able man, Commissioner de Mist, sought to establish during the brief government of the Batavian Republic from 1803 to 1806, when the Dutch nation, convinced and ashamed of the false policy by which they had permitted a mere money-making association to disgrace the Batavian name, and to entail degradation on what might have been a free and prosperous colony, sought to redeem their error by making this country a national colonial possession, instead of a slavish property, to be neglected, oppressed or ruined, as the caprice or avarice of its merchant owners might dictate.
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  • But, in fact, serfdom naturally took the form of an ugly ownership of live chattels on the part of a privileged class, and all sorts of excesses, of cruelty, ruthless exploitation and wanton caprice, followed as a matter of course.
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  • For, if He merely may redeem but must punish, then His greatest deeds on our behalf wear an aspect of caprice, or suggest unknown if not unknowable motives.
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  • But native caprice and jealousy of the growing force of the European nations in these seas, and the rivalries between those nations themselves, were destructive of sound trade; and the English factory, though several times set up, was never long maintained.
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