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capitol

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capitol

capitol Sentence Examples

  • The new state capitol was finished in 1903.

  • The state library in the Capitol contains about 150,000 volumes.

  • The most prominent building is the Capitol, about 400 ft.

  • As he entered the city and went on foot to the Capitol the plaudits of the people were unmistakably genuine.

  • The first state capitol was completed in 1836.

  • In the capitol grounds are monuments to the memory of Ulysses S.

  • The Capitol was built in 1905-1907 at a cost of more than $2,000,000; in it are.

  • Saturninus, defeated in a pitched battle in the Forum (Dec. 10), took refuge with his followers in the Capitol, where, the water supply having been cut off, they were forced to capitulate.

  • The principal buildings are the State Capitol, Grecian in architecture, the Federal Building, and the County Court House.

  • John the Divine, in New York, and another head of Lincoln in the rotunda of the Capitol at Washington.

  • The State Capitol Square (to acres) is not owned by the city.

  • The chief building in Des Moines is the State Capitol, erected at a cost of about $3,000,000; other important buildings are the public library (containing, in 1908, 40,415 volumes), the court house, the post office, the Iowa State Historical building, a large auditorium and two hospitals.

  • in width, runs at right angles with Front Street through the business centre of the city, being interrupted by the Capitol Park (about 16 acres).

  • Soon, however, she found her way on to the Capitol, and there a new Etruscan triad, Jupiter, Juno and Minerva, possibly going back from Etruria to Greece, was enshrined in a magnificent new temple built by Etruscan workmen and decorated in the Etruscan manner.

  • The State Capitol, built of native granite and marble (1887-1895, cost $2,500,000), is an imposing building.

  • From 1784 to 1804 Rutland was one of the capitals of Vermont, and the Capitol, built in 1784, is the second oldest building in the state.

  • In1907-1908the institution had 28 buildings (including the old State Capitol, built in 1840), a teaching and administrative force of nearly 200 members and 2315 students, of whom 1082 were in the college of liberal arts; the university library had about 65,000 volumes (25,000 were destroyed by fire in 1897), and the university law library, 14,000 volumes; and the total income of the university was about $611,000.

  • The old state capitol, dating from 1839, is of considerable interest; in it were held the secession convention (1861), the "Black and Tan Convention" (1868), and the constitutional convention of 1890, and in it Jefferson Davis made his last speech (1884).

  • The Capitol,' dedicated in 1906, was erected to replace one burned in 1897; it is a fine building, with a dome modelled after St Peter's at Rome.

  • Among prominent public buildings are the State Capitol (completed 1889), containing a law library of about 65,000 volumes and a collection of portraits of famous Georgians, the north-west front of the Capitol grounds containing an equestrian statue (unveiled in 1907) of John Brown Gordon (1832-1904), a distinguished Confederate general in the American Civil War and governor of Georgia in 1887-1890; the court house; the Carnegie library, in which the young men's library, organized in 1867, was merged in 1902; the post office building; and the Federal prison (about 4 m.

  • In the First Civil War they were to be found in both camps, and the murderers of Caesar were escorted to the Capitol by gladiators.

  • Licinius Sura, a lifelong friend of Trajan, and on the 27th of October in the year 97 he ascended the Capitol and proclaimed that he adopted Trajan as his son.

  • Helena is delightfully situated with Mt Helena as a background in the hollow of the Prickly Pear valley, a rich agricultural region surrounded by rolling hills and lofty mountains, and contains many fine buildings, including the state capitol, county court house, the Montana club house, high school, the cathedral of St Helena, a federal building, and the United States assay office.

  • In Capitol Square are also a marble statue of Henry Clay, by Joel T.

  • Among the best residence streets are Peachtree and West Peachtree streets to the north, and the older streets to the south of the business centre of the city - Washington Street, Whitehall, Pryor and Capitol Avenues.

  • Near the centre of the city are the Capitol Grounds (27 acres; until 1872 the campus of Trinity College) and Bushnell Park (41 acres), adjoining Capitol Park.

  • The Capitol (begun in 1785 and completed in 1792 - the wings were added in 1906) was designed from a model and plans of the Maison Carree, at Nimes, supplied by Thomas Jefferson, while he was minister to France.

  • The chief public building is the state capitol (built in1868-1888at a cost of about $4,50o,000), in the form of a Greek cross, with porticoes of granite and a dome 361 ft.

  • " It was at Rome, on the 15th of October 1764, as I sat musing amidst the ruins of the Capitol, while the barefooted friars were singing vespers in the temple of Jupiter, that the idea of writing the decline and fall of the city first started to my mind."

  • The city is attractively built on high level land, above the river; in addition to a fine customs house, court house and high school, it contains the West Virginia state capitol, erected in 1880.

  • Among the public buildings, the finest is the new State Capitol, one of the largest and most imposing in America.

  • The university, organized in 1847, and occupying the old State Capitol grounds, is an integral part of the public school system of the state, and is under the control of a board of regents, consisting of the governor, the superintendent of public instruction and eleven members, elected - one from each congressional district - by the General Assembly.

  • The president ordered the withdrawal of Federal troops from the capitol on the 20th of April 1877, and the white party was thus left in control.

  • It is the fifth state capitol of Illinois and the second erected in Springfield.

  • On the 1 9 th of May 1347 heralds invited the people to a parliament on the Capitol, and on the loth, the day being Whit-Sunday, the meeting took place.

  • Further to conciliate the Romans and especially Sulla,he sent to the Capitol a group of Victories guarding a device in gold showing Bocchus handing over Jugurtha to Sulla.

  • On the Capitol Grounds is the state capitol (Richard M.

  • Richmond has many fine monuments and statues of historic interest and artistic merit, the most noteworthy of the former being the Washington Monument, in Capitol Square.

  • In October 97, in the temple of Jupiter on the Capitol, Trajan was formally adopted as his son and declared his colleague in the government of the empire (Pliny, Paneg.

  • The state capitol, an imposing structure built on a bluff above the river, was built in1838-1842and enlarged in 1887-1888; it was first occupied in 1840 by the legislature, which previously had met (after 1837) in the county court house.

  • Other prominent structures are the U.S. government and the judiciary buildings, the latter connected with the capitol by a stone terrace, the city hall, the county court house, the union station, the board of trade, the soldiers' memorial hall (with a seating capacity of about 4500), and several office buildings.

  • Caesar, in return, accused him of embezzling public money during the reconstruction of the temple on the Capitol, and proposed to obliterate his name from the inscription and deprive him of the office of commissioner for its restoration.

  • Among the public buildings are the capitol, the United States government building, a United States mint, and a state orphans' home; in the vicinity are the state prison and a United States government school for Indians.

  • The chief manufactures are paper and wire, and from the quarries near the village of Lee is obtained an excellent quality of marble; these quarries furnished the marble for the extension of the Capitol at Washington, for St Patrick's cathedral in New York City and for the Lee High School and the Lee Public Library (1908).

  • When Vespasian was proclaimed emperor at Alexandria,Domitian escaped with difficulty from the temple of the Capitol, which had been set on fire by the Vitellians, and remained in hiding till his father's party proved victorious.

  • The state capitol stands in a square 8 acres in extent, and has a central tower and dome 240 ft.

  • Subsequently the Romans, when besieged in the Capitol by the Gauls, created him dictator; he completely defeated the enemy (but see Brennus and Rome: History, ii., "The Republic") and drove them from Roman territory.

  • Other prominent buildings are the Supreme Court building, the county court house (the old state capitol, finished in 18J3), the city-hall, the state arsenal, the high school and the public library.

  • The issue of bonds for the construction of the new capitol building and other purposes has led, however, to a new debt, which at the beginning of 1910 amounted to $4,800,000.

  • When Massachusetts was called upon to select for Statuary Hall in the capitol at Washington two figures from the long line of her worthies, she chose as her fittest representatives John Winthrop, the type of Puritanism and state-builder, and Samuel Adams (though here the choice was difficult between Samuel Adams and John Adams) as her greatest leader in the heroic period of the War of Independence.

  • Dressed in full armour and attended by the papal vicar, Cola headed a procession to the Capitol; here he addressed the assembled crowd, speaking "with fascinating eloquence of the servitude and redemption of Rome."

  • Among the public edifices are the capitol, which occupies a whole square, the university, of nearly equal size, the cathedral, pantheon, masonic temple (built by the state in the spendthrift days of Guzman Blanco), national library, opera-house, and a number of large churches.

  • Besides the university library, there is the Ohio state library occupying a room in the capitol and containing in 1908 126,000 volumes, including a "travelling library" of about 36,000 volumes, from which various organizations in different parts of the state may borrow books; the law library of the supreme court of Ohio, containing complete sets of English, Scottish, Irish, Canadian, United States and state reports, statutes and digests; the public school library of about 68,000 volumes, and the public library (of about 55,000), which is housed in a marble and granite building completed in 1906.

  • The principal building is the state capitol (completed in 1857) in a square of ten acres at the intersection of High and Broad streets.

  • They entered Italy on the north-east under the leadership of Antonius Primus, defeated the army of Vitellius at Bedriacum (or Betriacum), sacked Cremona and advanced on Rome, which they entered after furious fighting and a frightful confusion, in which the Capitol was destroyed by fire.

  • Among the public buildings and institutions are the State Capitol, the State Library, a city public library, the county court-house, the Federal building, the state penitentiary and several charitable institutions.

  • Richardson; the Federal Building; the State Museum of Natural History; the galleries of the Albany Institute and Historical and Art Society, in State Street, opposite the Capitol; Harmanus Bleecker Hall, a theatre since 1898; and the Ten Eyck and Kenmore hotels.

  • In that year, on a hill near the site of the present Capitol, Fort Orange was built, and around it, as a centre, the new town.

  • But the Tarpeian rock was a near neighbor of the Capitol.

  • Her oldest sanctuary at Rome was in the temple built by Tarquin on the Capitol, where she was worshipped with Jupiter and Juno.

  • Among its prominent buildings are the United States government building, the Capitol (erected1866-1903at a cost of $3,200,589 and one of the best state buildings in the country), the county court house, the public library (1882), an auditorium (with a seating capacity of about 5000), the Y.M.C.A.

  • The city is the see of a Protestant Episcopal bishop. In the Capitol are the library (about 6000 volumes) and natural history collections of the Kansas Academy of Science, and the library (30,000 books, 94,000 pamphlets and 28,500 manuscripts) and collections of the Kansas State Historical Society, which publishes Kansas Historical Collections (1875 sqq.) and Biennial Reports (1879 sqq.).

  • dag dvergastein and returns them than the amazing capitol bar the.

  • Its streets are wide and well constructed, and there are sixteen public parks, three of which, East Lake, Lakeview and Capitol, are particularly attractive.

  • A large and handsome building of white granite was begun in 1908 directly opposite the Capitol to accommodate the department of education and the magnificent state library (about 450,000 volumes).

  • I hated that I didn't find a way to include any classic Angie/Jesse stuff from AMC, or any moments from Capitol or The Edge of Night.

  • The background information provided to Young and the Restless writers about how things work in the Capitol helped them deliver a realistic portrayal in the fictional Genoa City.

  • The politically motivated soap opera Capitol was set in the fictional Jeffersonia suburb of Washington D.C. and focused on the political and romantic machinations of r the Denning, Clegg and McCandless families.

  • Prior to arriving in Genoa City, Walton portrayed Kelly Harper on the now-defunct Capitol.

  • Following a recovery from drug and alcohol addiction, Walton joined the daytime drama Capitol as Kelly Harper.

  • When Capitol ended, Walton joined The Young and the Restless as Jill Foster Abbott.

  • From the hub of activity in the Mediterranean to the capitol of an empire, the "Eternal City" has always been a center of culture, art, history and knowledge.

  • Attractions in the city include the ornate State Capitol building, designed after Paris' Hotel de Ville; the "Egg," an egg-shaped performing arts center; and the Empire State Plaza, a striking mixed use facility in the heart of downtown.

  • Your kids can experience hands-on learning at the White House, the National Mall, the Smithsonian Institution Building and the U.S. Capitol Building.

  • Heart, the group's first album with Capitol Records, introduced the public to a different sound.

  • In the wake of whitechocolatespaceegg, she signed with major label Capitol Records, and things began to change.

  • Capitol Records were unhappy with the initial recordings of the songs and wanted something with a bit more crossover potential.

  • The resulting four tracks pleased Capitol, and they went ahead with the album.

  • This self titled album might have pleased the top brass at Capitol, but it did not please many fans and critics.

  • A second album for Capitol tried to turn back to her earlier sound, but Phair was unable to convince many of her old fans.

  • The album received better reviews than the first Capitol album, but it was not a major success.

  • In the end, Capitol Records won and those 15 tracks that Grohl and Barrett recorded would end up being the Foo Fighters debut album.

  • The Foo Fighters would eventually leave Capitol Records for RCA when their friend and Capitol Records president was forced to resign.

  • That sound has evolved as the band has signed to numerous labels including EMI (their founding home), Harvest, Capitol, Tower and lastly Columbia over their active years (1965 to 1996).

  • Perry went on to work with Island/Def Jam Music Group and Columbia Records before finally settling with Capitol Records.

  • He is, however, gay in a homophobic culture, and his disgusted father sends him to his aunt, a Herald in the kingdom's capitol city Haven, to 'make a man' out of him.

  • Washington, D.C. Architecture with the U.S. Capitol, the White House, the Jefferson Memorial, the Washington Monument, Georgetown, and the Lincoln Memorial.

  • Photos of the Capitol are typically from the mall and capture the iconic dome.

  • In fact, the government produced so much cotton that it could have carpeted the entire capitol four times over if laid out flat!

  • A bronze equestrian statue was set up in the Forum, now on the Capitol.

  • north of the capitol.

  • He erected many temples and public buildings (amongst them the Odeum, a kind of theatre for musical performances) and restored the temple of the Capitol.

  • This agreement is known as the Pact of Rome, because it was publicly proclaimed at a " Congress of the Oppressed Nationalities of Austria-Hungary," held on April 8 in the Roman Capitol.

  • The castle, built in 1680, is believed to occupy the site of the Roman capitol.

  • In 1881-85 and in1898-1905he was a regent of the university of Wisconsin; and he was a member (1897-1903) of the commission which had charge of the erection of the State Historical Library at Madison, and in 1906-8 of the commission for the construction of the new state capitol.

  • The boundarystones between properties (termini) were also the objects of cult at the annual festival of the Terminalia, and the "god Terminus," the symbolic boundary-stone, shares with Jupiter the great temple on the Capitol.

  • Jupiter in the rusticcult was a sky-god concerned mainly with the wine festivals and associated with the sacred oak on the Capitol.

  • A new state library and supreme court building and a new state armoury and arsenal, both of granite, have been (1910) erected upon lands recently added to the Capitol Grounds, thus forming a group of state buildings with the Capitol as the centre.

  • The Hebrew "shekel of the sanctuary" is familiar; the standard volume of the apet was secured in the dromus of Anubis at Memphis (35); in Athens, besides the standard weight, twelve copies for public comparison were kept in the city; also standard volume measures in several places (2); at Pompeii the block with standard volumes cut in it was found in the portico of the forum (33); other such standards are known in Greek cities (Gythium, Panidum and Trajanopolis) (11, 33); at Rome the standards were kept in the Capitol, and weights also in the temple of Hercules (2); the standard cubit of the Nilometer was before Constantine in the Serapaeum, but was removed by him to the church (2).

  • Already in 68 B.C. he had paraded the bust of Marius at his aunt's funeral; in 65 B.C., as curule aedile, he restored the trophies of Marius to their place on the Capitol; in 64 B.C., as president of the murder commission, he brought three of Sulla's executioners to trial, and in 63 B.C. he caused the ancient procedure of trial by popular assembly to be revived against the murderer of Saturninus.

  • 91), and as praetor (70) he maintained, in opposition to Vespasian, that the management of the finances ought to be left to the discretion of the senate; he proposed that the capitol, which had been destroyed in the Neronian conflagration, should be restored at the public expense; he saluted Vespasian by his private name, and did not recognize him as emperor in his praetorian edicts.

  • It contains the state capitol, the state penitentiary, a U.S. land office, a U.S. surveyor-general's office, a U.S. Indian school and a U.S. weather station; about a mile S.

  • With an imposing force he returned to the Forum, and at the foot of the Capitol encountered Galba, who, alarmed by vague rumours of treachery, was making his way through a dense crowd of wondering citizens towards the barracks of the guard.

  • The sessions of the court are held in the Capitol.

  • Among the public buildings and institutions are the state capitol, the executive mansion (1909), the Federal building (in front of which is a monument to Kit Carson), the county court house, a National Guard armoury, a Federal industrial boarding school for Indians (with 300 pupils in 1908) and Saint Catherine's Industrial School for Indians (Roman Catholic).

  • The Texas State Capitol, a handsome building of red Texas granite, with a dome 318 ft.

  • Next to the National Capitol at Washington, it is the largest capitol building in the United States, and it is said to be one of the ten largest buildings in the world.

  • With Franklin, whose bust he had recently executed, Houdon left France in 1785, and, staying some time with Washington at Mount Vernon, he modelled the bust, with which he decided to go back to Paris, there to complete the statue destined for the capitol of the State of Virginia.

  • (1142), who was unable to stem the growing revolution or prevent the establishment of a Roman senate sitting in the Capitol.

  • Lucius II., when called upon to renounce all his regalian rights, fell mortally wounded in an attempt to drive the autonomists by force from the Capitol (1145).

  • To give this supremacy a firmer basis, Boniface fortified the Vatican and the Capitol, and restored the castle of St Angelo - which had previously been used as a quarry - providing it with walls and battlements, and erecting a tower in the centre.

  • Taxes on real estate have been abolished and those on personal property are being reduced, although the heavy expenditures on the new capitol at Harrisburg checked the movement temporarily.

  • of the National Capitol.

  • - State Capitol, Hartford, Connecticut.

  • Among the prominent buildings are the Capitol, which is constructed of native sandstone and stands in a park of considerable beauty, the county court-house, St Peter's hospital, the governor's mansion and the city hall.

  • The state library is housed in the Capitol.

  • He talked at large of the "purple geese of the Capitol" and met the remonstrances of Cardinal Zelada, the papal secretary of state, with insults.

  • Besides these may be mentioned the church of St Pantaleon, a 13th-century structure, with a monument to Theophano, wife of the emperor Otto II.; St Cunibert, in the Byzantine-Moorish style, completed in 1248; St Maria im Capitol, the oldest church in Cologne, dedicated in 1049 by Pope Leo IX., noted for its crypt, organ and paintings; St Cecilia, St Ursula, containing the bones of that saint and, according to legend, of the 1 r,000 English virgins massacred near Cologne while on a pilgrimage to Rome; St Severin, the church of the Apostles, and that of St Andrew (1220 and 1414), which contains the remains of Albertus Magnus in a gilded shrine.

  • In Archbishop Hildebold's day Cologne was still contained by the square of its Roman walls, within which stood the cathedral and the newly-founded church of St Maria (known later as "im Capitol"); the city was, however, surrounded by a ring of churches, among which those of St Gereon, St Ursula, St Severin and St Cunibert were conspicuous.

  • Among the principal buildings are the state capitol, the state library, the city hall, the county court-house, the post-office, the Fowler public library, the state hospital, the state prison, the Centennial home for the aged, the Margaret Pillsbury memorial hospital, the Rolfe and Rumford asylum for orphan girls, founded by the countess Rumford, and several fine churches, including the Christian Science church built by Mrs Eddy.

  • Among the others are two by Thomas Ball, one in statuary hall in the Capitol at Washington, and one in Boston; two - one in Rochester, N.Y., and one in Springfield, Ill.

  • Carpenter painted in 1864 "Lincoln signing the Emancipation Proclamation," now in the Capitol at Washington.

  • Among the public buildings are the state capitol, the post office building, the county court house, the city hall, the second regiment armoury, public library (containing about 42,000 volumes in 1909), and the building (1910) given by Henry C. Kelsey to the city for the school of industrial arts (founded in 1898).

  • Here also are the state normal and model schools (1855), the state library, housed in the capitol, the state school for deaf mutes, the state home for girls, one of the two state hospitals for the insane (opened in 1848), the state arsenal - the building being the old state prison - the state prison (1836), St Francis hospital (1874), Mercer hospital (1892), the William McKinley memorial hospital (1887), the city hospital, two children's day nurseries, the Friends' home, the Union industrial home (for destitute children), the Florence Crittenton home (1895), the indigent widows' and single women's home (1854), the Har Sinai charity society, the home for friendless children, and the society of St Vincent de Paul.

  • above sea-level on ground sloping gently in all directions from its centre, where there is a beautiful park of 4 acres known as Union Square, in which is the State Capitol and from which extend four broad streets.

  • The State Capitol (1840) is surmounted by a dome and modelled to some extent after the Parthenon and other buildings of ancient Greece; the first Capitol (begun in 1794) was burned in 1831.

  • But Sixtus had no appreciation of antiquity: the columns of Trajan and Antoninus were made to serve as pedestals for the statues of SS Peter and Paul; the Minerva of the Capitol was converted into "Christian Rome"; the Septizonium of Severus was demolished for its building materials.

  • Rome thus lay at his mercy, but he wasted time, and the Romans were able to occupy and provision the Capitol (though they had not sufficient forces to defend their walls) and to send their women and children to Veii.

  • The city was sacked and burnt; but the Capitol itself withstood a siege of more than six months, saved from surprise on one occasion only by the wakefulness of the sacred geese and the courage of Marcus Manlius.

  • The chief actors in the ceremony were Augustus himself and his colleague Agrippa, - while, as the extant record tells us, the processional hymn, chanted by youths and maidens first before the new temple of Apollo on the Palatine and then before the temple of Jupiter on the Capitol, was composed by Horace.

  • Augustus witnessed the triumphal procession, and Tiberius, as it turned from the Forum to ascend the Capitol, halted, descended from his triumphal car, and did reverence to his adopted father.

  • There are sandstone deposits in Carbon county, which supplied the stone for the Capitol at Cheyenne and the state penitentiary; and from the Iron mountain quarries in Laramie county was taken the white variety used in building the Carnegie library and the Federal building in Cheyenne.

  • Facing on Plaza de la Constitucian are the capitol and cathedral.

  • The capitol, which is occupied by the executive and legislative departments, is an elegant and spacious building, erected since 1875.

  • Besides streets running east and west, which are named by the letters of the alphabet, and streets running north and south, which are numbered, there are avenues named for various states, which radiate from two foci - the Capitol and the White House - or traverse the city without any fixed plan.

  • North and south of the Capitol they are numbered; east and west from it streets are lettered, but streets are distinguished by annexing to the name or letter the name of the quarter: N.W., S.W., N.E.

  • - the city is divided into these four parts by North Capitol, East Capitol and South Capitol streets, which intersect at the Capitol.

  • The principal business streets are Pennsylvania Avenue (especially between the Capitol and the White House) and 7th, 9th, 14th and F streets.

  • In L'Enfant's plan a park or mall was to extend from the Capitol to the White House.

  • Instead of this the mall extends from the Capitol to Washington Monument, which stands near the intersection of lines west from the Capitol and south from the White House.

  • Olmsted, Jr.) was appointed by authority of the United States Senate to prepare plans for the beautification of the city and this body, seeking in the main to return to L'Enfant's plan, has submitted a design for a park-like treatment of the entire district between Pennsylvania and Maryland avenues from the Capitol to the White House and between lower New York Avenue and the Potomac, with an elm-shaded mall 300 ft.

  • wide bisecting the park from the Capitol to the Monument, with a group of official and scientific buildings fronting the mall on either side, with a group of municipal buildings between the mall and Pennsylvania Avenue, and with a Lincoln memorial on the bank of the Potomac. Potomac Park (740 acres), a portion of which is embraced in this design, has already been reclaimed from the Potomac river.

  • The Capitol faces east, and on this side is a richly sculptured 3 portico with Corinthian columns leading to the rotunda under the dome, a sculptured Corinthian portico leading to the Senate Chamber in the north wing, and a plain Corinthian portico leading to the Hall of Representatives in the south wing; there is also a portico at each end and on the west side of each wing.

  • East of the White House and obstructing the view from it to the Capitol stands the oldest of the departmental buildings, the Treasury Building (architect, Robert Mills (1781-1855), then U.S. architect), an imposing edifice mainly of granite, 510 ft.

  • The exterior walls are of white New Hampshire granite, and the walls of the See Glenn Brown, The History of the United States Capitol (2 vols., 1900-1903).

  • 4 Connected with the Capitol by subways, immediately S.E.

  • of the Capitol respectively, are the marble office buildings (1908) of the House of Representatives and of the Senate.

  • The Capitol is connected by subways with the Library of Congress also.

  • On Pennsylvania Avenue, nearly midway between the Capitol and the White House, is the nine-storey Post Office (1899; with a tower 300 ft.

  • W Story) in the grounds of the Smithsonian Institution, of John Marshall (by Story) on the west terrace of the Capitol, of General Andrew Jackson (by Clark Mills) and, in Lafayette Square, of the Marquis de Lafayette (by Falguiere and Mercie), of the Comte de Rochambeau (by F.

  • In Pennsylvania Avenue, at the foot of Capitol Hill, is a Monument of Peace (by Franklin Simmons) in memory of officers, seamen and marines of the U.S. Navy killed in the Civil War.

  • of the Capitol) isa National Military Cemetery containing the graves of 7220 soldiers.

  • On the bank of the Anacostia river, east of the Capitol, is the Congressional Cemetery containing the graves of many members of Congress.

  • One wing of the Capitol and the President's House were nearly completed, but much of the land surrounding the Capitol was a marsh; there were no streets worthy of the name, the roads were very bad, and the members of Congress were obliged to lodge in Georgetown.

  • of Washington, occupied the city and burned the Capitol, the President's House, some of the public offices, and the Navy Yard.

  • At the close of the first day's bombardment of Fort Sumter (April 12th, 1861) Leroy P. Walker (1817-1884), the Confederate Secretary of War, boasted that before the 1st of May the Confederate flag would float over the Capitol.

  • Owen (13,102), Teocalli Mountain (13,220), Snow Mass (13,970, Hayden) and Maroon (14,003, Hayden) mountains, Castle Peak (14,259), Capitol Mountain (13,997, Hayden), Pyramid Peak (13,885, Hayden), Taylor Peak (13,419), and about a dozen other summits above 12,000 ft.

  • The main duty of the flamens was the offering of daily sacrifices; on the 1st of October the three major flamens drove to the Capitol and sacrificed to Fides Publica (the Honour of the People).

  • The state capitol is in a wooded park at the summit of a hill 85 ft.

  • The capitol, built in1860-1867(with an addition in 1883) on the site of the original capitol building (1837-1838), was partially destroyed by fire in 1904, and in1909-1910was replaced by a larger edifice.

  • The principal business portion of the city is built about the capitol park and the university.

  • Running directly west from the capitol is State Street, at the western end of which lie the grounds of the university of Wisconsin, occupying a hilly wooded tract of 300 acres, and extending for a mile along the south shore of Lake Mendota.

  • Other libraries in the city include the state law library (45,0eo volumes) in the capitol, the Madison public library (22,500 volumes), and the Woodman astronomical library (7500 volumes).

  • The state capitol was built in 1880-1882, replacing another burned in 1862.

  • He laid out the Circus Maximus, instituted the "great" games, built the great sewers (cloacae), and began the construction of the temple of Jupiter on the Capitol.

  • The principal buildings are the state capitol, the United States assay office, a Carnegie library, a natatorium, and the Federal building, containing the post office, the United States circuit and district court rooms, and a U.S. land office.

  • They were arrested, proved guilty, and on the 5th of December condemned to death and strangled in the underground dungeon on the slope of the Capitol.

  • There, in the month of April, Petrarch assumed the poet's crown upon the Capitol from the hand of the Roman senator amid the plaudits of the people and the patricians.

  • The ancient and the modern eras met together on the Capitol at Petrarch's coronation, and a new stadium for the human spirit, that which we are wont to style Renaissance, was opened.

  • Five public orations have been preserved, the most weighty of which, in explanation of Petrarch's conception of literature, is the speech delivered on the Capitol upon the occasion of his coronation.

  • Luku!u A Longitude E.ust of Capitol Pygmy Forest (from the races inhabiting it), the Aruwimi or Ituri Forest (from the rivers traversing it), the Stanley Forest (from its discoverer), or the Great Congo Forest.

  • Of later Roman sarcophagi, there is an immense series enriched with figures in high relief, of which the chief are the Niobid example in the Lateran, the Lycomedes sarcophagus in the Capitol, the Penthesilea sarcophagus in the Vatican, and the immense sarcophagus representing a battle of the Romans and the barbarians in the Museo delle Terme.

  • Of the Roman processions, the most prominent was that of the Triumph, which had its origin in the return of the victorious army headed by the general, who proceeded in great pomp from the Campus to the Capitol to offer sacrifice, accompanied by the army, captives, spoils, the chief magistrate, priests bearing the images of the gods, amidst strewing of flowers, burning of incense and the like (Ovid, Trist.

  • Connected with the triumph was the pompa circensis, or solemn procession which preceded the games in the circus; it first came into use at the ludi roman, when the games were preceded by a great procession from the Capitol to the Circus.

  • Thus, when it became customary for the consul to celebrate games at the opening of the consular year, he came, under the empire, to appear in triumphal robes in the processes consularis, or procession of the consul to the Capitol to sacrifice to Jupiter.

  • The introduction to a dialogue called Virgilius orator an pceta is extant, in which the author (whose name is given as Publius Annius Florus) states that he was born in Africa, and at an early age took part in the literary contests on the Capitol instituted by Domitian.

  • TARPEIA, in Roman legend, daughter of the commander of the Capitol during the war with the Sabines caused by the rape of the Sabine women.

  • Simylus, a Greek elegiac poet, makes Tarpeia betray the Capitol to a king of the Gauls.

  • It is the seat of the Middle Georgia Military and Agricultural College, which occupies the old capitol building, and of the Georgia Normal and Industrial College for girls (1889; enrolment 1908-1909, 653), which is a part of the University of Georgia, and occupies the site of the old state penitentiary.

  • The principal buildings include a state capitol (built 1883-1889); a city-hall, formerly the U.S. government building (1874-1879); a county court-house; a federal building (1904-1906); a Carnegie library (1902); a hospital for crippled children (1905) and a home for the friendless, both supported by the state; a state penitentiary and asylum for the insane, both in the suburbs; and the university of Nebraska.

  • Close to the forum, if not in it, was the capitol, in which the university of Constantinople was established.

  • Among the principal buildings are the capitol, modelled after the National Capitol at Washington; the United States government building, the Soldiers' and Sailors' Home, the Union Pacific depot, the high school, the Carnegie library, St Mary's cathedral (Roman Catholic), the Convent of the Holy Child Jesus, the Masonic Temple and the Elks' clubhouse.

  • They are employed principally for interior decoration, and were thus largely used in the capitol at Nashville and in the National Capitol at Washington.

  • However my 45 liter fuel tank capacity will easily take me to the capitol from the border at Kariba.

  • Elizabethan dramatists generally assumed that the Capitol was the site of the Senate House.

  • Have adversely affected quot the march of the criticisms released on Capitol hill.

  • The lineup remained intact for their third release, ' Forever ', in 1988 for Capitol.

  • Dancin ' Homer; Homer relates the story of how he moved to Capitol City to be their football mascot.

  • nun at the convent of St Mary in the Capitol in Cologne in Germany.

  • Currently, the mood on Capitol Hill seems very partisan, with each party criticizing the other's proposal.

  • We have republicans, Democrats, people who work on Capitol Hill.

  • The books were kept in the temple of Jupiter on the Capitol and shared the destruction of the temple by fire in 83.

  • The old capitol (first occupied in 1829) is still standing.

  • This inspection (recognitio) must not be confounded with the full-dress procession (transvectio) on the 15th of July from the temple of Mars or Honos to the Capitol, instituted in 304 B.C. by the censor Q.

  • It occupies a commanding position in Capitol Square (7.84 acres), one of the highest points in the city.

  • above the Potomac stands the Capitol I (built 1793-1827; architect, William Thornton (d.

  • The Library of Congress (1889-18c, 7; cost, exclusive of site, over $6,000,000), south-east of the Capitol, was designed by Smithmeyer & Pelz, and the designs were modified by Edward Pearce Casey (b.

  • Los Angeles Architecture with the Hollywood Bowl, Concert Hall, La Minitura by Frank Lloyd Wright, the Capitol Records Tower, Griffith Observatory, and Los Angeles International Airport.

  • Fortunately, interior design firms are abundant in the nation's capitol, giving you plenty of opportunities to implement your own style or explore the basics of interior design.

  • Federal style was particularly influential in US architecture and can be seen on display in the design of the Capitol building.

  • The nation's capitol has so many iconic places to visit you can devote an entire album to layouts of your trip.

  • The capitol city is Phoenix, and US Airlines has a hub at the airport.

  • Due to the success of this record, the band was later signed to Capitol Records.

  • After signing with Capitol, LTJ released Losing Streak in 1996.

  • As a result of their rising popularity, LTJ bought their contract from Capitol and released 2000's Borders and Boundaries on Fat Wreck Records.

  • The McMillan Commission decided that it should be an open mall area from the Capitol to the Potomac River in Washington, D.C. Chest French designed the statue.

  • In the Legislative Branch, you can work in the Architect of the Capitol (deals with the operation and maintenance among other things), the Congressional Budget Office.

  • This vast domain has been utilized to provide homes for settlers, to encourage education, to subsidize railways, and to build the state capitol.

  • Near the Capitol, at the approach of the memorial bridge across the Park river, is the Soldiers' and Sailors' memorial arch, designed by George Keller and erected by the city in 1885 in memory of the Hartford soldiers and sailors who served in the American Civil War.

  • Here, facing MaiStreet, stands the city hall, a beautiful example of Colonial architecture, which was designed by Charles Bulfinch, completed in 1796, and until 1879 used as a state capitol; it has subsequently been restored.

  • A large number of statues have been found in the villa, and costly foreign marbles and fine mosaic pavements, some of the last being preserved in situ, while among others may be named the mosaic of the doves in the Capitol and that of the masks in the Vatican.

  • In the front court of the, temple of Minerva on the Capitol there was a chapel of Juventas, in which a coin had to be deposited by each youth on his assumption of the toga virilis, and sacrifices were offered on behalf of the rising manhood of the state.

  • As a decorative artist his work may be seen at Trinity Church, Boston; the Bank of Pittsburg; and the Capitol at St Paul, Minnesota.

  • We have Republicans, Democrats, people who work on Capitol Hill.

  • Founded in 1975, the Washington D.C. Chapter of ASID is a professional organization of over 800 members from parts of Virginia, Maryland, and the Capitol region.

  • The pre-show exhibit also includes a bronze replica of the 1964 sculpt of Abraham Lincoln's head, as well as a model of the U.S. Capitol building.

  • American Association on Mental Retardation. 444 North Capitol Street NW, Suite 846, Washington, DC 20001-1512.

  • Digestive Disease National Coalition. 507 Capitol Court, Suite 200, Washington, DC 20002.

  • She is also viewed as a down-to-earth person and not caught up in all things Hollywood, even though her career is firmly entrenched in the movie capitol.

  • This store is all about sexy bikinis with a capitol S!

  • You can probably start your company without obtaining any capitol.

  • Many freelance writing opportunities exist in Austin, the state capitol of Texas and the unofficial live music capital of the state.

  • Since every state has its own capitol, you can add to the challenge by making that particular question part of the trivia fun!

  • Minnesota State Capitol: Visit the state capitol building and learn about government and history.

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