Capillary-action sentence example

capillary-action
  • in dry weather, since it promotes capillary action by reducing the soil spaces.
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  • Capillarity and Surface Tension.-Reference should be made to the article Capillary Action for the general discussion of this phenomenon of liquids.
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  • Laplace was, moreover, the first to offer a complete analysis of capillary action based upon a definite hypothesis - that of forces "sensible only at insensible distances"; and he made strenuous but unsuccessful efforts to explain the phenomena of light on an identical principle.
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  • By this capillary action water may be transferred to the upper layers of the soil from a depth of several feet below the surface.
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  • If material systems are constituted of discrete atoms, separated from each other by many times the diameter of any of them, this simple plan of exhibiting their interactions in terms of direct forces between them would indeed be exact enough to apply to a wide range of questions, provided we could be certain that the laws of the forces depended only on the positions and not also on the motions of the atoms. The most important example of its successful application has been the theory of capillary action elaborated by P. S.
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  • If a thickwalled capillary tube is passed over the platinum tube and its length so adjusted that the liquid rises in it by capillary action just above the level of the tube, the spectrum may be examined directly, and the loss of light due to the passage through the partially wetted surface of the walls of the tube is avoided.
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  • CAPILLARY ACTION.
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  • p. 551), Leonardo da Vinci must be considered as the discoverer of capillary phenomena, but the first accurate observations of the capillary action of tubes and glass plates were made by Francis Hawksbee (Physico-Mechanical Experiments, London, 1709, pp. 13916 9; and Phil.
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  • In like manner we may by experiment ascertain the general fact that the surface of a liquid is in a state of tension similar to that of a membrane stretched equally in all directions, and prove that this tension depends only on the nature and temperature of the liquid and not on its form, and from this as a secondary physical principle we may deduce all the phenomena of capillary action.
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  • He also observed the constancy of the angle of contact of a liquid surface with a solid, and showed how from these two principles to deduce the phenomena of capillary action.
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  • We have now described the principal forms of the theory of capillary action during its earlier development.
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  • Theory Of Capillary Action When two different fluids are placed in contact, they may either diffuse into each other or remain separate.
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  • The experiments of Quincke and others seem to show that the extreme range of the forces which produce capillary action lies between a thousandth and a twenty-thousandth part of a millimetre.
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  • It is easy to show that a force subject to this law would not account for capillary action.
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  • The surface-tension diminishes as the temperature rises, and when the temperature reaches that of the critical point at which the distinction between the liquid and its vapour ceases, it has been observed by Andrews that the capillary action also vanishes.
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  • The early writers on capillary action supposed that the diminution of capillary action was due simply to the change of density corresponding to the rise of temperature, and, therefore, assuming the surface-tension to vary as the square of the (37)?(f) =eP f (38) density, they deduced its variations from the observed dilatation of the liquid by heat.
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  • An early observation of the diffusion of gases was recorded by him in 1823 when he noticed the escape of hydrogen from a cracked jar, attributing it to the capillary action of fissures.
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  • Such a saltwater saucer of fresh water is maintained full to overflowing by the rainfall, and owing to the frictional resistance of the sand and to capillary action and the fact that a given column of fresh water is balanced by a shorter column of sea water, the fresh water never sinks to the mean sea-level unless artificially abstracted.
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  • damp proofing: In the 18th century it was discovered that an applied voltage affected capillary action.
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  • The wick draws the flammable liquid up from the holding tank through a process known as capillary action.
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  • The wick absorbs the melted wax and through capillary action draws the melted wax up the wick toward the flame.
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  • The amount of moisture retained depends mainly upon the absorbability of the soil, and as it depends largely on capillary action it varies with the coarseness or fineness of the pores of the soil, being greater for soils which consist of fine particles.
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