Canterbury sentence example

canterbury
  • With the archbishop of Canterbury he received Henry VI.
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  • So far as the organization of the Anglican Church is concerned, the most important outcome of the conference was the reconstruction of the Central Consultative Body on representative lines (54-56); this body to consist of the archbishop of Canterbury and seventeen bishops appointed by the various Churches of the Anglican Communion throughout the world.
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  • He died on the 22nd of August 1532 and was buried in Canterbury cathedral.
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  • Ten days after he sealed the statutes, on the 12th of April 1443, Chicheley died and was buried in Canterbury cathedral on the north side of the choir, under a fine effigy of himself erected in his lifetime.
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  • CHARLES THOMAS LONGLEY (1794-1868), archbishop of Canterbury, was born at Rochester, and educated at Westminster and Oxford.
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  • Archbishop Ralph of Canterbury refused to consecrate him unless he made a profession of obedience to the southern see; this Thurstan refused and asked the king for permission to go to Rome to consult Pope Paschal II.
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  • They therefore requested him to call a "national synod of the bishopsof the Anglican Church at home and abroad," to meet under his leadership. After consulting both houses of the Convocation of Canterbury, Archbishop Longley assented, and convened all the bishops of the Anglican Communion (then 144 in number) to meet at Lambeth in 1867.
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  • In December 1189, by the treaty of Canterbury, Richard gave up all claim to suzerainty over Scotland in return for 10,000 marks, the treaty of Falaise being thus definitely annulled.
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  • Refusing to recognize the new archbishop of Canterbury, William of Corbeil, as his superior, Thurstan took no part in his consecration, and on two occasions both archbishops carried their complaints in person to Rome.
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  • vir.) in Chaucer's Canterbury Tales prefaces his account of Alexander with the statement that his story is so common That every wight that hath discrecioun Hath herd somewhat or all of his fortune.
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  • The idea of these meetings was first suggested in a letter to the archbishop of Canterbury by Bishop Hopkins of Vermont in 1851, but the immediate impulse came from the colonial Church in Canada.
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  • In 1865 the synod of that province, in an urgent letter to the archbishop of Canterbury (Dr Longley), represented the unsettlement of members of the Canadian Church caused by recent legal decisions of the Privy Council, and their alarm lest the revived action of Convocation "should leave us governed by canons different from those in force in England and Ireland, and thus cause us to drift into the status of an independent branch of the Catholic Church."
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  • In 1502 Warham was consecrated bishop of London and became keeper of the great seal, but his tenure of both these offices was short, as in 1504 he became lord chancellor and archbishop of Canterbury.
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  • was alive, he successfully protested against Beaufort's being made a cardinal and legate a latere to supersede the legatine jurisdiction of Canterbury.
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  • In 1862 he succeeded John Bird Sumner as archbishop of Canterbury.
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  • LAMBETH CONFERENCES, the name given to the periodical assemblies of bishops of the Anglican Communion (Pan-Anglican synods), which since 1867 have met at Lambeth Palace, the London residence of the archbishop of Canterbury.
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  • From 1685 till his death he was principal of St Edmund's Hall; and in 1704 he was nominated by Queen Anne to a prebendal stall in Canterbury.
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  • JOHN MORTON (c. 1420-1500), archbishop of Canterbury, cardinal and statesman, belonged to a family which had migrated from Nottinghamshire into Dorset, and was born either at Bere Regis or Milborne St Andrew.
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  • He died at Knole on the 12th of October 1500, and was buried in the crypt of Canterbury Cathedral.
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  • He was twice prolocutor of the lower house of convocation for the province of Canterbury.
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  • that Siger and Boetius fled to Italy and, according to John Peckham, archbishop of Canterbury, perished miserably.
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  • of Canterbury, on the South Eastern & Chatham railway.
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  • The branch railway connecting Whitstable with Canterbury was one of the earliest in England, opened in 1830.
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  • THOMAS CRANMER (1489-1556), archbishop of Canterbury, born at Aslacton or Aslockton in Nottinghamshire on the 2nd of July 1489, was the second son of Thomas Cranmer and of his wife Anne Hatfield.
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  • The immediate occasion of his imprisonment was a strongly worded declaration he had written a few days previously against the mass, the celebration of which, he heard, had been re-established at Canterbury.
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  • and Foreign; Foxe's Acts and Monuments; Strype's Memorials of Cranmer (1694); Anecdotes and Character of Archbishop Cranmer, by Ralph Morice, and two contemporary biographies (Camden Society's publications); Remains of Thomas Cranmer, by Jenkyns (1833); Lives of Cranmer, by Gilpin (1784), Todd (1831), Le Bas, in Hook's Lives of the Archbishops of Canterbury, vols.
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  • regarding the appointment of a new archbishop to the see of Canterbury.
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  • As a guarantee of his good faith the king surrendered the city of London to his foes, while the Tower was entrusted to the neutral keeping of the archbishop of Canterbury.
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  • The preamble states that the king has granted the charter on the advice of various prelates and barons, some of whom, including the archbishop of Canterbury, the papal legate Pandulf, and William Marshal, earl of Pembroke, are mentioned by name.
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  • The decision on these matters is to rest with the archbishop of Canterbury and the twenty-five barons appointed to see that the terms of the charter are carried out.
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  • THOMAS SECKER (1693-1768), archbishop of Canterbury, was born at Sibthorpe, Nottinghamshire.
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  • In 1758 he became archbishop of Canterbury.
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  • ALPHEGE [2ELFHEA11], Saint (954-1023), archbishop of Canterbury, came of a noble family, but in early life gave up everything for religion.
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  • In 984 he was appointed through Dunstan's influence to the bishopric of Winchester, and in 1006 he succeeded iElfric as archbishop of Canterbury.
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  • At the sack of Canterbury by the Danes in 1011 ZElfheah was captured and kept in prison for seven months.
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  • He was buried in St Paul's, whence his body was removed by Canute to Canterbury with all the ceremony of a great act of state in 1023.
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  • c. 1090), who says that his account of the solemn translation to Canterbury in 1023 was received from the dean, Godric, one of Alphege's own scholars.
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  • The appeal was heard at great length, in a synod of 703 under John VI., deputies from the archbishop of Canterbury being present.
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  • In England the dispute between Canterbury and York was settled by making them both primates, giving Canterbury the further honour of being primate of all England.
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  • Thus, in Canterbury there was an appeal from the dean of Arches to the official principal of the Arches court.
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  • Fournier (p. 219) says that in France it was not till the 17th century that there grew up a custom of having different officials for the metropolitan, one for him as bishop, a second as metropolitan, and even a third as primate, with an appeal from one to the other, and that it was an abuse due to the parlements which strove to make the official independent of the bishop. In England there has been, for a long time, a separate diocesan court of Canterbury held before the " commissary."
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  • The occupants of certain sees by a kind of prescription became legates without special appointment, legati nati, as in the case of Canterbury.
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  • In England the Constitutions of Clarendon (by chap. viii.) prohibited appeals to the pope; but after the murder of St Thomas of Canterbury Henry II.
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  • The subject was dealt with in the Constitutions of Clarendon, formally revoked after the murder of St Thomas of Canterbury.
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  • Canterbury, York, Armagh, Dublin, Cashel and Tuam are put in the place of Rome.
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  • The judge under this act became (upon vacancies occurring) ex officio official principal of the arches court of Canterbury and of the chancery court of York.
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  • As to suffragan bishops in the province of Canterbury, see Read v.
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  • Wakefield seceded, and joined Lord Lyttelton and John Robert Godley in establishing the Canterbury settlement as a Church of England colony.
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  • A portion of his correspondence on this subject was published by his son as The Founders of Canterbury (Christchurch, 1868).
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  • Archbishop Theodore was sent to Canterbury by Vitalian.
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  • He deprived Taenberht, archbishop of Canterbury, of several of his suffragan sees, and assigned them to Lichfield, which, with the leave of the pope, he constituted as a separate archbishopric under Hygeberht.
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  • He is buried under a fine tomb at Canterbury.
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  • As used by George Stephenson on the Stockton & Darlington and Whitstable & Canterbury lines they weighed 28 lb per yard.
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  • He left considerable benefactions to Pembroke Hall, Cambridge, Queen's College, Oxford, and Christ's College, Cambridge; he also endowed a free school at St Bees, and left money for the poor of St Bees, Canterbury, Lambeth and Croydon.
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  • He at length became a Franciscan monk of Canterbury.
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  • the livings of Great Baddow, Essex, and of Wokey, Somerset, which he had received in 1546, and was presented in 1552 by the dean and chapter of Canterbury to the rectory of All Hallows, Lombard Street, London.
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  • In 1718 he entered into a correspondence with William Wake, archbishop of Canterbury, with a view to a union of the English and Gallican churches; being suspected of projecting a change in the dogmas of the church, his papers were seized in February 1719, but nothing incriminating was found.
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  • The ancient British and Celtic churches followed the cycle of 84 years which they had originally received from Rome, and their stubborn refusal to abandon it caused much bitter controversy in the 8th century between their representatives and St Augustine of Canterbury and the Latin missionaries.
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  • at Canterbury, Bury St Edmunds, Hereford and York.
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  • In 1920, after the disestablishment of the Welsh Church, of which measure he had been one of the most active opponents, he was created Archbishop of Wales, and was enthroned by the Archbishop of Canterbury at St.
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  • The first known instance of a mitred abbot is Egelsinus of St Augustine's, Canterbury, who received the honour from Pope Alexander II.
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  • The question of the use of the mitre in the Anglican Church is dealt with in the Report of the Sub-Committee of the Convocation of Canterbury on the Ornaments of the Church and its Ministers (1908).
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  • Among the first, the name of the "Tabard" is well known from its mention by Chaucer in detailing the company of pilgrims for Canterbury.
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  • Before the end of that year he obtained from the pope a dispensation to hold two livings in conjunction with Limington, and Archbishop Deane of Canterbury also appointed him his domestic chaplain.
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  • The most important of Strype's works are the Memorials of Thomas Cranmer, Archbishop of Canterbury, 1694 (ed.
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  • 1731; 2nd ed., 1 735, 4 vols.; 3rd ed., 1736-1738, 4 vols.); Life and Acts o f Edmund Grindal, Archbishop of Canterbury (1710), of Matthew Parker, Archbishop of Canterbury (1711), and of John Whitgift, Archbishop of Canterbury (1718); An Accurate Edition of Stow's Survey of London (1720), a valuable edition of Stow, although its interference with the original text is a method of editing which can scarcely be reckoned fair to the original author; and Ecclesiastical Memorials (3 vols., 1721; 3 vols., 1733).
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  • He was not eager to assume this task, and he made great efforts to avoid promotion to the archbishopric of Canterbury, which Elizabeth designed for him as soon as she had succeeded to the throne.
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  • The chief authority for the bishop's life is William de Chambre (printed in Wharton's Anglia Sacra, 1691, and in Historiae Dunelmensis scriptores tres, Surtees Soc. 1839), who describes him as an amiable and excellent man, charitable in his diocese, and the liberal patron of many learned men, among these being Thomas Bradwardine, afterwards archbishop of Canterbury, Richard Fitzralph, afterwards archbishop of Armagh, the enemy of the mendicant orders, Walter Burley, who translated Aristotle, John Mauduit the astronomer, Robert Holkot and Richard de Kilvington.
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  • Copies were smuggled into England but were suppressed by the bishops, and William Warham, archbishop of Canterbury, even bought up copies on the Continent to destroy them.
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  • two letters addressed to the archbishop of Canterbury (1824), and King Charles the First, the Author of Icon Basilike (1828); H.
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  • to the Archbishop of Canterbury concerning Eikon Basilike (1825); Bishop Gauden, The Author of the Icon Basilike (1829); W.
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  • 1089), archbishop of Canterbury, was a Lombard by extraction.
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  • His first difficulties were with Thomas of Bayeux, archbishopelect of York, who asserted that his see was independent of Canterbury and claimed jurisdiction over the greater part of midland England.
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  • Boehmer's Die Fdlschungen Erzbischof Lanfranks von Canterbury (Leipzig, 1902), and the same author's Kirche and Staat in England and in der Normandie (Leipzig, 1899) are useful.
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  • THOMAS BECKET (c. 1118-1170), by his contemporaries more commonly called Thomas of London, English chancellor and archbishop of Canterbury under Henry II., was born about the year 1118 in London.
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  • In 1154 he was promoted to be archdeacon of Canterbury, after first taking deacon's orders.
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  • Henry bestowed on him the see of Canterbury, left vacant by the death of Theobald.
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  • Becket had not shrunk from excommunicating a tenant in chief who had encroached upon the lands of Canterbury, and had protected against the royal courts a clerk named Philip de Brois who was charged with an assault upon a royal officer.
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  • In more sweeping measures, however, the pope refused to support him, until in 1170 Henry infringed the rights of Canterbury by causing Archbishop Roger of York to crown the young king.
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  • Within a short time his shrine at Canterbury became the resort of innumerable pilgrims. Plenary indulgences were given for a visit to the shrine, and an official register was kept to record the miracles wrought by the relics of the saint.
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  • In 1275 Burnell was elected bishop of Bath and Wells, and three years later Edward repeated the attempt which he had made in 1270 to secure the archbishopric of Canterbury for his favourite.
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  • RANDALL THOMAS DAVIDSON (1848-), archbishop of Canterbury, son of Henry Davidson, of Muirhouse, Edinburgh, was born in Edinburgh and educated at Harrow and Trinity College, Oxford.
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  • He took orders in 1874 and held a curacy at Dartford, in Kent, till 1877, when he became resident chaplain and private secretary to Dr Tait, archbishop of Canterbury, a position which he occupied till Dr Tait's death, and retained for a short time (1882-1883) under his successor Dr Benson.
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  • In 1903 he succeeded Temple as archbishop of Canterbury.
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  • - Stigand, Archbishop of Canterbury (1052-1070); from the Bayeux Tapestry.
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  • " Take the amice, which signifies discipline in speech," while other interpretations survive in 1 In the Anglican Church, in the numerous cases when the liturgical colours are used, these generally follow the Roman use, which was in force before the Reformation in the important dioceses of Canterbury, York, London and Exeter.
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  • Thirty years after the Ridsdale judgment, the ritual confusion in the Church of England was worse than ever, and the old ideal expressed in the Acts of Uniformity had given place to a desire to sanctify with some sort of authority the parochial "uses" which had grown up. In this respect the dominant opinion in the Church, intent on compromise, seems to have been expressed in the Report presented in 1908 to the convocation of the province of Canterbury by the sub-committee of five bishops appointed to investigate the matter, namely, that under the Ornaments Rubric the vestments prescribed in the first Prayer Book of Edward VI.
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  • He declined invitations from Cambridge, but accepted from Archbishop Laud a prebend in Canterbury cathedral without residence, and went to England to be installed in 1629, when he was made LL.D.
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  • In 1776 he was chosen vice-chancellor of his university; in 1781 he was made dean of Canterbury, and in 1790 was raised to the see of Norwich.
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  • At Bethersden, between Ashford and Tenterden, marble quarries were formerly worked extensively, supplying material to the cathedrals of Canterbury and Rochester, and to many local churches.
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  • At Charing, north-west of Ashford, the archbishops of Canterbury had a residence from pre-Conquest times, and ruins of a palace, mainly of the Decorated period, remain.
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  • See Edward Hasted, History and Survey of Kent (Canterbury, 1778-1799, 2nd ed.
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  • It has more lately, however, been held that the present building is not Aldhelm's, but a restoration, dating from about 975, and attributable to the influence of Dunstan, archbishop of Canterbury.
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  • The Conqueror reposed much confidence in two prelates, Lanfranc of Canterbury and Geoffrey of Coutances.
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  • The English Church derives its orders through Matthew Parker, archbishop of Canterbury, who was consecrated in 1559 by William Barlow, bishop-elect of Chichester.
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  • The suburbs comprise the following distinct municipalities, Alexandria, with a population in 1901 of 9341; Annandale, 8 349; Ashfield, 14,329; Balmain, 30,076; Bexley, 3079; Botany, 33 8 3; North Botany, 3772; Burwood, 7521; Camperdown, 7931 Canterbury, 4226; Concord, 2818;2818; Darlington, 3784; Drummoyne, 4244; Enfield, 2 4 97;97; Erskineville, 6059; Glebe, 19,220;, Hunter's Hill, 4232; Hurstville, 4019; Kogarah, 3892; Lane Cove, 1918; Leichhardt, 17,454; Manly, 5035; Marrickville, 18, 775; Eastwood, 713; Mosman, 5691; Newtown, 22,598;22,598; North Sydney, 22,040; Paddington, 21,984; Petersham, 15,307; Randwick, 9753; Redfern, 24,2,9; Rockdale, 7857; Ryde, 3222; St Peter's, 5906; Vaucluse, 1152; Waterloo, 9609;9609; Waverley, 12,342; Willoughby, 6004; Woollahra, 12,351.
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  • This theological deduction from his doctrine drew upon Roscellinus the polemic of his most celebrated opponent, Anselm of Canterbury (1033-1109).
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  • On the Loth Tyler seized Canterbury, sacked the palace of Archbishop Sudbury, the chancellor, and beheaded three citizens as "traitors."
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  • While it was being collected, the Danes sacked Canterbury and barbarously slew the archbishop Alphege.
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  • Benjamin Thorpe, 1844-1846, for the IElfric Society), compiled from the Christian fathers, and dedicated to Sigeric, arch bishop of Canterbury (990-994).
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  • There have been three suppositions about Alfric. (I) He was identified with Alfric (995-1005), archbishop of Canterbury.
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  • Mores made him abbot of St Augustine's at Dover, and finally archbishop of Canterbury.
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  • of Canterbury on the South-Eastern & Chatham railway.
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  • EDWARD WHITE BENSON (1829-1896), archbishop of Canterbury, was born on the 4th of July 1829, at Birmingham.
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  • On the death of Dr Tait, Benson was nominated to the see of Canterbury and was enthroned on the 29th of March 1883.
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  • He was largely instrumental in the inauguration of the House of Laymen in the province of Canterbury (1886); he made diligent inquiries as to the internal order of the sisterhoods of which he was visitor; from 1884 onwards he gave regular Bible readings for ladies in Lambeth Palace chapel.
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  • Another Cuthbert was bishop of Hereford from 736 to about 740, and archbishop of Canterbury from the latter date until his death in October 758.
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  • Ram, St John's, Norwich, against the use of incense in the Church of England, the archbishops of Canterbury (Dr Temple) and York (Dr Maclagan) supported the appeal.
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  • The question was once more elaborately argued in May 1899 before an informal tribunal consisting of the archbishop of Canterbury (Dr. Temple) and the archbishop of York (Dr. Maclagan), at Lambeth Palace.
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  • Under the date 604 we read: " This year Augustine to Justus he gave Rochester, which is twenty-four miles from Canterbury.
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  • " The Christianity of the Londoners was of an unsatisfactory character, for, after the death of Sebert, his sons who were heathens stirred up the multitude to drive out their bishop. Mellitus became archbishop of Canterbury, and London relapsed into heathenism.
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  • There was a gatehouse at each end and a chapel or crypt in the centre, dedicated to St Thomas of Canterbury, in which Peter of Colechurch was buried in 1205.
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  • Fitzstephen, the monk of Canterbury, has left us the first picture of London.
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  • After the marriage at Canterbury of the king with Eleanor of Provence the royal personages came to London, and were met by the mayor, aldermen and principal citizens to the number of 360, sumptuously apparelled in silken robes embroidered, riding upon stately horses.
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  • With a view to facilitating the crusade, a council was held at Bari in October 1098, at which religious differences were debated and the exiled Anselm of Canterbury combated the Eastern view of the Procession of the Holy Ghost.
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  • While the so-called "barbaric laws" (leges barbarorum) of the continent, not excepting those compiled in the territory now called Germany, were largely the product of Roman influence, the continuity of Roman life was almost completely broken in the island, and even the Church, the direct heir of Roman tradition, did not carry on a continuous existence: Canterbury was not a see formed in a Roman province in the same sense as Tours or Reims. One of the striking expressions of this Teutonism is presented by the language in which the Anglo-Saxon laws were written.
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  • After the defeat of Lancaster at Boroughbridge, Badlesmere was taken and hanged at Canterbury on the 14th of April 1322.
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  • They must have a special ecclesiastical licence from the archbishop of Canterbury.
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  • He submitted, however, to the Elizabethan settlement of religion, and was rewarded with the archdeaconry of Middlesex, a canonry at Canterbury and in 1560 with the deanery of St Paul's.
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  • JOHN POTTER (c. 1674-1747), archbishop of Canterbury, was the son of a linen-draper at Wakefield, Yorkshire, and was born about 1674.
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  • In January 1737, Potter was unexpectedly appointed to succeed Wake in the see of Canterbury.
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  • Under William and Mary he succeeded Tillotson as dean of Canterbury in 1689, and (after declining a choice of sees vacated by nonjurors who were his personal friends) followed Thomas Lamplugh as archbishop of York in 1691.
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  • The castle was begun, in or about 1109, by Cadwgan ab Bleddyn ab Cynfyn (Cynvyn), and finished by Gwenwynwyn; in 1196 it was besieged, undermined and taken by Hubert, archbishop of Canterbury.
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  • The service-books were wholly in MS. until the press of the archbishop of Canterbury's mission at Urmia issued the Takhsa (containing the liturgies, baptismal office, &c.) and several other liturgical texts.
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  • i.); Quarterly Papers and Annual Reports of the Archbishop of Canterbury's Assyrian Mission.
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  • Even the clergy were by no means altogether on Innocent's side; the council of Lyons was attended by but 150 bishops, mainly French and Spanish, and the deputation from England, headed by Robert Grossetete of Lincoln and Roger Bigod, came mainly in order to obtain the canonization of Edmund of Canterbury and to protest against papal exactions.
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  • By the year 95 6 .Ælfgifu had become the king's wife, but in 958 Archbishop Odo of Canterbury secured their separation on the ground of their being too closely akin.
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  • About 885 IEthelfla d, lady of the Mercians, with the consent of Æthelred her husband, gave Hadleigh to Christ Church, Canterbury.
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  • The dean and chapter of Canterbury have held possession of it ever since the Dissolution.
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  • In the same year Edwig died and Edgar became sole king, Dunstan shared his triumph, and was appointed archbishop of Canterbury.
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  • He retired to Canterbury, and died on the 9th of May 988.
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  • One of the r4th century is dedicated to Thomas Becket of Canterbury.
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  • He was translated to the see of Canterbury in 1716 on the death of Thomas Tenison.
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  • -SUTTON, CHARLES MANNERS (1755-1828), archbishop of Canterbury, was educated at Charterhouse and Cambridge.
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  • In 1805 he was chosen to succeed Archbishop Moore in the see of Canterbury.
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  • For his son Charles see Canterbury, 1St Viscount.
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  • He was brought to Canterbury, possibly by Becket, together with a supply of books upon the civil law, to act as counsel (causidicus) to Archbishop Theobald in his struggle, which ended successfully in 1146, to obtain the transfer of the legateship from the bishop of Winchester to himself.
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  • In 14 he became archbishop of Canterbury.
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  • In 1864 the Convocation of the province of Canterbury, having taken the opinion of two of the most eminent lawyers of the day (Sir Hugh Cairns and Sir John Rolt), passed judgment upon the volume entitled Essays and Reviews.
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  • The ecclesiastical government of the Church of England is divided between two archbishops - the archbishop of Canterbury, who is "primate of all England" and metropolitan of the province of Canterbury, and the archbishop of York, who is "primate of England" and metropolitan of the province of York.
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  • The jurisdiction of the archbishop of Canterbury as primate of all England extends in certain matters into the province of York.
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  • The archbishop of Canterbury exercises the twofold jurisdiction of a metropolitan and a diocesan bishop. As metropolitan he is the guardian of the spiritualities of every vacant see within the province, he presents to all benefices which fall vacant during the vacancy of the see, and through his special commissary exercises the ordinary jurisdiction of a bishop within the vacant diocese.
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  • The archbishop had formerly exclusive jurisdiction in all causes of wills and intestacies, where parties died having personal property in more than one diocese of the province of Canterbury, and he had concurrent jurisdiction in other cases.
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  • A right very rarely exercised by the archbishop of Canterbury, but one of great importance, is that of the visitation and deprivation of inferior bishops.
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  • It is the privilege of the archbishop of Canterbury to crown the kings and queens of England.
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  • The archbishop exercises the ordinary jurisdiction of a bishop over his diocese through his consistory court at Canterbury, the judge of which court is styled the commissary-general of the city and diocese of Canterbury.
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  • The archbishop of Canterbury takes precedence immediately after princes of the blood royal and over every peer of parliament, including the lord chancellor.
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  • The archbishop of York has immediate spiritual jurisdiction as metropolitan in the case of all vacant sees within the province of York, analogous to that which is exercised by the archbishop of Canterbury within the province of Canterbury.
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  • He has also an appellate jurisdiction of an analogous character, which he exercises through his provincial court, whilst his diocesan jurisdiction is exercised through his consistorial court, the judges of both courts being nominated by the archbishop. His ancient testamentary and matrimonial jurisdiction was transferred to the crown by the same statutes which divested the see of Canterbury of its jurisdiction in similar matters.
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  • SIR GEORGE ROOKE (1650-1709), English naval commander, was born near Canterbury in 1650.
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  • Gervase Of Canterbury >>
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  • Thomas's other sons received fiefs and bishoprics abroad, and one of them, Boniface, was made archbishop of Canterbury.
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  • Thomas II., Boniface, I earl of Richmond count of Piedmont archbishop of Canterbury Boniface (d.
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  • As has been well said by a learned Baptist theologian, Dr Green: " It was by a true divine instinct that the early theologians made Christ Himself, in His divine-human personality, their centre of the creeds."' The fundamental questions of Christianity, exhibited in theApostles' Creed, should be marked In response to an invitation issued by the archbishop of Canterbury, acting on a resolution of the Lambeth Conference of 1908, a committee of eminent scholars met in April and May 1909 for the purpose of preparing a new translation.
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  • The village appears in Domesday, and the manor belonged to the Archbishops of Canterbury until the time of Henry VIII., when it passed by exchange to the Crown.
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  • A young Oxford priest, Richard Symonds by name, conceived the project of putting forward the boy Simnel to impersonate one of these princes as a claimant for the crown, with the idea of thereby procuring for himself the archbishopric of Canterbury.
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  • Dispensations, however, could be easily obtained from Rome, before the reformation of the Church of England, to enable a clerk to hold several ecclesiastical dignities or benefices at the same time, and by the Peterpence, Dispensations, &c. Act 1534, the power to grant such dispensations, which had been exercised previously by the court of Rome, was transferred to the archbishop of Canterbury, certain ecclesiastical persons having been declared by a previous statute (1529) to be entitled to such dispensations.
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  • Gervase of Canterbury, who lived in the 13th century, mentions that almost all writers of his country agreed in regarding Christmas day as the first of the year, because it forms, as it were, the term at which the sun finishes and recommences his annual course.
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  • Escaping by way of Strassburg he found an asylum in England, where he was made a prebendary of Canterbury, received a pension from Edward VI.'s privy purse, and composed his chief work, A Trajedy or Dialogue of the unjust usurped Primacy of the Bishop of Rome (1549) This remarkable performance, originally written in Latin, is extant only in the translation of John Ponet, bishop of Winchester, a splendid specimen of nervous English.
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  • Though as a theologian Cajetan was a scholastic of the older Thomist type, his general position was that of the moderate reformers of the school to which Reginald Pole, archbishop of Canterbury, also belonged; i.e.
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  • Laud, now archbishop of Canterbury, was not a little solicitous about Chillingworth's reply to Knott, and at his request, as "the young man had given cause why a more watchful eye should be held over him and his writings," it was examined by the vicechancellor of Oxford and two professors of divinity, and published with their approbation in 1637, with the title The Religion of Protestants a Safe Way to Salvation.
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  • FREDERICK TEMPLE (1821-1902), English divine, archbishop of Canterbury, was born in Santa Maura, one of the Ionian Islands, being the son of Major Octavius Temple, who was subsequently appointed lieutenant-governor of Sierra Leone.
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  • He was interred in Canterbury cathedral four days later.
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  • Nevertheless on her deathbed, when she was attended by the archbishop of Canterbury and the bishop of London, she used expressions which were construed as a declaration of Protestantism.
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  • The duke himself complained in parliament of the way he was spoken of out of doors, and at the outbreak of Wat Tyler's insurrection the peasants stopped pilgrims on the road to Canterbury and made them swear never to accept a king of the name of John.
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  • JOHN KEMPE (c. 1 3 80 - 1 454), English cardinal, archbishop of Canterbury, and chancellor, was son of Thomas Kempe, a gentleman of 011antigh, in the parish of Wye near Ashford, Kent.
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  • He was rewarded by his translation to Canterbury in July 1452, when Pope Nicholas added as a special honour the title of cardinal-bishop of Santa Rufina.
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  • He was buried at Canterbury, in the choir.
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  • Hook's Lives of Archbishops of Canterbury, v.
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  • An unfavourable judgment was given by the Canterbury Court of Arches in 1862, but reversed by the Privy Council in 1864.
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  • He became a monk in the Benedictine monastery of Christ Church, Canterbury, where he made the acquaintance of Anselm, at that time visiting England as abbot of Bec. The intimacy was renewed when Anselm became archbishop of Canterbury in 1093; thenceforward Eadmer was not only his disciple and follower, but his friend and director, being formally appointed to this position by Pope Urban II.
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  • In 1120 he was nominated to the archbishopric of St Andrews, but as the Scots would not recognize the authority of the see of Canterbury he was never consecrated, and soon afterwards he resigned his claim to the archbishopric. His death is generally assigned to the year 1124.
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  • Less noteworthy are Eadmer's lives of St Dunstan, St Bregwin, archbishop of Canterbury, and St Oswald, archbishop of York; these are all printed in Henry Wharton's Anglia Sacra, part ii.
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  • at Canterbury evidently represents one of great magnificence, both of design and ornament.
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  • Th e clergy of the Y g) gY province of Canterbury were fined £100,000 and coin pelled to declare the king " their singular protector and only supreme lord, and, as far as that is permitted by the law of Christ, the supreme head of the Church and of the clergy."
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  • A few months later Thomas Cranmer, who had been one of those to discuss sympathetically Luther's works in the little circle at Cambridge, and who believed the royal supremacy would tend to the remedying of grave abuses and that the pope had acted ultra vires in issuing a dispensation for the king's marriage with Catherine, was induced by Henry to succeed Warham as archbishop of Canterbury.
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  • During the same years the monasteries, lesser and greater, were dissolved, and the chief shrines were despoiled, notably that of St Thomas of Canterbury.
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  • The English monks took the lead in carrying out this legislation, and in 1 218 the first chapter of the province of Canterbury was held at Oxford, and up to the_ dissolution under Henry VIII.
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  • The church of St George, Early English and later, contains numerous brasses; and near it is the site of a palace of the archbishops of Canterbury, maintained until the time of Archbishop Simon Islip (c. 1350).
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  • Æthelberht gave Augustine a dwelling-place in Canterbury, and Christ Church was consecrated in 603.
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  • When Rennes and Dinan were attacked by the duke of Lancaster in 1356, Du Guesclin fought continuously against the English, and at this time he engaged in a celebrated duel with Sir Thomas Canterbury.
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  • He promulgated laws about the year 928, appointing a large number of " moneyers " or " mynteres," London being assigned eight, Canterbury seven, other important towns various numbers and all smaller boroughs one moneyer each.
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  • The Canterbury plain has but 26 ins.
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  • There were in its early years six distinct settlements - Auckland, Wellington, Nelson, New Plymouth, Canterbury and Otago - between which communication was for several years irregular and infrequent.
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  • A school of engineering and an agricultural college are attached to the university college in the province of Canterbury, and there are several schools of mines elsewhere.
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  • Grey, much the best of the absolute governors, held the balance fairly between the white and brown races, and bought large tracts of land for colonization, including the whole South Island, where the Presbyterian settlement of Otago and the Anglican settlement of Canterbury were established by the persevering Wakefield.
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  • Hocken, Contributions to the Early History of New Zealand (London, 1898); Samuel Butler, First Year in the Canterbury Settlement (1863).
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  • These " pilgrim signs " are frequently alluded to in literature - notably in the Canterbury Tales and in Piers Plowman.
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  • The most common of the English pilgrims' signs are those of the shrine of Thomas Becket at Canterbury, the greatest centre of pilgrimage in England.
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  • Canterbury.
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  • - From Winchester, in Hampshire, to Canterbury, in Kent, runs a road or way which can still be traced, now on the present made roads, now as a lane, bridle path, or cart track, now only by a line of ancient yews, hollies or oaks which once bordered it.
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  • To this old track the name of " pilgrims' way " has been given, for along it passed the stream of pilgrims coming through Winchester from the south and west of England and from the continent of Europe by way of Southampton to Canterbury Cathedral to view the place of the martyrdom of Thomas Becket, in the north transept, to the relics in the crypt where he was first buried after his murder, in 1170, and the shrine in the Trinity Chapel which rose above his tomb after the translation of the body in 1220.
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  • Erasmus gives a vivid picture of the glories of the shrine and of all that was shown to the pilgrims on his visit with Colet to Canterbury in 1514.
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  • At Otford, Wrotham and Charing were manorhouses or rather palaces of the archbishops of Canterbury; at Hollingbourne was a manor of the priors of Christchurch.
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  • This road, although its name of the Pilgrims' Way has for long confined it to the road by which the pilgrims came to Canterbury from Winchester, follows a far older track.
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  • Right back into British and even older times the main direction which commerce and travellers followed across southern and western England to the Straits of Dover and the Continent lay from Canterbury along the southern chalk slope of the North Downs to near Guildford, then by the Hog's Back to Farnham.
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  • In Westminster Abbey the space east of the transept is the presbytery, and the same arrangement is found in Canterbury Cathedral.
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  • Many of the early archbishops of Canterbury were buried in the baptistery there.
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  • In England, a detached baptistery is known to have been associated with the cathedral of Canterbury.
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  • She died in November 1687, and was buried on the 17th, according to her own request, in the church of St Martin-in-the-Fields, her funeral sermon being preached by the vicar, Thomas Tenison, afterwards archbishop of Canterbury, who said "much to her praise."
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  • Under it all the principal officers of state, including the first lords of the treasury and admiralty, the secretaries of state, and certain members of the privy council, among whom was the archbishop of Canterbury, obtained seats at the board ex officio; and ten unofficial members, including several eminent statesmen, were also placed on the committee.
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  • 1292), archbishop of Canterbury, was probably a native of Sussex, and received his early education from the Cluniac monks of Lewes.
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  • In 1279 he returned to England as archbishop of Canterbury, being appointed by the pope on the rejection of Robert Burnell, Edward I.'s candidate.
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  • Disputes resulted, and on some points Peckham gave way, but his powers as papal legate complicated matters, and he did much to strengthen the court of Canterbury at the expense of the lower courts.
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  • The chief authority on Peckham as archbishop of Canterbury, is the Registrum fratris Johannis Peckham, edited by C. Trice Martin for the Rolls Series (London, 1882-1885).
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  • The baptism was performed in a drawing-room of Kensington Palace on the 24th of June by Dr Manners Sutton, archbishop of Canterbury.
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  • Dr Howley, archbishop of Canterbury, and the marquis of Conyngham, bearing the news of the king's death, started in a landau with four horses for Kensington, which they reached at five o'clock.
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  • The channel was called the Wantsume, and its extent may be gathered from the position of the village of Fordwich near Canterbury, which had formerly a tidal harbour, and is a member of the Cinque Port of Sandwich.
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  • wide stretching southwards from Whitstable to Canterbury, and extending eastwards to the Isle of Thanet.
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  • After dipping below the London Clay at Canterbury, it sends out an outcrop which forms the greater part of Thanet.
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  • at Canterbury, and 39'8° at Dover; for July 63'3° and 61'6° respectively, and the mean annual 50° and 50'2° respectively.
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  • The principal orchard districts are the valleys of the Darent and Medway, and the tertiary soils overlying the chalk, between Rochester and Canterbury.
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  • The principal hop districts are the country between Canterbury and Faversham, the valley of the Medway in mid Kent, and the district of the Weald.
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  • The municipal boroughs are Bromley (pop. 27,354), Canterbury, a city and county borough (24,889), Chatham (37,057), Deal (10,581), Dover (4 1, 794), Faversham (11,290), Folkestone (30,650), Gillingham (42,530), Gravesend (27,196), Hythe (5557), Lydd (2675), Maidstone (33,516), Margate (23,118), New Romney (1328), Queenborough (1544), Ramsgate (2 7,733), Rochester, a city (30,590), Sandwich (3170), Tenterden (324.3), Tunbridge Wells (33,373) The urban districts are Ashford (12,808), Beckenham (26,331), Bexley (12,918), Broadstairs and St Peter's (6466), Cheriton (7091), Chislehurst (7429), Dartford (18,644), Erith (25,296), Foots Cray (5817), Herne Bay (6726), Milton (7086), Northfleet (12,906), Penge (22,465), Sandgate (2294), Sevenoaks (8106), Sheerness (18,179), Sittingbourne (8943), Southborough (6977), Tonbridge (12,736), Walmer (5614), Whitstable (7086), Wrotham (3571).
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  • The boroughs having separate commissions of the peace and courts of quarter sessions are Canterbury, Deal, Dover, Faversham, Folkestone, Gravesend, Hythe, Maidstone, Margate, Rochester, Sandwich and Tenterden; while those of Lydd, New Romney, Ramsgate and Tunbridge Wells have separate commissions of the peace.
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  • Kent is mainly in the diocese of Canterbury, but has parts in those of Rochester, Southwark and Chichester.
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  • The county (extra-metropolitan) is divided into 8 parliamentary divisions, namely, North-western or Dartford, Western or Sevenoaks, South-western or Tunbridge, Mid or Medway, North-eastern or Faversham, Southern or Ashford, Eastern or St Augustine's and the Isle of Thanet, each returning one member; while the boroughs of Canterbury, Chatham, Dover, Gravesend, Hythe, Maidstone and Rochester each return one member.
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  • The remaining four, Borowast Lest, Estre Lest, Limowast Lest and Wiwart Lest, existed at least as early as the 9th century, and were apparently named from their administrative centres, Burgwara (the burg being Canterbury), Eastre, Lymne and Wye, all of which were meeting places of the Kentish Council.
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  • Kent is remarkable as the only English county which comprises two entire bishoprics, Canterbury, the see for East Kent, having been founded in 597, and Rochester, the see for West Kent, in 600.
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  • In 1291 the archdeaconry of Canterbury was coextensive with that diocese and included the deaneries of Westbere, Bridge, Sandwich, Dover, Elham, Lympne, Charing, Sutton, Sittingbourne, Ospringe and Canterbury; the archdeaconry of Rochester, also co-extensive with its diocese, included the deaneries of Rochester, Dartford, Mailing and Shoreham.
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  • In 1873 East and West Bridge deaneries were created in the archdeaconry of Canterbury, and Croydon in the archdeaconry of Maidstone.
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  • The chief events connected with the county under the Norman kings were the capture of Rochester by William Rufus during the rebellion of Odo of Bayeux; the capture of Dover and Leeds castles by Stephen; the murder of Thomas a Becket at Canterbury in 1170; the submission of John to the pope's legate at Dover in 21 3, and the capture of Rochester Castle by the king in the same year.
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  • In the peasants' rising of 1381 the rebels plundered the archbishop's palace at Canterbury, and 10o,000 Kentishmen gathered round Wat Tyler of Essex.
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  • Thread-making at Maidstone and silk-weaving at Canterbury existed in the 16th century, and before 1590 one of the first paper-mills in England was set up at Dartford.
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  • In 1290 Kent returned two members to parliament for the county, and in 1295 Canterbury, Rochester and Tunbridge were also represented; Tunbridge however made no returns after this date: In 1552 Maidstone acquired representation, and in 1572 Queenborough.
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  • By the act of 1885 the county returned eight members in eight divisions, and the representation of Canterbury, Maidstone and Rochester was reduced to one member each.
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  • The earliest were the priory of Christ's Church and the abbey of St Peter and St Paul, now called St Augustine's, both at Canterbury, founded by Augustine and the monks who accompanied him to England.
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  • Some of these were refounded, and the principal monastic remains now existing are those of the Benedictine priories at Rochester (1089), Folkestone (1095), Dover (1140); the Benedictine nunneries at Malling (time of William Rufus),Minster-in-Sheppey (1130), Higham (founded by King Stephen), and Davington (I 153); the Cistercian Abbey at Boxley (1146); the Cluniac abbey at Faversham (1147) and priory at Monks Horton (time of Henry II.), the preceptory of Knights Templars at Swingfield (time of Henry II.); the Premonstratensian abbey of St Radigund's, near Dover (1191); the first house of Dominicans in England at Canterbury (1221); the first Carmelite house in England, at Aylesford (1240); and the priory of Augustinian nuns at Dartford (1355).
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  • Other houses of which there are slight remains are Lesnes abbey, near Erith, and Bilsington priory near Ashford, established in 1178 and 1253 respectively, and both belonging to the Augustinian canons; and the house of Franciscans at Canterbury (1225).
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  • But no remains exist of the priories of Augustinian canons at Canterbury (St Gregory's; 1084), Leeds, near Maidstone (1119), Tunbridge (middle of 12th century), Combwell, near Cranbrook (time of Henry II.); the nunnery of St Sepulchre at Canterbury (about 110o) and Langdon abbey, near Walmer (1192), both belonging to the Benedictines; the Trinitarian priory of Mottenden near Headcorn, the first house of Crutched Friars in England (1224), where miracle plays were presented in the church by the friars on Trinity Sunday; the Carmelite priories at Sandwich (1272) and Losenham near Tenterden (1241); and the preceptory of Knights of St John of Jerusalem at West Peckham, near Tunbridge (1408).
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  • Even apart from the cathedral churches of Canterbury and Rochester, the county is unsurpassed in the number of churches it possesses of the highest interest.
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  • The castles of Rochester and Dover are famous; those of Canterbury and Chilham are notable among others.
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  • folio, Canterbury, 1778-1799; 2nd ed., 12 vols.
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  • 8vo, Canterbury, 1797-1801), W.
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  • Enjoying the favour of the new king, Edward III., the bishop became chancellor of England in 1328; but he failed to secure the archbishopric of Canterbury which became vacant about the same time, and was deprived of his office of chancellor and imprisoned when Isabella lost her power in 1330.
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  • Yet if he judges too favourably the leaders of the national party in England on the eve of the Norman Conquest, that is a small matter to set against the insight which he exhibits in writing of Aratus, Sulla, Nicias, William the Conqueror, Thomas of Canterbury, Frederick the Second and many more.
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  • Goussen (though members of the Archbishop of Canterbury's Mission to the Assyrian Christians had previously been acquainted with the book).
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  • From this manuscript an edition was printed in 1574 under the direction of Matthew Parker, archbishop of Canterbury; but this contained many interpolations and alterations which were copied by subsequent editors.
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  • He found in London a circle of learned friends through whom he was introduced to William Warham, archbishop of Canterbury, Richard Foxe, bishop of Winchester and other dignitaries.
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  • Augustine was not the first preacher of the Gospel at Canterbury.
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  • 988 as archbishop of Canterbury) worked independently, but on similar lines.
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  • 110 9), archbishop of Canterbury, was the first to deal with the subject.
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  • RICHARD BANCROFT (1544-16to), archbishop of Canterbury, was born at Farnworth in Lancashire in 1544.
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  • In the following November he was elected successor to Whitgift in the see of Canterbury.
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  • His power was greatly increased after his return from Scotland, whither he had accompanied the king, by his promotion to the archbishopric of Canterbury in August 1633.
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  • Collins (lectures, bibliography, catalogue of exhibits, 1895); Hook's Lives of the Archbishops of Canterbury; and H.
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  • Among those who had learned their Greek at Canterbury was Aldhelm (d.
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  • In and after the middle of that century the Norman monastery of Bec flourished under the rule of Lanfranc and Anselm, both of whom had begun their career in northern Italy, and closed it at Canterbury.
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  • At Canterbury he inspired with his own love of learning his nephew, Linacre, who joined him on one of those visits, studied Greek at Florence under Politian and Chalcondyles, and apparently stayed in Italy from 1485 to 1499.
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  • 1348), archbishop of Canterbury, was born at Stratford-on-Avon and educated at Merton College, Oxford, afterwards entering the service of Edward II.
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  • In 1333 he was appointed archbishop of Canterbury and he resigned the chancellorship in the following year; however, he held this office again from 1335 to 1337 and for about two months in 1340.
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  • Fearing arrest John de Stratford fled to Canterbury, and entered upon a violent war of words with.
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  • (From copy belonging to Robert de Bello, abbot of St Augustine's, Canterbury.
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  • In the 1 1th century a similar task was undertaken by Lanfranc, archbishop of Canterbury (1069-1089); in the 12th century by Stephen Harding (1109), third abbot of Citeaux, and by Cardinal Nicolaus Maniacoria (1150), whose corrected Bible is preserved in the public library at Dijon.
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  • A chapel, dedicated to St Thomas of Canterbury, is used as a grammar school.
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  • 1270), archbishop of Canterbury, became primate in 1243, through the favour of Henry III., of whose queen, Eleanor of Provence, he was an uncle.
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  • Harsle, Eadwine's Canterbury Psalter (E.E.T.S., No.
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  • The Convocation of Canterbury refreshed the Westcott, op. cit.
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  • Dr Hadrian de Saravia, canon of Canterbury.
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  • C. P.) More ambitious attempts at amending the new version were not lacking, but they all proved fruitless, until in February 1870 the Convocation of Canterbury appointed a committee The to consider the subject of revision.
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  • Ginsburg; the Rev. Dr Gotch of Bristol; Archdeacon Benjamin Harrison (1808-1887), Hebraist; the Rev. Stanley Leathes (1830-1900), professor of Hebrew at King's College, London; Professor M `Gill; Canon Robert Payne Smith (1819-1895), regius professor of divinity at Oxford, dean of Canterbury (1870); Professor J.
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  • Ellicott, bishop of Gloucester and Bristol; and George Moberly, bishop of Salisbury; Dr Edward Bickersteth (1814-1892), prolocutor of the lower house of convocation; Henry Alford, dean of Canterbury, and Arthur Penrhyn Stanley, dean of Westminster; Joseph Williams Blakesley (1808-1885), canon of Canterbury, and (1872) dean of Lincoln.
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  • In Canterbury cathedral and Westminster Abbey it has definitely displaced the older Version.
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  • The Upper House of the Convocation of Canterbury in May 1898 appointed a committee to consider the expediency of " permitting or encouraging " the use of the Revised Version in the public services of the Church.
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  • lElfwine, the brother of Ecgfrith, was slain on this occasion, but at the intervention of Theodore, archbishop of Canterbury, !Ethelred agreed to pay a wergild for the Northumbrian prince and so prevented further hostilities.
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  • After his subsequent conversion by Laurentius, archbishop of Canterbury, he recalled the bishops Mellitus and Justus, and built a church dedicated to the Virgin at Canterbury.
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  • As illustrating this process Father Braun (p. 170) cites an interesting correspondence between Archbishop Lanfranc of Canterbury and John of Avranches, archbishop of Rouen, as to the propriety of a bishop wearing a chasuble at the consecration of a church, Lanfranc maintaining as an established principle that the vestment should be reserved for the Mass.
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  • - Offences against the law ecclesiastical (not being crimes) committed by clergy of the Church of England as a rule come by letters of request from the bishop of the diocese before the arches court of Canterbury or the chancery court of York (of both of which the same person is judge).
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  • The parties concerned were three clergymen, who appealed from the direction of their respective diocesans, the bishops of St Albans and Peterborough and the archbishop of York: in the two former cases the archbishop (Temple) of Canterbury was the principal and the archbishop of York (Maclagan) the assessor, whilst in the latter case the functions were reversed.
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  • (London, 1893); Guardian newspaper, July 19 and 26, 1899, and May 2, 1900; The Archbishops of Canterbury and York on Reservation of the Sacrament (London, 1900); J.
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  • Canterbury, Ely, Norwich, &c., where the archbishop or bishop occupied the abbot's place, the superior of the monastery being termed prior.
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  • The buildings at Canterbury, as at St Gall, form separate groups.
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  • To the north a large open court divides the monastic from the menial buildings, intentionally placed as remote as possible from the 1 The Architectural History of the Conventual Buildings of the Monastery of Christ Church in Canterbury.
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  • 1381), archbishop of Canterbury, was born at Sudbury in Suffolk, studied at the university of Paris, and became one of the chaplains of Pope Innocent VI., who sent him, in 1356, on a mission to Edward III.
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  • In 1375 he succeeded William Wittlesey as archbishop of Canterbury, and during the rest of his life was a partisan of John of Gaunt.
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  • Having released John Ball from his prison at Maidstone, the Kentish insurgents attacked and damaged the archbishop's property at Canterbury and Lambeth; then, rushing into the Tower of London, they seized the archbishop himself.
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  • His body was afterwards buried in Canterbury Cathedral.
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  • Sudbury rebuilt part of the church of St Gregory at Sudbury, and with his brother, John of Chertsey, he founded a college in this town; he also did some building at Canterbury.
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  • Hook, Lives of the Archbishops of Canterbury.
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  • In Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, most MSS.
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  • The chief chronicles for the reign are Gervase of Canterbury's Gesta regum, Ralf of Coggeshall's Chronicon, Walter of Coventry's Memoriale, Roger of Wendover's Flores historiarum, the Annals of Burton, Dunstaple and Margan - all these in the Rolls Series.
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  • He was present at the council of Reims, presided over by Pope Eugenius III., and was probably presented by Bernard of Clairvaux to Theobald, archbishop of Canterbury, at whose court he settled, probably about 1150.
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  • In the following years, during which he continued in an influential situation in Canterbury, but at what precise date is unknown, he drew up the Life of Thomas Becket.
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  • The chantry of St Edmund the Martyr which stood on the opposite side of the town was a part of Edward III.'s endowment to the priory, and became so famous as a place of pilgrimage, especially for those on their way to Canterbury, that the part of Watling Street which crossed there towards London was sometimes called " St Edmund's Way.
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  • No substantial alteration has been made in the Prayer Book since 1662, but two alterations must be chronicled as having obtained the sanction of the Convocations of Canterbury and York, and also legal force by act of parliament.
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  • The Memoirs of the Life and Times of the Most Rev. Father in God, Dr Thomas Tenison, late Archbishop of Canterbury, appeared without date not long after his death.
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    0
  • Whilst at Rome he issued several bulls to the archbishop of Canterbury, the king of England, and the university of Oxford, commanding an investigation of Wycliffe's doctrines.
    0
    0
  • It was under his conduct that Theodore of Tarsus came from Rome to Canterbury in 669, and in the same year Benedict was appointed abbot of St Peter's, Canterbury.
    0
    0
  • He was early placed in the household of Cardinal Morton, archbishop of Canterbury.
    0
    0
  • In 1231 he was chosen archbishop by the monks of Canterbury, but the election was not ratified by the pope.
    0
    0
  • He crossed over to England with the royal bride, but, unlike Thomas Cromwell, he did not lose the royal favour when the king repudiated Anne, and in 1541, having already refused the bishopric of Hereford, he became dean of Canterbury and in 1544 dean of York.
    0
    0
  • In March 1857 Viscount Palmerston advanced him to the deanery of Canterbury, where, till his death on the 12th of January 1871, he lived the same strenuous and diversified life that had always characterized him.
    0
    0
  • south of Reading; Durovernum Cantiacorum, now Canterbury; and Venta Icenorum, now Caistor-by-Norwich.
    0
    0
  • One road ran south-east to Canterbury and the Kentish ports, of which Richborough (Rutupiae) was the most frequented.
    0
    0
  • Even if the first part of Egonesham is English - which is by no means certain - it is hardly sufficient reason for discrediting this statement, for Canterbury (Cantwaraburg) and Rochester (Hrofes ceaster) were without doubt Roman places in spite of their English names.
    0
    0
  • Yet London and Canterbury must have recovered a certain amount of importance quite early, at all events within two centuries after the invasion, and the same is probably true of York, Lincoln and a few other places.
    0
    0
  • put an end to the long quarrel between the royal government and Anselm of Canterbury by accepting the Concordat of London (1107).
    0
    0
  • The Plantagenet abjured the Constitutions of Clarendon, recognized the rights of the pope over the Church of England, and augmented the privileges and domains of the archbishopric of Canterbury.
    0
    0
  • After the consecration of Cranmer to the archbishopric of Canterbury in 1533 Latimer's position was completely altered.
    0
    0
  • A commission appointed to inquire into the disturbances caused by his preaching in Bristol severely censured the conduct of his opponents; and, when the bishop prohibited him from preaching in his diocese, he obtained from Cranmer a special licence to preach throughout the province of Canterbury.
    0
    0
  • In 1741-1742 he was in England collecting for his mission and obtaining the sanction of the archbishop of Canterbury.
    0
    0
  • These plans were artfully fostered by the Savoyard kinsmen of Eleanor, daughter of Raymond Berenger, count of Provence, whom he married at Canterbury in January 1236, and by his half-brothers, the sons of Queen Isabella and Hugo, count of la Marche.
    0
    0
  • On 6th December 1595 he was admitted to a canonry at Canterbury (which he resigned in 1602), and in the same year to the vicarage of Lewisham, Kent, where he became an intimate friend of Richard Hooker, his near neighbour, whom he absolved on his deathbed.
    0
    0
  • He died at Canterbury on the 15th of January 1612, and was buried in the cathedral on the, 9th of January.
    0
    0
  • The protests of Becket against this usurpation of the rights of Canterbury were the ultimate cause of the primate's murder.
    0
    0
  • PETER GUNNING (1614-1684), English divine, was born at Hoo, in Kent, and educated at the King's School, Canterbury, and Clare College, Cambridge, where he became a fellow in 1633.
    0
    0
  • c. 1210), English monk and chronicler, entered the house of Christchurch, Canterbury, at an early age.
    0
    0
  • Their evidence suggests that he died in or shortly after 1210, and that he had resided almost continuously at Canterbury from the time of his admission.
    0
    0
  • He took a keen interest in the secular quarrels of the Canterbury monks with their archbishops, and his earliest literary efforts were controversial tracts upon this subject.
    0
    0
  • From the Gesta the indefatigable Gervase turned to a third project, the history of the see of Canterbury from the arrival of Augustine to the death of Hubert Walter (1205).
    0
    0
  • Stubbs's edition of the Historical Works of Gervase of Canterbury (Rolls edition, 2 vols., 1879-1880).
    0
    0
  • But Thomas Becket, archdeacon of Canterbury, a younger statesman whom Theobald had discovered and promoted, soon became all-powerful.
    0
    0
  • After Becket's flight (1164), the king put himself still further in the wrong by impounding the revenues of Canterbury and banishing at one stroke a number of the archbishop's friends and connexions.
    0
    0
  • Great efforts were made by William Beveridge (1637-1708), bishop of St Asaph, William Wake { 16 5 71 737), archbishop of Canterbury, John Sharp (1645-1 714), archbishop of York, Edmund Gibson (1669-1748), bishop of London, and afterwards by the philosophic Bishop Berkeley, and Bishop Butler, the famous author of the Analogy, to develop the colonial church and provide for the wants of the Indian tribes.
    0
    0
  • Eventually, in 1887, the Canterbury Convocation and Archbishop Benson formed a Board of Missions; and York followed shortly afterwards.
    0
    0
  • With the same object, though on different lines, the archbishop of Canterbury's Assyrian Mission seeks to influence the Nestorians.
    0
    0
  • c. 1070), archbishop of Canterbury, was a Norman who became prior of St Ouen at Rouen and then abbot of Jumieges.
    0
    0
  • In 1051, although the chapter had already made an election, Edward appointed him archbishop of Canterbury.
    0
    0
  • In August 1583 he was appointed archbishop of Canterbury, and thus was largely instrumental in giving its special complexion to the church of the Reformation.
    0
    0
  • He was noted for his hospitality, and was somewhat ostentatious in his habits, sometimes visiting Canterbury and other towns attended by a retinue of 800 horsemen.
    0
    0
  • Hook's Archbishops of Canterbury (1875), and vol.
    0
    0
  • In 1670 he became prebendary and in 1672 dean of Canterbury.
    0
    0
  • In August of this year he was appointed by the chapter of his cathedral to exercise the archiepiscopal jurisdiction of the province of Canterbury during the suspension of Sancroft.
    0
    0
  • The archbishop of Canterbury, Robert Kilwardby, was also his friend; but after Kilwardby's death in 1279 a series of disputes arose between the bishop and the new archbishop, John Peckham, and this was probably the cause which drove Cantilupe to visit Italy.
    0
    0
  • More weighty contributions are the anonymous theological discussion The Kernel and the Husk (1886), Philomythus (1891), his book on Cardinal Newman as an Anglican (1892), and his article "The Gospels" in the ninth edition of the Encyclopaedia Britannica, embodying a critical view which caused considerable stir in the English theological world; he also wrote St Thomas of Canterbury, his Death and Miracles (1898), Johannine V ocabulary (1905), Johannine Grammar (1906).
    0
    0
  • His hopes of the see of Canterbury were disappointed, but he obtained in 1139 a legatine commission which gave him a higher rank than the primate.
    0
    0
  • He even contemplated the erection of a new province, with Winchester as its centre, which was to be independent of Canterbury.
    0
    0
  • On his return to England, he was successively appointed prebendary of Lincoln, archdeacon of Lincoln (1347), and in 1349 archbishop of Canterbury.
    0
    0
  • Hook, Lives of the Archbishops of Canterbury, vol.
    0
    0
  • They did not,, however, retain the manor beyond the close of the 12th century, when it was acquired by the see of Canterbury.
    0
    0
  • 1205), chief justiciar of England and archbishop of Canterbury, was a relative of Ranuif de Glanvill, the great justiciar of Henry II., and rose under the eye of his kinsman to an important position in the Curia Regis.
    0
    0
  • Soon afterwards he was elected archbishop of Canterbury and made justiciar.
    0
    0
  • In 1198 Hubert, who had inherited from his predecessors in the primacy a fierce quarrel with the Canterbury monks, gave these enemies an opportunity of complaining to the pope, for in arresting the London demagogue, William Fitz Osbert, he had committed an act of sacrilege in Bow Church, which belonged to the monks.
    0
    0
  • The inquiry was as rapid as the judgment, and both often took place a short time after the death of the saint, as in the cases of St Thomas of Canterbury (died 1170, canonized 1173), St Peter of Castelnau (died on the 15th of January 1208, canonized on the 12th of March of the same year), St Francis of Assisi (died on the 4th of October 1226, canonized on the 19th of July 1228), and St Anthony of Padua (died on the 13th of June 1231, canonized on the 3rd of June 1232).
    0
    0
  • Despite the intercession of Brihwald, archbishop of Canterbury, Aldfrith king of Northumbria refused to admit the aged prelate into his kingdom till his last illness (705).
    0
    0
  • He was buried at Ripon, whence, according to Eadmer, his bones were afterwards removed to Canterbury.
    0
    0
  • In 1897, on the translation of Dr Temple to Canterbury, Bishop Creighton was transferred to London.
    0
    0
  • 624), bishop of London and archbishop of Canterbury, was sent to England by Pope Gregory the Great in 601.
    0
    0
  • He took refuge in Kent and then in Gaul, but soon returned to England, and in 619 became archbishop of Canterbury in succession to Laurentius.
    0
    0
  • It is interesting as a stage in the transition from the vernacular to the Latin chronicle; but it has little independent value, being a mere epitome, made at Canterbury in the 11th or 12 th century, of a chronicle akin to E.
    0
    0
  • At some subsequent time it was transferred bodily to Canterbury, where it received numerous interpolations in the earlier part, and a few later local entries which finally tail off into the Latin acts of Lanfranc. A may therefore be dismissed.
    0
    0
  • This section was probably composed at Canterbury.
    0
    0
  • The section 1023 - I 06 7 certainly, and possibly also the section 1068-11 21, was composed at St Augustine's, Canterbury; and the former is of extreme interest and value, the writer being in close contact with the events which he describes.
    0
    0
  • When, on the conclusion of peace, the church-people of Connecticut sent Dr Samuel Seabury to England, with a request to the archbishop of Canterbury to consecrate him, it is not surprising that Archbishop Moore refused.
    0
    0
  • In April of that year, however, Bishop Blomfield of London published his famous letter to the archbishop of Canterbury, declaring that "an episcopal church without a bishop is a contradiction in terms," and strenuously advocating a great effort for the extension of the episcopate.
    0
    0
  • Moreover, for many years all bishops alike were consecrated in England, took the customary "oath of due obedience" to the archbishop of Canterbury, and were regarded as his extra-territorial suffragans.
    0
    0
  • They are not only nominated by the crown and consecrated under letters patent, but the appointment is expressly subjected "to such power of revocation and recall as is by law vested" in the crown; and where additional oversight was necessary for the church in Tinnevelly, it could only be secured by the consecration of two assistant bishops, who worked under a commission for the archbishop of Canterbury which was to expire on the death of the bishop of Madras.
    0
    0
  • (3) By degrees, also, the relations of colonial churches to the archbishop of Canterbury have changed.
    0
    0
  • secrated in India under a commission from the arch bishop of Canterbury; and until 1874 it was held to be unlawful for a bishop to be consecrated in England without taking the suffragan's oath of due obedience.
    0
    0
  • the diocese Honolulu (Hawaii), previously under the jurisdiction of the archbishop of Canterbury, was transferred in 1900 to the Episcopal Church in the United States on account of political changes.
    0
    0
  • The Anglican communion consists of the following: - (I) The Church of England, 2 provinces, Canterbury and York, with 24 and II dioceses respectively.
    0
    0
  • (II) Nearly 30 isolated dioceses and missionary jurisdictions holding mission from the see of Canterbury.
    0
    0
  • He exercised considerable influence over the prince of Wales, afterwards King Henry V., and although he steadily supported the house of Lancaster he opposed the party led by Thomas Arundel, archbishop of Canterbury.
    0
    0
  • A successful diplomacy detached the emperor Sigismund from France, and by the Treaty of Canterbury paved the way to end the schism in the Church.
    0
    0
  • The market was originally held on Sunday under grant from John to Warin Fitz Gerald in 1205, but in 1351, in consequence of a protest from the archbishop of Canterbury, it was changed to Thursday, on which day it is still held.
    0
    0
  • Suspended from his office, he went to Rome to be tried before Pope Boniface VIII., who referred the case to Winchelsea, archbishop of Canterbury; the archbishop, although Langton's lifelong enemy, found him innocent, and this sentence was confirmed by Boniface in 1303.
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    0
  • of Canterbury, on the South Eastern and Chatham railway.
    0
    0
  • Before the report was issued, Stanley was appointed to a canonry in Canterbury Cathedral.
    0
    0
  • His Memorials of Canterbury (1855), displayed the full maturity of his power of dealing with the events and characters of past history.
    0
    0
  • In England pilgrimages were made to the tomb of the murdered archbishop, Thomas Becket, in Canterbury Cathedral.
    0
    0
  • The setting of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales gives a vivid idea of the motley company of pilgrims; but it seems probable that Germany also sent a contingent (Gervas.
    0
    0
  • The enemy escaped, but a peaceful settlement was made by the good offices of Odo of Canterbury and Wulfstan of York.
    0
    0
  • died in November 1272 the archbishopric of Canterbury was vacant, and consequently the great seal was delivered to the archbishop of York, who was the chief of the three regents who successfully governed the kingdom until the return of Edward I.
    0
    0
  • HOUSES OF LAYMEN, deliberative assemblies of the laity of the Church of England, one for the province of Canterbury, and the other for the province of York.
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    0
  • That of Canterbury was formed in 1886, and that of York shortly afterwards.
    0
    0
  • In 1848 he was consecrated archbishop of Canterbury, in which capacity he dealt impartially with the different church parties.
    0
    0
  • In the Anglican Church a vicar-general is employed by the archbishop of Canterbury and some other bishops to assist in such matters as ecclesiastical visitations.
    0
    0
  • They also differed over the prerogatives of Canterbury with regard to probate and other questions of ecclesiastical jurisdiction.
    0
    0
  • He became a Benedictine monk at Canterbury, and then joining the Cluniacs, was prior of Lenton Abbey, near Nottingham; he was chaplain to Henry V., whom he accompanied to France in 1415, being present at Agincourt.
    0
    0
  • Elmham wrote a history of the monastery of St Augustine at Canterbury, which has been edited by C. Hardwick for the Rolls Series (1858); and a Liber metricus de Henrico V., edited by C. A.
    0
    0
  • The term is also given to the apse or semicircular termination of the choir; as at Canterbury in the part called "Becket's crown."
    0
    0
  • 1136), archbishop of Canterbury, was born probably at Corbeil on the Seine, and was educated at Laon.
    0
    0
  • At the beginning of 1123 he was chosen from among several candidates to be archbishop of Canterbury, and as he refused to admit that Thurstan, archbishop of York, was independent of the see of Canterbury, this prelate refused to consecrate him, and the ceremony was performed by his own suffragan bishops.
    0
    0
  • He died at Canterbury on the 21st of November 1136.
    0
    0
  • William built the keep of Rochester Castle, and finished the building of the cathedral at Canterbury, which was dedicated with great pomp in May 1130.
    0
    0
  • Hook, Lives of the Archbishops of Canterbury (1860-1884); and W.
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    0
  • Dunstan, archbishop of Canterbury (925-988), like Bernward, bishop of Hildesheim a few years later, and St Eloi of France three centuries earlier, was himself a skilful worker in all kinds of metal.
    0
    0
  • The college of St Martin for twenty-two secular canons, which had been established in the castle in 696, was removed into the town in the beginning of the 8th century, and in 1139 became a Benedictine priory under the jurisdiction of that at Canterbury, to which see the lands are still attached.
    0
    0
  • Dover is a suffragan bishopric in the diocese of Canterbury.
    0
    0
  • 1376), archbishop of Canterbury and cardinal, was born at Langham in Rutland, becoming a monk in the abbey of St Peter at Westminster, and later prior and then abbot of this house.
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    0
  • In 1360 he was made treasurer of England and in 1361 he became bishop of Ely; he was appointed chancellor of England in 1363 and was chosen archbishop of Canterbury in 1366.
    0
    0
  • Perhaps the most interesting incident in his primacy was when he drove the secular clergy from their college of Canterbury Hall, Oxford, and filled their places with monks.
    0
    0
  • He was soon allowed to hold other although less exalted positions in England, and in 1374 he was elected archbishop of Canterbury for the second time; but he withdrew his claim and died at Avignon on the 22nd of July 1376.
    0
    0
  • ARCHIBALD CAMPBELL TAIT (1811-1882), Anglican divine, archbishop of Canterbury, was born at Edinburgh on the 21st of December 1811.
    0
    0
  • His translation to Canterbury in 1868 (he had refused the archbishopric of York in 1862) constituted a recognition of his work, but made no break in it.
    0
    0
  • He was ordained in 1757, and in 1762 was appointed domestic chaplain to the archbishop of Canterbury.
    0
    0
  • British dukes rank next to princes and princesses of the blood royal, the two archbishops of Canterbury and York, the lord Chancellor, etc., but beyond this precedence they have no special privileges which are not shared by peers of lower rank.
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    0
  • In 1549 he was placed on a commission to examine Anabaptists, and in 1551 he was appointed chancellor to Bishop Ridley, select preacher at Canterbury, and a commissioner for the reform of the canon law; in 1552 Coverdale made him archdeacon of Exeter.
    0
    0
  • In the same year he brought to an end the investiture struggle in England, in which Anselm, archbishop of Canterbury, had been engaged with King Henry I., by retaining himself exclusive right to invest with the ring and crozier, but recognizing the royal nomination .to vacate benefices and oath of fealty for temporal domains.
    0
    0
  • It was according to tradition in a tower which, previous to 1584, stood near the church of the Annunziata that Boethius wrote his De consolatione philosophiae; the legal school of Pavia was rendered celebrated in the 11th century by Lanfranc (afterwards archbishop of Canterbury); Petrarch was frequently here as the guest of Galeazzo II., and his grandson died and was buried here.
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    0
  • Among his many writings are An Ecclesiastical Biography, containing the Lives of Ancient Fathers and Modern Divines (8 vols., 1845-1852), A Church Dictionary, The Means of Rendering more Effectual the Education of the People, The Cross of Christ (1873), The Church and its Ordinances (sermons, 4 vols., 1876), and Lives of the Archbishops of Canterbury (12 vols., 1860-1876).
    0
    0
  • There are a large American Mission with schools, orphanage and a resident doctor, a French (Dominican) Mission with schools, and also a branch of the archbishop of Canterbury's Mission to the Nestorian Christians who live in the mountains to the south.
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    0
  • Eccl.) that he wrote encouraging letters to Mellitus, archbishop of Canterbury, and Justus, bishop of Rochester, and quotes three letters - to Justus, to Eadwin, king of Northumbria, and to his wife IEthelberga.
    0
    0
  • William of Malmesbury gives a letter to Justus of the year 625, in which Canterbury is constituted the metropolitan see of Britain for ever.
    0
    0
  • But among Paul's cardinals were three remarkable men, the Italians Contarini and Sadolet, and the Englishman Reginald Pole, afterwards archbishop of Canterbury under Mary.
    0
    0
  • If the right of presentation to an ecclesiastical benefice belongs to any office under the crown, and that office is held by a Roman Catholic, the archbishop of Canterbury exercises the right for the time being (io Geo.
    0
    0
  • In 1397 it was the scene of a conspiracy organized by the earl of Arundel, archbishop of Canterbury and duke of Gloucester.
    0
    0
  • - Ecclesiastically, the whole of Wales lies within the province of Canterbury.
    0
    0
  • The close of the 12th century saw the final and complete subjection of the ancient Cambro-British Church to the supremacy of Canterbury.
    0
    0
  • In 1188 Archbishop Baldwin with a distinguished train, whilst preaching the Third Crusade, made an itinerary of the Welsh sees and visited the four cathedral churches, thereby formally asserting the supremacy of Canterbury throughout all Wales.
    0
    0
  • Finally, in 1203, Gerald was compelled to make complete submission to the king and archbishop at Westminster, and henceforth Canterbury remained in undisputed possession of the Welsh sees, a circumstance that undoubtedly tended towards the later union of the two countries.
    0
    0
  • In this letter Owen, who was holding his court in Llanbadarn near Aberystwith, demands his own acknowledgment as sovereign of Wales; the calling of a free Welsh parliament on the English model; the independence of the Welsh Church from the control of Canterbury; and the founding of national colleges in Wales itself.
    0
    0
  • Dr Lea is probably right in suggesting that it was a confused recollection of these decrees which prompted one of Cranmer's judges to assure him that "his children were bondmen to the see of Canterbury."
    0
    0
  • REGINALD POLE (1500-1558), English cardinal and archbishop of Canterbury, born at Stourton Castle, Staffordshire, was the third son of Sir Richard Pole, Knight of the Garter, and Margaret, countess of Salisbury, a daughter of George, duke of Clarence, and therefore niece of Edward IV.
    0
    0
  • On Cranmer's deprivation, Pole became archbishop of Canterbury; and, having been ordained priest two days before, he was consecrated on the 22nd of March 1556, the day after Cranmer suffered at Oxford.
    0
    0
  • deprived Pole of his power both as legate a latere and legatus natus as archbishop of Canterbury (June 14, 1557); he also reconstituted the process of the Inquisition against the cardinal and summoned him to Rome to answer to the crime and heresies imputed to him.
    0
    0
  • He was buried at Canterbury near the spot where the shrine of St Thomas Becket once stood.
    0
    0
  • 1228), cardinal and archbishop of Canterbury, was the son of English parents; but the date and place of his birth are unknown.
    0
    0
  • The suffragans of Canterbury claimed a share in choosing the new primate, although that right had been exclusively reserved to the monks of Canterbury by a papal privilege; and John supported the bishops since they were prepared to give their votes for his candidate, John de Gray, bishop of Norwich.
    0
    0
  • and was appointed archdeacon of Canterbury; he was consulted by Pope Gregory IX.
    0
    0
  • On hearing the news the king banished the monks of Canterbury and lodged a protest with the pope, in which he threatened to prevent any English appeals from being brought to Rome.
    0
    0
  • He died on the 9th of July 1228, and was buried in Canterbury Cathedral, where his tomb, unless tradition errs, may still be seen.
    0
    0
  • Some letters, by Langton and others, relating to the quarrel over his election are preserved in a Canterbury Chronicle (ed.
    0
    0
  • Hook, Lives of the Archbishops of Canterbury (London, 1860-1876), and W.
    0
    0
  • In 1501 he was elected archbishop of Canterbury, but he died on the 27th of January 1501, before his election had been confirmed.
    0
    0
  • It is cruciform, with a central tower, and has an eastern octagon which may have been copied from the corona of Canterbury Cathedral, as Eystein, archbishop of Trondhjem (1160-1188) and an active builder, was in England during his episcopate.
    0
    0
  • 1072), archbishop of Canterbury, is first mentioned in 1020.
    0
    0
  • In this year the archbishop of Canterbury, Robert of Jumieges, having been outlawed and driven from England, Stigand was appointed to the archbishopric; but, regarding Robert as the rightful archbishop, Pope Leo IX.
    0
    0
  • Stigand was an avaricious man and a great pluralist, holding the bishopric of Winchester after he became archbishop of Canterbury, in addition to several abbeys.
    0
    0
  • 1327), archbishop of Canterbury, was the son of a Windsor baker, and became a clerk, or chaplain, in the service of Edward I.
    0
    0
  • When Robert Winchelsea, archbishop of Canterbury, died in May 1313 Edward II.
    0
    0
  • to appoint his favourite to the vacant archbishopric, and Walter was enthroned at Canterbury in February 1314.
    0
    0
  • Although the private life of the new archbishop appears to have been the reverse of exemplary he attempted to carry out some very necessary reforms in his new official capacity; he also continued the struggle for precedence, which had been carried on for many years between the archbishops of Canterbury and of York.
    0
    0
  • Having been made prebendary of Exeter, of Wells and of York, he was consecrated bishop of Hereford in 1370, was translated to the see of London in 1375, and became archbishop of Canterbury in 1381, succeeding Simon of Sudbury in both these latter positions.
    0
    0
  • Having meanwhile become archbishop of Canterbury Courtenay summoned a council, or synod, in London, which condemned the opinions of Wycliffe; he then attacked the Lollards at Oxford, and urged the bishops to imprison heretics.
    0
    0
  • Courtenay died at Maidstone on the 31st of July 1396, and was buried in Canterbury cathedral.
    0
    0
  • About 1235 he became chancellor of the diocese of Canterbury under Archbishop Edmund Rich, and he was with the archbishop during his exile in France.
    0
    0
  • Having returned to England some time after Edmund's death in 1240 he became vicar of Deal and chancellor of Canterbury for the second time.
    0
    0
  • The slight inward sweep of the coast forms the Canterbury Bight, and the shore-line northward from Timaru is called the Ninety-mile Beach.
    0
    0
  • Timaru is the chief town in South Canterbury district, and the seat of the supreme and district courts.
    0
    0
  • (3) The Anglican mission, which was established by Dr Benson, archbishop of Canterbury, and has its work among the Nestorians in Azerbaijan.
    0
    0
  • After the fire of 1 184 the monks asserted that they were in possession of the remains of St Dunstan, which had been abstracted from Canterbury after the Danish sack of ion and kept in concealment ever since.
    0
    0
  • The Canterbury monks naturally denied the assertion, and the contest continued for centuries.
    0
    0
  • In 1508 Warham and Goldston having examined the Canterbury shrine reported that it contained all the principal bones of the saint, but the abbot of Glastonbury in reply as stoutly maintained that this was impossible.
    0
    0
  • This deed provided for the appointment of an advisory council, consisting of the archbishop of Canterbury, the bishop of Bath and Wells and four other bishops, each with power to nominate one clerical and one lay member.
    0
    0
  • The archbishop of Canterbury, in whose court the case was heard (1889), decided that the mere presence of two candles on the table, burning during the service but lit before it began, was lawful under the first Prayer-Book of Edward VI.
    0
    0
  • He was then sent to Samuel Jones's dissenting academy at Gloucester, and afterwards at Tewkesbury, where his most intimate friend was Thomas Secker, who became archbishop of Canterbury.
    0
    0
  • The story is that the Abbot of St Augustine, Canterbury, diverted the funds by which the sea-wall protecting Earl Godwin's island was kept up, for the purpose of building Tenterden steeple, the consequence being that in 1099 an inundation took place and ."Tenterden steeple was the cause of the Goodwin Sands."
    0
    0
  • The manor was given in 941 by King Edmund to the monks of Christ Church, Canterbury, from whom it had been previously taken, but it was again alienated, for it was restored to the same monks by Edred in 948.
    0
    0
  • This was published in 1900 at the Phanar press, erected as a memorial to Theodore of Tarsus, archbishop of Canterbury, by Greek and English churchmen, which was set up by the patriarch Constantine V.
    0
    0
  • In 1899 there was further an interchange of courtesies between the archbishop of Canterbury and Constantine V., patriarch of Constantinople.
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  • 1038), archbishop of Canterbury, known also as Egelnodus or Ednodus, was a son of the ealdorman lEthelmaer, and a member of the royal family of Wessex.
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  • He became a monk at Glastonbury, then dean of the monastery of Christ Church, Canterbury, and chaplain to King Canute, and on the 13th of November 1020 was consecrated archbishop of Canterbury.
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  • He appears to have exercised considerable influence over Canute, largely by whose aid he restored his cathedral at Canterbury.
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  • he became archbishop of Canterbury and in his official capacity he took part in the coronation of this king, but his health soon began to fail and he died at Lambeth on the 4th of June 1663.
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  • The matrix of one of the seals of Canterbury Cathedral was also constructed in the same manner.
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  • He had assistance from two clerics of widely differing opinions - from Edmund Grindal, who was later, as archbishop of Canterbury, to maintain his Puritan convictions in opposition to Elizabeth; and from John Aylmer, afterwards one of the bitterest opponents of the Puritan party.
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  • Brighton, Eastbourne, Dover, Chatham, or in the gaps where rivers from the centre pierce the Chalk ring, as at Guildford, Rochester, Canterbury, Lewes and Arundel.
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  • Of these, excluding Welsh ones, we may with some certainty identify Canterbury (Caint), Caerleonon-Usk, Leicester (Lerion), Penzelwood, Carlisle, Colchester, Grantchester (Granth), London, Worcester (Guveirangon), Doncaster (Daun), Wroxeter (Guoricon), Chester (Legion - this is Roman), Lichfield (Licitcsith) and Gloucester (Gloui).
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  • The ecclesiastical system is episcopal, the whole of England (including for this purpose Wales) being divided into two provinces, Canterbury and York, and 37 bishoprics (including the primatial sees of Canterbury and York).
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  • The following are suffragan or assistant bishoprics (the names of the dioceses to which each belongs being given in brackets): Dover, Croydon (Canterbury), Beverley, Hull, Sheffield (York), Stepney, Islington, Kensington (London), Jarrow (Durham), Guildford, Southampton, Dorking (Winchester), Barrow-inFurness (Carlisle), Crediton (Exeter), Grantham (Lincoln), Burnley (Manchester), Thetford, Ipswich (Norwich), Reading (Oxford), Leicester (Peterborough), Richmond, Knaresborough (Ripon), Colchester, Barking (St Albans), Swansea (St.
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  • At his instigation, Folcard, a monk of Canterbury, wrote the Life of St John of Beverley.
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  • It was during this reign that the archbishopric of Lichfield was abolished, probably before 803, as the Hygeberht who signed as an abbot at the council of Cloveshoe in that year was presumably the former archbishop. Coenwulf appears from the charters to have quarrelled with Wulfred of Canterbury, who was consecrated in 806, and the dispute continued for several years.
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  • In 774 land in Lydd was granted by Offa to the monks of Christ Church, Canterbury, and the archbishop of Canterbury evidently held the lordship of the town from an early date.
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  • Cardinal Pole, however, came back to his own country with great honour in the reign of Queen Mary, and was made archbishop of Canterbury on the deprivation of Cranmer.
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