Cannon-bone sentence example

cannon-bone
  • A gland and tuft are present on the skin of the outer side of the upper part of the hind cannon-bone; but, unlike American deer, there is no gland on the inner side of the hock.
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  • This is one of the few deer in which there are glands neither on the hock nor on the skin covering the cannon-bone.
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  • Reduction and final loss of outer pair of digits (second and fifth), with coalescence of the metacarpal and metatarsal bones of the two middle digits to form a cannon-bone.
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  • In the Sheep and the Camel the long compound bone, supporting the two main (or only) toes is the cannon-bone.
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  • The most interesting genera are, however, the Upper Oligocene and Lower Miocene Gelocus and Prodremotherium, which have perfectly selenodont teeth, and the third and fourth metacarpal and metatarsal bones respectively fused into an imperfect cannon-bone, with the reduction of the lateral metacarpals and metatarsals to mere remnants of their upper and lower extremities.
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  • In the forelimbs the bones corresponding to the third and fourth metacarpals of the pig's foot are fused into a cannon-bone; and a similar condition obtains in the case of the corresponding metatarsals in the hind-limbs.
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  • Part of the cannon-bone of a camel from another district in Russia is provisionally assigned to the same species.
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  • Unfortunately, the skull is incomplete, and the rest of the skeleton very imperfectly known; but sufficient of the former remains to show that the socket of the eye was open behind, and of the latter to indicate that in the hind-foot, at any rate, the upper bones of the two functional toes had not coalesced into a cannon-bone.
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  • In Protolabis of the Middle Miocene, while no cannon-bone is formed, the first and second pairs of incisor teeth are retained, and the limbs and feet are short and disproportionately small.
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  • In all the more typical members of the family the three middle metatarsals of the long hind-legs are fused into a cannon-bone; and in the true jerboas of the genus Jaculus the two lateral toes, with their supporting metatarsals, are lost, although they are present in the alactagas (Alactaga), in which, however, as in certain allied genera, only the three middle toes are functional.
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  • In both groups, for instance, the lower part of the hind-leg is formed by a long, slender cannon-bone, or metatarsus, terminating inferiorly in triple condyles for the three long and sharply clawed toes, the resemblance being increased by the fact that in both cases the small bone of the leg (fibula) is fused with the large one (tibia).
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  • Further, at an early stage of development the fibula is a complete and separate bone, while the three metatarsals, which subsequently fuse together to form the cannon-bone, are likewise separate.
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  • The bone specimen tested in this report was the equine third metacarpal or cannon bone.
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  • (See JUMPINGMousE.) In the other genera, so far as known, the three central metatarsals of the hind foot are -fused into a cannon-bone, of a type unique among mammals and comparable to that of birds.
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