Canadian sentence example

canadian
  • But first, I feel the urge to partake of Canadian hospitality.
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  • In opposition to the Canadian Pacific railway a southern line was built from Winnipeg to the American boundary.
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  • From the age of 13 he belonged to the Canadian volunteer militia, with which he saw service in 1870 at the time of the Fenian raids.
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  • Meanwhile the Canadian Pacific, a true transcontinental line, was built from Montreal, on Atlantic tide-water, to the Pacific at Vancouver, 2906 m.
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  • When we crossed over to the Canadian side, I cried, "God save the Queen!"
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  • This fell into the hands of the Northern Pacific railway, but was purchased by the promoters of the Canadian Northern railway.
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  • They were destroyed by whites and Indians in 1879-1882 on the approach of the Canadian Pacific railway.
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  • The basis of the population is Canadian, and the immigration has been chiefly from (I) the British Isles, (2) United States, (3) continent of Europe (chiefly Austria, Hungary and Russia).
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  • In the valley of the Bow river, alongside the Canadian Pacific railway, valuable beds of anthracite coal are worked, and the coal is carried by railway as far east as Winnipeg.
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  • From Calgary to Edmonton northward runs a line under the control of the Canadian Pacific railway.
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  • In 1906 the new line of the Canadian Northern railway was opened, connecting Winnipeg, 1000 m.
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  • Administration, &c. - The local government of Alberta is carried on by a provincial organization resembling that of the other Canadian provinces.
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  • The organization adopted in Utah among the Mormons is found also in Alberta, but the Canadian Mormons profess to have received a later revelation condemning polygamy.
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  • A similar counsel of moderation was given to the Canadian press in connexion with the Manitoba school question in December 1897.
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  • The facies of the fossils is, according to Mr Etheridge, North American and Canadian, though many of the species are British.
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  • It is the natural terminal of three great northern transcontinental railway lines - the Northern Pacific, the Great Northern, and the Chicago, Milwaukee & Puget Sound (the extension of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul system); and the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy and the connecting lines of the Canadian Pacific form lines of communication with the middle Northwest and the Pacific provinces of Canada.
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  • In 1679 Daniel Greysolon, Sieur du Lhut (Duluth), as agent for a company of Canadian merchants which sought to establish trading posts on the Lakes, explored the country from the head of Lake Superior to Mille Lacs and planted the arms of Louis XIV.
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  • At the close of his embassy he told the Canadians that probably three-fourths of the business of the British embassy at Washington was Canadian, and of the 11 or 12 treaties he had signed nine had been treaties relating to the affairs of Canada.
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  • Subsequently the tramways of the city have been mostly concentrated in the hands of a single Canadian company.
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  • Pop. (1890) 44,654, (1900) 62,559, of whom 28,577 were foreign-born (7058 being Irish, 6999 French Canadians, 5131 English, 2465 German, 1683 English Canadian), and (1910 census) 85,892.
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  • The love-sick mood and romantic temperament of the young Irishman found congenial soil in the wild surroundings of unexplored Canadian forests, and the enthusiasm thus engendered for the "natural" life of savagery may have been already fortified by study of Rousseau's writings, for which at a later period Lord Edward expressed his admiration.
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  • The low ground between it and the shore, and between the Niagara escarpment and the water on the Canadian shore, is a celebrated fruit growing district, covered with vineyards, peach, apple and pear orchards and fruit farms. The Niagara river is the main feeder of the lake; the other largest rivers emptying into the lake are the Genesee, Oswego and Black from the south side, and the Trent, which discharges into the upper end of the bay of Quinte, a picturesque inlet 70 m.
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  • The principal Canadian ports are Kingston, at the head of the St Lawrence river; Toronto, where the harbour is formed by an island with improved entrance channels constructed both east and west of it; and Hamilton, at the head of the lake, situated on a landlocked lagoon, connected with the main lake by Burlington channel, an artificial cut.
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  • In 1815 he became speaker of the house, being already recognized as the leader of the French Canadian party.
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  • The aim of the French Canadian opposition at this time was to obtain financial and also constitutional reforms. Matters came to a head when the legislative assembly of Lower Canada refused supplies and Papineau arranged for concerted action with William Lyon Mackenzie, the leader of the reform party in Upper Canada.
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  • It would thus seem that he was intriguing to bring about intervention by the United States with a view to annexation; and as the independence of the French Canadian race, which he professed to desire, could not have been achieved under the constitution of the American republic, it is inconsistent to regard his services to his fellow-countrymen as those of a true patriot.
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  • At the beginning of the War of Independence he raised a regiment and as colonel did good service in the Battle of Bunker Hill, in the Canadian expedition, and in Washington's New Jersey campaign in the winter of 1776-77.
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  • Canada Canadian periodicals have reached a higher standard than in .any other British self-governing colony.
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  • The first Canadian review, the Quebec Magazine (1791-1793), was published quarterly in French and English.
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  • Chandonnet; the Canadian Journal (Toronto), commenced in 1852 under Henry Youle Hind and continued by Daniel Wilson; L'Abeille (Quebec, 1848-1881), and the Canadian Monthly (Toronto, 1872-1882).
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  • Contemporary magazines are the Canadian Magazine (1893), the Westminster, both produced at Toronto, La Nouvelle-France (Quebec), the Canada Monthly (London, Ontario), and the University Magazine, edited by Professor Macphail, of the McGill University.
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  • Pop. (1890), 20,798; (1900), 25,180, of whom 3 8 43 were foreign-born (1004 German, 941 English Canadian); (1910 census) 31,433.
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  • He was educated in his native province, and called to the Canadian bar in 1864.
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  • After some years spent in journalism at Chicago, he was in 1874 elected as the Liberal candidate to represent Levis in the Canadian parliament.
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  • He was president of the Royal Society of Canada, and of the Canadian Society of Arts, and received numerous honorary degrees.
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  • His works include: Mes Loisirs (1863); La Voix d'un exile (1867), a satire against the Canadian government; boreales, and Les Oiseaux de neige (1880), crowned by the French academy; La Legende d'un peuple (1887); two historical dramas, Papineau (1880) and Felix Poutre (1880); La Noel au Canada (1900), and several prose works and translations.
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  • An exponent of local French sentiment, he won the title of the "Canadian Laureate."
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  • Of modern institutions may be mentioned the high school, public library, hospital, and the chapel, school and hospital of the Canadian Presbyterian mission.
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  • Corps, to which the Canadian Corps was now added.
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  • The 3rd Canadian Div., moving off at 4:55 A.M.
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  • That night the divisions in line were relieved, the ist Canadian Div.
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  • Corps (Godley) was now brought in on the Canadian left; the 11th Div.
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  • Corps astride the Scarpe was to secure the Canadian left.
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  • The first objective and part of the second were carried on time and without great difficulty, but the left of the ist Canadian Div., swinging to the left against Marquion, was checked for a time, until reinforcements, including units of the 11th Div., came up to complete the capture of the village and its defences.
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  • Further progress was difficult, particularly on the right, where the 4th Canadian Div., which had outstripped the advance of the left of the Third Army, was held up by flanking fire and counter-attacks from the S., and was unable to do more than establish itself on the fourth objective by the evening, with its right thrown back along the Bapaume-Cambrai road.
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  • On this line it was relieved during the night by the 3rd Canadian Div.
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  • It was decided that the attack should be continued on the 28th, the 3rd and 4th Canadian Div.
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  • After its exertions and achievements during the previous five days of incessant fighting the Canadian Corps was in urgent need of rest and refitment.
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  • To him are due the introduction of the decimal system of currency and the adoption of a system of protection to Canadian manufactures.
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  • In 1877 he was the Canadian nominee on the Anglo-American fisheries commission at Halifax, and rendered brilliant service.
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  • In 1880 he was appointed Canadian high commissioner to Great Britain, but retired in 1883 in favour of Sir Charles Tupper.
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  • He was Canadian delegate at the Paris Monetary Conference of 1881, and to the International Exhibition of Fisheries in 1883.
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  • No Canadian statesman has had sounder or more abundant ideas, but a certain intellectual fickleness made him always a somewhat untrustworthy colleague in political life.
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  • The Rio Grande and its principal tributary, the Pecos, drain narrow basins in the S.W.; these two rivers and the Canadian river rise in the Rocky Mountains in Colorado and New Mexico, but all the other rivers by which the state is drained rise within its borders.
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  • Thither also came Julien Dubuque, a French Canadian, to trade with the new occupants.
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  • The Boston trade to the Canadian north-west coast was begun in 1788.
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  • After the Irish the leading foreign elements are Canadian English (18.7%), Canadian French (r 5.8%) and English (9.7%), these four constituting threefourths of the foreign population.
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  • A large part of the transatlantic immigrants pass speedily to permanent homes in the west, but by far the greater part of the Canadian influx remains.
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  • The scenes of the recurrent wars were mostly distant from Massachusetts proper, either in Maine or on Canadian or Acadian territory, although some savage inroads of the Indians were now and then made on the exposed frontier towns, as, for instance, upon Deerfield in 1704 and upon Haverhill in 1708.
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  • On the one hand were the English plantations, populated, cultivated, profitable, stretching along the east coast of North America; on the other were the Canadian settlements, poverty-stricken, empty, over-officialled, a cause of constant expense to the home government, and, at a vast distance, those of Louisiana, struggling and bankrupt.
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  • From 1869 to 1879 he took part in local politics, and was premier from 1876-1879; in 1882 he entered the Canadian parliament as a Liberal, and from 1896 to 1901 was minister of marine and fisheries.
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  • A mint at Ottawa was opened in 1908 for the manufacture of all Canadian coins as well as English sovereigns.
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  • Indeed, it is commonly considered to be an extension of the Canadian mountains.
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  • The American Fall is entirely within the state; but the Canadian boundary-line passes down the centre of the Horseshoe or Canadian Fall.
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  • In London, New Zealand cheese fetches as high a price as Canadian; the value of the cheese exported was £662,000 in 1907.
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  • The experiment of applying responsible government on party lines to the two Canadian provinces at last seemed to have come to a deadlock.
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  • He also undertook the immediate construction of the Canadian Pacific railway, which had been postponed by the former government.
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  • Few political leaders have ever had such a number of antagonistic elements to reconcile as presented themselves in the first Canadian parliament after confederation.
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  • From where the main range turns east from the Idaho boundary line the crest of the Bitterroot Mountains continues on that line with a downward slope to within one degree of latitude from the Canadian border.
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  • It is more accurate to say that as to certain matters the legislature of the Canadian Dominion is sovereign, and as to certain others that it is not (Lefroy, 244; Quick and Garran, Australian Commonwealth, 328; Dicey, 106); and as to some matters they are in fact, if not in form, universitates superiorem non recognoscentes (Quick and Garran, 319); or that they are states in process of making.
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  • Meanwhile his interests were not wholly confined to law: for some time (1840-1843) he wrote for The Times and the British Critic; he made a plunge into patristic learning, from which he soon recoiled; he was much interested in the controversies which distracted the Church on the subject of Tract 90; in the treatment of the Episcopal Church in Canada by the Canadian government and the Colonial Office; in the establishment by the crown, in conjunction with the king of Prussia, of the Jerusalem bishopric; and in the contest for the professorship of poetry at Oxford on Keble's retirement.
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  • Dawson and Leo Lesquereux, and others who reported on the Canadian and American fossil plants.
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  • In 1915 he went to France with the Canadian expeditionary force as " Eye-Witness," and in 1916 became the representative of the Canadian Government at the front, also doing valuable propaganda work.
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  • In 1917 he was appointed officer in charge of the Canadian war records, and in 1918 entered the Government as Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster in succession to Lord Cawley and director of the Ministry of Information in succession to Sir Edward Carson, but resigned in Oct.
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  • They include three genera, of which the first is represented by the Canadian porcupine (Erethizon dorsatus), a stout, heavily-built animal, with long hairs almost or quite hiding its spines, four frontand five hind-toes, and a short, stumpy tail.
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  • A branch line connects it with the Canadian Pacific. It has steamer communication with the St Lawrence and Lake Ontario ports, and is a summer resort.
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  • A careful and even brilliant financier, and a keen debater, he became known as a strong believer in protection for Canadian industries and in preferential trade within the British empire.
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  • American, and later Canadian, capital and enterprise have also been very largely concerned in the development of the country; and its progress was not permanently interfered with by the great earthquakes of April 1907 and July 1909 at Acapulco, and the floods in August 1909 at Monterey.
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  • The Canadian government did their best to facilitate the immigration, and allotted land to the Doukhobors in the provinces of Assiniboia near Yorktown and of Saskatchewan near Thunder Hill and Prince Albert.
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  • They were very cordially received by the population of the Canadian port towns.
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  • InApril1901,in the Canadian House of Commons, the minister of justice made a statement about them in which he said that "not a single offence had been committed by the Doukhobors; they were law-abiding, and if good conduct was a recommendation, they were good immigrants..
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  • A man of great force of character and much ability, of keen ambitions and unusual shrewdness, though not remarkable for breadth of mind, he attained to great influence in the executive government and was soon the leading spirit in that dominant group known in Upper Canadian history as the Family Compact.
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  • On the death of Bishop Stewart of Quebec the Canadian see was divided, and Strachan was made bishop of Toronto in August 1839.
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  • After several strong appeals and counter-appeals to the British government, the Canadian parliament was allowed to deal as it pleased with the question, with the result that the Reserves were completely secularized in 1854, provision being made for the life-interest of the beneficiaries at the time.
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  • The central plains are divided by a hardly perceptible height of land into a Canadian and a United States portion; from the latter the great Mississippi system discharges southward to the Gulf of Mexico.
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  • The valley floors always join at accordant levels, as is the habit among normally subdued mountains; they thus contrast with glaciated mountains such as the Alps and the Canadian Rockies, where the laterals habitually open as hanging valleys in the side slope of the main valleys.
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  • Canals on the Canadian side of these unnavigable stretches admit vessels of a considerable size to lakes Ontario and Erie.
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  • This peculiar feature is explained as the result of displacement of the river from a better graded preglacial valley by the Pleistocene ice-sheet, which here overspread the plains from the moderately elevated Canadian highlands far on the north-east, instead of from the much higher mountains near by on the west.
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  • The Llano is separated from the plains on the north by the mature consequent valley of the Canadian river, and from the mountains on the west by the broad and probably mature valley of the Pecos river.
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  • The central denuded area, east of the Llano, resembles the east-central section of the plains in exposing older rocks; between these two similar areas, in the space limited by the Canadian and Red rivers.
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  • The strong changes of temperature with the seasons are indicated also by the distribution of summer maxima and winter minima; summer temperatures above 112 are known in the south-western deserts, and temperatures of 100 are sometimes carried far northward on the Great Plains by the hot winds nearly to the Canadian boundary; while in winter, temperatures of 40 occur along the mid-northern boundary and freezing winds sometimes sweep down to the border of the Gulf of Mexico.
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  • Fauna.Differences of temperature have produced in North America seven transcontinental life-zones or areas characterized by relative uniformity of both fauna and flora; they are the Arctic, Hudsonian and Canadian, which are divisions of the Boreal Region; the Transition, Upper Austral and Lower Austral, which are divisions of the Austral Region, and the Tropical.
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  • The Arctic, Hudsonian and Canadian enter the United States from the north and the Tropical from the south; but the greater part of the United States is occupied by the Transition, Upper Austral and Lower Austral, and each of these is divided into eastern and western subzones by differences in the amount of moisture.
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  • The Canadian zone crosses from Canada into northern and northwestern Maine, northern and central New Hampshire, northern Michigan, and north-eastern Minnesota and North Dakota, covers the Green Mountains, most of the Adirondacks and Catskills, the higher slopes of the mountains in Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Virginia, western North Carolina and eastern Tennessee, the lower slopes of the northern Rocky and Cascade Mountains, the upper slopes of the southern Rocky and Sierra Nevada Mountains, and a strip along the Pacific coast as far south as Cape Mendocino, interrupted, however, by the Columbia Valley.
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  • In these figures no account is taken of the trade of the Canadian ports on the lakes.
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  • This led to his interest in the development of western Canada, and from 1881 onwards he was associated with his cousin in the construction of the Canadian Pacific railway, for his services in connexion with which he was in 1886 made a baronet, in 1891 raised to the peerage; and in 1905 made G.C.V.O.
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  • The St Lawrence is far the most important Canadian river from the historic and economic points of view, since it provided the main artery of exploration in early days, and with its canals past rapids and between lakes still serves as a great highway of trade between the interior of the continent and the seaports of Montreal and Quebec. It is probable that politically Canada would have followed the course of the States to the south but for the planting of a French colony with widely extended trading posts along the easily ascended channel of the St Lawrence and the Great Lakes, so that this river was the ultimate bond of union between Canada and the empire.
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  • The parallel of 49° approximately separates the Saskatchewan waters from the streams going south to the Missouri, though a few sn1all tributaries of the latter river begin on Canadian territory.
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  • In most cases they reach the coast through deep valleys or profound canyons, and the transcontinental railways find their way beside them, the Canadian Pacific following at first tributaries of the Columbia near its great bend, and afterwards Thompson river and the Fraser; while the Grand Trunk Pacific makes use of the valley of the Skeena and its tributaries.
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  • As most of the Canadian rivers have waterfalls on their course, they must become of more and more importance as sources of power.
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  • The Selkirks and Gold Ranges west of the Rockies, with their great areas of eruptive rocks, both ancient and modern, include most of the important mines of gold, silver, copper and lead which give British Columbia its leadership among the Canadian provinces as a producer of metals.
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  • Nearly all the sea-birds of Great Britain are found in Canadian waters or are represented by closely allied species.
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  • The chief seaports from east to west are Halifax, N.S., Sydney, N.S., St John, N.B., Quebec and Montreal on the Atlantic; and Vancouver, Esquimalt and Victoria, B.C.; on the Pacific. Halifax is the ocean terminus of the Intercolonial railway; St John, Halifax and Vancouver of the Canadian Pacific railway.
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  • Numerous steamship lines ply between Canada and Great Britain; direct communication exists with France, and the steamers of the Canadian Pacific railway run regularly to Japan and to Australia.
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  • There are, nominally, about 200 railways, but about one-half of these, comprising five-sixths of the mileage, have been amalgamated into four great systems: the Grand Trunk, the Canadian Pacific, the Canadian Northern and the Intercolonial; most of the others have been more or less consolidated.
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  • With the completion of the Grand Trunk Pacific (planned for 191 1) and the Canadian Northern, the country would possess three trans-continental railways, and be free from the reproach, so long hurled at it, of possessing length without breadth.
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  • It has long been a Canadian ideal to shorten the distance from Lake Superior to the sea.
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  • In 1903 all tolls were taken off the Canadian canals, greatly to the benefit of trade.
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  • The Canadian Pacific railway controls large land areas in the two new provinces; and large tracts in these provinces are owned by land companies.
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  • Harrington and others; also articles in Canadian Economics and in the Handbook of Canada, published on the occasion of visits of the British Association.
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  • This gives Canadian wheat excellent milling properties, and enables the millers to turn out flour uniform in quality and of high grade as to keeping properties.
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  • Canadian flour has a high reputation in European markets.
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  • It is known as flour from which bakers can make the best quality of bread, and also the largest quantity per barrel, the quantity of albuminoids being greater in Canadian flour than in the best brands of European.
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  • For this reason some of the strong Canadian wheats have commanded in the home market 5s.
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  • Over large areas the Canadian soil and climate are admirably adapted for producing oats of heavy weight per bushel.
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  • Canadian oatmeal is equal in quality to the best.
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  • After the raising of the duty on barley under the McKinley and Dingley tariffs that trade was practically destroyed and Canadian farmers were obliged to find other uses for this crop. Owing to the development of the trade with the mother-country in dairying and meat products, barley as a home feeding material has become more indispensable than ever.
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  • Canadian eggs are usually packed in cases containing thirty dozens each.
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  • The bracing weather of Canadian winters is followed by the warmth and humidity of genial summers, under which crops grow in almost tropical luxuriance, while the cool evenings and nights give the plants a robustness of quality which are not to be found in tropical regions, and also make life for the various domestic animals wholesome and comfortable.
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  • Canadian hogs are fed, as a rule, on feeds suited for the production of what are known as " fleshy sides."
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  • The cheese is chiefly of the variety known as " Canadian Cheddar."
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  • Legislation was passed to protect Canadian dairy produce from dishonest manipulation, and soon Canadian cheese obtained a deservedly high reputation in the British markets.
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  • Amongst the British imports of cheese the Canadian product ranks first in quality, whilst in quantity it represents about 72% of the total value of the cheese imports, and 84% of the total value of the imports of that kind of cheese which is classed as Cheddar.
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  • The high flavour, the crisp, juicy flesh and the long-keeping qualities of the Canadian apples are their chief merits.
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  • Canadian honey for colour, flavour and substance is unsurpassed.
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  • The government promotes the extension of markets for farm products; it maintains officers in the United Kingdom who make reports from time to time on the condition in which Canadian goods are delivered from the steamships, and also on what they can learn from importing and distributing merchants regarding the preferences of the market for different qualities of farm goods and different sorts of packages.
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  • At the beginning of the 17th century we find the first great name in Canadian history.
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  • They had also penetrated to what is now the Canadian West, and it was a French Canadian, La Verendrye, who, by the route leading past the point where now stands the city of Winnipeg, pressed on into the far West until in 1743, first recorded of white men, he came in sight of the Rocky Mountains.
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  • Some thought that, under a Protestant sovereign, the Canadian Catholics would be rapidly converted to Protestantism.
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  • He recommended the union of the two Canadian provinces at once, the ultimate union of all British North America and the granting to this large state of full self-government.
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  • The issue was finally settled in 1849 when the earl of Elgin was governor and the Canadian legislature, sitting at Montreal, passed by a large majority the Rebellion Losses Bill, compensating citizens, some of them French, in Lower Canada, for losses incurred at the hands of the loyal party during the rebellion a decade earlier.
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  • He did so in the face of this fierce opposition, on the ground that, in Canadian domestic affairs, the Canadian parliament must be supreme.
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  • In 1854 Lord Elgin negotiated a reciprocity treaty with the United States which gave Canadian natural products free entrance to the American market.
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  • An act authorizing the change of control was passed by the imperial parliament in July 1868; the arrangement made with the Hudson's Bay Company was accepted by the Canadian parliament in June 1869; and the deed of surrender from the Hudson's Bay Company to Her Majesty is dated November 19th, 1869.
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  • In anticipation of the formal transfer to the Dominion an act was passed by the Canadian parliament in the same month providing for the temporary government of Rupert's Land and the North-West Territories.
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  • They resented the presence of the Canadian surveyors sent to lay out roads and townships, and the tactless way in which some of these did their work increased the suspicion that long-established rights to the soil would not be respected.
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  • An armed force, composed partly of British regulars and partly of Canadian volunteers, was made ready and placed under the command of Colonel Garnet Wolseley, afterwards Lord Wolseley.
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  • The construction of the Canadian Pacific railway, thus inaugurated, became for several years the chief subject of political contention between opposing parties.
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  • Finally in 1878, in order to remove all doubts about unoccupied territory, an imperial order in council was passed in response to an address of the Canadian parliament, annexing to the Dominion all British possessions in North America, except Newfoundland.
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  • Recent friction with that country made this route objected to by the imperial and many Canadian authorities.
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  • A signal proof was soon furnished of the new standing in the empire which federation had given to the Canadian provinces.
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  • American fishermen, however, showed so little inclination to give up what they had enjoyed so long, that it was found necessary to take vigorous steps to protect Canadian fishing rights, and frequent causes of friction consequently arose.
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  • On the other hand, Canadian feeling had been equally exasperated by the Fenian raids, organized on American soil, which had cost Canada much expenditure of money and some loss of life.
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  • By the terms of this treaty the " Alabama " claims and the San Juan boundary were referred to arbitration; the free navigation of the St Lawrence was granted to the United States in return for the free use of Lake Michigan and certain Alaskan rivers; and it was settled that a further commission should decide the excess of value of the Canadian fisheries thrown open to the United States over and above the reciprocal concessions made to Canada.
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  • To some of these terms the representative of Canada made a strenuous opposition, and in finally signing the treaty stated that he did so chiefly for imperial interests, although in these he believed Canadian interests to be involved.
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  • The clauses relating to the fisheries and the San Juan boundary were reserved for the approval of the Canadian parliament, which, in spite of much violent opposition, ratified them by a large majority.
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  • The Fishery Commission, on the other hand, which sat in Halifax, awarded Canada $5,500,000 as the excess value of its fisheries for twelve years, and after much hesitation this sum was paid by the United States into the Canadian treasury.
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  • In 1872 two companies had been formed and received charters to build the Canadian Pacific railway.
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  • Huntingdon, formally charged certain members of the cabinet with having received large sums of money, for use in the election, from Sir Hugh Allan, on condition, as it was claimed, that the Canadian Pacific contract should be given to the new company, of which he became the head on the failure of the plan for amalgamation.
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  • Meanwhile a policy destined to affect profoundly the future of the Dominion had, along with that of the construction of the Canadian Pacific railway, become a subject of burning political discussion and party division.
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  • The factories of the United States, unduly developed by an extreme system of protection, sought in Canada a slaughter market for their surplus products, to the detriment or destruction of Canadian industries.
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  • Macdonald brought forward a proposal to adopt what was called a " national policy," or, in other words, a system of protection for Canadian industries.
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  • The new system was laid before parliament in 1879 by the finance minister, Sir Leonard Tilley; and the tariff then agreed upon, although it received considerable modification from time to time, remained, under both Conservative and Liberal administrations, the basis of Canadian finance, and, as Canadians generally believed, the bulwark of their industry.
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  • Even before the Canadian Pacific railway was fully completed, it proved of great service in a national emergency which suddenly arose in the north-west.
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  • Major-general Middleton, of the imperial army, who was then in command of the Canadian militia, led the expedition.
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  • Painful as were the circumstances connected with this rebellion, it is certain that the united action of the different provinces in suppressing it tended to consolidate Canadian sentiment, and the short military campaign had the effect of fixing public attention upon the immense fertile territory then being opened up.
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  • The Conservative party took the position that commercial union, involving as it would a common protective tariff against all other countries, including the motherland, with a new company to complete the Canadian Pacific railway within ten years, on condition of receiving a Pacific grant of $25,000,000 and 25,000,000 acres of land, would inevitably lead to political unification with the United States.
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  • Edward Blake from Canadian politics to accept a seat in the British parliament as a member of the Home Rule party.
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  • While the federation of the provinces favoured the growth of a strong sentiment of Canadian individuality, the result of unification had been to strengthen decidedly the ties that bind the country to the empire.
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  • The outbreak of the South African war in 1899 furnished an occasion for a practical display of Canadian loyalty to imperial interests.
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  • Three contingents of troops were despatched to the seat of war and took an active part in the events which finally secured the triumph of the British arms. These forces were supplemented by a regiment of Canadian horse raised and equipped at the sole expense of Lord Strathcona, the high commissioner of the Dominion in London.
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  • The Canadian Pacific system was extended until it included 1 2,000 m.
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  • The Canadian Northern railway, already constructed from the Great Lakes westward to the neighbourhood of the Rockies, and with water and rail connexions reaching eastward to Quebec, began to transform itself into a complete transcontinental system, with an extension to the Hudson Bay.
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  • It became necessary to enforce the terms of that convention, under which the fishermen of the United States could not pursue their avocations within the three miles' limit, tranship cargoes of fish in Canadian ports, or enter them except for shelter, water, wood or repairs.
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  • The sum of $463,454 was finally awarded as compensation to the Canadian sealers who had been unlawfully seized and punished.
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  • The commission, which included three members of the Canadian cabinet and a representative of Newfoundland, and of which Lord Herschell was appointed chairman, met at Quebec on the 23rd of August 1898.
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  • A statement made by the Canadian commissioners, who refused to sign the report, of an unexplained change of opinion on the part of Lord Alverstone, produced a widespread impression for a time that his decision in favour of American claims was diplomatic rather than judicial.
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  • Later Canadian opinion, however, came to regard the decision of the commission as a reasonable compromise.
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  • Lemieux, to Japan in 1907, to settle Canadian difficulties with that country, illustrated the change of diplomatic system in progress.
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  • Since 1877 Canadian degrees have been recognized by the Medical Council of Great Britain.
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  • One principal object of the framers of the Canadian constitution was to establish a strong central government.
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  • Some of these questions have played a considerable part in Canadian politics, but are of too complicated a nature to be dealt with in the present brief sketch.
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  • An excellent bibliography of Canadian history will be found in the volume Literature of American History, published by the American Library Association.
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  • The annual Review of Historical Publications Relating to Canada, published by the University of Toronto, gives a critical survey of the works on Canadian topics appearing from year to year.
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  • English Canadian Literature Is Marked By The Weaknesses As Well As The Merits Of Colonial Life.
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  • Barring The Work Of Francis Parkman, Who Was Not A Canadian, .No History Of The First Rank Has Yet Been Written In Or Of Canada.
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  • In Belles Lettres Very Little Has Been Accomplished, Unless We 'May Count Goldwin Smith (Q.V.) As A Canadian.
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  • As A Scholar, A ` Thinker, And A Master Of Pure English He Has Exerted A Marked Influence Upon Canadian Literature And Canadian Life.
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  • Drummond (1854-1907) Stand In A Class By Themselves, Between English And French Canadian Literature, Presenting The Simple Life Of The Habitant With Unique Humour, And Picturesqueness.
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  • Richardson Afterwards Wrote Half A Dozen Other Romances, Dealing Chiefly With Incidents In Canadian History.
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  • He Has Made Admirable Use In Many Of His Novels Of The Inexhaustible Stores Of Romantic And Dramatic Material That Lie Buried In Forgotten Pages Of Canadian History.
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  • In Many Respects His Is The Most Striking Figure In Canadian Literature.
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  • French Canadian Literature At The Opening Of The Loth Century Might Be Described As Entirely The Work Of Two Generations, And It Was Separated From The Old Regime By Three More Generations Whose Racial Sentiment Only Found Expression In The Traditional Songs And Tales Which Their Forefathers Of The 17Th Century Had Brought Over From The Mere Patrie.
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  • Folk Lore Has Always Been The Most Essentially French Of All Imaginative Influences In Canadian Life; And The Songs Are The Quintessence Of The Lore.
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  • French Forms Are Freely Turned Into Pure Canadianisms, Like Cageux, Raftsman, Boucane, Brushwood Smoke, Portage, &C. New Characters, Which Appeal More Directly To The Local Audience, Sometimes Supplant Old Ones, Like The Quatre Vieux Sauvages Who Have Ousted The Time Honoured Quatre Z Officiers From The Canadian Version Of Malbrouk.
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  • But These Very Digressions' Give The Book Its Intimate And Abiding Charm; For They Keep The Reader In Close Personal Touch With Every Side Of Canadian Life, With Songs And Tales And Homely Forms Of Speech, With The Best Features Of Seigniorial Times And The Strong Guidance Of An Ardent Church, With Voyageurs, Coureurs De Bois, Indians,., Soldiers, Sailors And All The Strenuous Adventurers Of A Wild, New, Giant World.
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  • He Is Usually Rather Too Derivative, He Lacks The Saving Grace, ,Of Style, And Even His Best Canadian Poems Hardly Rise Above Fervent Occasional Verse.
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  • Be Remembered As The First Canadian Philosopher.
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  • Chief Justice Routhier, A Most Accomplished Occasional Writer, Is Very French Canadian When Arraigning Les Grands Drames Of The Classics (1889) Before His Ecclesiastical Court And Finding Them Guilty Of Paganism.
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  • In 1878 his party went out of office and Sir John Macdonald entered upon a long term of power, with protection as the chief feature of his policy, to which was afterwards added the construction of the Canadian Pacific railway.
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  • He was associated with Blake in his sustained opposition to high tariff, and to the Conservative plan for the construction of the Canadian Pacific railway, and was a conspicuous figure in the long struggle between Sir John Macdonald and the leaders of the Liberal party to settle the territorial limits of the province of Ontario and the legislative rights of the provinces under the constitution.
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  • He was the first French Canadian to lead a federal party in Canada since confederation.
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  • During the years from 1896 to 1910, he came to hold a position within the British Empire which was in its way unique, and in this period he had seen Canadian prosperity advance progressively by leaps and bounds.
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  • The chief features of his administration were the fiscal preference of 333% in favour of goods imported into Canada from Great Britain, the despatch of Canadian contingents to South Africa during the Boer war, the contract with the Grand Trunk railway for the construction of a second transcontinental road from ocean to ocean, the assumption by Canada of the imperial fortresses at Halifax and Esquimault, the appointment of a federal railway commission with power to regulate freight charges, express rates and telephone rates, and the relations between competing companies, the reduction of the postal rate to Great Britain from 5 cents to 2 cents and of the domestic rate from 3 cents to 2 cents, a substantial contribution to the Pacific cable, a practical and courageous policy of settlement and development in the Western territories, the division of the North-West territories into the provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan and the enactment of the legislation necessary to give them provincial status, and finally (1910), a tariff arrangement with the United States, which, if not all that Canada might claim in the way of reciprocity, showed how entirely the course of events had changed the balance of commercial interests in North America.
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  • Some of his speeches in Great Britain, coming as they did from a French-Canadian, and revealing delicate appreciation of British sentiment and thorough comprehension of the genius of British institutions, excited great interest and enthusiasm, while one or two impassioned speeches in the Canadian parliament during the Boer war profoundly influenced opinion in Canada and had a pronounced effect throughout the empire.
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  • But he strove for sympathetic relations between Canadian and imperial authorities, and favoured general legislative and fiscal co-operation between the two countries.
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  • It is the terminus of branches of the Canadian Pacific and Grand Trunk railways, and of the Canadian Pacific and other steamship lines plying to ports on Lakes Huron and Superior.
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  • In 1851 he entered the Canadian parliament as member for Kent county.
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  • His attacks upon the Roman Catholic church and on the supposed domination in parliament of the French Canadian section made him very unpopular in Lower Canada, but in Upper Canada his power was great.
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  • In December 1873 he was called to the Canadian senate, and in 1874 was appointed by the imperial government joint plenipotentiary with Sir Edward Thornton to negotiate a reciprocity treaty between Canada and the United States.
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  • After a brief visit to France, where he was treated with high honour, he returned to the Mohawk country in May 1646 and ratified a treaty between that tribe and the Canadian government.
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  • Gas, obtained by pipe lines from the Ohio-Pennsylvania and the Canadian (Welland) natural gas fields, is also used extensively for lighting and heating purposes.
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  • Of the foreignborn population 36,720 were German, the other large elements in their order of importance being Polish, Canadian, Irish, the British (other than Irish).
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  • With the Canadian shore Buffalo is connected by ferry, and by the International bridge (from Squaw Island), which cost $1,500,000 and was completed in 1873.
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  • The establishment of Dominion government agencies, the formation of a local government, the machinery required for the government of the province, the influx of a small army of surveyors who mapped out and surveyed wide districts of the country, and the taking up of free lands in all directions by Canadian settlers, all tended to build up the hamlet of Winnipeg into a considerable town.
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  • The greatest business street is Main Street, on which (north) the Great Canadian Pacific railway station and Royal Alexandra Hotel are situated, and (south) the Union station of the Canadian Northern and Grand Trunk Pacific railways are found.
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  • The buildings are not exceeded for beauty of design or for completeness of finish by any Canadian city and by few American cities.
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  • His preaching and lecturing drew great crowds both in the Dominion and in the United States, and he was five times president of the Canadian conference.
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  • Another nutritious lichen is the " Tripe de Roche " of the arctic regions, consisting of several species of the Gyrophorei, which when boiled is often eaten by the Canadian hunters and Red Indians when pressed by hunger.
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  • The scene of operations naturally divided into three sections: - (I) the ocean; (2) the Canadian frontier, from Lake Huron, by Lakes Erie and Ontario, the course of the St Lawrence and Lake Champlain; (3) the coast of the United States.
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  • But on the Canadian frontier they made little difference.
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  • A vehement statement of the Canadian side will be found in How Canada was held for the Empire, by James Hannay (London,Edinburgh,Toronto, 1905).
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  • In the Canadian North-West the Church Missionary Society's Missions have reached many tribes up to the shores of the Polar sea, and made some thousands of converts.
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  • He was a proficient in medicine, among other qualifications for this post, and he remained for years on intimate terms with the most extreme men in the Fenian organization under all its forms. His services enabled the British government to take measures which led to the fiasco of the Canadian invasion of 1870 and Riel's surrender in 1871, and he supplied full details concerning the various Irish-American associations, in which he himself was a prominent member.
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  • His ability and force brought him to the front, and he rose till in 1881 he was appointed general manager of the Canadian Pacific railway.
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  • From 1885 onward he was more and more associated with every branch of Canadian mercantile and financial life, and as a publicist gave shrewd expression to his views on political and economic questions.
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  • Collective Supplies and Sales.-There are ten large American and Canadian companies with extensive systems for gathering the annual hauls of skins from the far-scattered trappers.
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  • The Canadian are silky in nature and inclined to a creamy colour, while the Siberian are more woolly and rather whiter.
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  • American and Canadian dressing is gradually improving, but hitherto their results have been inferior to the older European methods.
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  • As has been explained, sable is a term applied for centuries past to the darker sorts of the Russian Siberian martens, and for years past the same term has been bestowed by the retail trade upon the American and Canadian martens.
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  • In 1905 his government was defeated, and in 1907 he retired to the Canadian Senate.
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  • Considerable interest attaches to the diamonds found in Wisconsin, Michigan and Ohio near the Great Lakes, for they are here found in the terminal moraines of the great glacial sheet which is supposed to have spread southwards from the region of Hudson Bay; several of the drift minerals of the diamantiferous region of Indiana have been identified as probably of Canadian origin; no diamonds have however yet been found in the intervening country of Ontario.
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  • Population 250, consisting chiefly of the keepers of the numerous lighthouses erected by the Canadian government.
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  • It is on the Grand Trunk, Canadian Pacific, Pere Marquette and Michigan Central railways, which connect at this point with the railways of the United States by means of large and powerful car-ferries.
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  • Gradually, however, areas of good soil were opened up, in the Rainy river valley, near Lake Temiscaming and elsewhere, and mines of various kinds were discovered, as the Canadian Pacific railway and its branches extended through the region, and at length the finding of very rich silver mines attracted world-wide attention to northern Ontario.
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  • These may exact fees or give free education at the ' A high school is raised to the rank of collegiate institute on complying with certain provisions, chief among which are the employment of at least four teachers with Degrees in Honours from a recognized Canadian university.
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  • This tragical farce was soon at an end and its author a fugitive in the United States, whence he instigated bands of hooligans to make piratical attacks upon the Canadian frontier.
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  • He was in charge of the Canadian government's Yukon expedition in 1887, and his name is permanently written in Dawson City, of gold-bearing fame.
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  • When the crews of the whale-boats were conveying stores, the forwarding officers tried to keep brandy and such like medical comforts from the European crews, coffee and tea from Canadian voyageurs and sugar from Kroo boys.
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  • In a straggling procession the boats worked their way up to Korti, piloted by Canadian voyageurs.
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  • The Australian, Canadian and New Zealand censorships adopted a different system, so that the exploits of these troops were and are well known throughout the world.
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  • Similar action was taken in 1858, when Bishop Selwyn became metropolitan of New Zealand; and again in 1860, when, on the petition of the Canadian bishops to the crown and the colonial legislature for permission to elect a metropolitan, letters patent were issued appointing Bishop Fulford of Montreal to that office.
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  • It was first assumed by the metropolitans of Canada and Rupert's Land, at the desire of the Canadian general synod in 1893; and subsequently, in accordance with a resolution of the Lambeth conference of 1897, it was given by their synods to the bishop of Sydney as metropolitan of New South Wales and to the bishop of Cape Town as metropolitan of South Africa.
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  • His enthusiasm for the land and the people, his idealistic outlook, his bright but simple manner, his utter lack of conventionality and stiffness, his fondness for travelling and nature and sport captivated the Canadian heart.
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  • While in England, he published Sketches of Canada and the United States, in which, with some exaggeration, many of the Canadian grievances were exposed.
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  • In the town of Buffalo he collected a disorderly rabble, who seized and fortified Navy Island, in the river between the two countries, and for some weeks troubled the Canadian frontier.
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  • American (Canadian) timber is stencilled in black and white.
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  • The red pine (Pinus resinosa or P. rubra) is also known as "Canadian pine" and "American deal."
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  • In that year he removed to Toronto, where he edited the Canadian Monthly, and subsequently founded the Week and the Bystander.
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  • These views are most fully stated in his Canada and the Canadian Question (1891).
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  • He was a member of the Imperial War Cabinet and Imperial War Conference, 1918; Canadian Government representative at the International Labour Conference at Washington, 1919; and a Canadian delegate to the first assembly of the League of Nations at Geneva, 1920.
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  • Much iron and copper ore is shipped from the Duluth-Superior harbour; and large quantities of coal, brought by lake boats, are distributed from here throughout the American and Canadian North-west.
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  • Though his eloquence had done more than anything else to make practicable a union of the British North American provinces, he opposed confederation, largely owing to wounded vanity; but on finding it impossible to obtain from the imperial authorities the repeal of the British North America Act, he refused to join his associates in the extreme measures which were advocated, and on the promise from the Canadian government of better financial terms to his native province, entered (on the 30th of January 1869) the cabinet of Sir John Macdonald as president of the council.
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  • The process adopted for the Canadian ores, which are poor in copper and nickel, consists in a preliminary roasting in heaps and smelting in a blast furnace in order to obtain a matte, which is then further smelted with a siliceous flux for a rich matte.
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  • California embraces areas of every life-zone of North America: of the boreal, the Hudsonian and Canadian subzones; of the transition, the humid Pacific subzone; of the upper austral, the arid or upper Sonoran subzone; of the lower austral, the arid or lower Sonoran; of the tropical, the " dilute arid " subzone.
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  • He was elected grand master of the Orange Association of British America, and was long the exponent in the Canadian parliament of the claims of that order.
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  • In 1896 he was elected to the Canadian parliament for the city of Halifax, but later lost his seat there and was elected for Carlton.
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  • The extension of responsible constitutional government by Great Britain to her chief colonies, under a governor or viceregal representative of the crown, has been followed in British North America by the union of the Canadian, maritime and Pacific provinces under a federal government - with a senate, the members of which are nominated by the crown, and a house of commons elected by the different provinces according to their relative population.
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  • In July 1913 Stefansson sailed from Nome with a large expedition, supported by the Canadian Government, for the exploration of the Beaufort Sea and the N.W.
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  • Pop. (1890) 77,696; (1900) 94,969, of whom 40,974 were foreignborn (14,674 being French Canadian, 12,147 Irish, 4485 English Canadian, 4446 English, 1203 Greek, 1099 Scotch); (1910 census), 106,294.
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  • It forms the water-parting between the upper waters of the Canadian river and the Rio Grande, and contains many of the loftiest peaks in New Mexico, among them being Truchas (13,275 ft.), Costilla (12,634 ft.) and Baldy (12,623 ft.).
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  • The Canadian river drains the eastern slope of the Rocky Mountains and flows in a general south-easterly direction through Texas into Oklahoma, where it empties into the Arkansas.
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  • He was still secretary when the Canadian rebellion broke out in 1837; his wavering and feeble policy was fiercely attacked in parliament; he became involved in disputes with the earl of Durham, and the movement for his supercession found supporters even among his colleagues in the cabinet.
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  • The tree abounds from Canada to Georgia, but in the eastern states has been so long sought for by the lumberer that most of the old trees have long disappeared, and large white pine timber is now only found in quantity in the Canadian Dominion.
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  • Lord Carnarvon (the 4th earl), when under-secretary for the colonies in 1858-1859, had regarded Grey's federation proposal with disfavour, but later, as secretary of state, he had introduced the bill for the federation of the Canadian provinces.
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  • In the case of the Canadian prisoners (1839) it was used to obtain the release of persons sentenced in Canada for participating in the rebellion of 1837, who were being conveyed throughout England in custody on their way to imprisonment in another part of the empire, and it is matter of frequent experience for the courts to review the legality of commitments under the Extradition Acts and the Fugitive Offenders Act 1881, of fugitives from the justice of a foreign state or parts of the king's dominions outside the British Islands.
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  • In 1920 he was made an Imperial Privy Councillor and the same year was a member of the Canadian delegation to the first assembly of the League of Nations at Geneva.
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  • The export trade of the island centres here, and the city has regular communication by steamer with the chief American and Canadian ports.
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  • It has even been said that the only permanent acquisition that England owed directly to him was her Canadian dominion; and, strictly speaking, this is true, it being admitted that the campaign by which the Indian empire was virtually won was not planned by him, though brought to a successful issue during his ministry.
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  • The loss of her Canadian possessions was only one of a series of disasters suffered by France, which radically affected the future of Europe and the world.
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  • Of the 24,604 foreignborn inhabitants of the state, 3943 were from England, 2974 were from Germany, 2528 were Canadian English, 2822 were from Sweden ., and 1633 were from Ireland, various other countries being represented by smaller numbers.
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  • On the Canadian side are Serpent river, Spanish river, French river, draining Lake Nipissing, Muskoka river, Severn river, draining lake Simcoe, and Nottawasaga river, all emptying into Georgian bay and North Channel, and Saugeen and Maitland rivers, flowing into the main lake.
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  • Practically all the United States traffic is confined to vessels passing through the main lake between Lakes Superior and Michigan and Lake Erie, but on the Canadian side are several railway termini which receive grain mostly from Lake Superior, and deliver mixed freight to ports on that lake.
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  • There is a large fishing industry in Lake Huron, the Canadian catch being valued at over a quarter million dollars per annum.
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  • See Georgian Bay and North Channel Pilot, Department of Marine and Fisheries (Ottawa, 1903); Sailing Directions for Lake Huron, Canadian Shore, Department of Marine and Fisheries (Ottawa, 1905); Bulletin No.
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  • It is the outlet of a rich and extensive agricultural district, and throughout the season of navigation lines of steamers ply between Toronto and the other lake ports on both the Canadian and American sides, the route of some of them extending from Montreal to Port Arthur on Lake Superior.
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  • He was called to the Canadian bar in 1884, and became Q.C. in 1900, being elected BatonnierGeneral of the Quebec bar in 1910.
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  • He derived considerable importance from the fact that he was the Quebec representative on the boards of large Canadian financial institutions.
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  • As early as 1883-1885 there was a considerable mining excitement due to these discoveries, and a much greater one in 1887 after the discovery of coarse gold on Forty Mile Creek in American territory; but these were as nothing to the picturesque and feverish rush that followed the location of the first Klondike claim in Canadian territory in August 1896.
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  • The product of gold and silver (of the latter some 1.3% of the total) from 1895 to 1901 was more than $32,000,000 from Alaska proper (not including that from the Canadian Yukon fields) as against a production of $5,000,000 in 1880-1896.
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  • The gold product of the Canadian Yukon territory from 1896-1903 was about $96,000,000, as estimated by the Canadian Geological Survey.
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  • Alaskan mails leave the states daily, many post-offices are maintained, mail is regularly delivered beyond the Arctic circle, all the more important towns have telegraphic communication with the states,' there is one railway in the interior through Canadian territory from Skagway, and other railways are planned.
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  • The award of the tribunal made in October 1 9 03 was arrived at by the favourable vote of the three commissioners of the United States and of Lord Alverstone, whose action was bitterly resented by the two Canadian commissioners; it sustained in the main the claims of the United States.
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  • The principal railway systems are the Maine Central, which enters every county but one, the Boston & Maine, the Bangor & Aroostook, the Grand Trunk and the Canadian Pacific. Lines of steamboats ply regularly between the largest cities of the state and Boston, between Portland and New York, and between Portland and several Canadian ports.
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  • At all times conspicuous for his eloquence, honesty and recalcitrancy, he twice came with especial prominence before the public - in 1838, when, although at the time without a seat in parliament, he appeared at the bar of the Commons to protest, in the name of the Canadian Assembly, against the suspension of the Canadian constitution; and in 1855, when, having overthrown Lord Aberdeen's ministry by carrying a resolution for the appointment of a committee of inquiry into the mismanagement in the Crimean War, he presided over its proceedings.
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  • The season has been extended for a few days, in both spring and autumn, by the use of ice-breaking tugs at Fort William and Port Arthur, this service being organized by the government particularly to facilitate the movement of grain from the Canadian North-west.
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  • On the Canadian side Fort William, in the mouth of the Kaministikwia, and Port Arthur, four miles distant, an artificial harbour, are the only important shipping points, being the lake terminals of three great transcontinental railway systems, though the whole north shore is liberally supplied with natural harbours.
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  • The principal freight shipped eastward consists of flour, wheat and other grains, through Duluth - Superior from the United States, and through Fort William - Port Arthur from the Canadian prairies; copper ore from the mines on the south shore; iron ore in immense quantities from both shores, ?
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  • It is served by the Great Northern, the Northern Pacific, the Canadian Pacific, and the Bellingham Bay & British Columbia railways - being a terminus of the last named, which operates only 62 m.
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  • This brought him to the front, and in 1861 he became a member of the Canadian parliament, where he at once made his mark and was closely connected with the liberal leader, George Brown.
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  • The state carries on an extensive commerce with the Orient and with the Canadian provinces.
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  • The Canadian shore is low and flat throughout, the United States shore is low but bordered by an elevated plateau through which the rivers have cut deep channels.
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  • He introduced many improvements into the Canadian postal service, and in 1898 in face of much opposition induced the Inter-Imperial Postal Conference to adopt the principle of penny postage within the British Empire.
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  • The ducks include the mallard, black duck, canvas-back and red-head; the Canadian goose, the snowy goose and the blue goose also appear during the migrating seasons.
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  • The climate of the whole state is influenced by the storms which move eastward along the Canadian border and by those which move northward up the Mississippi Valley, and that of the eastern and northern sections is moderated by the Great Lakes.
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  • In the northern section the heavy snowfall is caused by the cyclonic storms along the Canadian border, and in the southern section the snowfall is increased by the storms which ascend the Mississippi Valley.
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  • Marie, in which has been absorbed the old Wisconsin Central, crosses the state and extends into the Canadian North-West, sharing in the heavy grain traffic of that section, and, like the Duluth, South Shore & Atlantic, which runs along the Lake Superior shore, is a link in the transcontinental system of the Canadian Pacific, which controls both these roads.
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  • In this period, however, the fur-trade assumed proportions of greater importance, and trading posts were established by the North-west Company (Canadian).
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  • For working these extensive deposits there are, however, few mills; these are in Kay, Canadian and Blaine counties.
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  • By these treaties, negotiated in 1866, the Cherokees gave the United States permission to settle other Indians on what was approximately the western half of their domain; the Seminoles, to whom the Creeks in 1855 had granted as their portion the strip between the Canadian river and its North Fork, ceded all of theirs, and the Creeks, Choctaws and Chickasaws ceded the western half of theirs back to the United States for occupancy by freedmen or other Indians.
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  • With St Paul, which is served by the same system of railways, Minneapolis is the chief railway centre of the Northwest and one of the greatest in the United States, being the principal gateway to the commerce of the Canadian and Pacific northwest.
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  • Frontenac died on the 28th of November 1698 at the Château St-Louis after a brief illness, deeply mourned by the Canadian people.
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  • In several Canadian provinces also, the public funds are used in promoting the bee industry in various ways, mainly in combating the bee-disease known as " foul brood."
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  • Sackville West and Sir Charles Tupper were selected by the government as British plenipotentiaries to discuss with the United States the Canadian fisheries dispute, and a treaty was arranged by them at Washington on the 15th of February 1888.
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  • Detroit is served by the Michigan Central, the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern, the Wabash, the Grand Trunk, the Pere Marquette, the Detroit & Toledo Shore Line, the Detroit, Toledo & Ironton and the Canadian Pacific railways.
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  • Trains are ferried across the river to Windsor, and steamboats make daily trips to Cleveland, Wyandotte, Mount Clemens, Port Huron, to less important places between, and to several Canadian ports.
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  • Indians at once came to the place in large numbers, but they soon complained of the high price of French goods; there was serious contention between Cadillac and the French Canadian Fur Company, to which a monopoly of the trade had been granted, as well as bitter rivalry between him and the Jesuits.
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  • It is situated on the Crow's Nest branch of the Canadian Pacific railway, at the junction of Coal Creek with the Elk river, and owes its importance to the extensive coal mines in its vicinity.
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  • Of lesser importance are greases, which form the by-product of the large slaughter-houses in the United States and Argentina, and American (Canadian) and Japanese fish oils.
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  • He was chairman of the U.S. representatives on the BritishAmerican Joint High Commission for dealing with Canadian questions in 1898 and 1903, being reelected to the Senate in the latter year.
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  • We don't monitor Canadian crimes.
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  • Conseil was eager to accept, and this time the Canadian proved perfectly amenable to going with us.
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  • Ken fired at the Canadian soldiers, having a banger at the end of the riffle to give a bang sound.
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  • The fee must be paid by bank draft in Canadian Dollars and can be purchased at most major banks.
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  • This was a Canadian girl who made the school's girls basketball team in her first year of high school.
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  • His grandfather, the Canadian billionaire Steven Edmond, is bent on revenge.
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  • Residues of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) in fatty foods of the Canadian diet.
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  • Henry Kelsey was the first white person to visit the Canadian plains and to see bison.
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  • This caused widespread blackouts, which cost the Canadian national grid several million of pounds in damage to their systems.
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  • The site includes images of cricket ties and cricket blazers, and links to US and Canadian leagues.
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  • Canadian government site on escaped free-living wild boar in Canada: Info about boar in Manitoba, Canada, that escape from farms.
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  • Also a range of American and Canadian whiskeys including bourbon, Jack Daniels, Johnny Drum and Knob Creek.
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  • Driven in part by my then brand-new Web access, I used a search engine to determine that Oris had no Canadian distributor.
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  • This entailed being sent to the front with the Canadian Cavalry brigade.
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  • In late March 2005, the Canadian Health Services Research Foundation hosted two one-day workshops for Ontario nurses on the topic of knowledge brokering.
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  • A leisurely expedition in a Canadian style canoe is an ideal way to spend a summer day.
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  • With our commitment to excellence, we start with the finest Canadian western red cedar.
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  • Also seen in the audience were songwriting genius Scott Reilly, and velvet-voiced Canadian chanteuse Denise MacKay.
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  • The unresolved case of Canadian chrysotile is bound to cast a specter over the economic free-for-all.
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  • Not only does she look exactly like the Canadian chart sensation she has all the right mannerisms to make the look totally convincing.
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  • Read article » Site Search Featured Designer Sharon Luk is a Canadian based costumier with experience in costuming for Opera.
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  • Also the covering cruiser HMS Bermuda was relieved by the Canadian destroyer HMCS Athabaskan and the British destroyer HMS Grenville.
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  • So the Canadian dockers were then on strike in support of the Liverpool dockers.
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  • You buy Euro, paying with US dollars, or you sell Japanese Yens for Canadian dollars.
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  • After rocking The Boat during Canadian Music Week, Sailboats Are White will tour eastern Canada with Lullabye Arkestra next month.
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  • I had lunch at a very nice terrace restaurant on the beach run by a Canadian expat and his Dominican wife.
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  • Inventive Canadian stand-up Wool certainly cuts a dash on stage with his heavy black eyeliner, long leather coat and distinctive cowboy hat.
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  • I have got dental fillings done for less than $ 5 Canadian.
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  • In Canadian forestry high quality red alder logs are said to be approximately equal in value to that of a Douglas fir log.
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  • Canadian fleabane is intermediate between a summer and winter annual.
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  • A baby seal being clubbed to death on the Canadian ice floes.
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  • Quickly becoming a forerunner on the Canadian comedy scene.
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  • But there's an edge to this performance from the Canadian funnyman that has not often been seen before.
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  • Despite the growing size and distinctive characteristics of urban Aboriginal populations, they have received relatively little attention among Canadian geographers.
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  • Other companies represented include Alcan, whose Canadian parent group owns the laboratory and scientific glassmaker Wheaton Science.
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  • Ski special: Canadian gold rush Whistler and Vancouver will host the 2010 Winter Olympics.
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  • He really made his early name in the Canadian TV series '21 Jump Street ', becoming a teen heartthrob.
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  • At the time, the Canadian high commissioner hailed that as NEPAD passing its first test.
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