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campanula

campanula

campanula Sentence Examples

  • glacialis, Gentiana bavarica, Phyteuma humile, Campanula thyrsoidea, C. cenisia, Achillea atrata, Cirsium spinosissimum, Crepis Terglouensis.

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  • Campanula Loreyi: hardy, i z ft., purplish-lilac or white.

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  • Campanula macrostyla: hardy, I to 2 ft., purple, beautifully veined.

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  • Campanula Medium calycanthema: hardy, 2 ft., blue or white; hose-in-hose flowered.

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  • A structure called the cool orchid house is set apart for the accommodation of the many lovely mountain species from South America and India, such as odontoglossums, masdevallias, &c., and in this the more uniform the temperature can be kept the better, that in summer varying between Cyanophyllum (Miconia) Cycas Dieffenbachia Dipladenia* Dracaena Eranthemum Eucharist Euphorbia Ficus Franciscea Gardenia Gesnera Gloriosa* Gloxinia f Heliconia f Hoffmannia I pomaea * Ixora Jacobinia Jasminum* Luculia Maranta Medinilla Meyenia Musa Nelumbium f Nepenthes Nymphaea f Oxera * Pancratium f Pandanus Passiflora* Pavetta Petraea * Pleroma* Poinsettia Rondeletia Sanchezia Schubertia* Scutellaria Stephanotis Tabernaemontana Terminalia Thunbergia Torenia Thyrsacanthus Tydaea Vinca Abutilon Acacia Agapanthus Agathaea Agave Alonsoa Aloysia Amaryllis Ardisia Asparagus Aspidistra Asystasia (Mackaya) Azalea Bauera Begonia Blandfordia Bomarea * Boronia Bougainvillea * Bouvardia Brugmansia Calceolaria Camellia Campanula Canna Celosia Cestrum * Chorizema* Chrysanthemum Cineraria 60° and 65°, and in winter from 45° to 60°.

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  • Other prominent species are Campanula, Pyrethrum, aconite, Cephaelis, speedwell, Alchemilla sericea, Centaurea macrocephala, Primula grandis and a species of primrose.

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  • In the bell-flower (Campanula) there is a racemose uniparous cyme.

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  • - Flower of Campanula medium; d, bract; v, bracteoles.

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  • A corolla which is continuous with the axis and not articulated to it, as in campanula and heaths, may be persistent, and remain in a withered or marcescent state while the fruit is ripening.

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  • In some instances, as in Tamarix gallica, Peganum Harmala, and Campanula, the base of the filament is much dilated, and ends suddenly in a narrow thread-like portion.

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  • Filaments are usually articulated to the thalamus or torus, and the stamens fall off after fertilization: but in Campanula and some other plants they are continuous with the torus, and the stamens remain persistent, although in a withered state.

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  • It sometimes bears hairs, which aid in the application of the pollen to the stigma, and are called collecting hairs, as in Campanula, and also in Aster and other Compositae.

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  • Thus in Campanula a five-cleft stigma indicates five carpels; in Bignoniaceae, Scrophulariaceae and Acanthaceae, the two-lobed or bilamellar stigma indicates a bilocular ovary.

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  • Masses of low blue campanula fill in below or between the larger flowers.

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  • overcrowded herbaceous plants such as Aster, Phlox, Campanula, Achillea and Artemisia.

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  • glacialis, Gentiana bavarica, Phyteuma humile, Campanula thyrsoidea, C. cenisia, Achillea atrata, Cirsium spinosissimum, Crepis Terglouensis.

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  • Campanula Loreyi: hardy, i z ft., purplish-lilac or white.

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  • Campanula macrostyla: hardy, I to 2 ft., purple, beautifully veined.

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  • Campanula Medium (Canterbury Bell): hardy, 2 ft., blue, white, rose, &c. The double-flowered varieties of various colours are very handsome.

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  • Campanula Medium calycanthema: hardy, 2 ft., blue or white; hose-in-hose flowered.

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  • A structure called the cool orchid house is set apart for the accommodation of the many lovely mountain species from South America and India, such as odontoglossums, masdevallias, &c., and in this the more uniform the temperature can be kept the better, that in summer varying between Cyanophyllum (Miconia) Cycas Dieffenbachia Dipladenia* Dracaena Eranthemum Eucharist Euphorbia Ficus Franciscea Gardenia Gesnera Gloriosa* Gloxinia f Heliconia f Hoffmannia I pomaea * Ixora Jacobinia Jasminum* Luculia Maranta Medinilla Meyenia Musa Nelumbium f Nepenthes Nymphaea f Oxera * Pancratium f Pandanus Passiflora* Pavetta Petraea * Pleroma* Poinsettia Rondeletia Sanchezia Schubertia* Scutellaria Stephanotis Tabernaemontana Terminalia Thunbergia Torenia Thyrsacanthus Tydaea Vinca Abutilon Acacia Agapanthus Agathaea Agave Alonsoa Aloysia Amaryllis Ardisia Asparagus Aspidistra Asystasia (Mackaya) Azalea Bauera Begonia Blandfordia Bomarea * Boronia Bougainvillea * Bouvardia Brugmansia Calceolaria Camellia Campanula Canna Celosia Cestrum * Chorizema* Chrysanthemum Cineraria 60° and 65°, and in winter from 45° to 60°.

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  • Other prominent species are Campanula, Pyrethrum, aconite, Cephaelis, speedwell, Alchemilla sericea, Centaurea macrocephala, Primula grandis and a species of primrose.

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  • In the bell-flower (Campanula) there is a racemose uniparous cyme.

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  • Regular gamopetalous corollas are sometimes campanulate or bell-shaped, as in (Campanula) (fig.

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  • - Flower of Campanula medium; d, bract; v, bracteoles.

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  • A corolla which is continuous with the axis and not articulated to it, as in campanula and heaths, may be persistent, and remain in a withered or marcescent state while the fruit is ripening.

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  • In some instances, as in Tamarix gallica, Peganum Harmala, and Campanula, the base of the filament is much dilated, and ends suddenly in a narrow thread-like portion.

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  • Filaments are usually articulated to the thalamus or torus, and the stamens fall off after fertilization: but in Campanula and some other plants they are continuous with the torus, and the stamens remain persistent, although in a withered state.

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  • It sometimes bears hairs, which aid in the application of the pollen to the stigma, and are called collecting hairs, as in Campanula, and also in Aster and other Compositae.

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  • Thus in Campanula a five-cleft stigma indicates five carpels; in Bignoniaceae, Scrophulariaceae and Acanthaceae, the two-lobed or bilamellar stigma indicates a bilocular ovary.

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  • Hairbell (Campanula) - The alpine kinds are charming for rock gardens, and not as a rule difficult to cultivate.

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  • The Canterbury Bell is one of the finest of biennials, the tall chimney Campanula a very handsome and precious plant for garden or greenhouse.

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  • Campanula Abietina - Forms close mats of leaves 2 inches high, and gives a delightful lot of open starry reddish-purple flowers in May, on wiry stems 9 inches high.

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  • Campanula Allioni - An alpine kind forming a network of succulent roots, with stemless rosettes of leaves an inch long, from which arise stalkless erect flowers.

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  • Alpine Hairbell (Campanula Alpina) - Covered with stiff down, giving it a slightly grey appearance, 5 to 10 inches high; flowers of dark fine blue, scattered along the stems, margins of mixed border, and the rock garden.

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  • Acutangula (Campanula Arvatica) - A pretty Spanish kind affording a profusion of starry deep violet flowers in July and August.

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  • Carpathian Hairbell (Campanula Carpatica) - A dwarf plant of free-flowering habit, the light-blue flowers large and cup-shaped, borne on footstalks 12 to 15 inches high in July and August in succession.

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  • Mont Cenis Hairbell (Campanula Cenisia) - A high alpine plant growing among Saxifraga biflora on the sides of glaciers, making little show above ground but vigorous below, and compact rosettes of light green leaves, with blue flowers.

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  • Brittle Hairbell (Campanula Fragilis) - The young branches are coated with soft down; the flowering branches prostrate, 12 or 15 inches long; the flowers 1 inch or more in diameter, delicate blue.

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  • Gargano Hairbell (Campanula Garganica) - A compact plant of prostrate habit, the starry erect flowers in branching racemes, pale blue, shading off to white towards the centre in summer, thriving in a rock garden or a border.

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  • Clustered Bellflower (Campanula Glomerata) - A handsome plant about 2 feet high, the stems terminated by dense clusters of pretty intense purple flowers.

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  • Campanula Hendersoni - Good hybrid for August and later.

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  • Ligurian Hairbell (Campanula Isophylla) - A very pretty Italian species; the leaves are round or heart-shaped, the flowers a pale but very bright blue, and with whitish centre.

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  • Campanula Macrantha - The stems of this handsome plant rise to a height of 5 feet, terminated by clusters of large deep blue flowers almost as large as Canterbury Bells, but less contracted at the mouth of the tube.

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  • Candelabra Bellflower (Campanula Macrostyla) - A singular plant, having large flowers, with blue netted veins on a white ground, which gets purple at the edges, and with a huge stigma.

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  • Wall Hairbell (Campanula Portenschlagiana) - A dense tufted evergreen kind, with small bright green leaves, so dense as to obscure the foot-stalks, 1 inch or more in length, by which they are supported.

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  • Campanula Profusion - A charming late flowering sort of hybrid origin raised by Mr E.

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  • Austrian Hairbell (Campanula Pulla) - One of the most beautiful of the Alpine Hairbells, a native of the Austrian Alps, on high mountain pastures; in the rock garden it should have a shelf of soil in which peat and sand have been mixed.

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  • Campanula Pulloides - Perhaps the finest of the dwarf Campanulas, and a plant of unsurpassed beauty.

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  • Campanula Pusilla - Smaller than C. caespitosa, rarely exceeding 4 inches in height, the shining green leaves heart-shaped and toothed, the flowers pale blue, in racemes, in June and July.

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  • Steeple Bellflower (Campanula Pyramidalis) - A vigorous plant, with thick and fleshy flower-stems, rising to a height of 4 to 6 feet; the flowers, close to the stem, giving the inflorescence a steeple-like form.

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  • Campanula Raddeana - A species of distinction and merit from the Caucasus of the easiest cultivation.

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  • English Hairbell (Campanula Rotundifolia) - Of this pretty wild plant we have a white variety, generally dwarfer, and there are several forms all beautiful, and of easy culture in any soil.

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  • Campanula Stansfieldi - A hybrid of unrecorded parentage, and one of the most charming of rock garden plants.

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  • Campanula Turbinata - urban Bellflower) is a dwarf plant with greyish-green leaves, the flowers borne singly on stems about 6 inches long, deep blue, and 1 1/2 inches across; a charming plant for choice border or rock culture.

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  • Campanula Waldsteiniana - A gem-like species from Croatia, and quite unique.

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  • Peach-leaved Bellflower (Campanula Persicifolia) - A beautiful kind, with cupshaped flowers 2 inches across, in July and August.

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  • Rainers Hairbell (Campanula Raineri) - A dwarf, sturdy plant, 3 to 6 inches high, each shoot bearing a large dark blue flower.

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  • The flowers, borne on slender stems 6 to 12 inches high, are bell-shaped and drooping, more like a Campanula than an Iris, and rich purple in color, which becomes a transparent white in the variety album.

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