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campania

campania

campania Sentence Examples

  • It is said to have been written by the Neapolitan arch-presbyter Leo, who was sent by Johannes and Marinus, dukes of Campania (941-965) to Constantinople, where he found his Greek original.

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  • CALATIA, an ancient town of Campania, Italy, 6 m.

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  • Aenaria, in poetry Inarime), an island off the coast of Campania, Italy, 16 m.

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  • BENEVENTO, a town and archiepiscopal see of Campania, Italy, capital of the province of Benevento, 60 m.

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  • SESSA AURUNCA, a town and episcopal see of Campania, Italy, in the province of Caserta, on the S.W.

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  • (ii.) For an upper limit of date, in default of definite evidence, it seems imprudent to go back beyond the 5th]century B.C., since neither in Rome nor Campania have we any evidence of public written documents of any earlier century.

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  • This mountainous tract, which has an average breadth of from 50 to 60 m., is bounded west by the plain of Campania, now called the Terra di Lavoro, and east by the much broader and more extensive tract of Apulia or Puglia, composed partly of level plains, but for the most part of undulating downs, contrasting strongly with the mountain ranges of the Apennines, which rise abruptly above them.

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  • In Campania the vines are allowed to climb freely to the tops of the poplars.

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  • Leasehold, varying from four to six years for arable land and from six to eighteen years for forest-land, prevails also in Campania, Basilicata and Calabria.

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  • The industry is chiefly developed in Lombardy, Piedmont and Liguria; to some extent also in Campania, Venetia and Tuscany, and to a less extent in Lazio (Rome), Apulia, Emilia, the Marches, Umbria, the Abruzzi and Sicily.

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  • The industry centres chiefly in Piedmont (province of Novara), Venetia (province of Vicenza), Tuscany (Florence), Lombardy (Brescia), Campania (Caserta), Genoa, Umbria, the Marches and Rome.

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  • In Campania and Calabria the curatoli and massari earn, in money and kind, about 12 a year; cowmen, shepherds and multeers about 10; irregular workmen are paid from 8~d.

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  • Campania holds the first place in the south, most of the savings of that region being deposited in the provident institutions of Naples.

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  • We have seen that the name of Italy was originally applied only to the southernmost part of the peninsula, and was only gradually extended so as to comprise the central regions, such as Latium and Campania, which were designated by writers as late as Thucydides and Aristotle as in Opicia.

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  • The first region comprised Latium (in the more extended sense of the term, as including the land of the Volsci, Hernici and Aurunci), together with Campania and the district of the Picentini.

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  • of Capua, the second city in Italy in the 3rd century B.C., and the centre of the road system of Campania.

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  • The road along the east coast from Fanum Fortmrnae down to Barium, which connected the terminations of the Via Salaria and Via Valeria, and of other roads farther south crossing from Campania, had no special name in ancient times, as far as we know.

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  • ACERRA, a town and episcopal see of Campania, Italy, in the province of Caserta, 9 m.

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  • In recognition of this and other brilliant services, he was elected consul in 88, and brought the revolt to an end by the capture of Nola in Campania.

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  • Rioting took place at Rome at the prompting of the popular leaders, Sulla narrowly escaping to his legions in Campania, whence he marched on Rome, being the first Roman who entered the city at the head of a Roman army.

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  • ITRI, a town of Campania, Italy, in the province of Caserta, 6 m.

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  • MISENUM, an ancient harbour town of Campania, Italy, about 3 m.

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  • This edict would have utterly ruined Campania.

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  • The boundaries of the original third Augustan region had by that time become somewhat altered, Metapontum belonging to Calabria, and Salernum and the territory of the Picentini to the third region instead of the first (Campania).

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  • LITERNUM, an ancient town of Campania, Italy, on the low sandy coast between Cumae and the mouth of the Volturnus.

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  • MADDALONI, a town of Campania, Italy, in the province of Caserta, about 3z m.

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  • Calvi), an ancient city of Campania, belonging originally to the Aurunci, on the Via Latina, 8 m.

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  • TORRE ANNUNZIATA, a seaport of Campania, Italy, in the province of Naples, on the east of the Bay of Naples, and at the south foot of Mt Vesuvius, 14 m.

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  • AVERNUS, a lake of Campania, Italy, about II m.

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  • NOLA, a city and episcopal see of Campania, Italy, in the province of Caserta, pleasantly situated in the plain between Mount Vesuvius and the Apennines, 164 m.

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  • Two fairs are held in Nola, on the 14th of June and the 12th of November; and the 26th of July is devoted to a great festival in honour of St Paulinus, one of the early bishops of the city, who invented the church bell (campana, taking its name from Campania).

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  • Nola (Naa) was one of the oldest cities of Campania, variously said to have been founded by the Ausones, the Chalcidians and the Etruscans.

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  • One of these last is a boundary stone relating to the assignation of lands in the time of the Gracchi, of which six other examples have been found in Campania and Lucania.

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  • 24.1) characterizing his epitaph as written in a vein of "Campanian arrogance" it has been inferred that he was born in one of the Latin communities settled in Campania.

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  • SARNO (anc. Sarnus), a town of Campania, Italy, in the province of Salerno, 15 m.

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  • ATELLA, an ancient Oscan town of Campania, 9 m.

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  • AQUINO, a town and episcopal see of Campania, Italy, in the province of Caserta; it is 56 m.

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  • It was shortly after this revolution, in 317, that Agathocles with a body of mercenaries from Campania and a host of exiles from the Greek cities, backed up by the Carthaginian Hamilcar, who was in friendly relations with the Syracusan oligarchy, became a tyrant or despot of the city, assuming subsequently, on the strength of his successes against Carthage, the title of king.

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  • AMALFI, a town and archiepiscopal see of Campania, Italy, in the province of Salerno, from the town of which name it is distant 12 m.

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  • He afterwards made many journeys through the ancient Campania to illustrate its geology, and published in 1798 his Topografia fisica della Campania, which contains the results of much accurate observation.

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  • At some period unknown, prior to the 6th century, the Etrurians became a conquering people and extended their power not only northwards over, probably, Mantua, Felsina, Melpum and perhaps Hadria and Ravenna (Etruria Circumpadana), but also southwards into Latium and Campania.

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  • This theory is corroborated by the fact that during the reigns of the Tarquin kings Rome appears as the mistress of a district including part of Etruria, several cities in Latium, and the whole of Campania, whereas our earliest picture of republican Rome is that of a small state in the midst of enemies.

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  • In 37 8 Paulinus was raised to the rank of consul suffectus, and in the following year he appears to have been sent as consularis into Campania.

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  • From Campania Paulinus returned to his native place and came into correspondence or personal intimacy with men like Martin of Tours and Ambrose of Milan, and ultimately (about 389) he was formally received into the church by bishop Delphinus of Bordeaux, whence shortly afterwards he withdrew with his wife beyond the Pyrenees.

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  • In the following year he went into Italy, and after visiting Ambrose at Milan and Siricius at Rome - the latter of whom received him somewhat coldly - he proceeded into Campania, where, in the neighbourhood of Nola, he settled among the rude structures which he had caused to be built around the tomb and relics of his patron saint.

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  • Hence it is suggested that the attack on Rome was merely an incident of the march of the Etruscans, driven southward by the invasion of upper Italy by the Celts, through Latium on their way to Campania.

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  • ISOLA DEL LIRI, a town of Campania, in the province of Caserta, Italy, 15 m.

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  • ARPINO (anc. Arpinum), a town of Campania, Italy, in the province of Caserta, 1475 ft.

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  • AVELLINO, a city and episcopal see of Campania, Italy, the capital of the province of Avellino,' 50 ft.

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  • It lay on the boundary of Campania and the territory of the Hirpini, at the junction of the roads from Nola (and perhaps also from Suessula) and Salernum to Beneventum.

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  • GAIUS LUCILIUS (c. 180-103 B.C.), the earliest Roman satirist, of whose writings only fragments remain, was born at Suessa Aurunca in Campania.

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  • Pozzuoli, q.v.), an ancient town of Campania, Italy, on the northern shore of the Bay of Puteoli, a portion of the Bay of Naples, from which it is 6 m.

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  • BAIAE, an ancient city of Campania, Italy, io m.

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  • He died at Campania in March of the year following his fifty-first year.

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  • Caiazzo), an ancient city of Campania, on the right bank of the Volturnus, II m.

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  • CASERTA, a town and episcopal see of Campania, Italy, the capital of the province of Caserta, situated 21 m.

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  • They went together to Siena and Rome and then on to Campania, thirsty under the summer sun.

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  • His intrigues were discovered by Otto, who, after he had defeated and taken prisoner Berengar, returned to Rome and summoned a council which deposed John, who was in hiding in the mountains of Campania, and elected Leo VIII.

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  • Nocera Inferiore, q.v.), an ancient town of Campania, Italy, in the valley of the Sarnus (Sarno), about io m.

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  • FONDI (anc. Fundi), a town of Campania, Italy, in the province of Caserta, 12 m.

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  • Bianchi, Memorie storiche e statutarie di Fondi in Campania (Rome, 1903); T.

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  • Pompey's available force consisted in two legions stationed in Campania, and eight, commanded by his lieutenants, Afranius and Petreius, in Spain; both sides levied troops in Italy.

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  • Returning to Italy, he quelled a mutiny of the legions (including the faithful Tenth) in Campania, and crossed to Africa, where a republican army of fourteen legions under Scipio was cut to pieces at Thapsus (6th of April 46 B.C.).

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  • of veterans in Campania under the Lex Julia Agraria, and had even then laid down rules for the foundation of such communities.

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  • To the north it adjoined Campania, Samnium and Apulia, and to the south it was separated by a narrow isthmus from the district of Bruttii.

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  • The precise limits were the river Silarus on the north-west, which separated it from Campania, and the Bradanus, which flows into the Gulf of Tarentum, on the north-east; while the two little rivers Laus and Crathis, flowing from the ridge of the Apennines to the sea on the west and east, marked the limits of the district on the side of the Bruttii.

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  • The Lucanians gradually conquered the whole country (with the exception of the Greek towns on the coast) from the borders of Samnium and Campania to the southern extremity of Italy.

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  • ARIANO DI PUGLIA, a town and episcopal see, which, despite its name, now belongs to Campania, Italy, in the province of Avellino, 1509 ft.

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  • STABIAE, an ancient town of Campania, Italy, on the coast at the east extremity of the Gulf of Naples (mod.

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  • Tiberius and his favourite Sejanus feared that her ambition might lead her to attempt to secure the throne for her children, and she was banished to the island of Pandataria off the coast of Campania, where she died on the 18th of October 33, starved to death by herself, or, according to some, by order of Tiberius.

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  • CASTELLAMMARE DI STABIA (anc. Stabiae), a seaport and episcopal see of Campania, Italy, in the province of Naples, 17 m.

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  • SALERNO (anc. Salernum), a seaport and archiepiscopal see of Campania, Italy, capital of the province of Salerno, on the west coast, 33 m.

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  • They were stationed at Ostia, at Cales in Campania, and in Gaul about the Padus (Po).

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  • On the outbreak of the persecution by Diocletian and Maximian, he was taken to Nola and brought before Timotheus, governor of Campania, on account of his profession of the Christian religion.

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  • by Campania, on the E.

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  • When the land tax was introduced into Italy in 292, the first region of Augustus obtained the name of provincia Campania.

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  • Later on the name Latium entirely disappeared, and the name Campania extended as far as Veii and the Via Aurelia, whence the medieval and modern name Campagna di Roma.

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  • Sinuessa, on the sea-coast between the Liris (Garigliano) and the Vulturnus, at the foot of the Monte Massico, was the last town in Latium according to the official use of the term and was sometimes assigned to Campania, while Suessa was more assigned to Latium.

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  • POMPEII, 1 an ancient town of Campania, Italy, situated near the river Sarnus, nearly 2 M.

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  • The conquest of Campania by the last-mentioned people is an undoubted historical fact, and there can be no doubt that Pompeii shared the fate of the neighbouring cities on this occasion, and afterwards passed in common with them under the yoke of Rome.

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  • 3 At a later period, however, it took a prominent part in the outbreak of the nations of central Italy, known as the Social War (91-89 B.C.), when it withstood a long siege by Sulla, and was one of the last cities of Campania that were reduced by the Roman arms. The inhabitants were admitted to the Roman franchise, but a military colony was settled in their territory in 80 B.C. by Sulla (Colonia Cornelia Veneria Pompeianorum), and the whole population was rapidly Romanized.

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  • From Campania the rebels marched into Lucania, a country better suited for guerrilla warfare.

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  • Nola and Nuceria in Campania, Thurii and Metapontum in Lucania were sacked.

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  • After repelling an attack by the Vandals upon Campania (458) he prepared a large force, composed chiefly of barbarians, to invade Africa, which he previously visited in disguise.

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  • Owing to the discovery of inscriptions relating to the Gens Vitruvia at Formiae in Campania (Mola di Gaeta), it has been suggested that he was a native of that city, and he has been less reasonably connected with Verona on the strength of an existing arch of the 3rd century, which is inscribed with the name of a later architect of the same family name -- "Lucius Vitruvius Cerdo, a freedman of Lucius."

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  • GAETA (anc. Caietae Portus), a seaport and episcopal see of Campania, Italy, in the province of Caserta, from which it is 53 m.

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  • EBOLI (anc. Eburum), a town of Campania, Italy, in the province of Salerno, from which it is 16 m.

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  • The valiant remains of the nation made another stand under Teias on the Lactarian Hill in Campania; after that they disappear from history.

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  • TORRE DEL GRECO, a seaport of Campania, Italy, in the province of Naples, 72 m.

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  • Having laid the founda - tions of a successful business in his admirable domestic pottery - the best the world had ever seen up to that time - he turned his attention to artistic pottery, and the European renaissance of classic art - fostered by the discovery of Pompeii and the recovery of Greek painted vases from the ancient graves in Campania.

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  • Having completed (when consul in 338 B.C.) the subjugation of Latium, which with Campania had revolted against Rome, he was honoured by a triumph, and a column was erected to him in the Forum.

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  • The brief notices of the classical writers inform us that Herculaneum' was a small city of Campania between Neapolis and Pompeii, that it was situated between two streams at the foot of Vesuvius on a hill overlooking the sea, and that its harbour was at all seasons safe.

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  • 16, 20), in which Pompeii also was destroyed, with other flourishing cities of Campania.

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  • Meanwhile his brother Buccelin, whose army was also suffering grievously from disease, partly induced by free indulgence in the grapes of Campania, encamped at Casilinum, the site of modern Capua.

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  • Like these, apparently, were the nuts of Abella, or Avella, in the Campania (cf.

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  • It is certain from the symbols which they develop or drop that the people of Campania and Samnium borrowed their alphabet from the Etruscans, who held dominion in Campania from the 8th to the 5th century B.C. Previous to the Punic wars Campania had reached a higher stage of civilization than Rome.

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  • It was probably one of the oldest of Roman roads, leading to the pass of Algidus, so important in the early military history of Rome; and it must have preceded the Via Appia as a route to Campania, inasmuch as the Latin colony at Cales was founded in 334 B.C. and must have been accessible from Rome by road, whereas the Via Appia was only made twentytwo years later.

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  • But a six months' residence in Campania, and the congratulations which poured in upon him from the neighbouring towns, where the report had been officially spread that Agrippina had fallen a victim to her treacherous designs upon the emperor, gradually restored his courage.

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  • POZZUOLI (anc. Puteoli, q.v.), a seaport and episcopal see of Campania, Italy, in the province of Naples, 71 m.

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  • Frederick, whose authoritative temper was at once offended by the independent tone of the Arnoldist party, concluded with the pope a treaty of alliance (October 16, 1152) of such a nature that the Arnoldists were at once put in a minority in the Roman government; and when the second successor of Eugenius III., the energetic and austere Adrian IV.(the Englishman, Nicholas Breakspear), placed Rome under an interdict, the senate, already rudely shaken, submitted, and Arnold was forced to fly into Campania (1155).

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  • Campania, Italy >>

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  • AVELLA (anc. Abella), a city of Campania, Italy, in the province of Avellino, 23 m.

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  • He did not, however, refuse to join the commission of twenty by whom the great agrarian scheme of Caesar for the resettlement of Capua and Campania was carried into execution (59 B.C.).

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  • Capua), an ancient city of Campania, Italy, 3 m.

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  • We have no evidence that he travelled much, though he must have paid at least one visit to Campania (xxxviii.

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  • RAVELLO, a village of Campania, Italy, in the province of Salerno, about 3 m.

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  • VENAFRUM, an ancient town of Campania, Italy, close to the boundaries of both Latium adjectum and Samnium.

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  • On the north-east shore east of Naples is an extensive flat, forming part of the ancient Campania Felix, and watered by the small stream Sebeto and by the Sarno, which last in classical times formed the port of Pompeii.

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  • In spite of ill-health, he continued to teach and write until his death, which took place on the estate of one of his friends near Minturnae in Campania.

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  • Sorrento, q.v.), an ancient town of Campania, Italy, situated on the N.

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  • AVERSA, a town and episcopal see of Campania, Italy, in the province of Caserta, 152 m.

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  • Prochyta), an island off the coast of Campania, Italy, 2 m.

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  • HORMISDAS, pope from 514 to 523 in succession to Symmachus, was a native of Campania.

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  • Their own name for themselves in the 4th century B.C. was Ausones, and in Greek writers we find the name Ausonia applied to Latium and Campania (see Strabo v.

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  • It is said to have been written by the Neapolitan arch-presbyter Leo, who was sent by Johannes and Marinus, dukes of Campania (941-965) to Constantinople, where he found his Greek original.

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  • CALATIA, an ancient town of Campania, Italy, 6 m.

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  • Aenaria, in poetry Inarime), an island off the coast of Campania, Italy, 16 m.

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  • BENEVENTO, a town and archiepiscopal see of Campania, Italy, capital of the province of Benevento, 60 m.

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  • SESSA AURUNCA, a town and episcopal see of Campania, Italy, in the province of Caserta, on the S.W.

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  • (ii.) For an upper limit of date, in default of definite evidence, it seems imprudent to go back beyond the 5th]century B.C., since neither in Rome nor Campania have we any evidence of public written documents of any earlier century.

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  • in height, which descends to the sea at Terracina, and between that point and the mouth of the Liri throws out several rugged mountain headlands, which may be considered as constituting the natural boundary between Latium and Campania, and consequently the natural limit of Central Italy.

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  • This mountainous tract, which has an average breadth of from 50 to 60 m., is bounded west by the plain of Campania, now called the Terra di Lavoro, and east by the much broader and more extensive tract of Apulia or Puglia, composed partly of level plains, but for the most part of undulating downs, contrasting strongly with the mountain ranges of the Apennines, which rise abruptly above them.

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  • of Frigento, in the province of Avellino, Campania (Virgil, Aeneid, vii.

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  • The figures for 1905 show that the total of 718,221 emigrants was made up, as regards numbers, mainly by individuals from Venetia, Sicily, Campania, Piedmont, Calabria and the Abruzzi; while the percentage was highest in Calabria (4.44), the Abruzzi, Venetia, Ba-~ilicata, the Marches, Sicily (2.86), Campania, Piedmont (2.02).

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  • In Campania the vines are allowed to climb freely to the tops of the poplars.

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  • Leasehold, varying from four to six years for arable land and from six to eighteen years for forest-land, prevails also in Campania, Basilicata and Calabria.

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  • The industry is chiefly developed in Lombardy, Piedmont and Liguria; to some extent also in Campania, Venetia and Tuscany, and to a less extent in Lazio (Rome), Apulia, Emilia, the Marches, Umbria, the Abruzzi and Sicily.

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  • The industry centres chiefly in Piedmont (province of Novara), Venetia (province of Vicenza), Tuscany (Florence), Lombardy (Brescia), Campania (Caserta), Genoa, Umbria, the Marches and Rome.

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  • In Campania and Calabria the curatoli and massari earn, in money and kind, about 12 a year; cowmen, shepherds and multeers about 10; irregular workmen are paid from 8~d.

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  • Campania holds the first place in the south, most of the savings of that region being deposited in the provident institutions of Naples.

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  • The ratio of voters to qualified electors tends to increase; it is highest in Campania, Basilicata and in the south generally; the lowest percentages are given by Einilia and Liguria.

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  • How far also the language or languages spoken in Bruttium and at certain points of Lucania, such as Anxia, differed from the Oscan of Samnium and Campania there is not enough evidence to show (see BRUTTII).

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  • We have seen that the name of Italy was originally applied only to the southernmost part of the peninsula, and was only gradually extended so as to comprise the central regions, such as Latium and Campania, which were designated by writers as late as Thucydides and Aristotle as in Opicia.

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  • The first region comprised Latium (in the more extended sense of the term, as including the land of the Volsci, Hernici and Aurunci), together with Campania and the district of the Picentini.

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  • of Capua, the second city in Italy in the 3rd century B.C., and the centre of the road system of Campania.

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  • Other roads ran south from Capua to Cumae, Puteoli (the most important harbour of Campania), and Neapolis, which could also be reached by a coast road from Minturnae on the Via Appia.

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  • The road along the east coast from Fanum Fortmrnae down to Barium, which connected the terminations of the Via Salaria and Via Valeria, and of other roads farther south crossing from Campania, had no special name in ancient times, as far as we know.

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  • ACERRA, a town and episcopal see of Campania, Italy, in the province of Caserta, 9 m.

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  • VIA APPIA, a high-road leading from Rome to Campania and lower Italy, constructed in 312 B.C. by the censor Appius Claudius Caecus.

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  • In recognition of this and other brilliant services, he was elected consul in 88, and brought the revolt to an end by the capture of Nola in Campania.

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  • Rioting took place at Rome at the prompting of the popular leaders, Sulla narrowly escaping to his legions in Campania, whence he marched on Rome, being the first Roman who entered the city at the head of a Roman army.

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  • ITRI, a town of Campania, Italy, in the province of Caserta, 6 m.

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  • MISENUM, an ancient harbour town of Campania, Italy, about 3 m.

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  • This edict would have utterly ruined Campania.

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  • The boundaries of the original third Augustan region had by that time become somewhat altered, Metapontum belonging to Calabria, and Salernum and the territory of the Picentini to the third region instead of the first (Campania).

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  • LITERNUM, an ancient town of Campania, Italy, on the low sandy coast between Cumae and the mouth of the Volturnus.

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  • MADDALONI, a town of Campania, Italy, in the province of Caserta, about 3z m.

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  • Calvi), an ancient city of Campania, belonging originally to the Aurunci, on the Via Latina, 8 m.

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  • It was taken by the Romans in 335 B.C., and, a colony with Latin rights of 2 500 citizens having been established there, it was for a long time the centre of the Roman dominion in Campania, and the seat of the quaestor for southern Italy even down to the days of Tacitus.

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  • TORRE ANNUNZIATA, a seaport of Campania, Italy, in the province of Naples, on the east of the Bay of Naples, and at the south foot of Mt Vesuvius, 14 m.

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  • AVERNUS, a lake of Campania, Italy, about II m.

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  • NOLA, a city and episcopal see of Campania, Italy, in the province of Caserta, pleasantly situated in the plain between Mount Vesuvius and the Apennines, 164 m.

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  • Two fairs are held in Nola, on the 14th of June and the 12th of November; and the 26th of July is devoted to a great festival in honour of St Paulinus, one of the early bishops of the city, who invented the church bell (campana, taking its name from Campania).

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  • Nola (Naa) was one of the oldest cities of Campania, variously said to have been founded by the Ausones, the Chalcidians and the Etruscans.

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  • One of these last is a boundary stone relating to the assignation of lands in the time of the Gracchi, of which six other examples have been found in Campania and Lucania.

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  • 24.1) characterizing his epitaph as written in a vein of "Campanian arrogance" it has been inferred that he was born in one of the Latin communities settled in Campania.

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  • SARNO (anc. Sarnus), a town of Campania, Italy, in the province of Salerno, 15 m.

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  • ATELLA, an ancient Oscan town of Campania, 9 m.

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  • AQUINO, a town and episcopal see of Campania, Italy, in the province of Caserta; it is 56 m.

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  • It was shortly after this revolution, in 317, that Agathocles with a body of mercenaries from Campania and a host of exiles from the Greek cities, backed up by the Carthaginian Hamilcar, who was in friendly relations with the Syracusan oligarchy, became a tyrant or despot of the city, assuming subsequently, on the strength of his successes against Carthage, the title of king.

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  • AMALFI, a town and archiepiscopal see of Campania, Italy, in the province of Salerno, from the town of which name it is distant 12 m.

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  • He afterwards made many journeys through the ancient Campania to illustrate its geology, and published in 1798 his Topografia fisica della Campania, which contains the results of much accurate observation.

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  • At some period unknown, prior to the 6th century, the Etrurians became a conquering people and extended their power not only northwards over, probably, Mantua, Felsina, Melpum and perhaps Hadria and Ravenna (Etruria Circumpadana), but also southwards into Latium and Campania.

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  • 31) that the third Roman tribe, known as Luceres, represented an Etruscan element of the population, and it is held by many authorities that the tradition of the Tarquin kings of Rome represents, not an immigrant wave, but the temporary domination of Etruscan lords, who extended their conquests some time before 600 B.C. over Latium and Campania.

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  • This theory is corroborated by the fact that during the reigns of the Tarquin kings Rome appears as the mistress of a district including part of Etruria, several cities in Latium, and the whole of Campania, whereas our earliest picture of republican Rome is that of a small state in the midst of enemies.

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  • of Syracuse; Etruria Circumpadana was occupied by the Gauls, the Campanian cities by the Samnites, who took Capua (see Campania) in 423, and in 396, after a ten years' siege, Veii fell to the Romans.

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  • In 37 8 Paulinus was raised to the rank of consul suffectus, and in the following year he appears to have been sent as consularis into Campania.

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  • From Campania Paulinus returned to his native place and came into correspondence or personal intimacy with men like Martin of Tours and Ambrose of Milan, and ultimately (about 389) he was formally received into the church by bishop Delphinus of Bordeaux, whence shortly afterwards he withdrew with his wife beyond the Pyrenees.

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  • In the following year he went into Italy, and after visiting Ambrose at Milan and Siricius at Rome - the latter of whom received him somewhat coldly - he proceeded into Campania, where, in the neighbourhood of Nola, he settled among the rude structures which he had caused to be built around the tomb and relics of his patron saint.

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  • Hence it is suggested that the attack on Rome was merely an incident of the march of the Etruscans, driven southward by the invasion of upper Italy by the Celts, through Latium on their way to Campania.

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  • After centuries of quiescence the volcanic energy began again o manifest itself in a succession of earthquakes, which spread ci larm through Campania.

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  • ISOLA DEL LIRI, a town of Campania, in the province of Caserta, Italy, 15 m.

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  • 1 The trade for a long time was chiefly in the hands of the Euboeans; and Cyme (Cumae) in Campania was founded in the 8th century B.C., when the Euboean Cyme was still a great city.

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  • ARPINO (anc. Arpinum), a town of Campania, Italy, in the province of Caserta, 1475 ft.

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  • AVELLINO, a city and episcopal see of Campania, Italy, the capital of the province of Avellino,' 50 ft.

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  • It lay on the boundary of Campania and the territory of the Hirpini, at the junction of the roads from Nola (and perhaps also from Suessula) and Salernum to Beneventum.

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  • GAIUS LUCILIUS (c. 180-103 B.C.), the earliest Roman satirist, of whose writings only fragments remain, was born at Suessa Aurunca in Campania.

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  • Pozzuoli, q.v.), an ancient town of Campania, Italy, on the northern shore of the Bay of Puteoli, a portion of the Bay of Naples, from which it is 6 m.

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  • BAIAE, an ancient city of Campania, Italy, io m.

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  • He died at Campania in March of the year following his fifty-first year.

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  • Caiazzo), an ancient city of Campania, on the right bank of the Volturnus, II m.

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  • CASERTA, a town and episcopal see of Campania, Italy, the capital of the province of Caserta, situated 21 m.

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  • They went together to Siena and Rome and then on to Campania, thirsty under the summer sun.

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  • His intrigues were discovered by Otto, who, after he had defeated and taken prisoner Berengar, returned to Rome and summoned a council which deposed John, who was in hiding in the mountains of Campania, and elected Leo VIII.

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  • Nocera Inferiore, q.v.), an ancient town of Campania, Italy, in the valley of the Sarnus (Sarno), about io m.

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  • FONDI (anc. Fundi), a town of Campania, Italy, in the province of Caserta, 12 m.

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  • Bianchi, Memorie storiche e statutarie di Fondi in Campania (Rome, 1903); T.

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  • Pompey's available force consisted in two legions stationed in Campania, and eight, commanded by his lieutenants, Afranius and Petreius, in Spain; both sides levied troops in Italy.

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  • Returning to Italy, he quelled a mutiny of the legions (including the faithful Tenth) in Campania, and crossed to Africa, where a republican army of fourteen legions under Scipio was cut to pieces at Thapsus (6th of April 46 B.C.).

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  • of veterans in Campania under the Lex Julia Agraria, and had even then laid down rules for the foundation of such communities.

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  • To the north it adjoined Campania, Samnium and Apulia, and to the south it was separated by a narrow isthmus from the district of Bruttii.

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  • The precise limits were the river Silarus on the north-west, which separated it from Campania, and the Bradanus, which flows into the Gulf of Tarentum, on the north-east; while the two little rivers Laus and Crathis, flowing from the ridge of the Apennines to the sea on the west and east, marked the limits of the district on the side of the Bruttii.

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  • The Lucanians gradually conquered the whole country (with the exception of the Greek towns on the coast) from the borders of Samnium and Campania to the southern extremity of Italy.

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  • ARIANO DI PUGLIA, a town and episcopal see, which, despite its name, now belongs to Campania, Italy, in the province of Avellino, 1509 ft.

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  • STABIAE, an ancient town of Campania, Italy, on the coast at the east extremity of the Gulf of Naples (mod.

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  • He made an attempt to oppose the agrarian law introduced by Caesar for distributing the lands of Campania, but was overpowered and even personally ill-treated by the mob.

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  • Tiberius and his favourite Sejanus feared that her ambition might lead her to attempt to secure the throne for her children, and she was banished to the island of Pandataria off the coast of Campania, where she died on the 18th of October 33, starved to death by herself, or, according to some, by order of Tiberius.

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  • CASTELLAMMARE DI STABIA (anc. Stabiae), a seaport and episcopal see of Campania, Italy, in the province of Naples, 17 m.

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  • SALERNO (anc. Salernum), a seaport and archiepiscopal see of Campania, Italy, capital of the province of Salerno, on the west coast, 33 m.

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  • They were stationed at Ostia, at Cales in Campania, and in Gaul about the Padus (Po).

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  • On the outbreak of the persecution by Diocletian and Maximian, he was taken to Nola and brought before Timotheus, governor of Campania, on account of his profession of the Christian religion.

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  • by Campania, on the E.

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  • The change thus introduced, though already manifest in the composition of the Latin league (see below) was not formally established till the reign of Augustus, who formed of this larger Latium and Campania taken together the first region of Italy; but it is already recognized by Strabo (v.

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  • When the land tax was introduced into Italy in 292, the first region of Augustus obtained the name of provincia Campania.

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  • Later on the name Latium entirely disappeared, and the name Campania extended as far as Veii and the Via Aurelia, whence the medieval and modern name Campagna di Roma.

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  • Sinuessa, on the sea-coast between the Liris (Garigliano) and the Vulturnus, at the foot of the Monte Massico, was the last town in Latium according to the official use of the term and was sometimes assigned to Campania, while Suessa was more assigned to Latium.

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  • POMPEII, 1 an ancient town of Campania, Italy, situated near the river Sarnus, nearly 2 M.

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  • The conquest of Campania by the last-mentioned people is an undoubted historical fact, and there can be no doubt that Pompeii shared the fate of the neighbouring cities on this occasion, and afterwards passed in common with them under the yoke of Rome.

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  • 3 At a later period, however, it took a prominent part in the outbreak of the nations of central Italy, known as the Social War (91-89 B.C.), when it withstood a long siege by Sulla, and was one of the last cities of Campania that were reduced by the Roman arms. The inhabitants were admitted to the Roman franchise, but a military colony was settled in their territory in 80 B.C. by Sulla (Colonia Cornelia Veneria Pompeianorum), and the whole population was rapidly Romanized.

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  • From Campania the rebels marched into Lucania, a country better suited for guerrilla warfare.

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  • The insurgents reoccupied Campania, and by the defeat of C. Thoranius, the quaestor of Varinius, obtained possession of nearly the whole of southern Italy.

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  • Nola and Nuceria in Campania, Thurii and Metapontum in Lucania were sacked.

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  • After repelling an attack by the Vandals upon Campania (458) he prepared a large force, composed chiefly of barbarians, to invade Africa, which he previously visited in disguise.

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  • Owing to the discovery of inscriptions relating to the Gens Vitruvia at Formiae in Campania (Mola di Gaeta), it has been suggested that he was a native of that city, and he has been less reasonably connected with Verona on the strength of an existing arch of the 3rd century, which is inscribed with the name of a later architect of the same family name -- "Lucius Vitruvius Cerdo, a freedman of Lucius."

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  • GAETA (anc. Caietae Portus), a seaport and episcopal see of Campania, Italy, in the province of Caserta, from which it is 53 m.

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  • EBOLI (anc. Eburum), a town of Campania, Italy, in the province of Salerno, from which it is 16 m.

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  • The valiant remains of the nation made another stand under Teias on the Lactarian Hill in Campania; after that they disappear from history.

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  • The anonymous author of the Cohortatio ad Graecos, a work of the 2nd century, visited the remnants of those cells, in which - so legend related the seventy interpreters laboured on their version of the Old Testament: nor, when he came to Cumae in Campania, did he fail to have shown him the old shrine of the Sibyl (Coh.

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  • TORRE DEL GRECO, a seaport of Campania, Italy, in the province of Naples, 72 m.

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  • Having laid the founda - tions of a successful business in his admirable domestic pottery - the best the world had ever seen up to that time - he turned his attention to artistic pottery, and the European renaissance of classic art - fostered by the discovery of Pompeii and the recovery of Greek painted vases from the ancient graves in Campania.

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  • Having completed (when consul in 338 B.C.) the subjugation of Latium, which with Campania had revolted against Rome, he was honoured by a triumph, and a column was erected to him in the Forum.

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  • The brief notices of the classical writers inform us that Herculaneum' was a small city of Campania between Neapolis and Pompeii, that it was situated between two streams at the foot of Vesuvius on a hill overlooking the sea, and that its harbour was at all seasons safe.

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  • 16, 20), in which Pompeii also was destroyed, with other flourishing cities of Campania.

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  • Meanwhile his brother Buccelin, whose army was also suffering grievously from disease, partly induced by free indulgence in the grapes of Campania, encamped at Casilinum, the site of modern Capua.

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  • Like these, apparently, were the nuts of Abella, or Avella, in the Campania (cf.

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  • It is certain from the symbols which they develop or drop that the people of Campania and Samnium borrowed their alphabet from the Etruscans, who held dominion in Campania from the 8th to the 5th century B.C. Previous to the Punic wars Campania had reached a higher stage of civilization than Rome.

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  • It was probably one of the oldest of Roman roads, leading to the pass of Algidus, so important in the early military history of Rome; and it must have preceded the Via Appia as a route to Campania, inasmuch as the Latin colony at Cales was founded in 334 B.C. and must have been accessible from Rome by road, whereas the Via Appia was only made twentytwo years later.

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  • But a six months' residence in Campania, and the congratulations which poured in upon him from the neighbouring towns, where the report had been officially spread that Agrippina had fallen a victim to her treacherous designs upon the emperor, gradually restored his courage.

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  • POZZUOLI (anc. Puteoli, q.v.), a seaport and episcopal see of Campania, Italy, in the province of Naples, 71 m.

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  • Frederick, whose authoritative temper was at once offended by the independent tone of the Arnoldist party, concluded with the pope a treaty of alliance (October 16, 1152) of such a nature that the Arnoldists were at once put in a minority in the Roman government; and when the second successor of Eugenius III., the energetic and austere Adrian IV.(the Englishman, Nicholas Breakspear), placed Rome under an interdict, the senate, already rudely shaken, submitted, and Arnold was forced to fly into Campania (1155).

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  • Campania, Italy >>

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  • AVELLA (anc. Abella), a city of Campania, Italy, in the province of Avellino, 23 m.

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  • He did not, however, refuse to join the commission of twenty by whom the great agrarian scheme of Caesar for the resettlement of Capua and Campania was carried into execution (59 B.C.).

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  • Capua), an ancient city of Campania, Italy, 3 m.

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  • We have no evidence that he travelled much, though he must have paid at least one visit to Campania (xxxviii.

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  • RAVELLO, a village of Campania, Italy, in the province of Salerno, about 3 m.

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  • VENAFRUM, an ancient town of Campania, Italy, close to the boundaries of both Latium adjectum and Samnium.

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  • On the north-east shore east of Naples is an extensive flat, forming part of the ancient Campania Felix, and watered by the small stream Sebeto and by the Sarno, which last in classical times formed the port of Pompeii.

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  • The emperor Gallienus and his wife Salonina were also his enthusiastic admirers, and favoured his idea of founding a Platonic Commonwealth (Platonopolis) in Campania (cf.

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  • In spite of ill-health, he continued to teach and write until his death, which took place on the estate of one of his friends near Minturnae in Campania.

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  • Sorrento, q.v.), an ancient town of Campania, Italy, situated on the N.

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  • AVERSA, a town and episcopal see of Campania, Italy, in the province of Caserta, 152 m.

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  • Prochyta), an island off the coast of Campania, Italy, 2 m.

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  • HORMISDAS, pope from 514 to 523 in succession to Symmachus, was a native of Campania.

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