How to use Cambridge in a sentence

cambridge
  • Waller edited the Cambridge History of English Literature (1907, &c.).

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  • Pritchard became a fellow of New College, Oxford, in 1883, and an honorary fellow of St John's College, Cambridge, in 1886.

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  • He was educated at Harrow and at Trinity College, Cambridge, and was called to the bar at Lincoln's Inn in 1786.

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  • He became a student of Christ's College, Cambridge, where he graduated B.A.

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  • He was educated at Richmond, Yorkshire, and entered Trinity College, Cambridge, in 1809.

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  • Smith, of Cambridge, in 1759, had the organ of Trinity College, built by Bernhardt Schmidt, lowered a whole tone, to reduce it to certain Roman pitch pipes made about 1720.

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  • At the age of eighteen he was enrolled as a sizar at St John's College, Cambridge, whence he graduated in 1830 as fourth wrangler.

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  • He remained president till 1908, in which year he was chosen to succeed the 8th duke of Devonshire as chancellor of Cambridge University.

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  • With the exception of the year 1836, when he acted as headmaster of a newly established school in Leicester, his life was divided between Cambridge and Ely.

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  • He was educated at Cambridge and afterwards entered politics, becoming private secretary to the Prime Minister, Lord Derby, from 1852 to 1855, and sitting as member for Beverley from 1854 to 1857.

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  • He lectured in the schools on natural philosophy, and on Greek in his own rooms. In 1540 Smith went abroad, and, after studying in France and Italy and taking a degree of law at Padua, returned to Cambridge in 1542.

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  • So Mildred stayed with me in Cambridge, and for six happy months we were hardly ever apart.

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  • Southern customers objected to its blue color, which is the evidence of its purity, as if it were muddy, and preferred the Cambridge ice, which is white, but tastes of weeds.

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  • In 1570 Presbyterian views found a distinguished exponent in Dr Thomas Cartwright at Cambridge; and the temper of parliament was shown by the act of 1571, for the reform of disorders in the Church, in which, while all mention of doctrine is omitted, the doctrinal articles alone being sanctioned, ordination without a bishop is implicitly recognized.

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  • Following the lead of the Independents, who set up Mansfield College at Oxford, the Presbyterian Church has founded Westminster College at Cambridge as a substitute for its Theological Hall in London.

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  • He became a fellow of Queens' College, Cambridge, in 1530, and in 1533 was appointed a public reader or professor.

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  • Going to Trinity College, Cambridge, he graduated as senior wrangler in 1865, and obtained the first Smith's prize of the year, the second being gained by Professor Alfred Marshall.

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  • From 1879 to 1884 he was Cavendish professor of experimental physics in the university of Cambridge, in succession to Clerk Maxwell; and in 1887 he accepted the post of professor of natural philosophy at the Royal Institution of Great Britain, which he resigned in 1905.

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  • The north-west coast, particularly the portions north of Cambridge Gulf and the shores of the Gulf of Carpentaria, are favoured with an annual visitation of the monsoon from December to March, penetrating as far as Soo m.

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  • To the Cambridge Mathematical Journal and its successor, the Cambridge and Dublin Mathematical Journal, Boole contributed in all twenty-two articles.

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  • While still an undergraduate he formed a league with John Herschel and Charles Babbage, to conduct the famous struggle of "d-ism versus dot-age," which ended in the introduction into Cambridge of the continental notation in the infinitesimal calculus to the exclusion of the fluxional notation of Sir Isaac Newton.

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  • He was also a prime mover in the establishment of the Cambridge Astronomical Observatory, and in the founding of the Cambridge Philosophical Society.

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  • Oliver was born on the 25th of April 1599, was educated under Dr Thomas Beard, a fervent puritan, at the free school at Huntingdon, and on the 23rd of April 1616 matriculated as a fellow-commoner at Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge, then a hotbed of puritanism, subsequently studying law in London.

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  • He was educated at St John's College, Cambridge, and successively held the livings of Islington (1662), of All-Hallows the Great, Thames Street, London (1679),(1679), and of Isleworth in Middlesex (1690).

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  • His father, a schoolmaster, sent him to Trinity College, Cambridge, where he was elected a fellow in 1760.

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  • Rutherford used this detector to make evident the passage of an electric or Hertzian wave for half a mile across Cambridge, England.

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  • In August 1529 the plague known as the sweating sickness, which prevailed throughout the country, was specially severe at Cambridge, and all who had it in their power forsook the town for the country.

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  • When the treatise was finished Cranmer was called upon to defend its argument before the universities of Oxford and Cambridge, which he visited, accompanied by Fox and Gardiner.

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  • He went to Queen's College, Cambridge, and graduated as seventh wrangler in 1789.

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  • The first buildings were upon land now included within the limits of Cambridge.

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  • At the Cambridge school, for the first time in my life, I enjoyed the companionship of seeing and hearing girls of my own age.

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  • In the end the difference of opinion between Mr. Gilman and Miss Sullivan resulted in my mother's withdrawing my sister Mildred and me from the Cambridge school.

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  • On the first of October Miss Keller entered the Cambridge School for Young Ladies, of which Mr. Arthur Gilman is Principal.

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  • I find I get on faster, and do better work with Mr. Keith than I did in the classes at the Cambridge School, and I think it was well that I gave up that kind of work.

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  • Perhaps, if you would send a copy of this to the head of the Cambridge School, it might enlighten his mind on a few subjects, on which he seems to be in total darkness just now....

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  • Those conveniences which the student requires at Cambridge or elsewhere cost him or somebody else ten times as great a sacrifice of life as they would with proper management on both sides.

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  • The really diligent student in one of the crowded hives of Cambridge College is as solitary as a dervish in the desert.

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  • To speak literally, a hundred Irishmen, with Yankee overseers, came from Cambridge every day to get out the ice.

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  • He was educated at Amersham Hall school and at Trinity Hall, Cambridge.

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  • The text is preserved in the Maitland folio MS. in the Pepysian library, Cambridge.

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  • In 1897 the freedom of the city of Manchester was conferred upon him, and in 1900 he was elected master of Peterhouse, Cambridge.

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  • Great attention is given to the education of the ministry, a considerable number of whom, in recent years, have taken arts degrees at Oxford and Cambridge.

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  • At the age of fourteen he was sent by his mother, who had in 1501 become a widow, to Cambridge.

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  • Although for a time it was lost sight of on the continent, Sir Isaac Newton thought so highly of this book that he prepared an annotated edition which was published in Cambridge in 1672, with the addition of the plates which had been planned by Varenius, but not produced by the original publishers.

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  • He entered Trinity College, Cambridge, at the age of sixteen, but took no degree, his course being interrupted by severe pulmonary attacks which compelled a long residence abroad.

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  • In 1819 he entered Trinity College, Cambridge, as a sizar.

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  • This chair he held for little more than a year, being elected in February 1828 Plumian professor of astronomy and director of the new Cambridge observatory.

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  • Some idea of his activity as a writer on mathematical and physical subjects during these early years may be gathered from the fact that previous to this appointment he had contributed no less than three important memoirs to the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, and eight to the Cambridge Philosophical Society.

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  • At the Cambridge observatory Airy soon gave evidence of his remarkable power of organization.

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  • In the same year the duke of Northumberland presented the Cambridge observatory with a fine object-glass of 12 in.

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  • It long remained a text-book of music in the universities of Oxford and Cambridge.

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  • Educated at Trinity College, Cambridge, where he took a first-class both in the mathematical tripos and in the 2nd part of the moral sciences tripos, he remained at Cambridge as a lecturer, and became well known as a student of mathematical philosophy and a leading exponent of the views of the newer school of Realists.

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  • He was educated at Magdalene and Christ's Colleges and then at Pembroke Hall, Cambridge, where he graduated B.A.

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  • He left considerable benefactions to Pembroke Hall, Cambridge, Queen's College, Oxford, and Christ's College, Cambridge; he also endowed a free school at St Bees, and left money for the poor of St Bees, Canterbury, Lambeth and Croydon.

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  • His early life was spent at Croydon, but it is not certain whether he was educated at Oxford or Cambridge.

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  • The first three eclogues, in the form of dialogues between Coridon and Cornix, were borrowed from the Miseriae Curialium of Aeneas Sylvius Piccolomini (Pope Pius II.), and contain an eulogy of John Alcock, bishop of Ely, the founder of Jesus College, Cambridge.

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  • This son (by name Edward) was educated at Westminster' and Cambridge, but never took a degree, travelled, became member of parliament, first for Petersfield (1734), then for Southampton (1741), joined the party against Sir Robert Walpole, and (as his son confesses, not much to his father's honour) was animated in so doing by " private revenge " against the supposed " oppressor " of his family in the South Sea affair.

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  • In 1838 he entered Magdalene College, Cambridge, and in 1842 he was ordained to the curacy of Eversley in Hampshire, to the rectory of which he was not long afterwards presented, and this, with short intervals, was his home for the remaining thirty-three years of his life.

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  • In 1859 he became chaplain to Queen Victoria; in 1860 he was appointed to the professorship of modern history at Cambridge, which he resigned in 1869; and soon after he was appointed to a canonry at Chester.

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  • His next brother, Edmund of Langley, who was created duke of York (1385),(1385), founded the Yorkist line, and was father, by a daughter and co-heiress of Pedro the Cruel, king of Castile, of two sons, Edward, second duke, who was slain at Agincourt, and Richard, earl of Cambridge, who by marrying the granddaughter and eventual heiress of Lionel's daughter Philippa, brought the right to the succession into the house of York.

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  • He was educated at the City of London school and at St John's College, Cambridge, where he took the highest honours in the classical, mathematical and theological triposes, and became fellow of his college.

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  • The Academy grounds include those occupied in 1808-1909 by the Andover Theological Seminary before its removal to Cambridge.

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  • The collected edition of his Latin works (in two quarto volumes) appeared at Amsterdam in 1668, because he could not obtain the censor's licence for its publication at London, Oxford or Cambridge.

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  • In 1899, at the jubilee commemoration of Sir George Stokes, he was Rede lecturer at Cambridge, his subject being the undulatory theory of light and its influence on modern physics; and on that occasion the honorary degree of D.Sc. was conferred on him by the university.

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  • Rasselas and Imlac, Nekayah and Pekuah, are evidently meant to be Abyssinians of the 18th century; for the Europe which Imlac describes is the Europe of the 18th century, and the inmates of the Happy Valley talk familiarly of that law of gravitation which Newton discovered and which was not fully received even at Cambridge till the 18th century.

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  • During the presidential campaign he made speeches in Illinois, and in Massachusetts he spoke before the Whig State Convention at Worcester on the 12th of September, and in the next ten days at Lowell, Dedham, Roxbury, Chelsea, Cambridge and Boston.

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  • The claim of the duke of Cambridge as the only male heir of full age was referred to the Bundesrat, but the duke refused to bring it before that body, and after a year the Brunswick government elected as regent Prince Albert of Hohenzollern, to hold office so long as the true heir was prevented from entering on his rights.

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  • Here too he planned and wrote the first two volumes of his chief historical work, the History of the Papacy; and it was in part this which led to his being elected in 1884 to the newly-founded Dixie professorship of ecclesiastical history at Cambridge, where he went into residence early in 1885.

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  • At Cambridge his influence at once made itself felt, especially in the reorganization of the historical school.

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  • He even found time for academical work, delivering the Hulsean lectures (1893-1894) and the Rede lecture (1894) at Cambridge, and the Romanes lecture at Oxford (1896).

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  • His most important book, Rational Theology and Christian Philosophy (1872), is one in which the Cambridge Platonists and other leaders of dispassionate thought in the 17th century are similarly treated.

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  • From Braintree school he was sent at the age of sixteen to Catharine Hall, Cambridge, whence he removed to Trinity College after about one year and three-quarters.

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  • The stations of the plants are minutely described; and Cambridge students still gather some of their rarer plants in the copses or chalk-pits where he found them.

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  • The germ of these works was contained in sermons preached long before in Cambridge.

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  • The editio princeps of the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle was by Abraham Wheloc, professor of Arabic at Cambridge, where the work was printed (1643-1644).

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  • At Cambridge, Leonard Courtney was second wrangler and first Smith's prizeman, and was elected a fellow of his college, St John's.

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  • In 1539 or 1J40 he started for Germany and Switzerland, and returning to England became a member of Corpus Christi College, Cambridge.

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  • Educated at Westminster school and at Trinity College, Cambridge, he began his literary career by some satirical verses on Bath society published in 1777, and Poetical Tales, by "Sir Gregory Gander," in 1778.

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  • Born at Bristol on the 27th of June 1786, he was educated at Westminster school and Trinity College, Cambridge, where he graduated in 1808.

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  • At Cambridge he founded the "Whig Club," and the "Amicable Society," and became very intimate with Byron, who accompanied him on a tour in Spain, Greece and Turkey in 1809.

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  • After studying law for six years, he became a fellow at St John's College, Cambridge, in 1564.

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  • In 1578 he was elected master of Pembroke Hall, Cambridge.

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  • Educated at the City of London School, he obtained a studentship at King's College, London, and in 1856 a scholarship at Queen's College, Cambridge, graduated as fifth wrangler in 185 9, and was immediately elected fellow of his college.

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  • Save for the abortive Scrope and Cambridge plot in favour of Mortimer in July 1415, the rest of his reign was free from serious trouble at home.

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  • Cambridge gave him the degree of LL.D.

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  • He entered Westminster school, and in 1759 was elected to a scholarship at Trinity College, Cambridge.

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  • In the year 1784 he left Cambridge, and soon afterwards received from William Pitt the office of a patent searcher of the customs, which required but little attendance, and enabled him to devote a considerable portion of his time to his special studies.

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  • A more recently discovered version in Magdalene College, Cambridge, in MS. Pepys 2498, is entitled The Recluse, and is abridged and differently arranged.

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  • His pall-bearers comprised representatives of literature, of science, of both Houses of Parliament, of theology, Anglican and Nonconformist, and of the universities of Oxford and Cambridge.

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  • Having held pastorates at Shipley, Hackney, Manchester, Leicester and Cambridge, he became principal of Hackney Theological College, Hampstead, in 1901.

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  • A translation of the whole book is now published, under the editorship of Professor Cowell, at the Cambridge University Press.

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  • After receiving his early education in Paris, he was sent to Rugby, and thence proceeded to Trinity College, Cambridge, where he was second classic and chancellor's medallist, and rowed for the university in the winning boat against Oxford.

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  • Morris, having passed his finals in the preceding term, was entered as a pupil at the office of George Edmund Street, the well-known architect; and on New Year's Day the first number of The Oxford and Cambridge Magazine appeared.

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  • He was educated at Cambridge, where he was a fellow of Trinity Hall, and in 1537, president of Queen's College.

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  • His favourable report on the Cambridge colleges saved them from dissolution.

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  • After attending the grammar schools of Melton and Oakham, he entered St John's College, Cambridge, and while still an undergraduate he addressed in February 1712, under the pseudonym of Peter de Quir, a letter to the Spectator displaying no small wit and humour.

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  • But he had probably already been to Cambridge, where he studied at Trinity Hall and greatly distinguished himself in the classics, especially in Greek.

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  • Next year Gardiner, still in the service of Wolsey, was sent by him to Italy along with Edward Fox, provost of King's College, Cambridge, to promote the same business with the pope.

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  • In I S30 he was sent to Cambridge to procure the decision of the university as to the unlawfulness of marriage with a deceased brother's wife, in accordance with the new plan devised for settling the question without the pope's intervention.

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  • In 1540, on the death of Cromwell, earl of Essex, he was elected chancellor of the university of Cambridge.

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  • He was a friend of learning in every form, and took great interest especially in promoting the study of Greek at Cambridge.

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  • At their worst, even with venal examiners (and additional fees were often offered as a bribe), Rashdall regards these examinations (at the end of the 13th century) as probably " less of a farce than the pass examinations of Oxford and Cambridge almost within the memory of persons now living."

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  • At Cambridge in 1774 Fellow Commoners were examined with such precipitation to fulfil the formal requirements of the statutes that the ceremony was termed " huddling for a degree " (Jebb, Remarks upon the Present Mode of Education in the University of Cambridge, 4th ed., 1 774, p. 32).

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  • The last privileges of this kind were abolished at Cambridge by a grace passed on the 10th of March 1884.

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  • At the Cambridge tripos (as described by Jebb in 1774, Remarks, &c., pp. 20-31) the first twenty-four candidates were also selected by a preliminary test; they were then divided further into " wranglers" (the disputants, par excellence) and Senior Optimes, the next twelve on the list being called the Junior Optimes.

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  • The standard of examinations was raised in Cambridge at an earlier date than at Oxford, and in the 18th century the tripos " established the reputation of Cambridge as a School of Mathematical Science."

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  • At Cambridge there is no intermediate examination between the " Previous Examination " (commonly called " Little-go "), which corresponds to Oxford " Responsions " or " Smalls " and the triposes and examinations for the " Poll " degree, which correspond to the Oxford final honours and pass examinations respectively.

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  • From the first the degrees were (unlike those of Oxford and Cambridge until 1871) open to all male persons without religious distinctions; and in 1878 they were opened to women.

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  • Thus the first two years of the arts curriculum in English and American universities correspond, roughly speaking, to the last two years spent in a secondary school of Germany or' France, and the continental " school-leaving examinations " correspond to the intermediate examinations of the newer English universities and to the pass examinations for the degree at Oxford and Cambridge (Mark Pattison, Suggestions on Academical Organization, 1868, p. 238, and Matthew Arnold, Higher Schools and Universities in Germany, 1892, p. 209).

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  • There are in England a number of school examinations which, under prescribed conditions, also serve as school-leaving examinations, and give entrance to certain universities, especially the Oxford and Cambridge local examinations (both established in 1858),and the examinations of the Oxford and Cambridge "Joint Board."

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  • Of recent years the Thesls thesis has been introduced into lower examinations; it is required for the master's degree at London in the case of internal students, in subjects other than mathematics (1910); both at Oxford and London, the B.Sc. degree, and at Cambridge the B.A.

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  • At Cambridge, numerical marks are used.

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  • Todhunter, Conflict of Studies (1873) William Whewell, Of a Liberal Education (London, 1845); Christopher Wordsworth, Scholae academicae (Cambridge, 1877); Etienne Zi (or Siu or Seu), Pratique des examens litteraires en Chine (Shanghai, 1894).

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  • He matriculated at Peterhouse, Cambridge, in December 1580, being then almost certainly a Roman Catholic; but soon became a convinced Protestant, with strong Puritan leanings.

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  • Thus he had to condemn the Association for the Promotion of the Unity of Christendom, with which he had shown some sympathy in its inception in 1857; and to forbid Catholic parents to send their sons to Oxford or Cambridge, though at an earlier date he had hoped (with Newman) that at Oxford at least a college or hall might be assigned to them.

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  • He was educated at St John's College, Cambridge, where he became a fellow in 1529.

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  • Cheke took a fairly active share in public life; he sat, as member for Bletchingley, for the parliaments of 1547 and 1 55 2-1 553; he was made provost of King's College, Cambridge (April 1, 1548), was one of the commissioners for visiting that university as well as Oxford and Eton, and was appointed with seven divines to draw up a body of laws for the governance of the church.

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  • He also appears to have studied at Cambridge, but nothing definite is known of the first thiry-five years of his career.

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  • In 1500 he was elected chancellor of Cambridge University, an office not confined to noble lords until a much more democratic age, and in 1507 master of Pembroke Hall in the same university.

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  • He went to school first at Highgate and then at Liverpool, and in 1831 entered St John's College, Cambridge.

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  • The free grammar school, founded by Edward VI., has two scholarships at Cambridge, and six exhibitions to each university, and occupies modern buildings.

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  • On the 26th of August 1629 he joined in the "Cambridge Agreement," by which he, and his associates, pledged themselves to remove to New England, provided the government and patent of the Massachusetts colony should be removed thither.

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  • He was four years, 1872-5, in the Eton eleven, and captain the last year; four years, 1876-9, in the Cambridge eleven, and captain the last year.

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  • He was king of the place before he left Eton; and when he went up to Trinity, Cambridge, in 1875 he gained a similar ascendancy.

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  • Having reached so far as to perceive that the central force of the solar system must decrease inversely as the square of the distance, and applied vainly to Wren and Hooke for further elucidation, he made in August 1684 that journey to Cambridge for the purpose of consulting Newton, which resulted in the publication of the Principia.

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  • In the spring of 1845 the Lowells returned to Cambridge and made their home at Elmwood.

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  • His public life had made him more of a figure in the world; he was decorated with the highest honours Harvard could pay officially, and with degrees of Oxford, Cambridge, St Andrews, Edinburgh and Bologna.

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  • The object-glass is by Messrs Clark of Cambridge, Mass., the mounting by the Repsolds of Hamburg.

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  • For the rest he was too Aristotelian, if we take the word broadly enough, or, as the result of his Cambridge studies, 3 Bacon, Novum Organum, ii.

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  • As instances we may take Goodwin's and O'Brien's papers in the Cambridge Philosophical Transactions for 1849.

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  • Tait's Elementary Treatise on Quaternions appeared (Cambridge).

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  • In Camberwell Road is Cambridge House, a university settlement, founded in 1897 and incorporating the earlier Trinity settlement.

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  • His great-grandfather the archbishop had been master of Jesus College, Cambridge, and to Jesus College he was sent.

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  • He kept up an intimacy which had begun at Cambridge with John Hall-Stevenson (1718-1785), a witty and accomplished epicurean, owner of Skelton Hall ("Crazy Castle") in the Cleveland district of Yorkshire.

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  • He received his early education at Eton and King's College, Cambridge.

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  • Of these Hurlingham Park is the headquarters of the Hurlingham Polo Club and a fashionable resort; and Queen's Club, West Kensington, has tennis and other courts for the use of members, and is also the scene of important football matches, and of the athletic meetings between Oxford and Cambridge Universities, and those between the English and American Universities held in England.

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  • The wish expressed by the Whigs, that a member of the electoral family should be invited to England, had already aroused the queen's indignation in 1708; and now, in 1714, a writ of summons for the electoral prince as duke of Cambridge having been obtained, Anne forbade the Hanoverian envoy, Baron Schutz, her presence, and declared all who supported the project her enemies; while to a memorial on the same subject from the electress Sophia and her grandson in May, Anne replied in an angry letter, which is said to have caused the death of the electress on the 8th of June, requesting them not to trouble the peace of her realm or diminish her authority.

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  • In the " cockney " dialect, really the dialect of Essex but now no less familiar in Cambridge and Middlesex, the ai sound of i is represented by of as in toime, " time," while a has become ai in Kate, pane, &c. In all southern English o becomes more rounded while it is being pronounced, so that it ends with a slight u 'sound.

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  • Ibn Batuta's travels have only been known in Europe during the 19th century; at first merely by Arabic abridgments in the Gotha and Cambridge libraries.

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  • There and at Ringwood he received his early education, and at the age of thirteen was entered at St John's College, Cambridge.

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  • He was educated at Giggleswick school, of which his father was head master, and at Christ's College, Cambridge.

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  • In 1847 Lightfoot went up to Trinity College, Cambridge, and there read for his degree with Westcott.

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  • The peculiar service which was rendered at this juncture by the ` Cambridge School' was that, instead of opposing a mere dogmatic opposition to the Tubingen critics, they met them frankly on their own ground; and instead of arguing that their conclusions ought not to be and could not be true, they simply proved that their facts and their premisses were wrong.

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  • In 1873, she was elected a life governor of University College, London, and in 1882 became secretary of Girton College, Cambridge, retiring in 1904.

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  • With the exception of one year, he resided at Cambridge, Massachusetts, from the time of his graduation until his death.

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  • On leaving Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge, in 1681, he became an assistant master at the Birmingham grammarschool, and took holy orders.

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  • Having settled at Cambridge in 1796, Gregory first acted as sub-editor on the Cambridge Intelligencer, and then opened a bookseller's shop. In 1802 he obtained an appointment as mathematical master at Woolwich through the influence of Charles Hutton, to whose notice he had been brought by a manuscript on the "Use of the Sliding Rule"; and when Hutton resigned in 1807 Gregory succeeded him in the professorship. Failing health obliged him to retire in 1838, and he died at Woolwich on the 2nd of February 1841.

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  • Entering at Cambridge in 1850, he spent a term or two at Peterhouse, but afterwards migrated to Trinity.

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  • He was summoned from his seclusion in 1871 to become the first holder of the newly founded professorship of Experimental Physics in Cambridge; and it was under his direction that the plans of the Cavendish Laboratory were prepared.

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  • He died at Cambridge on the 5th of November 1879.

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  • Immediately after taking his degree, he read to the Cambridge Philosophical Society a very novel memoir, " On the Transformation of Surfaces by Bending."

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  • A considerable part of this translation was accomplished during his career as an undergraduate in Cambridge.

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  • In 1564 he entered Christ's College, Cambridge, where, after a short time, he formally adopted the reformed doctrines and was in consequence disinherited by his father.

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  • In 1567 he was elected a fellow of his college, and subsequently was chosen lecturer of St Clement's church, Cambridge, where he preached to admiring audiences for many years.

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  • Reverting to incidents in England itself, in 1870 the abolition of university tests removed all restrictions on Jews at Oxford and Cambridge, and both universities have since elected Jews to professorships and other posts of honour.

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  • He received his education at Eton and at King's College, Cambridge.

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  • In the 17th century mysticism is represented in the philosophical field by the so-called Cambridge Platonists, and especially by Henry More (1614-1687), in whom the influence of the Kabbalah is combined with a species of christianized Neoplatonism.

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  • He was educated at Charterhouse School and Trinity College, Cambridge, and in 1809 was elected professor of Greek in succession to Porson.

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  • He was educated at Harrow, and St John's College, Cambridge, where he graduated as a.

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  • Taylor did not vacate his fellowship at Cambridge before 1636, but he spent, apparently, much of his time in London, for Laud desired that his "mighty parts should be afforded better opportunities of study and improvement than a course of constant preaching would allow of."

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  • The younger John was educated at St Paul's School, and on the 5th of July 1662 entered Jesus College, Cambridge; thence he proceeded to Catherine Hall, where he graduated B.A.

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  • After attending the Academy at Edinburgh and spending a session at the University, he went up to Cambridge as a member of Peterhouse, and graduated as senior wrangler and first Smith's prizeman in 1852.

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  • As a fellow and lecturer of his college he remained in Cambridge for two years longer, and then left to take up the professorship of mathematics at Queen's College, Belfast.

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  • In 1873 he took thermoelectricity for the subject of his discourse as Rede lecturer at Cambridge, and in the same year he presented the first sketch of his well-known thermoelectric diagram before the Royal Society of Edinburgh.

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  • Many other inquiries conducted by him might be mentioned, and some idea may be gained of his scientific activity from the fact that a selection only from his papers, published by the Cambridge University Press, fills three large volumes.

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  • In 1894, at Cambridge, the awards were for fixed and portable oil engines, potato-spraying and tree-spraying machines, sheep-dipping apparatus and churns.

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  • He had come under the influence of the Cambridge reformers, and after Anne Boleyn's recognition as queen he was made her chaplain.

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  • On the passing of the act of parliament in 1545 enabling the king to dissolve chantries and colleges, Parker was appointed one of the commissioners for Cambridge, and their report saved its colleges, if there had ever been any intention to destroy them.

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  • Bucer was his friend at Cambridge, and he preached Bucer's funeral sermon in 1551.

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  • In 1552 he was promoted to the rich deanery of Lincoln, and in July 1553 he supped with Northumberland at Cambridge, when the duke marched north on his hopeless campaign against Mary.

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  • His historical research was exemplified in his De antiquitate ecclesiae, and his editions of Asser, Matthew Paris, Walsingham, and the compiler known as Matthew of Westminster; his liturgical skill was shown in his version of the psalter and in the occasional prayers and thanksgivings which he was called upon to compose; and he left a priceless collection of manuscripts to his college at Cambridge.

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  • The early chroniclers declare that St Aldhelm founded a church near Wareham about 701, and perhaps the priory, which is mentioned as existing in 876, when the Danes retired from Cambridge to a strong position in this fort.

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  • Having made terms with Alfred, they broke the conditions and returned to Cambridge.

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  • He graduated at Bowdoin College in 1840; and in 1847, at the request of Prof. Andrews Norton, went to Cambridge, where he was principal of a public school until 1856.

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  • He died in Cambridge, Massachusetts, on the 21st of March 1884.

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  • Belon, as has just been said, had a knowledge of the anatomy 1 This was reprinted at Cambridge in 1823 by Dr George Thackeray.

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  • It possesses close scholarships at Oxford and Cambridge universities.

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  • Educated at Marylebone grammar school and at Eton College, he proceeded to King's College, Cambridge, and was elected a fellow of this society in 1768.

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  • The bridge of chief artistic merit is the Cambridge Bridge (1908), which replaced the old West Boston Bridge, and is one feature of improvements long projected for the beautifying of the Charles river basin.

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  • In 1855 a number of For several years it was uncertain whether Cambridge, Charlestown or Boston should be the capital of the colony, but in 1632 the General Court agreed " by general consent, that Boston is the fittest place for public meetings of any place in the Bay."

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  • He was a select preacher at Oxford in 1895-1897, and at Cambridge in 1900; he received a canonry in Bristol cathedral in 1893, but retained his wardenship of Toynbee Hall, while relinquishing the living of St Jude's.

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  • Stevenson's The Crusaders in the East (Cambridge, 1907)is very valuable.

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  • After graduating at Cambridge (Emmanuel College) and taking holy orders, he officiated for several years as curate at Mitcham.

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  • Educated at Bury St Edmunds school and at St John's College, Cambridge, he took his M.A.

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  • He studied at King's college, Aberdeen, where he graduated with distinction in 1849, thence proceeding to Cambridge, where he remained till 1855 without taking a degree.

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  • Another Syriac MS., in the library of Cambridge University, contains a translation of a work by Zosimus which is so far unknown in the original Greek.

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  • In 1905 it was decided by the board to reorganize the college and remove it to Cambridge.

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  • He was educated at the free grammar school of his native town, and in 1631 was nominated to the Lynn scholarship in Emmanuel College, Cambridge, where he graduated B.A.

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  • He was ordained in 1836, and two years later was elected senior tutor of Emmanuel College, Cambridge.

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  • From 1843 to 1849 he was vice-principal of St David's College, Lampeter, and in 1854 was appointed Norrisian professor of divinity at Cambridge.

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  • He was educated at Dedham grammar school and at Cambridge, and in 1868 became professor of engineering at Owens College, Manchester, holding that post for nearly 40 years.

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  • Oxford and Cambridge sadly neglected the erection of convenient laboratories for many years, and consequently we find technical schools and other universities having a far better equipment and offering greater facilities.

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  • In 1484 he went to Michael House, Cambridge, where he took his degrees in arts in 1487 and 1491, and, after filling several offices in the university, became master of his college in 1499.

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  • His love for Cambridge never waned, and his own benefactions took the form of scholarships, fellowships and lectures.

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  • In 1503 he was the first Margaret professor at Cambridge; and the following year was raised to the see of Rochester, to which he remained faithful, although the richer sees of Ely and Lincoln were offered to him.

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  • A great friend of Erasmus, whom he invited to Cambridge, whilst earnestly working for a reformation of abuses, he had no sympathy with those who attacked doctrine; and he preached at Paul's Cross (12th of May 1521) at the burning of Luther's books.

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  • In 1839 he went to Trinity College, Dublin, and in 1844 to Trinity, Cambridge, where he was a wrangler.

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  • Lumby (Cambridge, 1883), supplemented a little„by Edward Hall (Chronicle, p p. 3 6 3-3 6 4).

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  • The repeal of the Test Act, the admission of Quakers to Parliament in consequence of their being allowed to affirm instead of taking the oath (1832, when Joseph Pease was elected for South Durham), the establishment of the University of London, and, more recently, the opening of the universities of Oxford and Cambridge to Nonconformists, have all had their effect upon the body.

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  • On the death of his mother in 1806, Julius was sent home to the Charterhouse in London, where he remained till 1812, when he entered Trinity College, Cambridge.

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  • In 1840 Hare was appointed archdeacon of Lewes, and in the same year preached a course of sermons at Cambridge (The Victory of Faith), followed in 1846 by a second, The Mission of the Comforter.

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  • Dr Peckard, vice-chancellor of the university of Cambridge, who entertained strong convictions against the slave trade, proposed in 1785 as subject for a Latin prize dissertation the question, " An liceat invitos in servitutem dare."

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  • Cambridge is built on a hill about Boo ft.

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  • Cambridge was first settled in 1798 by emigrants from the island of Guernsey (whence the name of the county); was laid out as a town in 1806; was incorporated as a village in 1837; and was chartered as a city in 1893.

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  • It is more fully explained by him, with later simplifications, in Principia mathematics (Cambridge).

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  • In 1705 he entered as a sizar at Emmanuel College, Cambridge; in 1711 he was elected fellow of his college and was ordained.

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  • He resided at Cambridge, teaching and taking occasional duty until the accession of George I., when his conscience forbade him to take the oaths of allegiance to the new government and of abjuration of the Stuarts.

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  • In the same year he accompanied his pupil to Cambridge, and resided with him as governor, in term time, for the next four years.

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  • Town and castle followed the vicissitudes of the dukedom of Norfolk, passing to the crown in 1405, and being alternately restored and forfeited by Henry V., Richard III., Henry VII., Edward VI., Mary, Elizabeth and James I., and finally sold in 1635 to Sir Robert Hitcham, who left it in 1636 to the master and fellows of Pembroke Hall, Cambridge.

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  • At Oxford Rotherham built part of Lincoln College and increased its endowment; at Cambridge, where he was chancellor and master of Pembroke Hall, he helped to build the University Library.

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  • Liveing, Cambridge Phil.

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  • He declined invitations from Cambridge, but accepted from Archbishop Laud a prebend in Canterbury cathedral without residence, and went to England to be installed in 1629, when he was made LL.D.

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  • He died at Cambridge, Massachusetts, on the 25th of April 1811.

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  • HiS SOD, Richard Henry Dana (1787-1879), was born in Cambridge, Massachusetts, on the 15th of November 1787.

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  • He became in 1814 a member of a literary society in Cambridge, known as the Anthology Club.

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  • Richard Henry Dana (1815-1882), son of the last-mentioned, was born in Cambridge, Massachusetts, on the 1st of August 1815.

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  • He was educated at Trinity College, Cambridge, and afterwards joined his father in his shipping business, being from 1896 to 1905 managing director of the Moor line of cargo steamers.

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  • He began distributing tracts and visiting the poor, joined the lay preachers' association, and gave his first sermon at Teversham, near Cambridge.

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  • The principal public buildings are the town hall, the Cambridge Hall (used for concerts, &c.), and an extensive range of markets.

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  • The Oxford and Cambridge boat-race from Putney to Mortlake on the tideway, the summer eights and the "torpids" at Oxford University, and the school races at Eton and Radley should also be mentioned.

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  • John Hales (1584-1656); Edmund Calamy (1600-1666); the Cambridge Platonist, Benjamin Whichcote (1609-1685); Richard Baxter (1615-1691); the puritan John Owen (1616-1683); the philosophical Ralph Cudworth (1617-1688); Archbishop Leighton (1611-1684) - each of these holds an eminent position in the records of pulpit eloquence, but all were outshone by the gorgeous oratory and art of Jeremy Taylor (1613-1667), who is the most illustrious writer of sermons whom the British race has produced.

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  • He is best remembered as the general editor of the Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges.

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  • He represented Hampshire in the parliament of 1654, and Cambridge University in that of 1656, and in November 16J5 was appointed one of the council of trade.

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  • Ile obtained his early education in Aberdeenshire, and at ten entered Pembroke Hall, Cambridge; after a short while he went to Paris, and, driven thence by the plague, to Louvain, whence by order of the pope he was transferred with several other Scottish students to the papal seminary at Rome.

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  • Entering St John's College, Cambridge, in 1724, he graduated in 1728; and on taking orders (in 1732) was presented to a small country curacy.

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  • He bequeathed his estates to Cambridge University for the purpose of maintaining two divinity scholars (-C30 a year each) at St John's College, of founding a prize for a dissertation, and of instituting the offices of Christian advocate and of Christian preacher or Hulsean lecturer.

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  • In 1866 the Cobden Club was founded in London, to promote free-trade economics, and it became a centre for political propaganda on those lines; and prizes were instituted in his name at Oxford and Cambridge.

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  • Wollaston was educated at Charterhouse, and afterwards at Caius College, Cambridge, of which he became a fellow.

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  • On the 12th of January 1754 he was admitted as sizar at St John's College, Cambridge, and took his degree of B.A.

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  • On the 1st of July 1771 Home obtained at Cambridge, though not without some opposition from members of both the political parties, his degree of M.A.

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  • Here he had the pleasure of finding that the Republique was studied at London and Cambridge, although in a barbarous Latin translation.

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  • Lord's, as it is called, is the headquarters of the M.C.C. (Marylebone Cricket Club), the governing body of the game; here are played the home matches of this club and of the Middlesex County Cricket Club, the Oxford and Cambridge, Eton and Harrow, and other well-known fixtures.

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  • Minns, Scythians and Greeks (Cambridge, 1909), gives a summary of various opinions and a survey of the subject from all points of view.

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  • In the latter class Kimhi stands pre-eminent; to the editions of his commentary on the Psalms enumerated in the article Kimhi must now be added the admirable edition of Dr Schiller-Szinessy (Cambridge, 1883), containing, unfortunately, only the first book of his longer commentary.

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  • Ephraim's Quotations from the Gospel (Cambridge, 1901); Evangelion da-mepharreshe (Cambridge, 1904), and the above cited Lecture.

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  • In Notulae syriacae (privately printed 1887) Wright edited the surviving fragment of a 3rd recension which is preserved in a 13th-century MS. at Cambridge.

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  • His education, begun under a private tutor, was continued (1712) at Trinity Hall, Cambridge; here he remained little more than a year and seems to have read hard, and to have acquired a considerable knowledge of ancient and modern languages.

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  • The most famous edition is that of Bentley, published at Cambridge in 1726.

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  • Baildon(Cambridge, 1907) are of minor value.

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  • He was educated at Glasgow University and at Trinity College, Cambridge (senior optime, and classical honours); was returned to parliament for Stirling as a Liberal in 1868 (after an unsuccessful attempt at a by-election); and became financial secretary at the war office (1871-1874; 1880-1882), secretary to the admiralty (1882-1884), and chief secretary for Ireland (1884-1885).

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  • It fell to his lot as war minister to obtain the duke of Cambridge's resignation of the' office of commander-in-chief; but his intended appointment of a chief of the staff in substitution for that office was frustrated by the resignation of the ministry.

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  • Lightfoot, both of whom preceded him to Trinity College, Cambridge, where he was elected a sub-sizar in 1848, becoming subsequently sizar and scholar.

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  • He became fellow of Magdalene College, Cambridge, and was a master at Eton College from 1885 to 1903.

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  • In 1903 he became a Roman Catholic, was ordained priest at Rome in the following year, and returned to Cambridge as assistant priest of the Roman Catholic church there.

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  • Before he was sixteen he attended lectures at Owens College, and at eighteen he gained a mathematical scholarship at Trinity College, Cambridge, where he graduated in 1871 as senior wrangler and first Smith's prizeman, having previously taken the degree of D.Sc. at London University and won a Whitworth scholarship. Although elected a fellow and tutor of his college, he stayed up at Cambridge only for a very short time, preferring to learn practical engineering as a pupil in the works in which his father was a partner.

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  • A statue of the duke of Cambridge, by Captain Adrian Jones, was unveiled in 1907 in front of the War Office, Whitehall.

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  • Such are the Oxford House, Bethnal Green; the Cambridge House, Camberwell Road; Toynbee Hall, Whitechapel; Mansfield House, Canning Town; the Robert Browning Settlement, Southwark; and the Passmore Edwards Settlement, St Pancras.

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  • Large gatherings of spectators are attracted to the first-class cricket matches played at Lord's ground, St John's Wood, by the Marylebone Club and the Middlesex County teams, Eton College against Harrow School, and Oxford against Cambridge University; to the Kennington Oval for the matches of the Surrey club, and the Leyton ground for those of the Essex club.

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  • At Queen's Club, West Kensington, the annual Oxford and Cambridge athletic meeting and others take place, besides football matches, and there is covered accommodation for tennis and other games.

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  • One is in the Guildhall Library, and the other among the Pepysian maps in Magdalene College, Cambridge.

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  • The thanes' gild at Cambridge afforded help in blood-feuds, and provided for the payment of the wergeld in case a member killed any one.

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  • Maitland's Domesday Book and Beyond (Cambridge, 1897) is indispensarle; and the same remark applies to his History of English Law before the time of Edward I.

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  • Palgrave, Central and Eastern Arabia (aondon, 1865); C. Doughty, Arabia Deserta (Cambridge, 1888), and an abridgment, containing mainly the personal narrative, under the title of Wanderings in Arabia (aondon, 1908); a.

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  • Among them were Fra Raimondo, who became master-general of the Dominicans, William Flete, an ascetically-minded Englishman from Cambridge, Stefano Maconi, who joined the Carthusians and ultimately became prior-general, and the two secretaries, Neri di Landoccio and Francesco Malavolti.

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  • He entered St John's College, Cambridge, as a fellow-commoner in 1701, and took degrees of LL.B.

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  • On the 10th February 1828 Charles and Alfred matriculated at Trinity College, Cambridge, where Frederick was already a student.

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  • He came back to find his father ailing, and in February 1831 he left Cambridge for Somersby, where a few days later Dr George Tennyson died.

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  • The youngest, Helen, was for some years vice-principal of Newnham College, Cambridge.

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  • Thus the three colleges which formed the nucleus of the Imperial University of Tokyo were presided over by a graduate of Michigan College (Professor Toyama), a member of the English bar (Professor HOzumi) and a graduate of Cambridge (Baron Kikuchi).

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  • It is doubtless to the second half of the life of Vacarius that the composition must be attributed of two works the MS. of which, formerly the property of the Cistercian Abbey of Biddleston, is now in the Cambridge University library.

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  • He declined an offer from his uncle, the Rev. Thomas Spencer, to send him to Cambridge, and so was practically self-taught.

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  • Still more brief was the existence of the General Repository and Review (1812), brought out at Cambridge by Andrews Norton with the help of the professors of the university, but of which only four numbers appeared.

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  • He was sent to Eton and Peterhouse, Cambridge, where he took the degree of LL.B.

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  • He held honorary degrees at the universities of Oxford, Cambridge, Dublin, Edinburgh and Durham, was an Associate of the Institute of France; a Commander of the Legion of Honour, and of the Order of Leopold.

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  • In the collected Scientific Papers of Lord Kelvin (3 vols., Cambridge, 1882), of James Clerk Maxwell (2 vols., Cambridge, 1890), and of Lord Rayleigh (4 vols., Cambridge, 1903), the advanced student will find the means for studying the historical development of electrical knowledge as it has been evolved from the minds of some of the master workers of the 19th century.

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  • For fuller details and explanations of the elements of the subject, the reader must be referred to general treatises such as Baynes's Thermodynamics (Oxford), Tait's Thermodynamics (Edinburgh), Maxwell's Theory of Heat (London), Parker's Thermodynamics (Cambridge), Clausius's Mechanical Theory of Heat (translated by Browne, London), and Preston's Theory of Heat (London).

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  • The danger was felt by the university of Cambridge, which in 1674 passed a statute forbidding its preachers to read their sermons.

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  • He died at Cambridge on the 16th of October 1900.

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  • At Cambridge he was president of the Union and acquired a considerable reputation for ability; and when he entered Parliament in 1906, at the age of 27, as Liberal member for the Chesterton division of Cambridgeshire, he was chosen by 1'Ir.

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  • He was the son of a Unitarian minister, and entered Trinity College, Cambridge, in 1823, though it was then impossible for any but members of the Established Church to obtain a degree.

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  • In 1866 Maurice was appointed professor of moral philosophy at Cambridge, and from 1870 to 1872 was incumbent of St Edward's in that city.

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  • Both at King's College and at Cambridge Maurice gathered round him a band of earnest students, to whom he directly taught much that was valuable drawn from wide stores of his own reading, wide rather than deep, for he never was, strictly speaking, a learned man.

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  • An attempt was made to add nine articles of a strong Calvinistic tone, which were drawn up by Dr Whitaker, regius professor of divinity at Cambridge, and submitted to Archbishop Whitgift.

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  • With the exception of a Preface to the Sermons of Dr Whichcote, one of the Cambridge Platonists or latitudinarians, published in 1698, Shaftesbury appears to have printed nothing himself till 1708.

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  • After a short residence at Lambeth he was appointed, through the influence of Cromwell, then chancellor of the university, to lecture on theology at Cambridge; but when he had delivered a few expositions of the Hebrew psalms, he was compelled by the opposition of the papal party to desist.

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  • It has been associated with the Oxford and Cambridge boat-race since 1845, the race finishing here.

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  • A regulation excluding Maltese from the navy (because of their speaking on board a language that their officers did not understand) provoked from Trinity College, Cambridge, the Strickland correspondence in The Times on the constitutional rights of the Maltese, and a leading article induced the Colonial Office to try an experiment known as the Strickland-Mizzi Constitution of 1887.

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  • These MSS are in the University Library of Cambridge, and were transcribed by Father Stevenson.

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  • Proceeding to Trinity College, Cambridge, in 1699, he obtained a fellowship in 1705, and in the following year was appointed Plumian professor of astronomy and experimental philosophy in the university of Cambridge.

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  • The learned Cambridge Commentary by Swete (The Apocalypse of John, 2nd ed., 1907) makes use of several of the methods of interpretation enumerated above.

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  • He was elected fellow of King's College, Cambridge, in 1839, and took orders in 1842.

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  • In 1850 he became vice-principal and Hebrew lecturer at St David's College, Lampeter, where he introduced muchneeded educational and financial reforms. He was appointed select preacher of Cambridge University in 1854, and preached a sermon on inspiration, afterwards published in his Rational Godliness after the Mind of Christ and the Written Voices of the Church (London, 1855).

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  • Strutt found that salt from evaporated sea-water did not contain one-third of the quantity of radium present in the water of the town supply in Cambridge.

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  • The only other surviving document of the 12th century bearing on this subject is a letter of which MS. copies are preserved in the Cambridge and Paris libraries, and which is also embedded in the chronicles of several English annalists, including Benedict of Peterborough, Roger Hovedon and Matthew Paris.

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  • The manuscripts of most of Eadmer's works are preserved in the library of Corpus Christi College, Cambridge.

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  • For the sick there are the Connaught Hospital in the Marlborough Lines, the Cambridge Hospital in Stanhope Lines, and the Union Hospital in Wellington Lines, besides the Louise Margaret Hospital for women and children and the isolated infection hospital.

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  • Johnson, whose chief asset was the MS. tragedy of Irene, was at first the host of his former pupil, who, however, before the end of the year took up his residence at Rochester with John Colson (afterwards Lucasian professor at Cambridge).

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  • Educated privately until 1605, he was then sent to Westminster School, and in 1609 he became a scholar of Trinity College, Cambridge, where he was made B.A.

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  • From Cambridge he wrote some Latin satiric verses 1 in defence of the universities and the English Church against Andrew Melville, a Scottish Presbyterian minister.

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  • This was published at Cambridge, apparently for private circulation, almost immediately after Herbert's death, and a second imprint followed in the same year.

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  • The Cambridge Platform of 1648 by which the New England churches defined their practice, devotes ch.

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  • His eldest son (Edmund), known as "the younger," was educated at Cambridge, and was ejected from the rectory of Moreton, Essex, in 1662.

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  • After studying at St John's College, Cambridge, and at Edinburgh, he settled in 1756 as a physician at Nottingham, but meeting with little success he moved in the following year to Lichfield.

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  • In 1844 he entered St John's College, Cambridge, where he was senior wrangler in 1848, and gained the first Smith's prize and the Burney prize; and in 1849 he was elected to a fellowship, and began his life of college lecturer and private tutor.

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  • He died at Cambridge on the 1st of March 1884.

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  • In the chapel are buried the earl of Cambridge, Lord Scrope, and Sir Thomas.

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  • Luther's works found their way into England, and were read and studied at both Oxford and Cambridge.

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  • A few months later Thomas Cranmer, who had been one of those to discuss sympathetically Luther's works in the little circle at Cambridge, and who believed the royal supremacy would tend to the remedying of grave abuses and that the pope had acted ultra vires in issuing a dispensation for the king's marriage with Catherine, was induced by Henry to succeed Warham as archbishop of Canterbury.

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  • According to the census of 1900 there were 33 incorporated cities in Massachusetts, of which 8 had between 12,000 and 20,000 inhabitants; 5 between 20,000 and 25,000 (Everett, North Adams, Quincy, Waltham, Pittsfield); 2 io between 25,000 and 50,000 (Holyoke, Brockton, Haverhill, Salem, Chelsea, Malden, Newton, Fitchburg, Taunton, Gloucester); 7 between 50,000 and ioo,000 (Lowell, Cambridge, Lynn, Lawrence, New Bedford, Springfield, Somerville); and 3 more than roo,000 inhabitants, viz.

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  • The leading educational institution of the state, as it is the oldest and most famous of the country, is Harvard University (founded 1636) at Cambridge.

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  • Of various institutions for the education of women, Mount Holyoke (1837) at South Hadley, Smith College (1875) at Northampton, Wellesley College (1875) at Wellesley near Boston, Radcliffe College (1879) in connexion with Harvard at Cambridge and Simmons College (1899) at Boston, are of national repute.

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  • There are schools, of theology at Cambridge (Protestant Episcopal), Newton (Baptist) and Waltham (New Church), as well as in connexion with Boston University (Methodist), Tufts College (Universalist) and Harvard (non-sectarian, and the affiliated Congregational Andover Theological Seminary at Cambridge).

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  • Another synod at Cambridge in 1647 more formally established the principle of state control.

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  • Massachusetts Bay had a large learned element; it is supposed that about 1640 there was an Oxford or Cambridge graduate to every 250 persons in the colony.

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  • The earliest printing in the British-American colonies was done at Cambridge in 1639; it was not until 1674 that the authorities of the colony permitted printing, except at Cambridge.

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  • Boston and Cambridge remain leading publishing centres to-day.

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  • The country towns now poured their militia into Cambridge, opposite Boston; troops came from neighbouring colonies, and Artemas Ward, a Massachusetts general, was placed in command of the irregular force, which with superior numbers at once shut the royal army up in Boston.

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  • Washington, chosen by the Continental Congress to command the army, arrived in Cambridge in July 1775, and stretching his lines around Boston, forced its evacuation in March 1776.

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  • The materials for studying the American man biologically are abundant in the United States National Museum in Washington; the Peabody Museum, at Cambridge, Massachusetts; the American Museum of Natural History, New York; the Academy of Sciences and the Free Museum of Arts and Sciences, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; the Field Museum in Chicago; the National Museum, city of Mexico, and the Museum of La Plata.

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  • In Europe there are excellent collections in London, Cambridge, Paris, Berlin, St Petersburg and Prague.

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  • In 1571 he was entered as a Watts scholar at Pembroke Hall, Cambridge, where in1574-1575he graduated B.A., proceeding M.A.

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  • He was educated at Steyning, and entered Trinity College, Cambridge, at the age of thirteen.

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  • He went up to Trinity College, Cambridge, in October 1814, and gained the Craven university scholarship and the chancellor's classical medal.

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  • On Hare's departure from Cambridge in 1832, Thirlwall became assistant college tutor, which led him to take a memorable share in the great controversy upon the admission of Dissenters which arose in 1834.

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  • But it was pointed out 2 that in the oldest MS. existing in the Cambridge university library the figure 4 had been imperfectly erased before the word "cent," a discovery which harmonized with the results of a criticism of the contents of the poem itself.

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  • In France, at Embrun, Peter de Bruys founded a sect known as Petrobrusians, who denied infant baptism, the need of consecrated churches, transubstantiation, 2 Bradshaw, in Transactions of Cambridge Antiquarian Society (1842).

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  • Sir Samuel Morland was sent on a special mission to Turin, and to him were confided by the Vaudois leaders copies of their religious books, which he brought back to England, and ultimately gave to the university library at Cambridge.

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  • Such a " gathered church " emerges as the great desideratum with Robert Browne, between 1572, when he graduated at Cambridge, and 1580-1581, when he first defined his Separatist theory.

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  • But they were burdened by the necessity of supplying literary as well as theological training, owing to the disabilities of Nonconformists at Oxford and Cambridge till 1871.

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  • The Cambridge Greensand, rich in phosphatic nodules, occurs at the base of the Chalk Marl.

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  • Williams, who was a generous benefactor of St John's College, Cambridge, died on the 25th of March 1650.

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  • The school is divided into classical and modern sides, and has exhibitions to Oxford and Cambridge universities.

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  • He took orders in 1747, and was elected fellow of Queens' College, Cambridge, in 1749.

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  • He died in Cambridge, Mass., Sept.

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  • Crossing to England towards the end of 1582, he attended the lectures of John Rainolds (1549-1607) at Oxford, and those of William Whitaker (1548-1595) at Cambridge.

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  • He graduated at Cambridge in 1584, and then went to Heidelberg, where the faculty had been by this time re-established.

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  • He went to school at Harrow, and graduated at Trinity College, Cambridge, in 1829.

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  • Honorary academic degrees were conferred upon him by the universities of Cairo, Christiania, Berlin, Cambridge and Oxford, and he was given both popular and official ovations of almost royal distinction - ovations which were repeated by his own countrymen on his return to America.

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  • Lowndes (Cambridge, 1898) is noteworthy in especial for its attention to his life and character.

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  • Barnes in Cambridge Bible (1899), and Harvey-Jellie in the Century Bible (1906), are helpful.

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  • From a Drawing in the Pepysian Library, Magdalene College, Cambridge.

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  • The sympathies of young men at the universities have been enlisted towards the movement, and an Oxford house, a Cambridge house, and other university missions have been founded in London.

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  • Kent and Cambridge, all married in the following year, the two elder on the same day.

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  • All three had children, but the duke of Clarence's two baby daughters died in infancy, in 1819 and 1821; and the duke of Cambridge's son George, born on the 26th of March 1819, was only two months old when the birth of the duke of Kent's daughter put her before him in the succession.

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