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cambridge

cambridge

cambridge Sentence Examples

  • He was educated at Amersham Hall school and at Trinity Hall, Cambridge.

  • Norton in 1877, and his Letters were edited and privately printed at Cambridge, Mass., in 1878 by James Bradley Thayer.

  • The text is preserved in the Maitland folio MS. in the Pepysian library, Cambridge.

  • He became a student of Christ's College, Cambridge, where he graduated B.A.

  • The title-page of the piece, which was printed by Thomas Colwell in 1575, states that it was played not long ago at Christ's College, Cambridge, and was "made by Mr S.

  • degree at Pembroke College, Cambridge, in 1560, and the witty and sometimes coarse character of his acknowledged work makes it reasonable to suppose that he may have been a coadjutor of the author.

  • He may have been the William Waynflete who was admitted a scholar of the King's Hall, Cambridge, on the 6th of March 1428 (Exch.

  • At the age of eighteen he was enrolled as a sizar at St John's College, Cambridge, whence he graduated in 1830 as fourth wrangler.

  • Pritchard became a fellow of New College, Oxford, in 1883, and an honorary fellow of St John's College, Cambridge, in 1886.

  • He was educated at Harrow and at Trinity College, Cambridge, and was called to the bar at Lincoln's Inn in 1786.

  • With the exception of the year 1836, when he acted as headmaster of a newly established school in Leicester, his life was divided between Cambridge and Ely.

  • 5 (Cambridge, 1907).

  • ADOLPHUS WILLIAM WARD (1837-), English historian and man of letters, was born at Hampstead, London, on the 2nd of December 1837, and was educated in Germany and at the university of Cambridge.

  • In 1897 the freedom of the city of Manchester was conferred upon him, and in 1900 he was elected master of Peterhouse, Cambridge.

  • Waller edited the Cambridge History of English Literature (1907, &c.).

  • Wallis Budge (1896, 2 vols., with English translation); the Syriac text of pseudo-Callisthenes by Budge (Cambridge, 1889); cp. K.

  • Smith, of Cambridge, in 1759, had the organ of Trinity College, built by Bernhardt Schmidt, lowered a whole tone, to reduce it to certain Roman pitch pipes made about 1720.

  • Sil bermann1713-1716Trinity College, Cambridge.

  • He was educated at Cambridge and afterwards entered politics, becoming private secretary to the Prime Minister, Lord Derby, from 1852 to 1855, and sitting as member for Beverley from 1854 to 1857.

  • In 1570 Presbyterian views found a distinguished exponent in Dr Thomas Cartwright at Cambridge; and the temper of parliament was shown by the act of 1571, for the reform of disorders in the Church, in which, while all mention of doctrine is omitted, the doctrinal articles alone being sanctioned, ordination without a bishop is implicitly recognized.

  • Following the lead of the Independents, who set up Mansfield College at Oxford, the Presbyterian Church has founded Westminster College at Cambridge as a substitute for its Theological Hall in London.

  • Great attention is given to the education of the ministry, a considerable number of whom, in recent years, have taken arts degrees at Oxford and Cambridge.

  • He became a fellow of Queens' College, Cambridge, in 1530, and in 1533 was appointed a public reader or professor.

  • He lectured in the schools on natural philosophy, and on Greek in his own rooms. In 1540 Smith went abroad, and, after studying in France and Italy and taking a degree of law at Padua, returned to Cambridge in 1542.

  • Going to Trinity College, Cambridge, he graduated as senior wrangler in 1865, and obtained the first Smith's prize of the year, the second being gained by Professor Alfred Marshall.

  • From 1879 to 1884 he was Cavendish professor of experimental physics in the university of Cambridge, in succession to Clerk Maxwell; and in 1887 he accepted the post of professor of natural philosophy at the Royal Institution of Great Britain, which he resigned in 1905.

  • He remained president till 1908, in which year he was chosen to succeed the 8th duke of Devonshire as chancellor of Cambridge University.

  • passim; C. Torr, Rhodes in Ancient Times (Cambridge, 1885), Rhodes in Modern Times (Cambridge, 1887); C. Schumacher, De republica Rhodiorum commentatio (Heidelberg, 1886); H.

  • Farther to the west, Van Diemen's Gulf, though much smaller, forms a better-protected bay, having Melville Island between it and the ocean; while beyond this, Queen's Channel and Cambridge Gulf form inlets about 14° 50' S.

  • Several minor ranges, the topography of which is little known, extend from Cambridge Gulf, behind a very much broken coast-line, to Limmen Bight on the Gulf of Carpentaria.

  • The north-west coast, particularly the portions north of Cambridge Gulf and the shores of the Gulf of Carpentaria, are favoured with an annual visitation of the monsoon from December to March, penetrating as far as Soo m.

  • Agassiz, Visit to the Barrier Reef (Cambridge, Mass., 1899); J.

  • of Cambridge and Dublin.

  • See Martin Veibull, Sveriges Storhedstid (Stockholm, 1881); Frederick Ferdinand Carlson, Sveriges Historia under Konungarne af Pfalziska Huset (Stockholm, 1883-1885); Robert Nisbet Bain, Scandinavia (Cambridge, 1905); O.

  • To the Cambridge Mathematical Journal and its successor, the Cambridge and Dublin Mathematical Journal, Boole contributed in all twenty-two articles.

  • He was educated at Richmond, Yorkshire, and entered Trinity College, Cambridge, in 1809.

  • While still an undergraduate he formed a league with John Herschel and Charles Babbage, to conduct the famous struggle of "d-ism versus dot-age," which ended in the introduction into Cambridge of the continental notation in the infinitesimal calculus to the exclusion of the fluxional notation of Sir Isaac Newton.

  • university statutes, in which he indicated the necessity for reform; and in 1850 and 1855 he was a member of the commission of inquiry relative to the university of Cambridge.

  • He was also a prime mover in the establishment of the Cambridge Astronomical Observatory, and in the founding of the Cambridge Philosophical Society.

  • Oliver was born on the 25th of April 1599, was educated under Dr Thomas Beard, a fervent puritan, at the free school at Huntingdon, and on the 23rd of April 1616 matriculated as a fellow-commoner at Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge, then a hotbed of puritanism, subsequently studying law in London.

  • of the Cambridge Mod.

  • He was educated at St John's College, Cambridge, and successively held the livings of Islington (1662), of All-Hallows the Great, Thames Street, London (1679),(1679), and of Isleworth in Middlesex (1690).

  • His father, a schoolmaster, sent him to Trinity College, Cambridge, where he was elected a fellow in 1760.

  • Johns, Assyrian Deeds and Documents relating to the Transfer of Property (3 vols., Cambridge, 1898); H.

  • Rutherford used this detector to make evident the passage of an electric or Hertzian wave for half a mile across Cambridge, England.

  • Macdonald, Electric Waves (Cambridge, 1901); H.

  • See also the Cambridge Modern History, vols.

  • (Cambridge, 1907, &c.), where full bibliographies will be found.

  • At the age of fourteen he was sent by his mother, who had in 1501 become a widow, to Cambridge.

  • If the offer was made, it was declined, and Cranmer continued at Cambridge filling the offices of lecturer in divinity at his own college and of public examiner in divinity to the university.

  • In August 1529 the plague known as the sweating sickness, which prevailed throughout the country, was specially severe at Cambridge, and all who had it in their power forsook the town for the country.

  • When the treatise was finished Cranmer was called upon to defend its argument before the universities of Oxford and Cambridge, which he visited, accompanied by Fox and Gardiner.

  • Maas in Results of In its arrangement the muscular tissue the "Albatross " Expedition, forms two s stems: the one composed Museum of Comparative Y P Zoology, Cambridge, Masse, of striated fibres arranged circularly, that U.S.A. is to say, concentrically round the central FIG.

  • C. Warren, Buddhism in Translations (Cambridge, Mass., 1896); Mrs Rhys Davids, Buddhist Psychology (London, 1900); K.

  • Only a few of the principal ones can be mentioned: - the Custom House, the Royal Exchange, Marlborough House, Buckingham House, and the Hall of the College of Physicians - now destroyed; others which exist are - at Oxford, the Sheldonian theatre, the Ashmolean museum, the Tom Tower of Christ Church, and Queen's College chapel; at Cambridge, the library of Trinity College and the chapel of Pembroke, the latter at the cost of Bishop Matthew Wren, his uncle.

  • MATTHEW NEWCOMEN (c. 1610-1669), English nonconformist divine, was born about 1610 and educated at St John's College, Cambridge (M.A.

  • 2 History of Ancient Geography (Cambridge, 1897), p. 70.

  • Although for a time it was lost sight of on the continent, Sir Isaac Newton thought so highly of this book that he prepared an annotated edition which was published in Cambridge in 1672, with the addition of the plates which had been planned by Varenius, but not produced by the original publishers.

  • Engler, Entwickelungsgeschichte der Pflanzenwelt; also Beddard, Zoogeography (Cambridge, 1895); and Sclater, The Geography of Mammals (London, 1899).

  • He entered Trinity College, Cambridge, at the age of sixteen, but took no degree, his course being interrupted by severe pulmonary attacks which compelled a long residence abroad.

  • Pearson (Cambridge, 1882).

  • 2 That on Genesis was edited for the first time by Schechter (Cambridge, 1902).

  • In 1819 he entered Trinity College, Cambridge, as a sizar.

  • This chair he held for little more than a year, being elected in February 1828 Plumian professor of astronomy and director of the new Cambridge observatory.

  • Some idea of his activity as a writer on mathematical and physical subjects during these early years may be gathered from the fact that previous to this appointment he had contributed no less than three important memoirs to the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, and eight to the Cambridge Philosophical Society.

  • At the Cambridge observatory Airy soon gave evidence of his remarkable power of organization.

  • In the same year the duke of Northumberland presented the Cambridge observatory with a fine object-glass of 12 in.

  • of Cambridge and Edinburgh.

  • It long remained a text-book of music in the universities of Oxford and Cambridge.

  • Skrine, The Expansion of Russia, 1815-1900 (Cambridge, 1903) V.

  • Educated at Trinity College, Cambridge, where he took a first-class both in the mathematical tripos and in the 2nd part of the moral sciences tripos, he remained at Cambridge as a lecturer, and became well known as a student of mathematical philosophy and a leading exponent of the views of the newer school of Realists.

  • He was educated at Magdalene and Christ's Colleges and then at Pembroke Hall, Cambridge, where he graduated B.A.

  • He left considerable benefactions to Pembroke Hall, Cambridge, Queen's College, Oxford, and Christ's College, Cambridge; he also endowed a free school at St Bees, and left money for the poor of St Bees, Canterbury, Lambeth and Croydon.

  • of the Church of England; Frere's volume in Stephens' and Hunt's series; Cambridge Mod.

  • (Berlin, 1895); and the Cambridge Modern History (vol.

  • His early life was spent at Croydon, but it is not certain whether he was educated at Oxford or Cambridge.

  • The first three eclogues, in the form of dialogues between Coridon and Cornix, were borrowed from the Miseriae Curialium of Aeneas Sylvius Piccolomini (Pope Pius II.), and contain an eulogy of John Alcock, bishop of Ely, the founder of Jesus College, Cambridge.

  • This son (by name Edward) was educated at Westminster' and Cambridge, but never took a degree, travelled, became member of parliament, first for Petersfield (1734), then for Southampton (1741), joined the party against Sir Robert Walpole, and (as his son confesses, not much to his father's honour) was animated in so doing by " private revenge " against the supposed " oppressor " of his family in the South Sea affair.

  • In 1847 Lightfoot went up to Trinity College, Cambridge, and there read for his degree with Westcott.

  • The peculiar service which was rendered at this juncture by the ` Cambridge School' was that, instead of opposing a mere dogmatic opposition to the Tubingen critics, they met them frankly on their own ground; and instead of arguing that their conclusions ought not to be and could not be true, they simply proved that their facts and their premisses were wrong.

  • In 1873, she was elected a life governor of University College, London, and in 1882 became secretary of Girton College, Cambridge, retiring in 1904.

  • With the exception of one year, he resided at Cambridge, Massachusetts, from the time of his graduation until his death.

  • On leaving Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge, in 1681, he became an assistant master at the Birmingham grammarschool, and took holy orders.

  • Having settled at Cambridge in 1796, Gregory first acted as sub-editor on the Cambridge Intelligencer, and then opened a bookseller's shop. In 1802 he obtained an appointment as mathematical master at Woolwich through the influence of Charles Hutton, to whose notice he had been brought by a manuscript on the "Use of the Sliding Rule"; and when Hutton resigned in 1807 Gregory succeeded him in the professorship. Failing health obliged him to retire in 1838, and he died at Woolwich on the 2nd of February 1841.

  • Entering at Cambridge in 1850, he spent a term or two at Peterhouse, but afterwards migrated to Trinity.

  • He was summoned from his seclusion in 1871 to become the first holder of the newly founded professorship of Experimental Physics in Cambridge; and it was under his direction that the plans of the Cavendish Laboratory were prepared.

  • He died at Cambridge on the 5th of November 1879.

  • Immediately after taking his degree, he read to the Cambridge Philosophical Society a very novel memoir, " On the Transformation of Surfaces by Bending."

  • He obtained in 185 9 the Adams prize in Cambridge for a very original and powerful essay, " On the Stability of Saturn's Rings."

  • A considerable part of this translation was accomplished during his career as an undergraduate in Cambridge.

  • In 1564 he entered Christ's College, Cambridge, where, after a short time, he formally adopted the reformed doctrines and was in consequence disinherited by his father.

  • In 1567 he was elected a fellow of his college, and subsequently was chosen lecturer of St Clement's church, Cambridge, where he preached to admiring audiences for many years.

  • Bevan, Cambridge Biblical Essays (ed.

  • (July 1909, " Simeon and Levi: the Problem of the Old Testament "); and Swete's Cambridge Bib.

  • Reverting to incidents in England itself, in 1870 the abolition of university tests removed all restrictions on Jews at Oxford and Cambridge, and both universities have since elected Jews to professorships and other posts of honour.

  • He received his education at Eton and at King's College, Cambridge.

  • - Pashley, Travels in Crete (2 vols., Cambridge and London, 1837); Spratt, Travels and Researches in Crete (2 vols., London, 1867); Raulin, Description physique del' ile de Crete (3 vols.

  • Weeks, Bibliography of Historical Literature of North Carolina (Cambridge, 1895).

  • In the 17th century mysticism is represented in the philosophical field by the so-called Cambridge Platonists, and especially by Henry More (1614-1687), in whom the influence of the Kabbalah is combined with a species of christianized Neoplatonism.

  • Sharp's general account of ants in the Cambridge Nat.

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