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cambrai

cambrai Sentence Examples

  • CAMBRAI -.

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  • In the south (of the Netherlands) Christianity was spread by the labours of devoted missionaries, foremost amongst whom were St Amandus, St Bavon and St Eligius, and bishoprics were set up at Cambrai, Tournai, Arras, Therouanne and Liege.

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  • Flourishing communities were likewise to be found in Hainault, Namur, Cambrai and the other southern districts of the Netherlands, but nowhere else the vigorous independence of Ghent, Bruges and Ypres, nor the splendour of their civic life.

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  • Two other bastards were placed on the episcopal throne of Liege, an illegitimate brother on that of Cambrai.

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  • Some time afterwards Pierre d'Ailly became bishop of Cambrai (March 1 9, 1 397) by the favour of the pope, who had yielded no whit, and, by virtue of this position, became also a prince of the empire.

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  • However, the language of the bishop of Cambrai seems on this occasion to have been lacking in decision; however that may be, it led to no felicitous result.

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  • Discouraged by his failure to effect this, he returned to his diocese of Cambrai at the beginning of 1408.

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  • This pope reigned only ten months; his successor, John XXIII., raised Pierre d'Ailly to the rank of cardinal (June 6, 1411), and further, to indemnify him for the loss of the bishopric of Cambrai, conferred upon him the administration of that of Limoges (November 3, 1412), which was shortly after exchanged for the bishopric of Orange.

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  • Both these pressing necessities, for a free outlet for merchandise and for a food-supplying area, drove Venice on to the mainland, and compelled her to initiate a policy which eventually landed her in the disastrous wars of Cambrai.

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  • The rapid formation of this land empire, and the obvious intention to expand, called the attention not only of Italy but of Europe to this power which seemed destined to become supreme in north Italy, and eventually led to the league of Cambrai for the dismemberment of Venice.

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  • So urgent was the need of restoring union at any cost that even prelates who had taken an active part in the work of the council of Pisa, such as Pierre d'Ailly, cardinal bishop of Cambrai, were forced to admit, in view of the fact that the decisions of that council had been and were still contested, that the only possible course was to reconsider the question of the union de novo, entirely disregarding all previous deliberations on the subject, and treating the claims of John and his two competitors with the strictest impartiality.

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  • He explored the region of Cambrai, seized that town, and occupied all the country as far as the Somme.

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  • Clovis made his authority recognized over the other Salian tribes (whose kings dwelt at Cambrai and other cities), and put an end to the domination of the Ripuarian Franks.

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  • He stayed at Cambrai for some time, where European diplomatists were still in full session, journeyed to Brussels, where he met and quarrelled with Jean Baptiste Rousseau, went on to the Hague, and then returned.

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  • Pope Julius II., after having formed the league of Cambrai with France and Spain against Venice, retired from it in 1510, Schis- and raised the cry of "Fuori i Barbari" (out with the matic barbarians), with a view to expelling the French from council of Italy.

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  • When only seven years old he was sent by his father, with his brother the dauphin Francis, as a hostage to Spain in 1526, whence they returned after the conclusion of the peace of Cambrai in 1530.

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  • "BATTLE OF CAMBRAI - ST.

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  • of this, the last artificial position, there lay the strong natural defence line of the Canal du Nord covering Cambrai.

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  • First Army's Advance to Cambrai (Sept.

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  • of the canal the Germans had as successive defensive positions the Marquion trench line, running from Oisy by Marquion to the main Hindenburg line near Graincourt; the Marcoing line, covering Cambrai at a distance of some two miles from its outskirts; and the Scheldt canal, from the Sensee at Estrun by the western suburbs of the city to Marcoing, Creveceeur and the south.

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  • of Cambrai.

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  • made no progress, but the line on the rest of the front was advanced to the junction of the roads from Arras and Bapaume in the suburbs of Cambrai and the line of the Douai-Cambrai road and railway, including the village of Sancourt.

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  • r the Canadian line ran from the western suburbs of Cambrai by Tilloy to the Douai-Cambrai railway W.

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  • This was the final day of the Cambrai battle on the First Army front.

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  • Though Cambrai itself only fell into Allied hands a week later,, its fate was in fact sealed by the five days' fighting which has.

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  • Corps on the left flank reached the suburbs of Cambrai on both banks of the Scheldt canal.

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  • The fate of Cambrai was sealed and only a part of the incompletely, constructed Masnieres-Beaurevoir line, already broken in its northern sector by the Third Army and in its southern sector by the Fourth Army, was left as a dyke to stem the further British advance.

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  • In 1585-1586 he returned with Castelnau to Paris, where his anti-Aristotelian views were taken up by the college of Cambrai, but was soon driven from his refuge, and we next find him at Marburg and Wittenberg, the headquarters of Lutheranism.

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  • He was one of the negotiators of the disastrous treaties of Blois (1504), and in 1508 of the League of Cambrai against Venice.

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  • of Lille on the Northern railway between that city and Cambrai.

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  • A few bishops, notably Gerard of Cambrai (1013-1051), seem from the first to have opposed the peace laws of the Church as encroaching on royal authority, but the lay rulers usually co-operated with the ecclesiastical authorities in encouraging and maintaining the Truce of God.

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  • ANDREA MOCENIGO, who flourished in the 15th and 16th centuries, was a senator of the republic and a historian; he composed a work on the league of Cambrai entitled Belli memorabilis Cameracensis adversus Venetos historiae libri vi.

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  • He brought his attainments somehow to the notice of Henry of Bergen, bishop of Cambrai, the leading prelate at, the court of Brussels; and about 1494 permission was obtained for him to leave Steyn and become Latin secretary to the bishop, who was then preparing for a visit to Rome.

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  • In the general anarchy Charles succeeded in escaping, defeated the Neustrians at Ambleve, south of Liege, in 716, and at Vincy, near Cambrai, in 717, and forced them to come to terms. In Austrasia he wrested the power from Plectrude, and took the title of mayor of the palace, thus prejudicing the interests of his nephews.

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  • The Westphalian circle which was formed at the same time comprised nearly all the rest of the modern province (including Mark) and the lands north of it between the Weser and the frontier of the Netherlands, also Verden, Schaumburg, Nassau, Wied, Lippe, Berg, Cleves, Julich, Liege, Bouillon and Cambrai.

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  • Cambrai >>

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  • Charles V.rpressed in vain upon him the archbishopric of Cambrai, but Blosius studiously exerted himself in the reform of his monastery and in the composition of devotional works.

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  • Two attempts were made to assassinate him.3 After the second the prince regent commanded him to leave Paris and proceed to the headquarters at Cambrai.

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  • After the signature of the treaty of Cambrai on the 3rd of August 1529 Charles met Clement at Bologna and received from him the imperial crown and the iron crown of Lombardy.

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  • This was soon transferred to Cambrai, but brought back to its original seat about 1100.

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  • In 1508 he helped to promote ha Y~ the league of Cambrai, formed to despoil Venice, but he soon returned to his former policy of waging war against France, and he continued to do this until peace was made in 15f6.

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  • Feeble efforts to challenge his power in Italy provoked the sack of Rome in 1527; and the peace of Cambrai in 1529 was made without any reference to Wolsey or England's interests.

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  • His brothers, however, compelled him to divide the kingdom with them, and Soissons, together with Amiens, Arras, Cambrai, Therouanne, Tournai and Boulogne, fell to Chilperic's share, but on the death of Charibert in 567 his estates were augmented.

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  • whereas Cambrai, whose population was French, is the only city politically situated in Germany, where a commune came to be established.

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  • On the death of his father in 511 he received as his share of the kingdom the town of Soissons, which he made his capital, the cities of Laon, Noyon, Cambrai and Maastricht, and the lower course of the Meuse.

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  • 1603), seigneur de Balagny, who was at first a zealous member of the League, but made his submission to Henry IV., and received from him the principality of Cambrai and the baton of a marshal of France.

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  • His nephew in the sixth degree was the celebrated archbishop of Cambrai.

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  • 'Fenelon, Francois De Salignac De La Mothe' (1651-1715); French writer and archbishop of Cambrai, was born at the chateau of Fenelon in Perigord on the 6th of August 1651.

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  • Four years before, Fenelon had been appointed archbishop of Cambrai, one of the richest benefices in France.

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  • To Cambrai, accordingly, all his energies were now directed.

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  • Still better is Saint-Simon's portrait of Fenelon as he appeared about the time of his appointment to Cambrai - tall, thin, well-built, exceedingly pale, with a great nose, eyes from which fire and genius poured in torrents, a face curious and unlike any other, yet so striking and attractive that, once seen, it could not be forgotten.

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  • Modern authorities are Fenelon a Cambrai (Paris, 1885), by Emmanuel de Broglie; Fenelon, by Paul Janet (Paris, 1892); Bossuet et Fenelon, by L.

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  • After occupying the episcopal sees of Therouanne and Cambrai, he attained to the cardinalate at an early age.

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  • receiver of the gave, a kind of church rate) at Cambrai, and he seems to have made this city his usual place of residence.

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  • He was for some time bailiff of the cathedral chapter and then provost of Cambrai.

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  • 615), and Cumean (Cumine Ailbha, abbot of Iona); in the Frankish kingdom the most interesting work is the Penitential of Halitgar, bishop of Cambrai 7 from 817 to 831.

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  • He is found at the siege of Cambrai in 1337, and at the battle of Crecy in 1346.

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  • This peace was amplified at the treaty of Cambrai (August 1529) into a general European pacification in which England had no voice.

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  • It was solely through his efforts that Hungary did not accede to the league of Cambrai, was consistently friendly with Venice, and formed a family compact with the Habsburgs.

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  • Whatever Le Bon's offences, his condemnation was to a great extent due to the violent attacks of one of his political enemies, Armand Guffroy; and it is only just to remember that it was owing to his courage that Cambrai was saved from falling.

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  • His son, Emile le Bon, published a Histoire de Joseph le Bon et des tribunaux revolutionnaires d'Arras et de Cambrai (2nd ed., 2 vols., Arras, 1864).

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  • The name of his mother was Jeanne le Franc; she was the daughter of an innkeeper at Cambrai, who afterwards came to reside at Noyon.

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  • 540), first bishop of Arras and Cambrai, who restored Christianity in northern Gaul.

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  • The league of Cambrai (I 5o8) was his finest diplomatic achievement.

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  • Thus did France, menaced with disruption, embark upon a course of action imposed upon her by the harsh conditions of the treaty of Madrid otherwise little respectedand later by those of Cambrai (1529); but it was not till later, too late indeed, that it was defined and became a national policy.

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  • The death of Francis I.s mother, Louise of Savoy (who had been partly instrumental in arranging the peace of Cambrai), the replacement of Montmorency by the bellicose Chabot, and the advent to power of a Burgundian, Granvella, as Charles Vs prime minister, put an end to this double-faced policy, which attacked the Calvinists of France while supporting the Lutherans of Germany; made advances to Clement VII.

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  • but after the conquest of Savoy and Piedmont and a fruitless invasion of Provence by Charles V., it resulted in another truce, concluded at Nice, in the interview at Aigues-mortes, and in the old contradictory policy of the treaty of Cambrai.

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  • All the more remarkable spirits of the time, like prophets in Israel, denounced a tyranny which put Chamillart at the head of the finances because he played billiards well, and Villeroy in command of the armies although he was utterly untrustworthy; which sent the patriot Vauban into disgrace, banished from the court Catinat, the Pre Ia Pense, exiled to Cambrai the too clear sighted Fnelon, and suspected Racine of Jansenism and La Fontaine of independence.

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  • CAMBRAI, a town of northern France, capital of an arrondissement in the department of Nord, 37 m.

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  • Cambrai is situated on the right and eastern bank of the Scheldt (arms of which traverse the west of the town) and at one extremity of the canal of St Quentin.

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  • The former cathedral of Cambrai was destroyed after the Revolution.

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  • Cambrai is the seat of an archbishop and a sub-prefect, and has tribunals of first instance and of commerce, a board of tradearbitrators, a chamber of commerce and a branch of the Bank of France.

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  • Cambrai is the ancient Nervian town of Camaracum, which is mentioned in the Antonine Itinerary.

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  • The League of Cambrai is the name given to the alliance of Pope Julius II., Louis XII., Maximilian I., and Ferdinand the Catholic against the Venetians in 1508; and the peace of Cambrai, or as it is also called, the Ladies' Peace, was concluded in the town in 1529 by Louise of Savoy, mother of Francis I., and Margaret of Austria, aunt of Charles V., in the name of these monarchs.

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  • The bishopric of Cambrai dates from the 5th century, and was raised in 1559 to the rank of an archbishopric, which continued till the Revolution, and has since been restored.

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  • Bouly, Histoire de Cambrai et du Cambresis (Cambria, 1843).

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  • He left his cloister on several occasions, and speaks of having visited Croyland, Worcester, Cambrai (I105) and Cluny (1132).

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  • At the end of the 12th century Gui de Cambrai and Jean le Nevelon (or Nevelaux or Venelais), each wrote a Vengeance d'Alexandre.

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  • In the south (of the Netherlands) Christianity was spread by the labours of devoted missionaries, foremost amongst whom were St Amandus, St Bavon and St Eligius, and bishoprics were set up at Cambrai, Tournai, Arras, Therouanne and Liege.

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  • Flourishing communities were likewise to be found in Hainault, Namur, Cambrai and the other southern districts of the Netherlands, but nowhere else the vigorous independence of Ghent, Bruges and Ypres, nor the splendour of their civic life.

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  • Two other bastards were placed on the episcopal throne of Liege, an illegitimate brother on that of Cambrai.

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  • Some time afterwards Pierre d'Ailly became bishop of Cambrai (March 1 9, 1 397) by the favour of the pope, who had yielded no whit, and, by virtue of this position, became also a prince of the empire.

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  • However, the language of the bishop of Cambrai seems on this occasion to have been lacking in decision; however that may be, it led to no felicitous result.

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  • Discouraged by his failure to effect this, he returned to his diocese of Cambrai at the beginning of 1408.

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  • At this time he was still faithful to Benedict XIII., and the disinclination he felt to joining the members of the French clergy who were on the point of ratifying the royal declaration of neutrality excited the anger of Charles VI.'s government, and a mandate, which was however not executed, ordered the arrest of the bishop of Cambrai.

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  • This pope reigned only ten months; his successor, John XXIII., raised Pierre d'Ailly to the rank of cardinal (June 6, 1411), and further, to indemnify him for the loss of the bishopric of Cambrai, conferred upon him the administration of that of Limoges (November 3, 1412), which was shortly after exchanged for the bishopric of Orange.

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  • Forgetting these benefits, the cardinal of Cambrai was one of the most formidable adversaries of John XXIII.

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  • Both these pressing necessities, for a free outlet for merchandise and for a food-supplying area, drove Venice on to the mainland, and compelled her to initiate a policy which eventually landed her in the disastrous wars of Cambrai.

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  • The rapid formation of this land empire, and the obvious intention to expand, called the attention not only of Italy but of Europe to this power which seemed destined to become supreme in north Italy, and eventually led to the league of Cambrai for the dismemberment of Venice.

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  • To complete her misfortunes, the European powers, the church and the small states of Italy, partly from jealous greed of her possessions, partly on the plea of her treason to Christendom in making terms with Islam, partly from fear of her expansion in north Italy, coalesced at Cambrai in 1508 for the partition of Venetian possessions.

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  • Giorgione, Titian, Sansovino, Tintoret, Paolo Veronese and Palladio all lived and worked after the disastrous wars of the league of Cambrai.

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  • So urgent was the need of restoring union at any cost that even prelates who had taken an active part in the work of the council of Pisa, such as Pierre d'Ailly, cardinal bishop of Cambrai, were forced to admit, in view of the fact that the decisions of that council had been and were still contested, that the only possible course was to reconsider the question of the union de novo, entirely disregarding all previous deliberations on the subject, and treating the claims of John and his two competitors with the strictest impartiality.

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  • It is not difficult to imagine the storms aroused by this indiscreet proposal; and had not the majority of the Frenchmen assembled at Constance had the sagacity to ref use to uphold the cardinal of Cambrai on this point, the upshot would have been a premature dissolution of the council.

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  • He explored the region of Cambrai, seized that town, and occupied all the country as far as the Somme.

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  • Clovis made his authority recognized over the other Salian tribes (whose kings dwelt at Cambrai and other cities), and put an end to the domination of the Ripuarian Franks.

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  • An account of Friar Thomas's preaching and its effect is given by Enguerrand de Monstrelet, provost of Cambrai (d.

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  • He stayed at Cambrai for some time, where European diplomatists were still in full session, journeyed to Brussels, where he met and quarrelled with Jean Baptiste Rousseau, went on to the Hague, and then returned.

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  • Pope Julius II., after having formed the league of Cambrai with France and Spain against Venice, retired from it in 1510, Schis- and raised the cry of "Fuori i Barbari" (out with the matic barbarians), with a view to expelling the French from council of Italy.

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  • When only seven years old he was sent by his father, with his brother the dauphin Francis, as a hostage to Spain in 1526, whence they returned after the conclusion of the peace of Cambrai in 1530.

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  • "BATTLE OF CAMBRAI - ST.

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  • of this, the last artificial position, there lay the strong natural defence line of the Canal du Nord covering Cambrai.

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  • First Army's Advance to Cambrai (Sept.

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  • of the canal the Germans had as successive defensive positions the Marquion trench line, running from Oisy by Marquion to the main Hindenburg line near Graincourt; the Marcoing line, covering Cambrai at a distance of some two miles from its outskirts; and the Scheldt canal, from the Sensee at Estrun by the western suburbs of the city to Marcoing, Creveceeur and the south.

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  • of Cambrai.

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  • made no progress, but the line on the rest of the front was advanced to the junction of the roads from Arras and Bapaume in the suburbs of Cambrai and the line of the Douai-Cambrai road and railway, including the village of Sancourt.

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  • r the Canadian line ran from the western suburbs of Cambrai by Tilloy to the Douai-Cambrai railway W.

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  • This was the final day of the Cambrai battle on the First Army front.

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  • Though Cambrai itself only fell into Allied hands a week later,, its fate was in fact sealed by the five days' fighting which has.

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  • Corps on the left flank reached the suburbs of Cambrai on both banks of the Scheldt canal.

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  • The fate of Cambrai was sealed and only a part of the incompletely, constructed Masnieres-Beaurevoir line, already broken in its northern sector by the Third Army and in its southern sector by the Fourth Army, was left as a dyke to stem the further British advance.

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  • In 1585-1586 he returned with Castelnau to Paris, where his anti-Aristotelian views were taken up by the college of Cambrai, but was soon driven from his refuge, and we next find him at Marburg and Wittenberg, the headquarters of Lutheranism.

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  • He was one of the negotiators of the disastrous treaties of Blois (1504), and in 1508 of the League of Cambrai against Venice.

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  • of Lille on the Northern railway between that city and Cambrai.

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  • A few bishops, notably Gerard of Cambrai (1013-1051), seem from the first to have opposed the peace laws of the Church as encroaching on royal authority, but the lay rulers usually co-operated with the ecclesiastical authorities in encouraging and maintaining the Truce of God.

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  • ANDREA MOCENIGO, who flourished in the 15th and 16th centuries, was a senator of the republic and a historian; he composed a work on the league of Cambrai entitled Belli memorabilis Cameracensis adversus Venetos historiae libri vi.

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  • He brought his attainments somehow to the notice of Henry of Bergen, bishop of Cambrai, the leading prelate at, the court of Brussels; and about 1494 permission was obtained for him to leave Steyn and become Latin secretary to the bishop, who was then preparing for a visit to Rome.

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  • In the general anarchy Charles succeeded in escaping, defeated the Neustrians at Ambleve, south of Liege, in 716, and at Vincy, near Cambrai, in 717, and forced them to come to terms. In Austrasia he wrested the power from Plectrude, and took the title of mayor of the palace, thus prejudicing the interests of his nephews.

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  • The Westphalian circle which was formed at the same time comprised nearly all the rest of the modern province (including Mark) and the lands north of it between the Weser and the frontier of the Netherlands, also Verden, Schaumburg, Nassau, Wied, Lippe, Berg, Cleves, Julich, Liege, Bouillon and Cambrai.

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  • Charles V.rpressed in vain upon him the archbishopric of Cambrai, but Blosius studiously exerted himself in the reform of his monastery and in the composition of devotional works.

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  • Two attempts were made to assassinate him.3 After the second the prince regent commanded him to leave Paris and proceed to the headquarters at Cambrai.

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  • After the signature of the treaty of Cambrai on the 3rd of August 1529 Charles met Clement at Bologna and received from him the imperial crown and the iron crown of Lombardy.

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  • This was soon transferred to Cambrai, but brought back to its original seat about 1100.

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  • In 1508 he helped to promote ha Y~ the league of Cambrai, formed to despoil Venice, but he soon returned to his former policy of waging war against France, and he continued to do this until peace was made in 15f6.

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  • Feeble efforts to challenge his power in Italy provoked the sack of Rome in 1527; and the peace of Cambrai in 1529 was made without any reference to Wolsey or England's interests.

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  • His brothers, however, compelled him to divide the kingdom with them, and Soissons, together with Amiens, Arras, Cambrai, Therouanne, Tournai and Boulogne, fell to Chilperic's share, but on the death of Charibert in 567 his estates were augmented.

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  • whereas Cambrai, whose population was French, is the only city politically situated in Germany, where a commune came to be established.

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  • On the death of his father in 511 he received as his share of the kingdom the town of Soissons, which he made his capital, the cities of Laon, Noyon, Cambrai and Maastricht, and the lower course of the Meuse.

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  • 1603), seigneur de Balagny, who was at first a zealous member of the League, but made his submission to Henry IV., and received from him the principality of Cambrai and the baton of a marshal of France.

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  • His nephew in the sixth degree was the celebrated archbishop of Cambrai.

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  • 'Fenelon, Francois De Salignac De La Mothe' (1651-1715); French writer and archbishop of Cambrai, was born at the chateau of Fenelon in Perigord on the 6th of August 1651.

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  • Four years before, Fenelon had been appointed archbishop of Cambrai, one of the richest benefices in France.

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  • To Cambrai, accordingly, all his energies were now directed.

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  • Still better is Saint-Simon's portrait of Fenelon as he appeared about the time of his appointment to Cambrai - tall, thin, well-built, exceedingly pale, with a great nose, eyes from which fire and genius poured in torrents, a face curious and unlike any other, yet so striking and attractive that, once seen, it could not be forgotten.

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  • Modern authorities are Fenelon a Cambrai (Paris, 1885), by Emmanuel de Broglie; Fenelon, by Paul Janet (Paris, 1892); Bossuet et Fenelon, by L.

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  • After occupying the episcopal sees of Therouanne and Cambrai, he attained to the cardinalate at an early age.

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  • receiver of the gave, a kind of church rate) at Cambrai, and he seems to have made this city his usual place of residence.

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  • He was for some time bailiff of the cathedral chapter and then provost of Cambrai.

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  • 615), and Cumean (Cumine Ailbha, abbot of Iona); in the Frankish kingdom the most interesting work is the Penitential of Halitgar, bishop of Cambrai 7 from 817 to 831.

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  • He is found at the siege of Cambrai in 1337, and at the battle of Crecy in 1346.

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  • This peace was amplified at the treaty of Cambrai (August 1529) into a general European pacification in which England had no voice.

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  • It was solely through his efforts that Hungary did not accede to the league of Cambrai, was consistently friendly with Venice, and formed a family compact with the Habsburgs.

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  • Whatever Le Bon's offences, his condemnation was to a great extent due to the violent attacks of one of his political enemies, Armand Guffroy; and it is only just to remember that it was owing to his courage that Cambrai was saved from falling.

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  • His son, Emile le Bon, published a Histoire de Joseph le Bon et des tribunaux revolutionnaires d'Arras et de Cambrai (2nd ed., 2 vols., Arras, 1864).

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  • The name of his mother was Jeanne le Franc; she was the daughter of an innkeeper at Cambrai, who afterwards came to reside at Noyon.

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  • 540), first bishop of Arras and Cambrai, who restored Christianity in northern Gaul.

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  • The league of Cambrai (I 5o8) was his finest diplomatic achievement.

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  • Thus did France, menaced with disruption, embark upon a course of action imposed upon her by the harsh conditions of the treaty of Madrid otherwise little respectedand later by those of Cambrai (1529); but it was not till later, too late indeed, that it was defined and became a national policy.

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  • The death of Francis I.s mother, Louise of Savoy (who had been partly instrumental in arranging the peace of Cambrai), the replacement of Montmorency by the bellicose Chabot, and the advent to power of a Burgundian, Granvella, as Charles Vs prime minister, put an end to this double-faced policy, which attacked the Calvinists of France while supporting the Lutherans of Germany; made advances to Clement VII.

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  • but after the conquest of Savoy and Piedmont and a fruitless invasion of Provence by Charles V., it resulted in another truce, concluded at Nice, in the interview at Aigues-mortes, and in the old contradictory policy of the treaty of Cambrai.

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  • All the more remarkable spirits of the time, like prophets in Israel, denounced a tyranny which put Chamillart at the head of the finances because he played billiards well, and Villeroy in command of the armies although he was utterly untrustworthy; which sent the patriot Vauban into disgrace, banished from the court Catinat, the Pre Ia Pense, exiled to Cambrai the too clear sighted Fnelon, and suspected Racine of Jansenism and La Fontaine of independence.

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  • CAMBRAI, a town of northern France, capital of an arrondissement in the department of Nord, 37 m.

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  • Cambrai is situated on the right and eastern bank of the Scheldt (arms of which traverse the west of the town) and at one extremity of the canal of St Quentin.

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  • The former cathedral of Cambrai was destroyed after the Revolution.

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  • Cambrai is the seat of an archbishop and a sub-prefect, and has tribunals of first instance and of commerce, a board of tradearbitrators, a chamber of commerce and a branch of the Bank of France.

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  • The chief industry of Cambrai is the weaving of muslin (batiste) and other fine fabrics (see Cambric); wool-spinning and weaving, bleaching and dyeing, are carried on, as well as the manufacture of chicory, oil, soap, sausages and metal boxes.

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  • Cambrai is the ancient Nervian town of Camaracum, which is mentioned in the Antonine Itinerary.

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  • The League of Cambrai is the name given to the alliance of Pope Julius II., Louis XII., Maximilian I., and Ferdinand the Catholic against the Venetians in 1508; and the peace of Cambrai, or as it is also called, the Ladies' Peace, was concluded in the town in 1529 by Louise of Savoy, mother of Francis I., and Margaret of Austria, aunt of Charles V., in the name of these monarchs.

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  • The bishopric of Cambrai dates from the 5th century, and was raised in 1559 to the rank of an archbishopric, which continued till the Revolution, and has since been restored.

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  • Bouly, Histoire de Cambrai et du Cambresis (Cambria, 1843).

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  • He left his cloister on several occasions, and speaks of having visited Croyland, Worcester, Cambrai (I105) and Cluny (1132).

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