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calls

calls Sentence Examples

  • Just don't tell him I'm here when he calls, please!

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  • "Quinn kept pestering Howie to "go back" as he calls it, at least to his own life.

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  • Now tell me where the calls come from.

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  • No one responded to her calls, and she found a note on the refrigerator.

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  • She'll give up her husband who she practically calls stupid and this other Abbott person just so she can live.

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  • He hadn't discouraged the short telephone calls with Connie on his phone.

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  • Not personally but I think all calls are somehow monitored.

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  • Do you treat these calls differently from the usual calls?

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  • I tried to get a number to call her back but she said no incoming calls were allowed.

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  • A series of phone calls followed.

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  • "You wouldn't return my phone calls," she said, calming.

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  • I have some phone calls to make.

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  • I get a lot of phone calls from people snooping for more information but I tell them I print everything I know.

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  • He just calls room service.

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  • Lisa dropped her pad and pencil on the couch and crossed the room, wondering who might be calling her on his telephone and why Yancey was screening her calls.

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  • While my relationship with Martha LeBlanc, nee Rossi, dated back to our play pen years and kindergarten days, lately we've hiked different paths, reducing our contact to Christmas cards and once a month phone calls.

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  • Perhaps a female voice would offer less chance of a connection to our other calls.

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  • Three calls were telephoned from Boston, New York and Connecticut while two were made on untraceable phones.

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  • "I see you're getting some publicity," Mr. Cooms said during one of my calls.

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  • He suggested the center change their policy and not tape calls in the future.

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  • I must be on my way, as business calls.

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  • They gave me a special telephone where the calls come in.

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  • Her stammering made it obvious she'd taken at least some of the calls.

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  • I would think if they see the connection they might be leery of taking our calls.

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  • Though I detest getting back to a city, business calls and I respond.

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  • Brenda Washington who handled tip line calls in Omaha was murdered by this person.

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  • I'll be in touch but please don't trace my calls.

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  • He pretended he needed time to make a few more phone calls but I could see he was disappointed by the delay.

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  • My wife and I had promised each other to remain constantly in phone contact after the close calls in New Hampshire.

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  • I'm taking calls and dealing with issues almost 24/7.

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  • If one of our guys calls, I'll go.

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  • I've got parish calls to make this evening.

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  • She dialed each of them, distressed when both calls went to voicemail.

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  • Suspecting Ving had made a couple of hurried phone calls, she let the call go to voicemail.

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  • Soon as this Fitzgerald guy calls with the details, we'll have a better idea of the time frame.

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  • "I'm sure the bones will be the first thing Martha asks about when she calls," Cynthia said.

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  • While there was a comment that father Joe Calvia hadn't taken the news well, no details were given, and no calls from a hospital emergency room followed.

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  • While Cynthia took her shower, Dean made a few phone calls, asking for Ms. Dawkins, but after a dozen tries, he came up empty.

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  • And you make house calls?

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  • But no such calls came, and breathing became easier as the day moved along.

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  • Someone has to cover the calls.

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  • I wish I had someone to screen my calls.

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  • She shook her head and focused on her phone again, willing Logan to return one of her dozens of calls or texts.

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  • You sleep with a wacko, your boyfriend won't return your calls.

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  • Hannah gives her all her old clothes, which aren't cheap, and she never even returns Hannah's phone calls.

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  • Supper was pancakes and eggs, with conversation directed to the children, interrupted by confirming calls from ice climbers who would begin arriving on Thursday.

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  • The state boys figure I'm too close to you to be what somebody calls 'objective'.

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  • Then five minutes later, some guy calls asking for her, by name!

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  • Proper detective work calls for an orderly investigation.

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  • "She's not answering my calls," Dean said but Fred just waved off his response.

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  • Do you want to tell my why your best friend calls you the Ice Queen?

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  • I'll make some phone calls, but we should get started as soon as possible, even before we're granted permission.

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  • I'm going to make some phone calls.

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  • He hadn't responded to her calls in over three days.

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  • She all but dropped into the commo sector chair and issued mayday calls on the emergency net.

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  • We've heard mayday calls from several of them.

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  • It's not good when the big guy calls you.

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  • But I checked out the morning cab calls too.

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  • Dean asked Harrigan to work up his end of the report on the Byrne matter and make a few last minute return phone calls to neighbors, just to dot the I's.

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  • Three more telephone calls to Cece Baldwin were as unsuc­cessful as the first and Dean spent the rest of the evening poring over the Byrne file.

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  • He recounted unsuccessful calls to banks, credit bureaus and public bodies but refrained from eliciting Dean's help in these activities, nor did he seek any guidance.

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  • The phone rang twice, both calls from Fred's lady friends, who were anxious for his return.

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  • Our guy sees the ad and calls Gruber and comes out and looks the rig over.

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  • I ain't leaving the house—maybe make a few phone calls from time to time.

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  • Yeah. He calls a lot but I don't think Ma likes it—him being married and all.

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  • Yes. I don't want to be home tomorrow when that man calls.

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  • After a series of phone calls to Denver and some monstrous lies, Dean managed to finagle a slot on the bike tour, not an easy accomplishment given the short time before the popular event.

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  • So far, he's not returned phone calls.

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  • The first two nights he was out on calls half the night and gone to work all day.

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  • He made two calls; one for an ambulance and the other to Josh, who was instructed to direct the ambulance in to their house.

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  • A few close calls made it more of a challenge, as Claire bounced back to avoid Jenn's strategic strikes.

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  • He calls at weird hours and you must do what he says.

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  • "How do you want me to handle phone calls like that?" she asked.

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  • Although this "much-abused prelate," as Lecky calls him, was a firm supporter of the English government in Ireland, he was far from being a man of tyrannical or intolerant disposition.

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  • For Passennus Paullus (or as an Assisi inscription calls him C. Passennus Sergius Paullus Properties Blaesus), see Pliny (Ep. vi.

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  • 2) calls it KaXXLQ-ra (3poreav iroXicov.

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  • The second method, which he calls the "Promptuarium Multiplicationis" on account of its being the most expeditious of all for the performance of multiplications, involves the use of a number of lamellae or little plates of metal disposed in a box.

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  • Gibbon justly calls Beli- sarius the Africanus of New Rome.

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  • 62) Shallow calls Bardolph's companions "cavaleros."

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  • Demetrius calls his statues sublime, and at the same time precise.

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  • He states that Bishop Caldwell,' whom he calls " the great missionary scholar of the Dravidian tongue," showed that the south and western Australian tribes use almost the same words for " I, thou, he, we, you, as the Dravidian fishermen on the Madras coast."

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  • None of them has an idea of what the West calls morality, except the simple one of right or wrong arising out of property.

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  • 4, 10, 15, &c.) to burn the processus pyramidalis of the liver, which played a particularly significant role in hepatoscopy, calls for special mention.

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  • 11), the great comic dramatist of ancient Rome, was born at Sarsina in Umbria according to the testimony of Festus, who calls him Umber Sarsinas, and Jerome.

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  • The important T Lents of 1617 and 1618 at Grenoble were a prelude to a still more important apostolate in Paris, "the theatre of the world," as St Vincent de Paul calls it.

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  • The evidence of date derived from changes in the language is more difficult to formulate, and the inquiry calls for the most diligent use of scientific method and critical judgment.

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  • In a large exchange a number of operators are necessary to attend to calls.

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  • Calls are registered by pressing a key, which connects a battery through a position meter of very low resistance to the socket of the line jack, thereby furnishing the necessary energy to the meter.

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  • The position meter just mentioned is common to all the cords on one position and records all completed calls handled at the position.

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  • Some administrations, in addition to employing the ordinary position meter, use a second one for registering ineffective calls.

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  • of the calls originated at an exchange are for subscribers connected to other exchanges, and in these cases the junction plant forms a considerable fraction of the whole equipment.

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  • Trunk or long-distance working is complicated by the necessity for recording all calls.

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  • The system of the British Post Office is worked as follows: A subscriber desiring a long-distance connexion calls up his local exchange in the ordinary way, and the operator there, being informed that a trunk connexion is desired, extends the subscriber's line to the Post Office by means of a record circuit.

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  • Particulars of calls are now passed between trunk centres to a great extent over telegraph circuits superposed upon the trunk lines.

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  • This arrangement permits particulars of calls to be passed over lines while conversations are in progress.

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  • Only calls originated by a subscriber pass through the selector switch (first selector) provided for his sole use; the calls incoming to him pass through one or other of the various connector switches upon which his circuit is multipled.

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  • The movements of the shaft are controlled by relays and electro-magnets which operate in response to the action of the subscriber whose telephone is fitted with a 'calling mechanism which, when the subscriber calls, earths the line a certain number of times for each figure in the number of the wanted subscriber.

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  • As the cost of the service varies in proportion to the amount of use, the toll rate is more scientific, and it has the further advantage of discouraging the unnecessary use of the instrument, which causes congestion of traffic at busy hours and also results in lines being " engaged " when serious business calls are made.

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  • The tariff for unlimited use has to be made very high to cover the cost of the additional burdens thrown upon the service, and it only works economically to the individual subscriber who has an exceptionally large number of calls originating from his instrument.

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  • The subscriber pays a fixed annual rent which covers a certain number of free out - ward calls, say boo; additional calls he purchases in advance in blocks of several hundred at so much per hundred, the price being reduced as the number increases.

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  • A reduction has been made in the charges for trunk calls at night, and calls for single periods of three minutes are allowed at half the ordinary rates between 7 p.m.

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  • No city calls itself either Guelpi or Ghibelline till it has expelled one-half of its inhabitants; for each party is resolved to constitute the state according to its own conception, and the affirmation of the, one programme is the negation of the other.

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  • 13 [27]) calls him vetustissimus auctor annalium.

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  • What James Martineau calls A Study of Religion is really in the main a re-statement of old theistic arguments.'

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  • A second type of hedonism - less ignoble, but perhaps also less logical - calls men to seek the happiness of others.

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  • Jones, almost as merciless as MacTaggart, calls this procedure by the hard names of agnosticism and dualism.

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  • C. Fraser calls "reasonable faith"?

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  • Green calls this king, had not, however, given up the struggle, and he was still in the field when he was taken ill, dying in Newark castle on the 19th of October 1216.

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  • Gardiner calls the scheme "a permanent organization for making war against the king."

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  • Grote calls attention to the contrast between Plato's and Aristotle's way of conceiving the gradations of mind (Aristotle, ii.

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  • The evolution of mind (the positive pole) proceeds by 1 Kant calls the doctrine of the transmutation of species " a hazardous fancy of the reason."

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  • Of the other German philosophers immediately following Kant, there is only one who calls for notice here, namely, Arthur Schopenhauer.

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  • 2.12, calls it longarum regina viarum.

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  • Jerome (the authority for the date of his death) calls him Pythagoricus et magus.

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  • These are, according to Meyer, acicular crystals, which he calls tricizites.

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  • Engler therefore calls it, 4rcio-Tertiary.

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  • Nevertheless, after much hesitation, he took what he himself calls the most mistaken step of his life, and in 1847 entered the priesthood.

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  • When the bunting at the end of the stray line passes his hand, he calls to his assistant to turn the glass, and allows the line to pay out freely.

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  • When all the sand has run through, the assistant calls "Stop!"

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  • (Whether one calls the unknowable a revealed mystery or an unexplained and inexplicable fact makes little difference.) William Paley (1743-1805) borrows from many writers; he borrows Lardner's learning and Butler's " particular evidence for Christianity," viz.

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  • The earliest communications were carried on by means of "raps," or, as Sir William Crookes calls them, "percussive sounds."

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  • The houses, mostly white with coloured roofs, are generally built of wood and iron, and have glazed porches, gay with fuchsias and pelargoniums. Government House, grey, stone-built and slated, calls to mind a manse in Shetland or Orkney.

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  • He calls to the waters of the sea and pours them on the earth's surface (chap. v.

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  • William Gilpin calls the cypress an architectural tree: "No Italian scene," says he, "is perfect without its tall spiral form, appearing as if it were but a part of the picturesquely disposed edifices which rise from the middle ground against the distant landscape."

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  • Hampshire, Kent, Wiltshire and Dorsetshire formed the successive theatres of what he calls his " bloodless and inglorious campaigns."

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  • He has recorded one or two interesting notes on Turin, Genoa, Florence and other towns at which halt was made on his route; but Rome was the great object of his pilgrimage, and the words in which he has alluded to the feelings with which he Her letters to Walpole about Gibbon contain some interesting remarks by this ' ` aveugle clairvoyante," as Voltaire calls her; but they belong to a later period (1777).

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  • Pliny, on the other hand, calls it Sabine.

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  • The marble urn containing the body of the poet still rests at Ravenna, where what Byron calls "a little cupola more neat than solemn" has been erected over it.

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  • Dio Cassius calls it the day of Cronos.

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  • His legendary presentation as the " Friend of God," like Abraham, to whom as to Cretan Moses the law was revealed on the holy mountain, calls myths.

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  • The extreme south-west part of the continent constitutes a separate zoological district, comprising Arabia, Palestine and southern Persia, and reaching, like the hot desert botanical tract, to Baluchistan and Sind; it belongs to what Dr Sclater calls the Ethiopian region, which extends over Africa, south of the Atlas.

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  • He calls them "natural judgments," "natural suggestions," "judgments of nature," "judgments immediately inspired by our constitution," "principles of our nature," "first principles," "principles of common sense."

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  • 2, 120 ff.; Hagen, in Delitzsch and Haupt, Beitrage zur Assyriologie, ii., 1894, where the chronicle of Nabonidus is also published anew with a much improved translation) he calls his ancestors, Teispes, Cyrus I.

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  • From then he calls himself "king of the Persians."

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  • The Romana, or, as he himself calls it, De summa temporum vel origine actibusque gentis Romanorum, was composed in 551.

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  • He has only one symbol (written somewhat like a final sigma) for an unknown quantity, which he calls apc0µ6s (defined as "an undefined number of units"); the symbol may be a contraction of the initial letters ap, as A Y, K Y, D Y O, &c., are for the powers of the unknown (Suvaµcs, square; icu(30s, cube; Svva,uo& va i ccs, fourth power, &c.).

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  • Corresponding to Proserpine as goddess of the dead is the old Norse goddess Hel (Gothic Halja), whom Saxo Grammaticus calls Proserpine.

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  • For these problems we want, not a few old-established general principles which no one seriously calls in question, but genuine constructive and organizing capacity, aided by scientific and detailed knowledge of particular institutions, industries and classes.

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  • The next king, whom Justin calls Priapatius, ruled 15 years (about 190-175); his successor, Phraates I., subjected the mountainous tribe of the Mardi (in the Elburz).

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  • In part 1 of his book he develops what he calls the "true or anthropological essence of religion."

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  • Feuerbach denied that he was rightly called an atheist, but the denial is merely verbal: what he calls "theism" is atheism in the ordinary sense.

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  • The "Life" calls into existence in the visible world a series of three great Helpers, Hibil, Shithil and Anosh (late Judaeo-Babylonian transformations of the well-known names of the book of Genesis), the guardians of souls.

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  • The war may be studied from the military point of view as an extreme example of what Clausewitz calls "war with a restricted aim."

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  • 4 Merrem, as did many others in his time, calls the coracoids "clavicultiae "; but it is now well understood that in birds the real claviculae form the furcula or " merry-thought."

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  • In 1180 Jean Beleth, of the diocese of Amiens, calls the festival of the sub-deacons festum stultorum (Migne, Patrol.

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  • The Greek monk Cosmas Indicopleustes, who visited India about 530, describes the ruler of the country, whom he calls Gollas, as a White Hun king, who exacted an oppressive tribute with the help of a large army of cavalry and war elephants.

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  • (d) The vampire is a particular form of demon which calls for some notice.

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  • He refused calls to churches in Dublin and Rotterdam, and in 1766 declined an invitation brought him by Richard Stockton to go to America as president of the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University); but he accepted a second invitation and left Paisley in May 1768.

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  • His fundamental physical maxims are matter and force; the latter he calls virtus, species, imago agentis, and by numberless other names.

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  • Its signification was authoritatively defined by the Council of Trent in the following words: "If any one shall say that, in the Holy Sacrament of the Eucharist there remains, together with the Body and Blood of Our Lord Jesus Christ, the substance of the Bread and Wine, and shall deny that wonderful and singular conversion of the whole substance of the Bread into (His) Body and of the Wine into (His) Blood, the species only of the Bread and Wine remaining - which conversion the Catholic Church most fittingly calls Transubstantiation - let him be anathema."

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  • Options are single puts" or " calls ") or double (that Swaddles."

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  • is, alternative " puts " or " calls ").

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  • The struggle of papacy and empire paralysed Europe, and even in France itself there were few ready to answer the calls for help which St Louis sent home from Acre.

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  • 473, line 14) calls OepaorEla, and his use of words generally accords better with the latter meaning.

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  • These are The Reign of Christ, wherein Christ as an earthly king calls his subjects to war: and Two Standards, one of Jesus Christ and the other of Lucifer.

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  • II seq.) calls Ovp33c(3evr-63 (Urbs vetus, the modern Orvieto).

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  • On the third, fourth and fifth calls for loans the St.

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  • Siegfried is piqued, and calls them back to offer them the ring.

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  • The dying Siegfried calls on Briinnhilde to awaken, and asks " Who hath locked thee again in sleep?"

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  • This is the last work Wagner calls by the title of Opera.

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  • He now formed the design of joining the Austrian army, for the purpose of campaigning against the Turks, and so crossed over from Dover to Calais with Gibbon, who, writing to his friend Lord Sheffield, calls his fellow-passenger "Mr SecretaryColonel-Admiral-Philosopher Thompson."

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  • The sun-god Shamash calls upon Eabani to remain with Gilgamesh, who pays him all honours in his palace at Erech.

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  • He calls this the second rise of Methodism, the first being at Oxford in November 1729.

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  • p. 122), who calls him the son of Oromazdes.

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  • He calls himself most frequently manthran (" prophet"), ratu (" spiritual authority"), and saoshyant ("` the coming helper" - that is to say, when men come to be judged according to their deeds).

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  • The characteristic feature of the imitative act, at the instinctive level, is that the presentation to sight or hearing calls forth a mode of behaviour of like nature to, or producing like results to, that which affords the stimulus.

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  • 1) calls the wealthy women of Samaria, who oppressed the poor, " kine of Bashan."

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  • At Göttingen he remained, declining all further calls elsewhere, as to Erlangen, Kiel, Halle, Tubingen, Jena and Leipzig, until his death, which occurred on the 4th of February 1855.

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  • 1712), who flourished under Ibrahim and Mahommed IV., calls for a little more attention.

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  • The lesser range, nearer the sea, known to the French as the Maritime Atlas, calls for little detailed notice.

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  • 19) calls it not a city, but a fortress, implying that it had none of the institutions of the Graeco-Roman city.

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  • The last stage, that in which the folds of the second segment are already reflected over the first, he calls the Typembryo.

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  • Machiavelli calls luxury, simony and cruelty the three dear friends and handmaids of the same pope.'

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  • Indeed Mechnikov, to whom we owe much of our knowledge of these forms, calls them "creeping Nematoda."

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  • 2) expressly calls him a sophist.

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  • 12 the prophet, speaking now for the first time in Yahweh's name, calls the people to a solemn fast at the sanctuary, and invites the intercession of the priests.

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  • The reason which gives a priori principles Kant calls "Pure Reason" (cf.

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  • 116), no doubt rightly, calls the founder of the colony Aristoteles, while Justin (xiii.

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  • von Baer in 1828, 5 Muller calls the attention of naturalists to the important fact, that while all the Squamata possess an amnion and an allantois, these structures are absent in the embryos of all the Nuda.

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  • He calls it salsugoterrae.

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  • 40) calls the chief priest summits pontifex, probably the pater patrum who had general supervision of all the initiates in one city, and states that he could marry but once.

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  • Symeon of Durham (854) calls it Edwinesburch, and includes the church of St Cuthbert within the bishopric of Lindisfarne.

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  • Its position, at the point where the Volscian Hills reach the coast, leaving no space for passage between them and the sea, commanding the Pomptine Marshes (urbs pron g in paludes, as Livy calls it) and possessing a small harbour, was one of great strategic importance; and it thus appears very early in Roman history.

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  • His short tenure of this office calls for no remark.

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  • The concessions to Nominalism which such views embody make them representative of what Haureau calls " the Peripatetic section of the Realistic school."

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  • Abelard, Peter Lombard, Gilbert de la Porree and Peter of Poitiers he calls the " four labyrinths of France."

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  • 8) calls himself on his coins " Mazdai, who is [placed] over the country beyond the Euphrates and Cilicia."

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  • 829a) calls the lotus iroav Tlva Kai bi -ccv.

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  • Putting q=a+,61+yj+bk, Hamilton calls a the scalar part of q, and denotes it by Sq; he also writes Vq for 01+yj+b �, which is called the vector part of q.

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  • He became an associate of Jay Gould in the development and sale of railways; and in 1863 removed to New York City, where, besides speculating in railway stocks, he became a money-lender and a dealer in "puts" and "calls" and "privileges," and in 1874 bought a seat in the New York Stock Exchange.

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  • The Acts of Thomas is now generally recognized to be an original Syriac work (or " novel," as Burkitt calls it), although a Greek version also exists.

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  • In the colophon also the compiler (as he calls himself) excuses the errors of orthography.

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  • The Key of Truth regards the water as a washing of the body, and sees in the rite no opus operatum, but an essentially spiritual rite in which "the king releases certain rulers a from the prison of sin, the Son calls them to himself and comforts them with great words, and the Holy Spirit of the king forthwith comes and crowns them, and dwells in them for ever."

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  • Sainte-Beuve calls Terence the bond of union between Roman urbanity and the Atticism of the Greeks, and adds that it was in the r 7th century, when French literature was most truly Attic, that he was most appreciated.

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  • He holds that new growths arise, both before birth or at any subsequent period of life, by the separation of cells or clumps of cells from their normal position, and that in health there is a balance between the various tissues and tissue elements regulated by what he calls the " tissue-tension " of the part, i.e.

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  • Wroth, Catalogue of the Coins of Parthia, p. 14 seq.; till then he only calls himself "the great king Arsakes") shows that he tried to conciliate his Greek subjects.

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  • The energy with which Ulysses, after the slaughter of the suitors, calls to Euryclea for "fire and sulphur" to purge (literally "fumigate") the dininghall from the pollution of their blood (Od.

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  • The anonymous Chorographer of Ravenna calls the place Londinium Augusta, and doubtless this was the form adopted.

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  • It is recorded that during the course of his lifetime he had received repeated calls to almost every university in Germany (e.g.

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  • Baber always calls the range Hindu Kush, and the way in which he speaks of it shows clearly that it was a range that was meant, not a solitary pass or peak (according to modern local use, as alleged by Elphinstone and Burnes).

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  • Howel Dda, king of West Wales, Owen, king of Cumbria, Constantine, king of the Scots, and Ealdred of Bamburgh, and henceforth he calls himself "rex totius Britanniae."

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  • (d) In course of time the natural associations get loosened and intermixed, and this calls forth the elaborate police legislation of the later Anglo-Saxon kings.

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  • He made Erech his capital and calls himself king of Kengi.

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  • The narrative was first printed at Pesaro in 1513, in what Apostolo Zeno calls lingua inculta e rozza.

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  • It begins with a description of the old campingground, before which the poet calls on his companion to stop, while he bewails the traces of those who have left for other places.

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  • Another explanation, which appears first in Jewish authors of the middle ages and has found wide acceptance in recent times, derives the name from the causative of the verb; He (who) causes things to be, gives them being; or calls events into existence, brings them to pass; with many individual modifications of interpretation - creator, lifegiver, fulfiller of promises.

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  • His reading ranges from Arabian philosophers and naturalists to Aristotle, Eusebius, Cicero, Seneca, Julius Caesar (whom he calls Julius Celsus), and even the Jew, Peter Alphonso.

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  • Inscriptions mentioning the ForoClodienses have come to light on the spot; and an inscription of the Augustan period, which probably stood over the door of a villa, calls the place Pausilypon - a name justified by the beauty of the site.

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  • In Hesiod it is chiefly confined to those who fought before Troy and Thebes; in view of their supposed divine origin, he calls them demi-gods (µLO€ot).

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  • Although a little engraving on copper has been practised in Japan of late years, it is of no artistic value, and the only branch of the art which calls for recognition is the Engraving.

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  • Viracocha too had a cosmic position; an old Peruvian hymn calls him " world-former, world-animator."

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  • century in Europe, in which what seems a new spring of national and individual life calls out an idealizing retrospect of the past.

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  • He calls the people to repentance, and he enforces the call by proclaiming the approach of Yahweh in judgment against Lhe sorcerers, the adulterers, the false swearers, the oppressors of the poor, the orphan and the stranger.

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  • The process was usually explained as the result of the action of a spirit, angel or devil, and many unessential formulae, invocations, "calls," written charms with cabbalistic signs, and fumigations, were employed.

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  • He calls it " the beautiful confession " to which Christ Jesus had borne witness before Pontius Pilate, and charges Timothy before God, who quickeneth all things, to keep this commandment.

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  • Tertullian calls the creed the " token " which the African Church shares with the Roman (de Praescr.

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  • Its main characteristic is perhaps best hit off by Charles Lamb when he calls it "genteel."

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  • Essex (Letter to Sir Philip Stapleton, Rushworth Collection) calls him "an honest, judicious and stout man," an estimate of Deane borne out by Clarendon's "bold and excellent officer" (book xiv.

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  • i.) calls him Oarses.

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  • During his archbishopric Dr Temple was deeply distressed by the divisions which were weakening the Anglican Church, and many of his most memorable sermons were calls for unity.

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  • de Paris (1748), Pierre Bouguer describes an instrument which he calls a heliometer.

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  • He had many "calls" to other churches, but chose to remain at Berwick.

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  • 1141) in a battle which the historian Ibn al-Athir calls the greatest defeat that Islam had ever undergone in those regions.

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  • Friar Odoric, about 1326, visited the country still ruled by the prince whom he calls Prester John; "but," he says, "as regards him, not one-hundredth part is true that is told of him."

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  • The rest of his life calls for little notice except that at the time of the July Revolution of 1830, which unseated the elder branch of the Bourbons, he urged Louis Philippe, duke of Orleans, to take the throne offered to him by popular acclaim.

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  • James calls his work the "last word" of the earlier stage of psychology, but he was in reality the pioneer of the new.

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  • Augustine speaks of the salt administered to catechumens before baptism and of their exorcism as sacraments; and as late as 1129 Godefrid so calls the salt and water, oil and chrism, the ring and pastoral staff used in ordinations.

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  • 88) calls the rite of washing feet a sacrament, because without it we have no portion with Christ (John xiii.

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  • He calls me a chatterer, although he himself is more talkative than a magpie."

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  • Krenkel (Josephus and Lucas, Leipzig, 18 94, p. 97) is that Josephus does not mean to imply that Abila was the only possession of Lysanias, and that he calls it the tetrarchy or kingdom of Lysanias because it was the last remnant of the domain of Lysanias which remained under direct Roman administration until the time of Agrippa.

    0
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  • A collection of all the phonetic elements exhausts the .standard alphabets and calls for new letters.

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  • Leland calls attention to the decay of a great number of houses.

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  • Thus there seems to be a measure of uncertainty as to what the Church of Rome now calls " dogma " - only in part relieved by 1 Three writers mentioned in Wetzer's and Welte's Kirchenlexikon.

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  • What he calls heresy, under the sanction of excommunication or that more formal excommunication known as anathema, is heresy.

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  • Cicero calls his style "copious and polished," Quintilian, "sweet, pure and flowing"; Longinus says he was "the most Homeric of historians"; Dionysius, his countryman, prefers him to Thucydides, and regards him as combining in an extraordinary degree the excellences of sublimity, beauty and the true historical method of composition.

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  • When the fleet was constructed on the Hydaspes, Onesicritus was appointed chief pilot (in his vanity he calls himself commander), and in this capacity accompanied Nearchus on the voyage from the mouth of the Indus to the Persian gulf.

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    0
  • Gesner's figure of the aurochs, or as he calls it "thur," given in the Icones to his History of Animals, was probably adapted from Herberstein's.

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  • p. 307) calls him an "inextricable compound parthenogenetic deity"; and finds, in the fact that his chief festival (when his paste idol was shot through with an arrow, and afterwards eaten) was at the winter solstice, ground for believing that he was at first a nature-god, whose life and death were connected with the year's.

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  • He addressed a letter to a person named Vussin, whom he calls fili and mi nate, but, as Vussin is not mentioned in documents in which his interests as Einhard's son would have been concerned, it is possible that he was only a young man in whom he took a special interest.

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  • The most recent and elaborate commentator even calls him an "ethnologist."

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  • But these " private assemblies of the professors in these hard times," as Strype calls them, were congregational simply by accident.

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  • 13), who had a high opinion of his work, calls him the miniature Thucydides " (pusillus Thucydides).

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  • Though it has resisted all attempts to reduce it to an ordered scheme, and probably was not written on any set plan, still it is possible roughly to indicate its contents: after the prologue and introductory chapter setting forth St Benedict's intention, follow instructions to the abbot on the manner in which he should govern his monastery (2, 3); next comes the ascetical portion of the Rule, on the chief monastic virtues (4-7); then the regulations for the celebration of the canonical office, which St Benedict calls "the Work of God" or "the divine work," his monks' first duty, "of which nothing is to take precedence" (8-20); faults and punishments (23-30); the cellarer and property of the monastery (31,32); community of goods (33, 34); various officials and daily life (21, 22, 35-57); reception of monks (58-61); miscellaneous (62-73).

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  • In these chapters pre-eminently appears that element of "discretion," as St Gregory calls it, or humanism as it would now be termed, which without doubt has.

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  • Declining calls to Breslau, Tubingen, and thrice to Bonn, Hug continued at Freiburg for upwards of thirty years, taking an occasional literary tour to Munich, Paris or Italy.

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  • On the fourth day, Jesus Himself calls Philip and Nathanael.

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  • 50): Jesus withdraws beyond Jordan, and then comes to Bethany, His friend Lazarus being buried three days; proclaims Himself the Resurrection and the Life; and calls Lazarus back to life.

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  • And the Ethiopians were not without successes, for on the Greek inscription of Axum (c. the middle of the 4th century) King Aeizanes calls himself " king of the Axumites, the Homerites, and Raidan, and of the Ethiopians, Sabaeans, and Silee."

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  • - When a bar or rod is of considerable cross-section, a transversal disturbance calls into play forces due to the strain of the material much more important than the forces due to any tension which is ordinarily applied.

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  • Pierre Eyquem, Montaigne's father, had been engaged in commerce (a herring-merchant Scaliger calls him, and his grandfather Ramon had certainly followed that trade), had filled many municipal offices in Bordeaux, and had served under Francis I.

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  • States which have, by treaty or otherwise, parted with some portion of their sovereignty and formed new political units: what Herbert Spencer calls "compound political heads," or, to use Austin's expression, "composite states."

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    0
  • Some of them were visible in the time of Pausanias, who calls them the places where Atreus and his sons kept their treasures.

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  • In this "mill," as he calls it, Erasmus continued to grind incessantly for eight years.

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  • Etienne Dolet calls him "enemy of Cicero, and jealous detractor of the French name."

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    0
  • About 400 the Notitia Galliarum calls it a civitas (so that it then had a municipal administration of its own), and reckons it as first among those of the Viennese.

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  • In Babylonia under the last empire (except in the case of Nebuchadrezzar, who calls himself patesi siri, "exalted priest," Q.I.B.

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  • 7) calls him Claudius Felix - or more probably of the empress Antonia.

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  • 4, 9) calls it A pocryph of Isaiah - 'AlrOKpucbov `Haalov, Epiphanius (Haer.

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  • Hsiian Tswang passed through Kashgar (which he calls Ka-sha) on his return journey from India to China.

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  • Marco Polo visited the city, which he calls Cascar, about 1275 and left some notes on it.

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  • Spenser, in "Colin Clout's come home again," calls him with a spice of raillery "old Palaemon" who "sung so long until quite hoarse he grew."

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  • Afterwards he went to Rome and there revised the text of the Gospel and reissued it for the Church in that city; this is the Western (or, as Blass calls it, Roman) text of the Gospel.

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  • The governor is commander-in-chief of the militia when it is not called into the service of the United States; he may remit fines and forfeitures, commute sentences, and grant reprieves and pardons, except in cases of impeachment; and he calls extraordinary sessions of the legislature.

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  • authoritative character which is felt to be inherent in our sense of right and wrong - for what Butler calls the "supremacy of conscience."

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  • X.) 1 Professor Bastable calls attention to the interesting fact that the proposal of an export duty on wool and the justification of a temporary monopoly to joint-stock companies both appear for the first time in the edition of 1784.

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  • Philostratus calls a Hierapolis, i 1 apxaIa Nivos but it must not be confounded with the Egyptian NI-y, Assur-bani-pal NI, the frontier city to the east of Egypt's greatest extension, where Tethmosis (Thothmes) III.

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  • He entreats " the Lord of Powers to fill this sacrifice with his Power and Participation," and calls the elements a " living sacrifice, a bloodless offering."

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  • In the West, Augustine, like Eusebius and Theodoret, calls the elements signs or symbols of the body and blood signified in them; yet he argues that Christ " took and lifted up his own body in his hands when he took the bread."

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  • 2 It is then in connexion with the history of inheritance and adoption, and of the gradual evolution from societies held together only by blood-kinship to societies consolidated on other bases, especially on that of local contiguity, that ancestor-worship chiefly calls for investigation.

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  • One of his arguments, however, calls for special criticism, - his assertion that it is selfevident that nothing that has a beginning can be without a cause is an unwarranted assumption of the very point at issue.

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  • Plutarch, who calls him, " the Philosopher," quotes Strabo's Memoirs (Luc. 28), and cites him as an historian (Sulla, 26).

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  • Josephus, who constantly calls him " the Cappadocian," often quotes from him, but does not mention the title of the work.

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  • In dealing with what the Nicomachean Ethics (Book vi.) calls intellectual virtues, but the Magna Moralia (i.

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  • Aristotle calls all these investigations sciences (brcaT7)µac); but he also uses the term " sciences " in a narrower sense in consequence of a classification of their objects, which pervades his writings, into things necessary and things contingent, as follows: (A) The necessary (TO iv5Ex6yEvov i.AAws 'xEtv), what must be; subdivided into: (1) Absolutely (airX&os), e.g.

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  • On the other hand, it does not follow that Aristotle would have regarded the Topics, which he calls " the investigation " and " the investigation of dialectic " (7) Jrpayyareta, Top, i.

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  • 30, 46 a 30), or the De Interpretatione, which he calls " the present theory " (rf j s 'Dv Oecopias, De Int.

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  • Consequently, the universal essence of a species of substances is not one and the same eternal essence in all the individuals of a species but only similar, and is not substance as Aristotle calls it in the Metaphysics, inconsistently with his own doctrine of substance, but is a whole number of similar substances, e.g.

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  • 89, Citizen Eusebe Salverte calls attention to the poem "De Ponderibus et Mensuris" generally ascribed to Rhemnius Fannius Palaemon, and consequently 300 years older than Hypatia, in which the hydrometer is described and attributed to Archimedes.

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  • In one of his letters home at this period he calls the campaign a "tissue of mismanagement, blunders, errors, ignorance and arrogance"; and outspoken criticism such as this brought him many bitter enemies throughout his career, who made the most of undeniable faults of character.

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  • The story is told by William of Tyre, who calls the place Quart Piert or Pierre, but it is a mere romance.

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  • (c. 1 100 B.C.) calls his predecessors,.

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  • In the meantime, however, his Indian career seemed likely to be sacrificed to the calls of warfare in another quarter.

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  • The prestige enjoyed by the French language, which, in the 14th century, the author of the Maniere de language calls "le plus bel et le plus gracious language et plus noble parler, apres latin d'escole, qui soft au monde et de touz genz mieulx prisee et amee que nul autre (quar Dieux le fist si douce et amiable principalement a l'oneur et loenge de luy mesmes.

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  • In spite of the many calls upon his time he produced a considerable amount of literary work, usually on classical or Scottish subjects, including some poems and songs of no mean order.

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  • Thus a West African native who wants a suhman takes a rudely-cut wooden image or a stone, a root of a plant, or some red earth placed in a pan, and then he calls on a spirit of Sasabonsum ("a genus of deities, every member of which possesses identical characteristics") to enter the object prepared, promising it offerings and worship. If a spirit consents to take up its residence in the object, a low hissing sound is heard, and the suhman is complete.

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  • Accordingly, he calls these and all other processes " psychophysical "; and as he recognized two parallel energies, physical and psychical, differing only as outer and inner aspects of the same energy, he called this " psychophysical energy."

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  • His " will " is instinct, impulsive feeling, a " will to live," not indeed unconscious, but often subconscious, without idea, without reasoning about ends and means, yet pursuing ends - in short, what he calls, after K.

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  • Now, the point of Schuppe is that, so far as they agree, individual consciousnesses are not merely similar, but the same in essence; and this supposed one and the same essence of consciousness in different individuals is what he calls consciousness in general (Bewusstsein iiberhaupt).

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  • He uses this psychical causality to carry out his voluntarism into detail, regarding it as an agency of will directed to ends, causing association and understanding, and further acting on a principle which he calls the heterogony of ends; remarking very truly that each particular will is directed to particular ends, but that beyond these ends effects follow as unexpected consequences, and that this heterogony produces social effects which we call custom.

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  • In working out this process he supposes that reason throws into consciousness a priori categories, synthetic predicates a priori, or, as he also calls them, " dialectic percepts."

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  • What Hume called repeated sequence Pearson calls " routine " of perceptions, and, like his master, holds that cause is an antecedent stage in a routine of perceptions; while he also acknowledges that his account of matter leads him very near to John Stuart Mill's definition of matter as " a permanent possibility of sensations."

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  • He calls each of these, as existing apart, a thing per se'(Ka6' aur6).

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  • But when we examine his theory of the non-ego, and find that it resolves matter into active force and this into animated activity, identifies law with reason, and calls God absolute substance, we see at once that this spiritual realism is not very far from idealism.

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  • Renouvier (q.v.)has worked out an idealism which he calls "Neo-criticisme," rejecting the thing-in-itself, while limiting knowledge to phenomena constituted by a priori categories.

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  • 3), calls him a Libyan by birth, and if the statement of Sozomen, a church historian of the 5th century, is to be trusted, he was, as a member of the Alexandrian church, connected with the Meletian schism

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  • Of the special regard which Henry seemed to have conceived for him Latimer took advantage to pen the famous letter on the free circulation of the Bible, an address remarkable, not only for what Froude justly calls " its almost unexampled grandeur," but for its striking repudiation of the aid of temporal weapons to defend the faith, "for God," he says, "will not have it defended by man or man's power, but by His Word only, by which He hath evermore defended it, and that by a way far above man's power and reason."

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  • In Mauritius the articles of the French law, summarized above, are still nominally in force; but in practice each side calls its own expert evidence, as in England.

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  • 'How much of Mesopotamia was involved in the revolt of what the Persian inscription calls Assyria (Athur) is not clear.

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  • 2.117) calls him an authority on the use of Latin words.

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  • 89) calls it the " red sea," meaning probably the xxi.

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  • was not only king of Tyre, as the Assyrian inscription calls him, but of Sidon too; and further, that by this time Tyre had established a colony in Cyprus (q.v.).

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  • When Lysias, in his Olympiacus (spoken here), calls it " the fairest spot of Greece," he was doubtless thinking also - or perhaps chiefly - of the masterpieces which art, in all its forms, had contributed to the embellishment of this national sanctuary.

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  • He was born at Comum, not (as is sometimes supposed) at Verona: it is only as a native of Gallia Transpadana that he calls Catullus of Verona his conterraneus, or fellow-countryman, not his municeps, or fellow-townsman (Praef.

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  • The " vulgar and more general story," as Ashmole calls it, is that of the countess of Salisbury's garter.

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  • 74) contains two statements: - (i) the fact that the eclipse did actually take place during a battle between the Medes and the Lydians, that it was a total eclipse (Herodotus calls it a " night battle "), that it caused a cessation of hostilities and led to a lasting peace between the contending nations; (2) that Thales had foretold the eclipse to the Ionians, and fixed the year in which it actually did take place.

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  • He has a fivefold wergild, summons the nobles and clergy for purposes of deliberation, calls out the host, administers justice and regulates finance.

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    0
  • The actual name given to the mysterious Jew varies in the different versions: the original pamphlet calls him Ahasver, and this has been followed in most of the literary versions, though it is difficult to imagine any Jew being called by the name of the typical anti-Semitic king of the Book of Esther.

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  • A variant of the same story was known to Guido Bonati, an astronomer quoted by Dante, who calls his hero or villain Butta Deus because he struck Jesus.

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    0
  • This mountainous character and the absence of any tolerable harbour - Pliny, in enumerating the islands of the Aegean, calls it "importuosissima omnium" - prevented it from ever attaining to any political importance, but it enjoyed great celebrity from its connexion with the worship of the Cabeiri, a mysterious triad of divinities, concerning whom very little is known, but who appear, like all the similar deities venerated in different parts of Greece, to have been a remnant of a previously existing Pelasgic mythology.

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  • There are some very evident disadvantages of excessive height; for instance, that the weight of an excessively high column of solid coke, ore and limestone tends to crush the coke and jam the charge in the lower and narrowing part of the furnace, and that the frictional resistance of a long column calls for a greater consumption of power for driving the blast up through it.

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  • In fact, no one can listen to the cheery sound of the little bird's ordinary calls with anything but a hopeful feeling.

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  • Cicero calls Ahala's deed a glorious one, but, whether Maelius entertained any ambitious projects or not, his summary execution was an act of murder, since by the Valerio-Horatian laws the dictator was bound to allow the right of appeal.

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  • The internal façade of the Palazzo Ginetti is finely decorated with stucco, and has a curious detached baroque staircase by Martino Lunghi the younger, which Burckhardt calls unique if only for the view to which its arched colonnades serve as a frame.

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  • The great act of service is the public common celebration of the canonical office, the " work of God " he calls it, to which " nothing is to be preferred " (Reg.

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  • In the 1803 edition he introduced the new element of the preventive check supplied by what he calls "moral restraint," and is thus enabled to "soften some of the harshest conclusions" at which he had before arrived.

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  • "An old ruynous thinge," as the Elizabethan poet Churchyard calls it even in the 16th century, it was inhabited, apparently, about 1390, by Myfanwy Fechan of the Tudor Trevor family and beloved by the bard Howel ab Einion Llygliw, whose ode to her is still extant.

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  • Accordingly the Pensees have always been a favourite exploring ground, not to say a favourite field of battle, to persons who take an interest in their problems. Speaking generally, their tendency is towards the combating of scepticism by a deeper scepticism, or, as Pascal himself calls it, Pyrrhonism, which occasionally goes the length of denying the possibility of any natural theology.

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  • This is what Epicurus calls explaining what we do not see by what we do see.

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  • Meanwhile, in spite of the matricular contributions, the calls on imperial finance had steadily increased, and up to 1908 were continually met to a large extent by loans, involving a continual growth of the imperial debt, which in 1907 amounted to 3643 millions of marks.

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  • Geoffrey of Monmouth, who calls her Guanhumara, makes her a Roman lady, but the general tradition is that she was of Cornish birth and daughter to King Leodegrance.

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    0
  • His "more stately genius," as Mr John Morley calls it, was already making him the undisputed master of the feelings of his audiences.

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  • It may be divided into three main periods - (1) from 431 to 421 (Lysias calls it the " Archidamian " War), when the Peace of Nicias, not merely formally, but actually produced a cessation of hostilities; (2) from 421 till the intervention of Sparta in the Sicilian War; during these years there was no " Peloponnesian War," and there were several years in which there was in reality no fighting at all: the Sicilian expedition was in fact a side issue; (3) from 413 to 404, when fighting was carried on mainly in the Aegean Sea (Isocrates calls this the " Decelean " War).

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  • In one place, to save the rhyme, he calls Mount Sinai Sinin (xcv.

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  • Mahomet repeatedly calls attention to the fact that the Koran is not written, like other sacred books, in a strange language, but in Arabic, and therefore is intelligible to all.

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  • is really, what a widely circulated tradition calls it, the oldest part of the whole Koran.

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  • The idea of a heavenly model would in itself have suggested such a course and, only in an inferior degree to this, the necessity of setting a new and uncorrupted document of the divine will over against the sacred scriptures of the Jews and Christians, the people of the Book, as the Koran calls them.

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  • 2) calls Zeus and Hera the first wedded pair, and a sacrifice to Zeus TAECos and Hera TEXeia was a regular feature of the Greek wedding.

    0
    0
  • The latter were not wholly mythical personages, though they were regarded as demigods (Manetho calls them the dead, P~Kves); they have been shown to be none other than the dim rulers of the predynastic age.

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  • He says nothing about the inhabitants of these islands, but tells us more about the Jutish peninsula, or Cimbric Chersonese as he calls it.

    0
    0
  • In the former he calls attention to the growing strength of Austria and France, and insists on the necessity of some third power, by which he clearly means Prussia, counterbalancing their excessive influence.

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  • On the other hand, cereal or vegetable diet calls for a supplement of salt, and so does boiled meat.

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  • 13); Homer calls salt " divine," and Plato names it " a substance dear to the gods " (Timaeus, p. 60; cf.

    0
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  • The Ottoman sultans still bear the title of "successors of the Prophet," and still find it useful in foreign relations, since there is or may be some advantage in the right of the caliph to nominate the chief cadi WO) of Egypt and in the fact that the spiritual head of Khiva calls himself only the nakib (vicegerent) of the sultan.'

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  • In 1513 and 1514 appeared the three most famous of Darer's works in copper-engraving, "The Knight and Death" (or simply "The Knight," as he himself calls it, 1513), the "Melancolia" and the "St Jerome in his Study" (both 1514).

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  • A steamer from Oban calls regularly at Arinagour.

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  • 551, 1907) calls attention to the exodus "of thousands of Fulani of all sorts, but mostly Mellawa, from the French Middle Niger," and states that the majority of the emigrants are settling in the Nile valley.

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  • In the Augsburg Confession (1530), which was largely due to him, freedom is claimed for the will in non-religious matters, and in the Loci of 1533 he calls the denial of freedom Stoicism, and holds that in justification there is a certain causality, though not worthiness, in the recipient, subordinate to the Divine causality.

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  • This he calls free will, as the power of laying hold of grace.

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  • Shakespeare introduces Siward and his son, whom he calls young Siward, into the tragedy of Macbeth, and represents the old man as saying when he heard that his son's wounds were in front, "Had I as many sons as I have hairs, I would not wish them to a fairer death."

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  • Knox himself fled to Kyle, though there is no evidence that he was privy to a deed which he calls " worthy of all praise," and Morton and Ruthven spurred to Berwick, while Lethington skulked in Atholl.

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  • Being composed largely of red clays and laterite, the soil is not generally rich, and calls for the patient cultivation of the Chinese gardener to make it really productive.

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  • In particular, while in his first draft he speaks of the bailiff as Gryssler - the usual name up to his time, except in the White Book and in Stumpff's Chronicle of 1548 - in his final recension he calls him Gessler, knowing that this was a real name.

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  • In 1904 appeared the third volume, La Renaissance de Petal, in which the author describes the efforts of the Capetian kings to reconstruct the power of the Frankish kings over the whole of Gaul; and goes on to show how the clergy, the heirs of the imperial tradition, encouraged this ambition; how the great lords of the kingdom (the "princes," as Flach calls them), whether as allies or foes, pursued the same end; and how, before the close of the 12th century, the Capetian kings were in possession of the organs and the means of action which were to render them so powerful and bring about the early downfall of feudalism.

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  • Edmund, the "deed-doer" as the chronicle calls him, "Edmundus magnificus" as Florence of Worcester describes him, perhaps translating the Saxon epithet, was buried at Glastonbury, an abbey which he had entrusted in 943 to the famous Dunstan.

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  • The whole group of states he calls Tukhara, by which name in the form Tokharistan, or by that of Haiathalah, the country continued for centuries to be known to the Mahommedans.

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  • C. Engler (Ber., 1897, 30, p. 1669) calls the substance which undergoes oxidation the "autoxidizer" and the substance which unites with the active oxygen the "acceptor"; in the oxidation of metals he expresses results as: M+02=M02, followed by MO,-)M 0+0, and if water be present, 0+H 2 O, ---11202.

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  • Of the Machachi basin, near Quito, which he calls a " zoologist's paradise," Mr Whymper writes (Travels amongst the Great Andes of the Equator): " Butterflies above, below and around; now here, now there, by many turns and twists displaying the brilliant tessellation of their under-sides...

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  • Less frequent calls are made at Esmeraldas and some of the other small ports on the coast, of which there are nine in all.

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  • to, II) calls " the first work of learning, on a great scale, published in England."

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  • His chief philosophical doctrine was taken up and developed more than a hundred years later by Giordano Bruno, who calls him the divine Cusanus.

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  • Soon afterwards at Cana of Galilee Jesus gives His first " sign," as the evangelist calls it, in the change of water into wine to supply the deficiency at a marriage feast.

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  • 30 be rendered: " I was at his side as a master-workman "; but the Hebrew word (amon) rendered " master-workman " is of doubtful meaning, and the connexion rather calls for some such sense as " nursling, ward "; Yahweh himself is represented as the architect, and wisdom, the first of his works, is his companion, sporting in his presence like a beloved child.

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  • Thomas Wilson, in the epistle prefixed to his translation of the Olynthiacs of Demosthenes (1570), has a long and most interesting eulogy of Cheke; and Thomas Nash, in To the Gentlemen Students, prefixed to Robert Greene's Menaphon (1589), calls him "the Exchequer of eloquence, Sir Ihon Cheke, a man of men, supernaturally traded in all tongues."

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  • Thought in this primary form, when in all its parts completed, is what Hegel calls the " idea."

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  • The Venetian ambassador calls Fox "alter rex" and the Spanish ambassador Carroz says that Henry VIII.

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  • Gradually they extended their powers, aided by the jealousy between the royal houses, which made it almost impossible for the two kings to co-operate heartily, and from the 5th to the 3rd century they exercised a growing despotism which Plato justly calls a tyrannis (Laws, 692).

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  • Catholic Ireland calls him her "Liberator" -still; and history will say of him that, with some failings, he had many and great gifts, that he was an orator of a high order, and that, agitator as he was, he possessed the wisdom, the caution and the tact of a real statesman.

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  • 3) calls Canaanite Jerusalem the offspring of an Amorite and a Hittite.

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  • For twentytwo years he held his office and was to all intents and purposes governor of Syria, Phoenicia and Samaria - " A good man " (Josephus calls him) " and a man of mind, who rescued the people of the Jews from poverty and weakness, and set them on the way to comparative splendour " (Ant.

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  • On his return to Halle, he acted for some time as Privatdozent, but in 1773 was appointed to a professorial chair; in 1775 he was translated to Jena, where the rest of his life was spent (though he received calls to other universities).

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  • Accordingly we find that Severus, in narrating the division of Canaan among the tribes, calls the special attention of ecclesiastics to the fact that no portion of the land was assigned to the tribe of Levi, lest they should be hindered in their service of God.

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  • His headdress he calls a pag; it is a turban of amamah shape but enormously large.

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  • The Sikh calls his kurta jhagga; it is very large and loose, bound with a scarf round the waist.

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  • In outlying villages he wears instead of the kurta a chadar or cloth, which he calls khes, on the upper part of his body.

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  • The quoit was the ancient weapon of the Sikh, who calls it chakar.

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  • 96, pp. 735-74 1, Loewy gives an account of an instrument which he calls an "equatorial coude," designed (I) to attain greater stability and so to measure larger angles than is generally possible with the ordinary equatorial; (2) to enable a single astronomer to point the telescope and make observations in any part of the sky without changing his position; (3) to abolish the usual expensive dome, and to substitute a covered shed on wheels (which can be run back at pleasure), leaving the telescope in the open air, the observer alone being sheltered.

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  • His pupil Quintilian calls him the greatest orator he had ever known; but he disgraced his talents by acting as public informer against some of the most distinguished personages in Rome.

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  • But he frequently describes an ideal character of a missionary sage, the perfect Stoic - or, as he calls him, the Cynic. This missionary has neither country nor home nor land nor slave; his bed is the ground; he is without wife or child; his only mansion is the earth and sky and a shabby cloak.

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  • Sisenna calls it " Oppidum tumulo in excelso loco propter mare, parvis moenibus, inter duas fluvias, infra Vesuvium collocatum " (lib.

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  • The population of European blood, which calls itself Creole, is greater than that of any other tropical colony; many of the inhabitants trace their descent from ancient French families, and the higher and middle classes are distinguished for their intellectual culture.

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  • In 1908 20 lines of ocean-going steamers made regular calls at the port and several lines of river steamers ran to Buenos Aires and the ports of the Parana, Paraguay and Uruguay rivers.

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  • There is, however, a tradition in which Ali himself calls the Omayyads born rulers.

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  • An attack from the Trentino with the object of cutting the Italian communications with the Julian front, and so bottling Cadorna's main force in what Krauss calls " the Venetian sack," was an operation which could not but commend itself to the Austrian general staff.

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  • All M is P. Proceeding from one order to the other, by converting one of the premises, and substituting the conclusion as premise for the other premise, so as to deduce the latter as conclusion, is what he calls circular inference; and he remarked that the process is fallacious unless it contains propositions which are convertible, as in mathematical equations.

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  • Lastly, Wundt's view is an interesting piece of eclecticism, for he supposes that induction begins in the form of Aristotle's inductive syllogism, S-P, S-M, M-P, and becomes an inductive method in the form of Jevons's inverse deduction, or hypothetical deduction, or analysis, M-P, S-M, S-P. In detail, he supposes that, while an " inference by comparison," which he erroneously calls an affirmative syllogism in the second figure, is preliminary to induction, a second " inference by connexion," which he erroneously calls a syllogism in the third figure with an indeterminate conclusion, is the inductive syllogism itself.

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  • Erdmann, again, has invented an induction from particular predicates to a totality of predicates which he calls " erganzende Induction, " giving as an example, " This body has the colour, extensibility and specific gravity of magnesium; therefore it is magnesium."

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  • How then can this universal be called, as Sigwart, for example, calls it, the ground from which these particulars follow?

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  • For proposition and judgment involve subject and predicate and exhibit what a modern writer calls " identity of reference with diversity of characterization."

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  • He calls for a logic of discovery.

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  • So long as the relation of the nominal to the real essence has no other background than Locke's doctrine of perception, the conclusion that what Kant afterwards calls analytical judgments a priori and synthetic judgments a posteriori exhaust the field follows inevitably, with its corollary, which Locke himself has the courage to draw, that the natural sciences are in strictness impossible.

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  • Normally he thinks of what he calls phenomena no longer as psychological groupings of sensations, as " states of mind," but as things and events in a physical world howsoever constituted and apprehended.

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  • to technical logic. It may be attributed in some sl i ght degree, perhaps, to incidental flashes of logical insight where his thought is least of what he himself calls logic, e.g.

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  • Reference has been made above to the effect upon the rise of the later psychological logic produced by Herbart's psychology of apperception, when disengaged from the background of his metaphysic taken in conjunction with his treatment in his practical philosophy of the judgment of value or what he calls the aesthetic judgment.

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  • Lotze's procedure is, indeed, analogous to the way in which, in his philosophy of nature, he starts from a plurality of real beings, but by means of a reductive movement, an application of Kant's transcendental method, arrives at the postulate or fact of a law of their reciprocal action which calls for a monistic and idealist interpretation.

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  • The soul of man, which as a microcosmos resumes the nature of things, strives by selfabnegation or self-annihilation to attain this unspeakable reunion (which Eckhart calls being buried in God).

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  • This principle (which Boehme often calls the evil in God) illuminates both sides of the antithesis, and thus contains the possibility of their real existence.

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  • He now proceeded to distinguish three moments in God, the first of which is the pure indifference which, in a sense, precedes all existence - the primal basis or abyss, as he calls it, in agreement with Boehme.

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  • Pliny calls it the last town of Italy on the north-west, and its position at the confluence of two rivers, at the end of the Great and Little St Bernard, gave it considerable military importance, which is vouched for by considerable remains of Roman buildings.

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  • The Holy Spirit, the determining factor in the religious life, uses the Bible as his means, and calls the intelligence into action.

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  • The Kayan or Bulungan river is the only other in the eastern versant that calls for mention.

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  • The connexion of the Chinese with Borneo calls for notice here.

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  • Ibn Batesta notices two destructive pestilences in the 14th century, and Ferishta one in 1443, which he calls ta'un, and describes as very unusual in India.

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  • In 1352 the restless man started for Central Africa, passing by the oases of the Sahara (where the houses were built of rock-salt, as Herodotus tells, and roofed with camel skins) to Timbuktu and Gogo on the Niger, a river which he calls the Nile, believing it to flow down into Egypt, an opinion maintained by some up to the date of Lander's discovery.

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  • Sanday calls " an unreal and artificial standard, the standard of the r9th century rather than the ist, of Germany rather than Palestine, of the lamp and the study rather than of active life."

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  • 8.6; for the numbers of his followers do not agree with either of Josephus's rather divergent accounts, while Acts alone calls them Sicarii.

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  • In fact, as has been shown already, Badoglio had little idea of how the fight was going on his front; Buongiovanni was in the dark regarding the general situation except for the calls which came from Cavaciocchi; and Cavaciocchi, who saw his own danger, had played his cards too soon, and had nothing left.

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  • According to Herodotus, Diodorus Siculus (who calls him Sesoosis) and Strabo, he conquered the whole world, even Scythia and Ethiopia, divided Egypt into administrative districts or nomes, was a great law-giver, and introduced a system of caste and the worship of Serapis.

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  • noticed above between the Iliad and the Odyssey, and between Homer and the early Cyclic poems. And the peculiar degradation of Homeric characters which appears in some poets (especially Euripides) finds a parallel in the later chansons de geste.3 The comparison of Homer with the great literary epics calls for more discursive treatment than would be in place here.

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  • The church preached Simon de Montfort's crusade, and organized Dominic's Inquisition; what Quinet calls the "Renaissance sociale par l'Amour" was extirpated by sword, fire, famine and pestilence.

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  • No one branch of public activity is entitled to make unlimited calls on the state's revenue.

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  • The idea that the ruler possessed a normal income in certain rents and dues of a quasi-private character, which on emergency he might supplement by calls on the revenues of his subjects, was a bequest of feudalism which gave way before the increasing power of the state.

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  • The principles of company investments are fully applicable: the creation of sinking-funds, the fixing the term of each loan to the time at which the return from its employment ceases, and the avoidance of the formation of fictitious capital, become guiding rules from this part of finance, and indicate the connexion with what the commercial world calls " financial operations."

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  • Those ministers who resigned their parishes to accept calls to Relief congregations, in places where forced settlements had taken place, and who might have been and claimed to be recognized as still ministers of the church, were deposed and forbidden to look for any ministerial communion with the clergy of the Establishment.

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  • This is clear from the use he makes of the Vindemiatio, from certain hints as to the testing of axioms, from his admission of the syllogism into physical reasoning, and from what he calls Experientia Literata.

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  • Alcaeus (7th-6th centuries B.C.) calls Antandrus in the Troad Lelegian, but Herodotus (5th century) substitutes Pelasgian (q.v.).

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  • The chief village is Castlebay, at which the Glasgow steamer calls once a week.

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  • Two drawings were prepared and placed before a painter at Cherbourg named Mouchel, who at once recognized the boy's gifts, and accepted him as a pupil; but shortly after (1835) Millet's father died, and the eldest son, with heroic devotion, took his place at home, nor did he return to his work until the pressing calls from without were solemnly enforced by the wishes of his own family.

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  • The merit of this definition, on the other hand, lies in its bilateral form, which calls attention to the need of characterizing both the religious attitude and the religious object to which the former has reference.

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  • The Greek historians name it Ake (Josephus calls it also Akre); but the name was changed to Ptolemais, probably by Ptolemy Soter, after the partition of the kingdom of Alexander.

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  • for Jeremiah's dirge on Josiah, or that the book he calls The Qinoth was identical with our Qinoth.

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  • This somewhat is what Kant calls a limit-concept.

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  • It means a great deal more; and it is his contention that what the scientist calls force is really will.

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  • Haeckel calls attention to the fact that a baby can hold a spoon with the big-toe as with a thumb.

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  • Their leaders renounced allegiance to the regent; she ended her not unkindly, but as Knox calls it "unhappy," life in the castle of Edinburgh; the English troops, after the usual Elizabethan delays and evasions, joined their Scots allies; and the French embarked from Leith.

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  • Henry Phillips (1775-1838), in his Flora historica, remarks that Turner (1568) "calls it gelouer, to which he adds the word stock, as we would say gelouers that grow on a stem or stock, to distinguish them from the clove-gelouers and the wall-gelouers.

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  • Gerard, who succeeded Turner, and after him Parkinson, calls it gilloflower, and thus it travelled from its original orthography until it was called July-flower by those who knew not whence it was derived."

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  • xviii.), who calls them Ashab al-Kahf, " the men of the cave.", According to Biruni (Chronology, tr.

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  • 15) likewise gives an account of Sweden, which he calls Thule, but the only tribes which he names are the Skrithephinnoi Beowulf.

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  • There is good reason to suppose that Jahan Shah, the Black Sheep Turkoman, before his defeat by Uzun IJasan, had set up the standard of royalty; and Zeno, at the outset of his travels, calls him king of Persia 1 in 1450.

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  • He calls Aga Mahommed chief of Mazandaran, as also of Astarabad and some districts situate in Khurasan, and describes his tribe the Kajar, to be, like the Indian Rajput, usually devoted to the profession of arms. Whatever hold his father may have had on Gilan, it is certain that this province was not then in the sons possession, for his brother, Jiafir Kuli, governor of Baifrush (Balfroosh), had made a recent incursion into it and driven Hidaiyat Khan, its ruler, from Resht to Enzeli, and Aga Mahommed was himself meditating another attack on the same quarter.

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  • The first of these only calls for any detailed account.

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  • Jones calls it, which, if ever it should be generally understood in its original language, will contest the merit of invention with Homer itself.

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  • The first epistle of John he calls less a letter or an epistle than a religious tract.

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  • He calls it the Principle of Reflection, the Reflex Principle of Approbation, and assigns to it as its province the motives or propensions to action.

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  • Contributions towards setting the poor to work, erecting the Royal Exchange, cleansing the city ditch, discovering new countries, furnishing military and naval armaments, for men, arms and ammunition for the defence of the city, are among what Herbert calls the sponging expedients of the government.

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  • On his return to France he spent three years with the Chastaigners, accompanying them to their different châteaux in Poitou, as the calls of the civil war required.

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  • 36) calls him "bishop" of Hierapolis, but whether with good ground is uncertain.

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  • The first distinct account which we have is from Arrian, who, with his usual brevity and severe veracity, narrates the march of Alexander through this region, which he calls the country of the Oreitae and Gadrosii.

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  • Thus he describes the body (which, after Epicurus, he calls the flesh) as a mere husk or fetter or prison of the soul; with its departure begins the soul's true life.

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  • The mountain chain, which Ditmar calls central, seems to be interrupted under 57° N.

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  • He calls it the most northerly of the British Isles and says that he reached it after six days' sail from Britain: it was inhabited, but produced little; corn grew there sparingly and ripened ill; in summer the nights were long and bright.

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  • 3, 16), whom Assur-bani-pal calls "a limb of Satan," after sacking Sardis, had been slain in Cilicia, but other Scythian invaders came to take his place.

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  • Huet devoted much pains to them, but his results were not made public. The first edition which calls for notice, except in a complete ¦)ibliography, is that of Le Duchat (Amsterdam, 1711).

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  • Where they disagreed, he calls attention to the fact, occasionally pronouncing in favour of one version rather than another (ii.

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  • It calls upon the imagination and the literary gifts of expression.

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  • This author, in his treatise on the Theorie de la vis d'Archimede, describes a machine provided with two screws which he calls a " pterophores."

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  • The intimacy between him and this "brown, beautiful, bold but insipid creature," as John Evelyn calls her, who chose to be known as Mrs Barlow (Barlo) lasted with intervals till the autumn of 1651, and Charles claimed the paternity of a child born in 1649, whom he subsequently created duke of Monmouth.

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  • 40) with Asclepiades the Samian, and Lycidas, " the goatherd, of Cydonia," may well be the poet Astacides, whom Callimachus calls "the Cretan, the goatherd."

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  • And yet he does not really go beyond the great city-prophet Isaiah who calls the men of Jerusalem " a people of Gomorrah " (i.

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  • Giesebrecht, on the other hand, maintains that there are passages which are certainly Jeremiah's, but which are not in what Duhm calls Jeremiah's metre; Giesebrecht also, himself rather conservative, considers Duhm remarkably free with his emendations.

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  • Gregory of Tours is very indulgent to Guntram, who showed himself on occasions generous towards the church; he almost always calls him "good king Guntram," and in his writings are to be found such phrases as "good king Guntram took as his servant a concubine Veneranda" (iv.

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  • If, on the contrary, we must hold that man is essentially related to what the same writer calls "a common nature," then it is a legitimate corollary that in man as intelligence we ought to find the key of the whole fabric. At all events, this method of approach must be truer than any which, by restricting itself to the external aspect of phenomena as presented in space, leaves no scope for inwardness and life and all that, in Lotze's language, gives "value" to the world.

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  • These "three friends" were Cornelius Felton, Louis Agassiz and Charles Sumner, whom he calls "The noble three, Who half my life were more than friends to me."

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  • It became a Roman municipium, with the rest of Gallia Transpadana; but'lvIartial calls it little Mantua, and had it not been for Virgil's interest in his native place, and in the expulsion of a number of the Mantuans (and among them the poet himself) from their lands in favour of Octavian's soldiers, we should probably have heard almost nothing of its existence.

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  • In Homer, notwithstanding the frequent mention of the use of wine, Dionysus is never mentioned as its inventor or introducer, nor does he appear in Olympus; Hesiod is the first who calls wine the gift of Dionysus.

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  • The most acrimonious of all his works is his Defence of Justification by Faith, an answer to what Bunyan calls "the brutish and beastly latitudinarianism" of Edward Fowler, afterwards bishop of Gloucester, an excellent man, but not free from the taint of Pelagianism.

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  • These bands Julius calls dispersion bands, and then, assuming that a species of tubular structure prevails within a large part of the sun (such as the filaments of the corona suggest for that region), he applies the weakening of the light to explain, for instance, the broad dark H and K calcium lines, and the sun-spots, besides many remoter applications.

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  • Iwo, calls the place Takarart, and describes it as an ordinary citadel, from which the town gradually developed, taking its name from the Miknasa Berbers.

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  • 115) calls Shedad.

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  • The most extravagant estimate of all was that of Whiston, who calls them "the most sacred standard of Christianity, equal in authority to the Gospels themselves, and superior in authority to the epistles of single apostles, some parts of them being our Saviour's own original laws delivered to the apostles, and the other parts the public acts of the apostles" (Historical preface to Primitive Christianity Revived, pp. 85-86).

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  • Cyclo-propane Group. Trimethylene, Calls, obtained by A.

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  • It is perhaps interesting to note that the latter-day telephone operator calls 1907 " nineteen O seven " instead of " nineteen nought seven."

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  • It was through this "triple discipline," as he calls it, that Cousin's philosophical thought was first developed, and that in 1815 he entered on the public teaching of philosophy in the Normal School and in the faculty of letters.'

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  • The harsh treatment of individuals only calls forth resistance when constitutional morality has sunk deeply into the popular mind.

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  • Ten years after the death of Pinzon, his friend Oviedo calls it the Maranon.

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  • The two legs of a hyperbolic branch may belong to different asymptotes, and in this case we have the forms which Newton calls inscribed, circumscribed, ambigene, &c.; or they may belong to the same asymptote, and in this case we have the serpentine form, where the branch cuts the asymptote, so as to touch it at its two extremities on opposite sides, or the conchoidal form, where it touches the asymptote on the same side.

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  • The copious additional information given by later writers is all by way either of interpretation of local legends in the light of Ephorus's theory, or of explanation of the name "Pelasgoi"; as when Philochorus expands a popular etymology "stork-folk" (w€Xaa'yoi-- it €Xap'yoi) into a theory of their seasonal migrations; or Apollodorus says that Homer calls Zeus Pelasgian "because he is not far from every one of us," 6TL Tiffs ryes 7rEXas EaTCV.

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  • p. 169), with the object of trying to preserve the lives of dogs by what he calls " artificial autophagy."

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  • Bleek calls Lev.

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  • On the 1st of May 418 a great synod ("A Council of Africa," St Augustine calls it), which assembled under the presidency of Aurelius, bishop of Carthage, to take action concerning the errors of Caelestius, a disciple of Pelagius, denounced the Pelagian doctrines of human nature, original sin, grace and perfectibility, and fully approved the contraryviews of Augustine.

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  • On his deathbed Herod discovered that his eldest son, Antipater, whom Josephus calls a "monster of iniquity," had been plotting against him.

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  • A moderate scholar of our day can find no historical nucleus, and calls it a sort of historical romance.'

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  • The opinions of the later Lollards can best be gathered from the learned and unfortunate Pecock, who wrote his elaborate Repressor against the "Bible-men," as he calls them.

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  • Even in the first book he appeals to the common reason, which he calls " common sense."

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  • Locke calls the former sort " primary, original or essential qualities of matter," and the others " secondary or derived qualities."

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  • the negative of the " golden rule ") - he still calls " immutable and eternal laws of nature " - meaning that, though a man is not unconditionally bound to realize them, he is, as a reasonable being, bound to desire that they should be realized.

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  • He explains that though absolute good is discerned by the intellect, the " sweetness and flavour " of it is apprehended, not by the intellect proper, but by what he calls a " boniform faculty "; and it is in this sweetness and flavour that the motive to virtuous conduct lies; ethics is the " art of living well and happily," and true happiness lies in " the pleasure which the soul derives from the sense of virtue."

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  • This immediate pleasure that we take in goodness (and displeasure in its opposite) is due to a susceptibility which he calls the " reflex " or " moral " sense, and compares with our susceptibility to beauty and deformity in external things; it furnishes both an additional direct impulse to good conduct, and an additional gratification to be taken into account in the reckoning which proves the coincidence of virtue and happiness.

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  • When the effort to restrain feeling is exhibited in a degree which surprises as well as pleases, it excites admiration as a virtue or excellence; such excellences Adam Smith quaintly calls the " awful and respectable," contrasting them with the " amiable virtues " which consist in the opposite effort to sympathize, when exhibited in a remarkable degree.

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  • Indeed, the acquired tendency to virtuous conduct may become so strong that the habit of willing it may continue, " even when the reward which 3 I should be observed that Austin, after Bentham, more frequently uses the term " moral " to connote what he more distinctly calls " positive morality," the code of rules supported by common opinion in any society.

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  • The chronicler Benedictus Abbas calls David rex, and Rhuddlan castle was probably the centre of his vague authority.

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  • In Geneva his progress was arrested, and his resolution to pursue the quiet path of studious research was dispelled by what he calls the "formidable obtestation" of Guillaume Fare1.2

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  • Hence depravity and corruption, diffused through all parts of the soul, attach to all men, and this first makes them obnoxious to the anger of God, and then comes forth in works which the Scripture calls works of the flesh (Gal.

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  • Those whom God has chosen to life He effectually calls to salvation, and they are kept by Him in progressive faith and holiness unto the end (bk.

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  • 135) calls them Thyrsagetae, probably in reference to their celebration of orgiastic rites in honour of some divinity akin to the Thracian Dionysus.

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  • There is no reason to doubt his sincerity, but he was coarse and intemperate - Froude roundly calls him a foul-mouthed ruffian - without the wisdom of the serpent or the harmlessness of the dove.

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  • He had impoverished Carlisle, and in his new see, according to Burnet (who calls him "a sour ill-tempered man"), "minded chiefly the enriching of his family."

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  • Concrete reality or personality is given to this divine Ternar, as Baader calls it, through nature, the principle of self-hood, of individual being, which is eternally and necessarily produced by God.

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  • 326), who calls her the daughter of Orthus and Chimaera.

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  • It is so employed by Homer, who calls it ipvOpos (red), afico/i (glittering), OaEvv6 (shining), terms which apply only to copper.

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  • The problem was to explain what he calls " the silly, savage and senseless element " in mythology (Sel.

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  • He calls his own child Dawn or Cloud, his own name is Sitting Bull or Running Wolf, and he is not tempted to explain his great-grandfather's name of Bright Sun or Lively Raccoon on the hypothesis that the ancestor really was a raccoon or the sun.

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  • In the former case he neglects the study of savage myths; in the latter he unconsciously accommodates what he hears to what he calls " the truth."

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  • 307) calls Huitzilopochtli an " inextricable compound parthenogenetic god."

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  • These the intellect can grasp, and in so doing it becomes what he calls intellect us acquisitus, and is in a measure divine.

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  • the Niger (1829), made the Niger join the Gir, which last stream he calls the Nile of Bornu.

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  • Bertin has shown that a useful picture of the form of these curves may be obtained by taking sections, parallel to the plate, of a surface that he calls the "isochromatic surface," and that is the locus of points on the crystal at which the relative retardation of two plane waves passing simultaneously through a given point and travelling in the same direction has an assigned value.

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  • The wool trade gave these great importance; in 1341 there were ten wool merchants in Cirencester, and Leland speaks of the abbots' cloth-mill, while Camden calls it the greatest market for wool in England.

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  • Epiphanius, in another passage, calls him an Assyrian.

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  • 688) calls Esther the mother of Bahman, and, like Firdousi, gives to Homai the name of Shahrazad.

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  • (in his Greek inscriptions he calls himself Artaxares, and the same form occurs in Agathias ii.

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  • calls himself "the Mazdayasnian [i.e."

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  • It is deserving of notice that the British character of the company is insisted upon in each case in the charter which calls it into life.

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  • His pupil Nicephorus Gregoras, who delivered his funeral oration, calls him a "living library."

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  • He introduces what are now called the geometrical forms (the row, flat pencil, &c.), and establishes between their elements a one-one correspondence, or, as he calls it, makes them projective.

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  • Mill calls him, "the apostle of la grande culture."

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  • 17) calls Osroes (cf.

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  • Yazd in his account of the campaigns of Timur, who reduced Mesopotamia in 1393, still calls the city (1425) Ruha.

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  • The unity of apperception, then, as Kant calls it, is only possible in relation to synthetic unity of experience itself, and the forms of this synthetic unity, the categories, are, therefore, on the one hand, necessary as forms in which self-consciousness is realized, and, on the other hand, restricted in their application and validity to the data of given sense, or the particular element of experience.

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  • In this deduction of the categories, as Kant calls it, there appears for the first time an endeavour to connect together into one organic whole the several elements entering into experience.

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