Called-to-the-bar sentence example

called-to-the-bar
  • Educated at University College, London, he was called to the bar in 1849.
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  • In 1803 Palgrave was articled to a firm of solicitors, but was called to the bar at the Middle Temple in 1827.
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  • He was educated at Harrow and at Trinity College, Cambridge, and was called to the bar at Lincoln's Inn in 1786.
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  • In 1721 he entered Merton College, Oxford, as a gentleman commoner, and studied philosophy, mathematics, French, Italian and music. He afterwards studied law at the Inner Temple, but was never called to the bar.
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  • A friend of the family, Lord Foley, provided the funds for his legal training, and he became a member of Lincoln's Inn on his departure from Oxford, being called to the bar in 1730.
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  • He was called to the bar four years later, and practised as a barrister for a short time; but in 18-61, after two comparatively false starts in poetry and fiction, he made his first noteworthy appearance as a writer with a satire called The Season, which contained incisive lines, and was marked by some promise both in wit and observation.
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  • On being called to the bar he "found a cause or two at nurse for him, which he did his best to put to death," to the bitter disappointment of his father, who had confidently looked forward to seeing him upon the woolsack.
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  • He was called to the bar in 1851, but did not pursue his profession.
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  • He was educated at Eton and at Christ Church, Oxford, and was called to the bar in 1735.
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  • He was called to the bar in 1795, and gained a considerable reputation there as well as a tolerable practice.
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  • In 1646 he became a student of the Middle Temple, but was never called to the bar.
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  • He studied law, and was called to the bar at Paris, but soon went into politics, contributing to various newspapers, particularly to the Temps.
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  • He was called to the bar of Lower Canada on the 19th of May 1810.
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  • The same year he became a student at the Inner Temple, and was called to the bar in 1794.
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  • He was called to the bar in 1858, and, in addition to his practice in equity cases, soon began to distinguish himself as an effective contributor to the higherclass reviews.
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  • He left Oxford without taking a degree in 1609, and was called to the bar at Lincoln's Inn in 1616, becoming a bencher in 1633.
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  • He was educated at Durham school and University, and in 1890 was called to the bar.
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  • At the age of fifteen Macdonald entered a law office; he was called to the bar in 1836, and began practice in Kingston, with immediate success.
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  • He was called to the bar on the 7th of June 1837, the same day on which John Rolt (1804-1871), a man of very different antecedents, but afterwards a worthy rival of Palmer, was also called.
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  • In 1847 he was appointed regius professor of civil law, and he was called to the bar three years later; he held this chair till 18J4.
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  • He was called to the bar (Lincoln's Inn) in 1876, and made himself a thoroughly competent equity lawyer and conveyancer, but finally devoted himself to comparative jurisprudence and especially the history of English law.
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  • His brother, Jules Martin Cambon (1845-), was called to the bar in 1866, served in the Franco-Prussian War and entered the civil service in 1871.
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  • Here he began his lifelong friendship with Mignet, and was called to the bar at the age of twentythree.
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  • Robert Baldwin was called to the Bar in 1825, and entered into partnership with his father.
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  • In 1745 he published an able treatise on the law of forfeiture for high treason, in defence of his father's treatment of the Scottish Jacobite peers; and in the following year he was called to the bar.
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  • He was called to the bar in January 1724, and, as he lacked those brilliant qualities which sometimes command immediate success, he employed his leisure in the compilation of Remarkable Decisions in the Court of Session from 1716 to 1728 (1728).
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  • Educated at Helensburgh, Glasgow University and Trinity College, Cambridge, he was elected fellow of his college in 1879 and was called to the bar.
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  • He was called to the bar in 1859, but, although contributing to a, Liberal review, edited by Challemel Lacour, did not make much way until, on the 17th of November 1868, he was selected to defend the journalist Delescluze, prosecuted for having promoted the erection of a monument to the representative Baudin, who was killed in resisting the coup d'etat of 1851.
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  • He was called to the bar at Lincoln's Inn in 1858, was professor of political economy at University College from 1872 to 1875, and in December 1876, after a previous unsuccessful attempt, was elected to parliament for Liskeard in the Liberal interest.
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  • He was called to the bar in 1623, but before long devoted himself entirely to literature.
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  • He was called to the bar in 1879, and so early as 1890 became a queen's counsel.
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  • He left Oxford, without a degree, for the Middle Temple, and was called to the bar in 1626 and chosen treasurer in 1628.
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  • He abjured Calvinism, and was called to the bar in Paris.
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  • He was called to the bar in 1884, and rapidly made a reputation as a brilliant lawyer and advocate, being counsel for the defence in most of the important political trials of the day during a period of nearly thirty years.
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  • He was called to the bar in 1891, and became head of the law firm of Rowell, Reid, Wood & Wright, Toronto; ultimately being made bencher of the Law Society of Upper Canada in 191 1.
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  • He had been president of the Union at Oxford, and he entered at Gray's Inn, being called to the bar in 189 9.
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  • In 1798 he was called to the bar of Ireland, and rose before long to the very highest eminence among contemporary lawyers and advocates.
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  • He studied law in Paris, and was called to the bar in 1851.
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  • He chose the law as his profession, and was called to the bar in 1881.
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  • Vergniaud was thereafter called to the bar (1782).
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  • Having adopted his father's profession, he had entered the Middle Temple in 1728, and ten years later he was called to the bar.
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  • In 1885 he was called to the bar at Gray's Inn.
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  • He was called to the bar in 1849, and remained at the bar fourteen years, till 1863, when he was elected to the new Sadlerian chair of pure mathematics in the university of Cambridge.
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  • After the death of his father, a civil servant, his mother's second marriage transferred him to Canada, where he was chiefly brought up. He came to England in 1824, was called to the bar (Q.C. 1843), became intimate with the leading radical and utilitarian reformers, was elected M.P. for Bath in 1832, and took up that general attitude of hostility to the government of the day, be it what it might, which he retained throughout his life.
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  • He was called to the bar at Lincoln's Inn in 1887 and practised until 1899.
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  • Hale was called to the bar in 1637, and almost at once found himself in full practice.
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  • After completing his course at Trinity College, Cambridge, William Lamb studied law at the university of Glasgow, and was called to the bar in 1804.
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  • In this irritated temper they took up the question of tonnage and poundage, and instead of confining themselves to the great public question, they called to the bar some custom-house officers who happened to have seized the goods of one of their members.
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  • He was called to the bar in 1820, and became a member of the House of Assembly.
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  • But, with entire decision, Christianity is called to the bar of modern culture.
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  • He was called to the bar in 1754.
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  • Educated at Upper Canada College and the university of Toronto, Blake was called to the bar in 1856 and quickly obtained a good practice, becoming Q.C. in 1864.
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  • Like a cousin and namesake (to whom, with other members of the society of Gray's Inn, he dedicated his play of The Lover's Melancholy), the future dramatist entered the profession of the law, being admitted of the Middle Temple in 1602; but he seems never to have been called to the bar.
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  • In the autumn of the year in which he was called to the bar his father died, leaving him a legacy of f r000 over and above the f 2000 previously settled on him.
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  • In 1902 he was admitted a solicitor, and in 1911 was called to the bar (K.C. 1914).
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