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calais

calais

calais Sentence Examples

  • North of that river the coast is low-lying and bordered by sand-lunes, to which succeed on the Strait of Dover the cliffs in the neighborhood of the port of Boulogne and the marshes and sand-dunes of Flanders, with the ports of Calais and Dunkirk, the latter the principal French port on the NOrth Sea.

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  • Calais - - - 52,839 50,818 59,623

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  • The production of lace and guipure, occupying 112,000 persons, is carried on mainly in the towns and villages of Haute-Loire and in Vosges (Mirecourt), Rhne (Lyons), Pas-de-Calais (Calais) and Paris.

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  • Its main lines run from Paris to Calais, via Creil, Amiens and Boulogne, from Paris to Lille, via Creil and Arras, and from Paris to Maubeuge via Creil, Tergnier and St Quentin.

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  • 79.5 Calais 14.1

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  • Of the coast defences the principal are Toulon, Antibes, Rochefort, Lorient, Brest, Olron, La Rochelle, BelleIsle, Cherbourg,St-Malo, Havre, Calais, Gravelines and Dunkirk A number of the older fortresses, dating for the most part from Louis XIV.s time, are still in existence, but are no longer of military importance.

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  • The Barre granites, like those of Woodbury and Calais (also in Washington county) and part of those of South Ryegate, Kirby and Newark (Caledonia county), are of the biotite type; they are grey, except the stone from Newark, which is pinkish.

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  • France and Great Britain jointly acquired the cables between Calais and Dover, Boulogne and Folkestone, Dieppe and Beachy Head, Havre and Beachy Head, Piron, near Coutances, and Vieux Châteaux (St Heliers, Jersey).

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  • In the middle ages Teignmouth was a flourishing port, able to furnish 7 ships and 120 mariners to the Calais expedition of 1347, and depending chiefly on the fishing and salt industries.

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  • His son and heir, another Sir John, admiral of the king's navy in the north, was a banneret who displayed his banner in the army that laid siege to Calais.

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  • The same day all her reputed lovers were executed; and on the 19th she herself suffered death on Tower Green, her head being struck off with a sword by the executioner of Calais brought to England for the purpose.'

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  • FABER, Fabri or Fabry (surnamed [[Stapulensis), Jacobus]] [Jacques Lefevre d'Etaples] (c. 1455 - c. 1536), a pioneer of the Protestant movement in France, was born of humble parents at Etaples, in Pas de Calais, Picardy, about 1455.

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  • Deane, however, died in 1503, and Wolsey became chaplain to Sir Richard Nanfan, deputy of Calais, who apparently recommended him to Henry VII.

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  • But, although a gorgeous show of friendship with France was kept up at the Field of Cloth of Gold in 1520, it had been determined before the conference of Calais in 1521, at which Wolsey pretended to adjudicate on the merits of the dispute, to side actively with Charles V.

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  • Meanwhile Maitland of Lethington had been at the English court, and an English fleet under William Winter was sent to the Forth in January 1560 to waylay Elbeuf's fleet, which was, however, driven back by a storm to Calais.

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  • In 1347 it contributed 15 ships of small tonnage at the time of the siege of Calais.

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  • In the cases of Odo of Bayeux (1082) and of William of St Calais, bishop of Durham (1088), he used his legal ingenuity to justify the trial of bishops before a lay tribunal.

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  • He now formed the design of joining the Austrian army, for the purpose of campaigning against the Turks, and so crossed over from Dover to Calais with Gibbon, who, writing to his friend Lord Sheffield, calls his fellow-passenger "Mr SecretaryColonel-Admiral-Philosopher Thompson."

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  • Accordingly, when the Harpies appeared as usual to carry off the food from Phineus's table, they were driven off and pursued by Calais and Zetes, the sons of Boreas, as far as the Strophades islands in the Aegean.

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  • But when the legend became common property, other and better-known heroes were added to their number - Orpheus, Castor and Polydeuces (Pollux), Zetes and Calais, the winged sons of Boreas, Meleager, Theseus, Heracles.

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  • He held command for a time at Calais, and took an active part in the French campaigns of Henry V., who created him earl and count of Aumale in Normandy.

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  • Later cadets were John, brother of the 3rd earl, who carried the standard at Crecy, became captain of Calais, and was summoned as a peer in 1350, but died unmarried; and William, brother of the 4th earl, who was distinguished in the French wars, and succeeding to the lands of the Lords Abergavenny was summoned in that barony 1392; his son was created earl of Worcester in 1420, but died without male issue in 1422; from his daughter, who married Sir Edward Neville, descended the Lords Abergavenny.

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  • After the death of Marcel, he tried, unsuccessfully, to deliver Laon, his episcopal town, to the king of Navarre, and he was excluded from the amnesty promised in the treaty of Calais (1360) by King John to the partisans of Charles the Bad.

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  • A large pleasure traffic is maintained by the steamers of the New Palace Company and others in summer between London Bridge and Southend, Clacton and Harwich, Ramsgate, Margate and other resorts of the Kent coast, and Calais and Boulogne.

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  • ARTOIS, an ancient province of the north of France, corresponding to the present department of Pas de Calais, with the exclusion of the arrondissements of Boulogne and Montrenil, which belonged to Picardy.

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  • AGINCOURT (AzINcouRT), a village of northern France in the department of Pas de Calais, 14 m.

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  • The battle was fought in the defile formed by the wood of Agincourt and that of Tramecourt, at the northern exit of which the army under d'Albret, constable of France, had placed itself so as to bar the way to Calais against the English forces which had been campaigning on the Somme.

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  • A good example of the camisia of the 12th century is the rochet of Thomas Becket, preserved at Dammartin in the Pas de Calais, the only surviving medieval example remarkable for the pleating which, as was the case with albs also, gave greater breadth and more elaborate folds.

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  • Louis retaliated by refusing to sanction the duke of Burgundy's projected expedition against Calais, whereupon John quitted the court in chagrin on the pretext of taking up his mother's heritage.

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  • Hostilities had been resumed with England; the duke of Orleans had squandered the money raised for John's expedition against Calais; and the two rivals broke out into open threats.

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  • In 1386 he was sent to Calais, and raided French territory, but was shortly afterwards recalled to defend England against a naval attack by France.

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  • CALAIS, a seaport and manufacturing town of northern France, in the department of Pas-de-Calais, 18 m.

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  • Calais, formerly a celebrated fortress, is defended by four forts, not of modern construction, by a citadel built in 1560, which overlooks it on the west, and by batteries.

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  • The demolition of the ramparts of Old Calais was followed by the construction of a new circle of defences, embracing both the old and new quarters, and strengthened by a deep moat.

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  • The church of Notre-Dame, built during the English occupancy of Calais, has a fine high altar of the 17th century; its lofty tower serves as a landmark for sailors.

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  • A gateway flanked by turrets (14th century) is a relic of the Hotel de Guise, built as a gild hall for the English woolstaplers, and given to the duke of Guise as a reward for the recapture of Calais.

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  • Calais has a board of trade-arbitrators, a tribunal and a chamber of commerce, a commercial and industrial school, and a communal college.

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  • Calais is the principal port for the continental passenger traffic with England carried on by the South-Eastern & Chatham and the Northern of France railways.

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  • The average number of passengers between Dover and Calais for the years 1902-1906 inclusive was 315,012.

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  • The main industry of Calais is the manufacture of tulle and lace, for which it is the chief centre in France.

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  • Calais was a petty fishing-village, with a natural harbour at the mouth of a stream, till the end of the 10th century.

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  • From this time the Calaisis or territory of Calais was known as the Pays Reconquis.

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  • Calais, Maine >>

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  • Next year Edward effected the reduction of Calais.

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  • Conspicuous among them were his famous combat with Eustace de Ribemont, near Calais, in 1349, and the hard-fought naval victory over the Spaniards off Winchelsea, in 1350.

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  • In 1355 Edward led an unsuccessful raid out of Calais, and in January and February 1356 harried the Lothians, in the expedition famous as the Burned Candlemas.

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  • On the 28th of October he landed at Calais, and advanced to Reims, where he hoped to be crowned king of France.

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  • This treaty, less onerous to France than that of London, took its final form in the treaty of Calais, ratified by King John on the 9th of October.

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  • The treaty of Calais did not bring rest or prosperity either to England or France.

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  • In 1369 the French king, Charles V., repudiated the treaty of Calais and renewed the war.

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  • In 1371 the Black Prince came back to England with broken health, and in 1373 John of Lancaster marched to little purpose through France, from Calais to Bordeaux.

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  • By it the only important possessions remaining in English hands were Calais, Bordeaux, Bayonne and Brest.

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  • The encounter, which lasted from the 18th to the 10th of February and ranged from Plymouth to Calais, is commonly named the "Three Days' Battle" and was described by Clarendon as "stupendous."

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  • He anchored in some confusion in Calais roads.

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  • He still enjoyed Beaufort's favour, and retaining his place in the council was employed on important missions, especially at the congress of Arras in 1 435, and the conference at Calais in 1438.

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  • The queen established herself at Calais and organized two fleets, one of which was commanded by Eustace the Monk, and an army under Robert of Courtenay; but all her resolution and energy were in vain.

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  • The Revolution drew him into political life, and he was elected a deputy for the Pas de Calais.

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  • He then turned to industrial pursuits, and, having made himself acquainted with the processes of the cotton manufacture, founded at Auchy, in the Pas de Calais, a spinning-mill which employed four or five hundred persons, principally women and children.

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  • The statute of 1630 forbidding the exportation of wool, followed by the Plague of 1665, led to a serious trade depression, while the former enactment resulted in the vast smuggling trade which spread along the coast, 40,000 packs of wool being smuggled to Calais from Kent and Sussex in two years.

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  • The faithful Batt had sought a pension for him from his own patroness, Anne of Borsselen, the Lady of Veere, who resided at the castle of Tournehem near Calais, and whose son Batt was now teaching.

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  • During the season steamers connect it with London and the intermediate watering-places on the north coast, and with Calais and Boulogne.

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  • The Protestant martyrs and Calais between them removed all the alternatives to an insular national English policy in church and in state; and no sovereign was better qualified to lead such a cause than the queen who ascended the throne amid universal, and the Spaniards thought indecent, rejoicings at Mary's death on the 17th of November 1558.

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  • He went to mass, confessed, and out of sheer zeal and in no official capacity went to meet Cardinal Pole on his pious mission to England in December 1554, again accompanying him to Calais in May 1 555.

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  • are also important manufactures of silk at Calais, Paris, Nimes, Tours, Avignon and Roubaix.

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  • Having entered the church he held many ecclesiastical appointments, and became dean of the Arches in 1423; then devoting his time to secular affairs he was sent on an embassy to Calais in 1439, and to John IV., count of Armagnac, in 1442.

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  • The most important results of Beckington's missions to France were one Latin journal, written by himself, referring to the embassy to Calais; and another, written by one of his attendants, relating to the journey to Armagnac.

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  • He was repeatedly employed on embassies to the Low Countries, and was for a long time stationed at Calais as agent in the shifty negotiations carried on by Wolsey with the court of France.

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  • His brother, Sir Edward Wotton (1489-1551), was made treasurer of Calais in 1540, and was one of those who took part in the overthrow of the protector Somerset.

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  • He had before wooed her in vain, and now carried her off to Mount Haemus, where they lived as king and queen of the winds, and had two sons, Zetes and Calais, and two daughters, Cleopatra and Chione (Apollodorus iii.

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  • But the French would not give battle, and though John marched from Calais right through Champagne, Burgundy and Auvergne, it was with disastrous results; only a shattered remnant of the host reached Bordeaux.

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  • it was a place of such importance as to supply him with six ships and ninetysix men for his armament against Calais.

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  • Philip proved a faithful ally of the king, aiding him in re-entering Paris and preparing an expedition against Calais, which, however, failed through the ill-will of his Flemish subjects (1436).

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  • Languages.The German-speaking nations in their various branches and dialects, if we include the Dutch and the Walloons, extend in a compact mass along the shores of the Baltic and of the North Sea, from Memel in the east to a point between Gravelines and Calais near the Straits of Dover.

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  • The numerous references to the privateering exploits of its ships in the Patent and Close Rolls and the extraordinary number of them at the siege of Calais in 1346 alike testify to its importance.

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  • It furnished 20 ships for the siege of Calais.

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  • The only foothold retained by the English on French ground was Calais.

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  • CALAIS, a city and sub-port of entry of Washington county, Maine, U.S.A., on the Saint Croix river, 12 m.

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  • In the city limits are the post-offices of Calais, Milltown and Red Beach.

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  • Big Island, now in the city of Calais, was visited in the winter of 1604-1605 by Pierre du Guast, sieur de Monts.

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  • Calais was first settled in 1779, was incorporated as a town in 1809, and was chartered as a city in 1851.

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  • Calais (Mythology) >>

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  • of Calais, with which it is also connected by a canal.

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  • At the conference of Calais in 1521 English influence reached its zenith; but the alliance with Charles destroyed the balance on which that influence depended.

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  • With Cromwell's help he secured parliamentary support, and its usefulness led him to extend parliamentary representation to Wales and Calais, to defend the privileges of Parliament, and to yield rather than forfeit its confidence.

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  • Representation was extended to Wales, Cheshire, Berwick and Calais; and parliamentary authority was enhanced, largely that it might deal with the church, until men began to complain of this new parliamentary infallibility.

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  • There is more than one meaning of Calais discussed in the 1911 Encyclopedia.

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  • The strike of miners in the Pas de Calais after the disaster at Courrieres, leading to the threat of disorder on the 1st of May 1906, obliged him to employ the military; and his attitude in the matter alienated the Socialist party, from which he definitely broke in his notable reply in the Chamber to Jean Jaures in June 1906.

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  • of Paris on the Northern railway to Calais.

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  • In May 1 553 he went over to Calais as one of the English commissioners to promote peace with France; but their efforts were ineffectual.

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  • It is one of the principal ports for passenger communications across the Channel, steamers connecting it with Calais and Ostend.

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  • After the decay of Richborough harbour the passage from Dover to Whitsand, and later to Calais, became the accustomed route to France, and by a statute of 1465 no one might ship for Calais except at Dover.

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  • Having been recently defeated in Lincoln, they were hard pressed, and reinforcements were sent to them from Calais in a fleet commanded by a pirate and mercenary soldier called Eustace the Monk.

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  • Eustace is said to have been under the impression that they meant to attack Calais in his absence, and to have derided them because he had left the town well guarded.

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  • Three ferries plied incessantly between Richborough and Calais and Dunkirk, connecting railhead in England with railhead in France.

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  • As things are, if I were to encourage Tom Paine's opinions we should have a bloody revolution.'" Paine was indicted for treason in May 1792, but before the trial came off he was elected by the department of Calais to the French convention, and escaped into France, followed by a sentence of outlawry.

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  • GABRIEL GERBERON (1628-1711), French Jansenist monk, was born on the 12th of August 1628 at St Calais, in the department of Sarthe.

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  • Journeying from Calais Henry reached his headquarters at Guines on the 4th of June 1520, and Francis took up his residence at Ardres.

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  • (1499-1500) a severe plague in London caused the king to retire to Calais.

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  • In March 1460 the earl of Warwick came from Calais to concert plans with his leader.

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  • RENE GOBLET (1828-1905), French politician, was born at Aire-sur-la-Lys, in the Pas de Calais, on the 26th of November 1828, and was educated for the law.

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  • There was an "English Pale" or "Calais Pale" also in France until 1558, extending from Gravelines to Wissant, and for a short time under the Tudors an English Pale in Scotland.

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  • For its use, Colbert reconstructed the works and arsenal of Toulon, founded the port and arsenal of Rochefort, and the naval schools of Rochefort, Dieppe and Saint-Malo, and fortified, with some assistance from Vauban (who, however, belonged to the party of his rival Louvois), among other ports those of Calais, Dunkirk, Brest and Havre.

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  • Calais >>

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  • defeated the French army at Crecy on the 26th of August 1346, and besieged Calais, which surrendered on the 3rd of August 1347.

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  • Hostilities were suspended for some years after this, in consequence of the truce of Calais concluded on the 28th of September 1347.

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  • On the r 5th of August he was directed to hand over £40 given him for the purpose, to a successor, the treaty of Bretigny having been made meanwhile and confirmed at Calais with Wykeham as one of the witnesses on the 24th of October.

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  • It was the seat of a conventus, including the cities of the Calais valley and some of those in the northern part of the Hermus valley.

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  • He fought also at Stoke against the insurgents with Lambert Simnel, was made a knight banneret, governor of Calais, and lord chamberlain.

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  • Channel from Calais to Dover in 31 minutes.

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  • Steamship services between Folkestone and Boulogne, Dover and Calais, &c.

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  • Dover to Calais (South-Eastern & Chatham railway); to Ostend (Belgian Royal mail steamers).

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  • In 1469 Anthony was promoted to be lieutenant of Calais and captain of the king's armada, while holding other honorary posts.

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  • After the Yorkist failure at Ludlow field in October 1459, Edward fled with the earls of Salisbury and Warwick, his uncle and cousin, to Calais.

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  • Soon after he had come of age he disposed of his property, and in 1593 went to Flanders and enlisted in the Spanish army, assisting at the capture of Calais by the Spanish in 1596 and gaining some military reputation.

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  • She interceded in 1331 with the king for some carpenters whose careless work on a platform resulted in an accident to herself and her ladies, and on 'a more famous occasion her prayers saved the citizens of Calais from Edward's vengeance.

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  • His days, however, were by no means fully occupied with his ecclesiastical duties, and in 1387 also he was appointed treasurer of Calais, holding about the same time other positions in this neighbourhood.

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  • His son Louis of Anjou, who had been left as hostage, escaped from Calais in the summer of 1363, and John, far in arrears in the payments of the ransom, surrendered himself again "to maintain his royal honour which his son had sullied."

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  • For Edward took his ~Ca~t,~we of army to beleaguer Calais, and after blockading it for nearly a year forced it to surrender.

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  • The years 1345I 347 saw the zenith of King Edwards prosperity; in them fell not only his own triumphs at Crecy and Calais, but a victory at Auberoche in Prigord won ~ by his cousin Henry of Lancaster, which restored Cruss.

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  • year-long siege of Calais.

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  • The war did not entirely cease, but became local and spasmodic. In Brittany the factions which supported the two claimants to the ducal title were so embittered that they never laid down their arms. In 1351 the French noblesse of Picardy, apparently without their masters knowledge or consent, made an attempt to surprise Calais, which was beaten off with some difficulty by King Edward in person.

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  • This drove the English king to put still further pressure on the enemy; in 1359 he led out from Calais the largest English army that had been seen during the war, devastated all northern France as far as Reims and the borders of Burgundy, and thencontinuing the campaign through the heart of the winterpresented himself before the gates of Paris and ravaged the Ile de France.

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  • These preliminaries were ratified by the definitive peace of Calais (Oct.

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  • In northern France, Calais and the county of Guines, and also the isolated county of Ponthieu, the inheritance of the wife of Edward L, were ceded to the English crown.

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  • at this, the culminating point of his reign, it must he mentioned that some time before the peace of Calais he had made terms Submiswith Scotland.

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  • He marched from Calais to Bordeaux, inflicted great misery on Picardy, Champagne and Berry, and left half his army dead by the way.

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  • By 1374 little was left of the great possessions which the English had held beyond the Channel save Calais, and the coast slip from Bordeaux to Bayonne, which formed the only loyal part of the duchy of Guienne.

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  • Thomas of Woodstock, the youngest son of Edward III., took a powerful army to Calais, and marched through Picardy and Champagne, past Orleans, and finally to Rennes in Brittany, but accomplished nothing save the ruin of his own troops and the wasting of a vast sum of money.

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  • After two long truces, which filled the years 1390-1395, a definitive peace was at last concluded, by which the English king kept Calais and the coaststrip of Guienne, from Bordeaux to Bayonne, which had never been lost to the enemy.

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  • He trumped.up a vain story that his uncle was once more conspiring against him, arrested him, and sent him HI over to Calais, where he was secretly murdered in re5venge on prison.

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  • There was a considerable chance that the French king might declare warnominally to avenge his son-in-law, really to win Calais and Bordeaux.

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  • Calais, tish wars.

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  • But such a large number of his troops perished in the trenches by a pestilential disorder, that he found himself too weak to march on Paris, and took his way to Calais across Picardy, hoping, as it seems, to lure the French to battle by exposing his small army to attack.

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  • When he had struggled across them, and was half-way to Calais, the enemy beset him in the fields of Agincourt (Oct.

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  • However, so exhausted was the victorious army that Henry merely led it back to Calais, without attempting anything more in this year.

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  • It was no wonder that Paris was lost within six months of the regents death, Normandy invaded, and Calais beleaguered by an army headed by Englands new enemy, Philip of Burgundy..

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  • But the council, still backed by the nation, refused to give up the game; Burgundy was beaten off from Calais, and the youngduke of York, the heir of the Mortimers, took the command at Rouen, and recovered much of what had been lost on the Norman side.

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  • The long struggle was over, and England now retained nothing of her old transmarine possessions save Calais and the Channel Islands.

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  • When the rising was well started Warwick declared his sympathy with the, aims of the insurgents, wedded his daughter to Clarence despite the kings prohibition of the match, and raised a force at Calais with which he landed in Kent, But his plot was already successful before he reached the scene of operations.

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  • He lent an army to Ferdinand for the invasion of Gascony, and landed himself at Calais with 25,000 men, to beat up the northern border of France.

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  • (1557) and Gravelines (1558), but the shame to England by the loss of Calais (Jan.

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  • 17), deserted by her husband and brokenhearted at the loss of Calais and her failure to win English hearts back to Rome.

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  • The Spaniards seized Calais in 1596; at another time they threatened England from Brest, and the invisible armada of 1599 created a greater panic than the invincible armada of 1588.

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  • and George Wrottesleys Crecy and Calais from the Public Records.

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  • Thomas of Berkeley fought at Crecy and Calais, bringing six knights and thirty-two squires to the siege in his train, with thirty mounted archers and two hundred men on foot.

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  • She escaped on the 3rd of June 161 disguised in man's clothing, and succeeded in getting on board a ship bound for Calais.

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  • In 1359 he was one of the leaders of an expedition into France, in 1360 he took the fortress of Chaven in Brittany, and was present at Calais when peace was made between England and France in October 1360.

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  • WILLIAM OF ST CALAIS (CARILEF) (d.

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  • 1096), bishop of Durham and chief counsellor of William Rufus, was a Norman monk and prior of St Calais in Maine, who received the see of Durham from the Conqueror (1081).

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  • The seizure of Calais in 1347, Crcy and despite heroic resistance, gave the English a port the taking where they could always find entry into France, just o a as.

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  • and the Black Prince, the only possessions of England in a liberated but ruined France were Bayonne, Bordeaux, Brest, Cherbourg and Calais.

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  • They kept only Calais; and now it was their turn to have a madman, Hen.ry VI., for king.

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  • He took Calais by assault in January 1558, after the English had held it for two centuries, and occupied Luxemburg.

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  • By the possession of the three bishoprics and the recapture of Calais an effort towards a natural line of frontier and towards a national policy seemed indicated; but while the old soldiers could not forget Marignano, Ceresole, nor Italy perishing with the name of France on her lips, the secret alliance between the cardinal of Lorraine and Granvella against the Protestant heresy foretold the approaching subordination of national questions to religious differences, and a decisive attempt to purge the kingdom of the new doctrines.

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  • It is served by the Washington County railway, and by steamboat lines to Boston, Portland and Calais.

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  • A boat, called the "Bessemer," was built on this plan in 1875 and put on the cross-Channel service to Calais, but the mechanism of the swinging saloon was not found effective in practice and was ultimately removed.

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  • landed at Calais in October; and a great part of the country was exposed to double depredations from the English and the Navarrese troops.

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  • Charles's generals avoided pitched battles, and contented themselves with defensive and guerrilla tactics, with the result that in 1380 only Bayonne, Bordeaux, Brest and Calais were still in English hands.

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  • A short drive from Calais and you can be enjoying quality cuisine and a warm welcome at authentically French auberges.

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  • bid farewell to the White Cliffs on our short sea crossing to Calais in France.

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  • constable of the castle of Hammes at Calais.

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  • Calais stores take UK credit cards and many take sterling currency, albeit at less than the normal rate of exchange.

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  • deception operation pointing to an attack on Calais also helped to keep the German focus away from the Normandy beaches.

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  • Mr Blunkett is to inspect new security measures at the Frethun rail freight depot outside Calais.

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  • We bid farewell to the White Cliffs on our short sea crossing to Calais in France.

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  • There are several big hypermarkets in Calais which are geared up to sell what UK buyers are looking for.

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  • motorway tolls from Calais to La Tania are approximately £ 95 return.

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  • In those days the British immigration officials used to travel on the ferries from Calais to Dover.

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  • Dover to Calais then overland a tad to Singapore.

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  • shootn, in March 1942, Bill was shot down over the Pas de Calais.

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  • motorway tolls from Calais to La Tania are approximately £ 95 return.

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  • North of that river the coast is low-lying and bordered by sand-lunes, to which succeed on the Strait of Dover the cliffs in the neighborhood of the port of Boulogne and the marshes and sand-dunes of Flanders, with the ports of Calais and Dunkirk, the latter the principal French port on the NOrth Sea.

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  • Calais - - - 52,839 50,818 59,623

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  • The production of lace and guipure, occupying 112,000 persons, is carried on mainly in the towns and villages of Haute-Loire and in Vosges (Mirecourt), Rhne (Lyons), Pas-de-Calais (Calais) and Paris.

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  • Besides the above, Boulogne, the most important fishing port in the country, Calais, Dieppe, Concarneau, Douarnenez, Les Sables dOlonne, La Rochelle, Marennes and Arcachon are leading ports for the herring, sardine, mackerel and other coast-fisheries of the ocean, while Cette, Agde and other Mediterranean ports are engaged in the tunny and anchovy fisheries.

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  • Its main lines run from Paris to Calais, via Creil, Amiens and Boulogne, from Paris to Lille, via Creil and Arras, and from Paris to Maubeuge via Creil, Tergnier and St Quentin.

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  • 79.5 Calais 14.1

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  • Of the coast defences the principal are Toulon, Antibes, Rochefort, Lorient, Brest, Olron, La Rochelle, BelleIsle, Cherbourg,St-Malo, Havre, Calais, Gravelines and Dunkirk A number of the older fortresses, dating for the most part from Louis XIV.s time, are still in existence, but are no longer of military importance.

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  • The Barre granites, like those of Woodbury and Calais (also in Washington county) and part of those of South Ryegate, Kirby and Newark (Caledonia county), are of the biotite type; they are grey, except the stone from Newark, which is pinkish.

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  • Telegraphic money orders were established in 1850; a cable was laid between Dover and Calais, and in November 1851 the stock exchanges of London and Paris were able for the first time to compare prices during business hours of the same day; numerous companies were formed, some of which were independent of the railways, and keen competition led to considerable extensions of wires and reduction of tariffs, with the result that a large increase in the volume of business took place.

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  • France and Great Britain jointly acquired the cables between Calais and Dover, Boulogne and Folkestone, Dieppe and Beachy Head, Havre and Beachy Head, Piron, near Coutances, and Vieux Châteaux (St Heliers, Jersey).

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  • In the middle ages Teignmouth was a flourishing port, able to furnish 7 ships and 120 mariners to the Calais expedition of 1347, and depending chiefly on the fishing and salt industries.

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  • His son and heir, another Sir John, admiral of the king's navy in the north, was a banneret who displayed his banner in the army that laid siege to Calais.

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  • The same day all her reputed lovers were executed; and on the 19th she herself suffered death on Tower Green, her head being struck off with a sword by the executioner of Calais brought to England for the purpose.'

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  • FABER, Fabri or Fabry (surnamed [[Stapulensis), Jacobus]] [Jacques Lefevre d'Etaples] (c. 1455 - c. 1536), a pioneer of the Protestant movement in France, was born of humble parents at Etaples, in Pas de Calais, Picardy, about 1455.

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  • Deane, however, died in 1503, and Wolsey became chaplain to Sir Richard Nanfan, deputy of Calais, who apparently recommended him to Henry VII.

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  • But, although a gorgeous show of friendship with France was kept up at the Field of Cloth of Gold in 1520, it had been determined before the conference of Calais in 1521, at which Wolsey pretended to adjudicate on the merits of the dispute, to side actively with Charles V.

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  • Meanwhile Maitland of Lethington had been at the English court, and an English fleet under William Winter was sent to the Forth in January 1560 to waylay Elbeuf's fleet, which was, however, driven back by a storm to Calais.

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  • In 1347 it contributed 15 ships of small tonnage at the time of the siege of Calais.

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  • In the cases of Odo of Bayeux (1082) and of William of St Calais, bishop of Durham (1088), he used his legal ingenuity to justify the trial of bishops before a lay tribunal.

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  • He now formed the design of joining the Austrian army, for the purpose of campaigning against the Turks, and so crossed over from Dover to Calais with Gibbon, who, writing to his friend Lord Sheffield, calls his fellow-passenger "Mr SecretaryColonel-Admiral-Philosopher Thompson."

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  • Accordingly, when the Harpies appeared as usual to carry off the food from Phineus's table, they were driven off and pursued by Calais and Zetes, the sons of Boreas, as far as the Strophades islands in the Aegean.

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  • But when the legend became common property, other and better-known heroes were added to their number - Orpheus, Castor and Polydeuces (Pollux), Zetes and Calais, the winged sons of Boreas, Meleager, Theseus, Heracles.

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  • He held command for a time at Calais, and took an active part in the French campaigns of Henry V., who created him earl and count of Aumale in Normandy.

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  • Later cadets were John, brother of the 3rd earl, who carried the standard at Crecy, became captain of Calais, and was summoned as a peer in 1350, but died unmarried; and William, brother of the 4th earl, who was distinguished in the French wars, and succeeding to the lands of the Lords Abergavenny was summoned in that barony 1392; his son was created earl of Worcester in 1420, but died without male issue in 1422; from his daughter, who married Sir Edward Neville, descended the Lords Abergavenny.

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  • After the death of Marcel, he tried, unsuccessfully, to deliver Laon, his episcopal town, to the king of Navarre, and he was excluded from the amnesty promised in the treaty of Calais (1360) by King John to the partisans of Charles the Bad.

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  • A large pleasure traffic is maintained by the steamers of the New Palace Company and others in summer between London Bridge and Southend, Clacton and Harwich, Ramsgate, Margate and other resorts of the Kent coast, and Calais and Boulogne.

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  • ARTOIS, an ancient province of the north of France, corresponding to the present department of Pas de Calais, with the exclusion of the arrondissements of Boulogne and Montrenil, which belonged to Picardy.

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  • AGINCOURT (AzINcouRT), a village of northern France in the department of Pas de Calais, 14 m.

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  • The battle was fought in the defile formed by the wood of Agincourt and that of Tramecourt, at the northern exit of which the army under d'Albret, constable of France, had placed itself so as to bar the way to Calais against the English forces which had been campaigning on the Somme.

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  • A good example of the camisia of the 12th century is the rochet of Thomas Becket, preserved at Dammartin in the Pas de Calais, the only surviving medieval example remarkable for the pleating which, as was the case with albs also, gave greater breadth and more elaborate folds.

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  • Louis retaliated by refusing to sanction the duke of Burgundy's projected expedition against Calais, whereupon John quitted the court in chagrin on the pretext of taking up his mother's heritage.

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  • Hostilities had been resumed with England; the duke of Orleans had squandered the money raised for John's expedition against Calais; and the two rivals broke out into open threats.

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  • In 1386 he was sent to Calais, and raided French territory, but was shortly afterwards recalled to defend England against a naval attack by France.

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  • CALAIS, a seaport and manufacturing town of northern France, in the department of Pas-de-Calais, 18 m.

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  • Calais, formerly a celebrated fortress, is defended by four forts, not of modern construction, by a citadel built in 1560, which overlooks it on the west, and by batteries.

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  • The demolition of the ramparts of Old Calais was followed by the construction of a new circle of defences, embracing both the old and new quarters, and strengthened by a deep moat.

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  • The church of Notre-Dame, built during the English occupancy of Calais, has a fine high altar of the 17th century; its lofty tower serves as a landmark for sailors.

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  • A gateway flanked by turrets (14th century) is a relic of the Hotel de Guise, built as a gild hall for the English woolstaplers, and given to the duke of Guise as a reward for the recapture of Calais.

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  • Calais has a board of trade-arbitrators, a tribunal and a chamber of commerce, a commercial and industrial school, and a communal college.

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  • Calais is the principal port for the continental passenger traffic with England carried on by the South-Eastern & Chatham and the Northern of France railways.

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  • The average number of passengers between Dover and Calais for the years 1902-1906 inclusive was 315,012.

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  • The main industry of Calais is the manufacture of tulle and lace, for which it is the chief centre in France.

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  • Calais was a petty fishing-village, with a natural harbour at the mouth of a stream, till the end of the 10th century.

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  • From this time the Calaisis or territory of Calais was known as the Pays Reconquis.

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  • Calais, Maine >>

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  • Next year Edward effected the reduction of Calais.

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  • Conspicuous among them were his famous combat with Eustace de Ribemont, near Calais, in 1349, and the hard-fought naval victory over the Spaniards off Winchelsea, in 1350.

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  • In 1355 Edward led an unsuccessful raid out of Calais, and in January and February 1356 harried the Lothians, in the expedition famous as the Burned Candlemas.

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  • On the 28th of October he landed at Calais, and advanced to Reims, where he hoped to be crowned king of France.

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  • This treaty, less onerous to France than that of London, took its final form in the treaty of Calais, ratified by King John on the 9th of October.

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  • The treaty of Calais did not bring rest or prosperity either to England or France.

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  • In 1369 the French king, Charles V., repudiated the treaty of Calais and renewed the war.

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  • In 1371 the Black Prince came back to England with broken health, and in 1373 John of Lancaster marched to little purpose through France, from Calais to Bordeaux.

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  • By it the only important possessions remaining in English hands were Calais, Bordeaux, Bayonne and Brest.

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  • The encounter, which lasted from the 18th to the 10th of February and ranged from Plymouth to Calais, is commonly named the "Three Days' Battle" and was described by Clarendon as "stupendous."

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  • He anchored in some confusion in Calais roads.

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  • He still enjoyed Beaufort's favour, and retaining his place in the council was employed on important missions, especially at the congress of Arras in 1 435, and the conference at Calais in 1438.

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  • The queen established herself at Calais and organized two fleets, one of which was commanded by Eustace the Monk, and an army under Robert of Courtenay; but all her resolution and energy were in vain.

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  • The Revolution drew him into political life, and he was elected a deputy for the Pas de Calais.

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  • He then turned to industrial pursuits, and, having made himself acquainted with the processes of the cotton manufacture, founded at Auchy, in the Pas de Calais, a spinning-mill which employed four or five hundred persons, principally women and children.

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  • The statute of 1630 forbidding the exportation of wool, followed by the Plague of 1665, led to a serious trade depression, while the former enactment resulted in the vast smuggling trade which spread along the coast, 40,000 packs of wool being smuggled to Calais from Kent and Sussex in two years.

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  • The faithful Batt had sought a pension for him from his own patroness, Anne of Borsselen, the Lady of Veere, who resided at the castle of Tournehem near Calais, and whose son Batt was now teaching.

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  • During the season steamers connect it with London and the intermediate watering-places on the north coast, and with Calais and Boulogne.

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  • The Protestant martyrs and Calais between them removed all the alternatives to an insular national English policy in church and in state; and no sovereign was better qualified to lead such a cause than the queen who ascended the throne amid universal, and the Spaniards thought indecent, rejoicings at Mary's death on the 17th of November 1558.

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  • He went to mass, confessed, and out of sheer zeal and in no official capacity went to meet Cardinal Pole on his pious mission to England in December 1554, again accompanying him to Calais in May 1 555.

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  • are also important manufactures of silk at Calais, Paris, Nimes, Tours, Avignon and Roubaix.

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  • Having entered the church he held many ecclesiastical appointments, and became dean of the Arches in 1423; then devoting his time to secular affairs he was sent on an embassy to Calais in 1439, and to John IV., count of Armagnac, in 1442.

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  • The most important results of Beckington's missions to France were one Latin journal, written by himself, referring to the embassy to Calais; and another, written by one of his attendants, relating to the journey to Armagnac.

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  • He was repeatedly employed on embassies to the Low Countries, and was for a long time stationed at Calais as agent in the shifty negotiations carried on by Wolsey with the court of France.

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  • His brother, Sir Edward Wotton (1489-1551), was made treasurer of Calais in 1540, and was one of those who took part in the overthrow of the protector Somerset.

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  • He had before wooed her in vain, and now carried her off to Mount Haemus, where they lived as king and queen of the winds, and had two sons, Zetes and Calais, and two daughters, Cleopatra and Chione (Apollodorus iii.

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  • But the French would not give battle, and though John marched from Calais right through Champagne, Burgundy and Auvergne, it was with disastrous results; only a shattered remnant of the host reached Bordeaux.

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  • it was a place of such importance as to supply him with six ships and ninetysix men for his armament against Calais.

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  • Philip proved a faithful ally of the king, aiding him in re-entering Paris and preparing an expedition against Calais, which, however, failed through the ill-will of his Flemish subjects (1436).

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  • Languages.The German-speaking nations in their various branches and dialects, if we include the Dutch and the Walloons, extend in a compact mass along the shores of the Baltic and of the North Sea, from Memel in the east to a point between Gravelines and Calais near the Straits of Dover.

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  • The numerous references to the privateering exploits of its ships in the Patent and Close Rolls and the extraordinary number of them at the siege of Calais in 1346 alike testify to its importance.

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  • It furnished 20 ships for the siege of Calais.

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  • The only foothold retained by the English on French ground was Calais.

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  • CALAIS, a city and sub-port of entry of Washington county, Maine, U.S.A., on the Saint Croix river, 12 m.

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  • In the city limits are the post-offices of Calais, Milltown and Red Beach.

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  • Big Island, now in the city of Calais, was visited in the winter of 1604-1605 by Pierre du Guast, sieur de Monts.

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  • Calais was first settled in 1779, was incorporated as a town in 1809, and was chartered as a city in 1851.

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  • Calais (Mythology) >>

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  • of Calais, with which it is also connected by a canal.

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  • At the conference of Calais in 1521 English influence reached its zenith; but the alliance with Charles destroyed the balance on which that influence depended.

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  • With Cromwell's help he secured parliamentary support, and its usefulness led him to extend parliamentary representation to Wales and Calais, to defend the privileges of Parliament, and to yield rather than forfeit its confidence.

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  • Representation was extended to Wales, Cheshire, Berwick and Calais; and parliamentary authority was enhanced, largely that it might deal with the church, until men began to complain of this new parliamentary infallibility.

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  • There is more than one meaning of Calais discussed in the 1911 Encyclopedia.

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  • The strike of miners in the Pas de Calais after the disaster at Courrieres, leading to the threat of disorder on the 1st of May 1906, obliged him to employ the military; and his attitude in the matter alienated the Socialist party, from which he definitely broke in his notable reply in the Chamber to Jean Jaures in June 1906.

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  • of Paris on the Northern railway to Calais.

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  • In May 1 553 he went over to Calais as one of the English commissioners to promote peace with France; but their efforts were ineffectual.

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  • It is one of the principal ports for passenger communications across the Channel, steamers connecting it with Calais and Ostend.

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  • After the decay of Richborough harbour the passage from Dover to Whitsand, and later to Calais, became the accustomed route to France, and by a statute of 1465 no one might ship for Calais except at Dover.

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  • Having been recently defeated in Lincoln, they were hard pressed, and reinforcements were sent to them from Calais in a fleet commanded by a pirate and mercenary soldier called Eustace the Monk.

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  • Eustace is said to have been under the impression that they meant to attack Calais in his absence, and to have derided them because he had left the town well guarded.

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  • Three ferries plied incessantly between Richborough and Calais and Dunkirk, connecting railhead in England with railhead in France.

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  • As things are, if I were to encourage Tom Paine's opinions we should have a bloody revolution.'" Paine was indicted for treason in May 1792, but before the trial came off he was elected by the department of Calais to the French convention, and escaped into France, followed by a sentence of outlawry.

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  • GABRIEL GERBERON (1628-1711), French Jansenist monk, was born on the 12th of August 1628 at St Calais, in the department of Sarthe.

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  • Journeying from Calais Henry reached his headquarters at Guines on the 4th of June 1520, and Francis took up his residence at Ardres.

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  • (1499-1500) a severe plague in London caused the king to retire to Calais.

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  • In March 1460 the earl of Warwick came from Calais to concert plans with his leader.

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  • RENE GOBLET (1828-1905), French politician, was born at Aire-sur-la-Lys, in the Pas de Calais, on the 26th of November 1828, and was educated for the law.

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  • There was an "English Pale" or "Calais Pale" also in France until 1558, extending from Gravelines to Wissant, and for a short time under the Tudors an English Pale in Scotland.

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  • For its use, Colbert reconstructed the works and arsenal of Toulon, founded the port and arsenal of Rochefort, and the naval schools of Rochefort, Dieppe and Saint-Malo, and fortified, with some assistance from Vauban (who, however, belonged to the party of his rival Louvois), among other ports those of Calais, Dunkirk, Brest and Havre.

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  • defeated the French army at Crecy on the 26th of August 1346, and besieged Calais, which surrendered on the 3rd of August 1347.

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  • Hostilities were suspended for some years after this, in consequence of the truce of Calais concluded on the 28th of September 1347.

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  • On the r 5th of August he was directed to hand over £40 given him for the purpose, to a successor, the treaty of Bretigny having been made meanwhile and confirmed at Calais with Wykeham as one of the witnesses on the 24th of October.

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  • It was the seat of a conventus, including the cities of the Calais valley and some of those in the northern part of the Hermus valley.

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  • He fought also at Stoke against the insurgents with Lambert Simnel, was made a knight banneret, governor of Calais, and lord chamberlain.

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  • Channel from Calais to Dover in 31 minutes.

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  • Steamship services between Folkestone and Boulogne, Dover and Calais, &c.

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  • Dover to Calais (South-Eastern & Chatham railway); to Ostend (Belgian Royal mail steamers).

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  • In 1469 Anthony was promoted to be lieutenant of Calais and captain of the king's armada, while holding other honorary posts.

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  • After the Yorkist failure at Ludlow field in October 1459, Edward fled with the earls of Salisbury and Warwick, his uncle and cousin, to Calais.

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  • Soon after he had come of age he disposed of his property, and in 1593 went to Flanders and enlisted in the Spanish army, assisting at the capture of Calais by the Spanish in 1596 and gaining some military reputation.

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  • She interceded in 1331 with the king for some carpenters whose careless work on a platform resulted in an accident to herself and her ladies, and on 'a more famous occasion her prayers saved the citizens of Calais from Edward's vengeance.

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  • His days, however, were by no means fully occupied with his ecclesiastical duties, and in 1387 also he was appointed treasurer of Calais, holding about the same time other positions in this neighbourhood.

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  • His son Louis of Anjou, who had been left as hostage, escaped from Calais in the summer of 1363, and John, far in arrears in the payments of the ransom, surrendered himself again "to maintain his royal honour which his son had sullied."

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  • For Edward took his ~Ca~t,~we of army to beleaguer Calais, and after blockading it for nearly a year forced it to surrender.

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  • The years 1345I 347 saw the zenith of King Edwards prosperity; in them fell not only his own triumphs at Crecy and Calais, but a victory at Auberoche in Prigord won ~ by his cousin Henry of Lancaster, which restored Cruss.

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  • year-long siege of Calais.

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  • The war did not entirely cease, but became local and spasmodic. In Brittany the factions which supported the two claimants to the ducal title were so embittered that they never laid down their arms. In 1351 the French noblesse of Picardy, apparently without their masters knowledge or consent, made an attempt to surprise Calais, which was beaten off with some difficulty by King Edward in person.

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  • This drove the English king to put still further pressure on the enemy; in 1359 he led out from Calais the largest English army that had been seen during the war, devastated all northern France as far as Reims and the borders of Burgundy, and thencontinuing the campaign through the heart of the winterpresented himself before the gates of Paris and ravaged the Ile de France.

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  • These preliminaries were ratified by the definitive peace of Calais (Oct.

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  • In northern France, Calais and the county of Guines, and also the isolated county of Ponthieu, the inheritance of the wife of Edward L, were ceded to the English crown.

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  • at this, the culminating point of his reign, it must he mentioned that some time before the peace of Calais he had made terms Submiswith Scotland.

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  • He marched from Calais to Bordeaux, inflicted great misery on Picardy, Champagne and Berry, and left half his army dead by the way.

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  • By 1374 little was left of the great possessions which the English had held beyond the Channel save Calais, and the coast slip from Bordeaux to Bayonne, which formed the only loyal part of the duchy of Guienne.

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  • Thomas of Woodstock, the youngest son of Edward III., took a powerful army to Calais, and marched through Picardy and Champagne, past Orleans, and finally to Rennes in Brittany, but accomplished nothing save the ruin of his own troops and the wasting of a vast sum of money.

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  • After two long truces, which filled the years 1390-1395, a definitive peace was at last concluded, by which the English king kept Calais and the coaststrip of Guienne, from Bordeaux to Bayonne, which had never been lost to the enemy.

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  • He trumped.up a vain story that his uncle was once more conspiring against him, arrested him, and sent him HI over to Calais, where he was secretly murdered in re5venge on prison.

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  • There was a considerable chance that the French king might declare warnominally to avenge his son-in-law, really to win Calais and Bordeaux.

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  • Calais, tish wars.

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  • But such a large number of his troops perished in the trenches by a pestilential disorder, that he found himself too weak to march on Paris, and took his way to Calais across Picardy, hoping, as it seems, to lure the French to battle by exposing his small army to attack.

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  • When he had struggled across them, and was half-way to Calais, the enemy beset him in the fields of Agincourt (Oct.

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  • However, so exhausted was the victorious army that Henry merely led it back to Calais, without attempting anything more in this year.

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  • The sole tangible asset of the campaign was ~ the possession of Harfleur, the gate of Normandy, a second Calais in its advantages when future invasions were taken in hand.

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  • It was no wonder that Paris was lost within six months of the regents death, Normandy invaded, and Calais beleaguered by an army headed by Englands new enemy, Philip of Burgundy..

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  • But the council, still backed by the nation, refused to give up the game; Burgundy was beaten off from Calais, and the youngduke of York, the heir of the Mortimers, took the command at Rouen, and recovered much of what had been lost on the Norman side.

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  • The long struggle was over, and England now retained nothing of her old transmarine possessions save Calais and the Channel Islands.

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  • When the rising was well started Warwick declared his sympathy with the, aims of the insurgents, wedded his daughter to Clarence despite the kings prohibition of the match, and raised a force at Calais with which he landed in Kent, But his plot was already successful before he reached the scene of operations.

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  • He lent an army to Ferdinand for the invasion of Gascony, and landed himself at Calais with 25,000 men, to beat up the northern border of France.

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  • (1557) and Gravelines (1558), but the shame to England by the loss of Calais (Jan.

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  • 17), deserted by her husband and brokenhearted at the loss of Calais and her failure to win English hearts back to Rome.

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  • The Spaniards seized Calais in 1596; at another time they threatened England from Brest, and the invisible armada of 1599 created a greater panic than the invincible armada of 1588.

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  • and George Wrottesleys Crecy and Calais from the Public Records.

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  • Thomas of Berkeley fought at Crecy and Calais, bringing six knights and thirty-two squires to the siege in his train, with thirty mounted archers and two hundred men on foot.

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  • She escaped on the 3rd of June 161 disguised in man's clothing, and succeeded in getting on board a ship bound for Calais.

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  • In 1359 he was one of the leaders of an expedition into France, in 1360 he took the fortress of Chaven in Brittany, and was present at Calais when peace was made between England and France in October 1360.

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  • WILLIAM OF ST CALAIS (CARILEF) (d.

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  • 1096), bishop of Durham and chief counsellor of William Rufus, was a Norman monk and prior of St Calais in Maine, who received the see of Durham from the Conqueror (1081).

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  • The seizure of Calais in 1347, Crcy and despite heroic resistance, gave the English a port the taking where they could always find entry into France, just o a as.

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  • and the Black Prince, the only possessions of England in a liberated but ruined France were Bayonne, Bordeaux, Brest, Cherbourg and Calais.

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  • They kept only Calais; and now it was their turn to have a madman, Hen.ry VI., for king.

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  • He took Calais by assault in January 1558, after the English had held it for two centuries, and occupied Luxemburg.

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  • By the possession of the three bishoprics and the recapture of Calais an effort towards a natural line of frontier and towards a national policy seemed indicated; but while the old soldiers could not forget Marignano, Ceresole, nor Italy perishing with the name of France on her lips, the secret alliance between the cardinal of Lorraine and Granvella against the Protestant heresy foretold the approaching subordination of national questions to religious differences, and a decisive attempt to purge the kingdom of the new doctrines.

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  • It is served by the Washington County railway, and by steamboat lines to Boston, Portland and Calais.

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  • A boat, called the "Bessemer," was built on this plan in 1875 and put on the cross-Channel service to Calais, but the mechanism of the swinging saloon was not found effective in practice and was ultimately removed.

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  • landed at Calais in October; and a great part of the country was exposed to double depredations from the English and the Navarrese troops.

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  • Charles's generals avoided pitched battles, and contented themselves with defensive and guerrilla tactics, with the result that in 1380 only Bayonne, Bordeaux, Brest and Calais were still in English hands.

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  • So if your ferry departs Calais at 17:00 you need to be queueing at the checkouts at 15:30.

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  • Then, in March 1942, Bill was shot down over the Pas de Calais.

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