This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

caen

caen

caen Sentence Examples

  • In 1677 the university of Caen adopted not less stringent measures against Cartesianism.

    0
    0
  • The Orne, which rises in the hills of Normandy and falls into the Channel below Caen, is of considerably less importance.

    0
    0
  • Marseilles CALvADO5 Caen CANTAL Aurillac .

    0
    0
  • CAEN - - Calvados, Manche, Orne.

    0
    0
  • CAEN alvados, Eure, Manche, Orne, Sarthe, Seine Infrieure.

    0
    0
  • There are 2 faculties of Protestant theology (Paris and Montauban); 12 faculties of law (Paris, Aix, Bordeaux, Caen, Grenoble, Lille, Lyons, Montpellier, Nancy, Poitiers, Rennes, Toulouse); 3 faculties of medicine (Paris, Montpellier and Nancy), and 4 joint faculties of medicine and pharmacy (Bordeaux, Lille, Lyons, Toulouse); 15 faculties of sciences (Paris, Besancon, Bor~ deaux, Caen, Clermont, Dijon, Grenoble, Lille, Lyons, Marseilles, Montpellier, Nancy, Poitiers, Rennes, Toulouse); 15 faculties of letters (at the same towns, substituting Aix for Marseilles).

    0
    0
  • JEAN BERTAUT (1552-1611), French poet, was born at Caen in 1552.

    0
    0
  • of Caen by road.

    0
    0
  • The great churches of those cities are wholly unlike those of Sicily; but, while some features show us that we are in Italy, while some features even savour of the Saracen, others distinctly carry us away to Caen and Peterborough.

    0
    0
  • Bougeart, Les Cordeliers, documents pour servir ix l'histoire de la Revolution (Caen, 1891); G.

    0
    0
  • Bishop Roger of Caen (1107-1139) built the castle, described by Henry of Huntingdon as scarcely inferior to that of Devizes, "than which there was none greater within the confines of England."

    0
    0
  • It has been suggested that Basselin's name may be safely connected with some songs preserved in the Bibliotheque Nationale at Paris, and published at Caen in 1866 by M.

    0
    0
  • He attended the council of Ferrara, and was soon made canon of the church at Rouen, professor of canon law in the new university of Caen and vicar-general for the bishop of Bayeux.

    0
    0
  • In 1066 he became the first abbot of St Stephen's at Caen, a house which the duke had been enjoined to found as a penance for his disobedience to the Holy See.

    0
    0
  • During the War of Independence his early training at the French military college at Caen enabled him to render effective service to General Benjamin Lincoln in 1778-1779, to Count d'Estaing (1779), to General Lincoln in the defence of Charleston and afterwards to General Horatio Gates.

    0
    0
  • By way of penance William and his wife founded the abbeys of St Stephen and the Holy Trinity at Caen.

    0
    0
  • He was buried in St Stephen's at Caen.

    0
    0
  • of Alencon on the railway from Le Mans to Caen.

    0
    0
  • It does not appear that Voltaire got into any great scrapes; but his father tried to break him off from such society by sending him first to Caen and then, in the suite of the marquis de Chateauneuf, the abbe's brother, to the Hague.

    0
    0
  • Much of the material was obtained from the destroyed houses of the unfortunate Jews, but the stone for the bulwarks was obtained from Caen, and the small bricks or tiles from Flanders.

    0
    0
  • In March1298-1299letters were sent from " the Mayor and Commune of the City of London " to the municipalities of Bruges, Caen and Cambray.

    0
    0
  • Gibson and begun in 1883; St Peter's Episcopal Church (French Gothic), of Hudson River bluestone; Emmanuel Baptist Church, of white granite; the Madison Avenue Reformed Church; and St Joseph's (Roman Catholic), of bluestone and Caen stone with marble trimmings.

    0
    0
  • Caen >>

    0
    0
  • In a memorable campaign Edward marched from La Hogue to Caen, and from Caen almost to the gates of Paris.

    0
    0
  • TANNEGUY LEFEBVRE (TANAQUILLUS Faber) (1615-1672), French classical scholar, was born at Caen.

    0
    0
  • In June 1138, with the aid of Robert of Gloucester, Geoffrey obtained the submission of Bayeux and Caen; in October he devastated the neighbourhood of Falaise; finally, in March 1141, on hearing of his wife's success in England, he again entered Normandy, when he made a triumphal procession through the country.

    0
    0
  • Sitting thus on the 13th of July he heard in the evening a young woman begging to be admitted to see him, saying that she brought news from Caen, where the escaped Girondins were trying to rouse Normandy.

    0
    0
  • He ordered her to be admitted, asked her the names of the deputies then at Caen, and, after writing their names, said, "They shall be soon guillotined," when the young girl, whose name was Charlotte Corday, stabbed him to the heart.

    0
    0
  • de Fleury (Caen, 1 743); M.

    0
    0
  • FRANCOIS LE METEL DE BOISROBERT (1592-1662), French poet, was born at Caen in 1592.

    0
    0
  • After teaching history, in the Faculties of Arts at Caen (1871) and Nancy (1873), he was called to the Sorbonne (1883), where he was the first to occupy the chair of contemporary history.

    0
    0
  • Its origin is obscure, and has been variously connected with a Saxon royal residence (King's town), a family of the name of Chenesi, and the word Caen, meaning wood, from the forest which originally covered the district and was still traceable in Tudor times.

    0
    0
  • After their deaths he lived for some time at Caen under the roof of Nicolas Foucault (1643-1721), the intendant of Caen, himself no mean archaeologist; and there he began the publication (12 vols., 1704-1717) of Les mille et une nuits, which excited immense interest during the time of its appearance, and is still the standard French translation.

    0
    0
  • As a boy he served in an ambulance corps during the Franco-Prussian War of 1870, and later passed with distinction through the Ecole Polytechnique in mining, becoming a mining engineer, but soon abandoning practical work for teaching, first at Caen and later in the university of Paris.

    0
    0
  • GUILLAUME FRANCOIS ROUELLE (1703-1770), French chemist, was born in 1703 at Mathieu, near Caen.

    0
    0
  • DANIEL FRANCCOIS ESPRIT AUBER (1782-1871), French musical composer, the son of a Paris printseller, was born at Caen in Normandy on the 29th of January 1782.

    0
    0
  • He failed to defend Caen and Falaise in the interest of the dauphin (afterwards Charles VII.) against Henry V.

    0
    0
  • Melingue, Etienne Marin (1808-1875), French actor and sculptor, was born in Caen, the son of a volunteer of 1792.

    0
    0
  • Both of them were at Westminster and Oxford and were called to the bar, and for a time they studied in France at the Royal Military College at Caen.

    0
    0
  • He was professor of philosophy at Caen, at the Ecole Normale in Paris and later at the Sorbonne.

    0
    0
  • FRANCOIS DE MALHERBE (1555-1628), French poet, critic and translator, was born at Caen in 1555.

    0
    0
  • The poet was the eldest son of another Francois de Malherbe, conseiller du roi in the magistracy of Caen.

    0
    0
  • He himself was elaborately educated at Caen, at Paris, at Heidelberg and at Basel.

    0
    0
  • CAEN, a city of north-western France, capital of the department of Calvados, 7-1m.

    0
    0
  • To the south-west of Caen, the Orne is joined by the Odon, arms of which water the "Prairie," a fine plain on which a well-known race-course is laid out.

    0
    0
  • St Pierre, the most beautiful church in Caen, stands at the northern extremity of the rue St Jean, in the centre of the town.

    0
    0
  • Caen possesses many old timber houses and stone mansions, in one of which, the hotel d'Ecoville (c. 1530), the exchange and the tribunal of commerce are established.

    0
    0
  • The monuments at Caen include one to the natives of Calvados killed in 1870 and 1871 and one to the lawyer J.

    0
    0
  • Caen is the seat of a court of appeal, of a court of assizes and of a prefect.

    0
    0
  • Caen, despite a diversity of manufactures, is commercial rather than industrial.

    0
    0
  • Its trade is due to its position in the agricultural and horsebreeding district known as the "Campagne de Caen" and to its proximity to the iron mines of the Orne valley, and to manufacturing towns such as Falaise, Le Mans, &c. In the south-east of the town there is a floating basin lined with quays and connected with the Orne and with the canal which debouches into the sea at Ouistreham 9 m.

    0
    0
  • English coal is foremost among the imports, which also include timber and grain, while iron ore, Caen stone,' butter and eggs and fruit are among the exports.

    0
    0
  • The industries of Caen include timber-sawing, metal-founding and machine-construction, cloth-weaving, lace-making, the manufacture of leather and gloves, and of oil from the colza grown in the district, furniture and other wooden goods and chemical products.

    0
    0
  • Though Caen is not a town of great antiquity, the date of its foundation is unknown.

    0
    0
  • During the Wars of Religion, Caen embraced the reform; in the succeeding century its prosperity was shattered by the revocation of the edict of Nantes (1685).

    0
    0
  • de la vile de Caen et de ses progres (Caen, 1836); B.

    0
    0
  • de la vile de Caen, ses origines (Caen, 1866); E.

    0
    0
  • de Beaurepaire, Caen illustre: son histoire, ses monuments (Caen, 1896).

    0
    0
  • GERVAIS DELARUE (1751-1835), French historical investigator, formerly regarded as one of the chief authorities on Norman and Anglo-Norman literature, was a native of Caen.

    0
    0
  • Besides numerous articles in the Memoirs of the Royal Society of London, the Memoires de l'Institut, the Memoires de la Societe d'Agriculture de Caen, and in other periodical collections, he published separately Essais historiques sur les Bardes, les Jongleurs, et les Trouveres normands et anglo-normands (3 vols., 1834), and Recherches historiques sur la Prairie de Caen (1837); and after his death appeared Memoires historiques sur le palinod de Caen (1841), Recherches sur la tapisserie de Bayeux (1841), and Nouveaux Essais historiques sur la ville de Caen (1842).

    0
    0
  • He was for many years a pastor of a Protestant church at Caen, and became tutor to Wentworth Dillon, earl of Roscommon.

    0
    0
  • In 1646 he published his Phaleg and Chanaan (Caen, 1646 and 1651), the two parts of his Geographia Sacra.

    0
    0
  • On his return to Caen he was received into the academy of that city.

    0
    0
  • He died at Caen on the 16th of May 1667.

    0
    0
  • Using his fortress of Saint Ceneri as a base of operations during the next few years, he seized upon Matthew Gough near Vivoin in 1431, and made an incursion as far as the walls of Caen, whence he brought away three thousand prisoners.

    0
    0
  • Army Corps and to the academie (educational division) of Caen.

    0
    0
  • He won the victory of Agincourt (October 25, 1415), and then seized Caen and part of Normandy, while France was exhausting herself in the feuds of Armagnacs and Burgundians.

    0
    0
  • After her death in 1804, Chenedolle returned to Normandy, where he married and became eventually inspector of the academy of Caen (1812-1832).

    0
    0
  • About the age of fifteen he went to Caen (Normandy), taking with him a little stock of merchandise, on which he traded, and so maintained himself whilst learning French, improving himself in Latin and.

    0
    0
  • in the Bourbon interest, and succeeded in capturing Bayeux and Caen.

    0
    0
  • of Caen on the Western railway.

    0
    0
  • He entered Rouen with him in November 1449, and was also with him at Formigny and Caen.

    0
    0
  • Gaz., 1907-1909); Matte, Recherches sur l'appareil libero-ligneux des Cycadacees (Caen, 1904).

    0
    0
  • At the age of thirteen he entered the Ecole Centrale in Caen, and at sixteen and a half the Ecole Polytechnique, where he acquitted himself with distinction.

    0
    0
  • Lasne, an engraver of Caen), represent him as a man of serious, almost of stern countenance, and this agrees well enough with such descriptions as we have of his appearance, and with the idea of him which we should form from his writings and conduct.

    0
    0
  • He succeeded in escaping, first to Caen, where he organized the civil war, then to Saint-Emilion near Bordeaux, where he wrote his Memoires, which were published in 1822 by his son, and re-edited in 1866.

    0
    0
  • John finally absconded to England in December 1203; he failed to return with an army of relief, as he had promised, and before the summer of 1204 was over, Caen, Bayeux and Rouen, the last places that held out for him, had been forced to open their gates.

    0
    0
  • Somerset, who had retired into Caen, surrendered two months later after a feeble defence, and the English power in northern France came to an end.

    0
    0
  • He was then removed to Caen, where he was detained until the accession of Louis XVI.

    0
    0
  • He studied at Caen; he became personally known to Henry I., Henry II., and the latter's eldest son, Prince Henry; from Henry II.

    0
    0
  • Attracted by the fame of his countryman, Lanfranc, then prior of Bec, he entered Normandy, and, after spending some time at Avranches, settled at the monastery of Bec. There, at the age of twentyseven, he became a monk; three years later, when Lanfranc was promoted to the abbacy of Caen, he was elected prior.

    0
    0
  • PIERRE DANIEL HUET (1630-1721), bishop of Avranches, French scholar, was born at Caen in 1630.

    0
    0
  • He was educated at the Jesuit school of Caen, and also received lessons from the Protestant pastor, Samuel Bochart.

    0
    0
  • In 1793 he was employed in breaking up the Federalist movement in Normandy, but he was arrested by the Federalist authorities of Caen, and only released in July 1793 after the defeat of their forces at Vernon.

    0
    0
  • Killed in the fighting around Caen following D-day on 22nd of July 1944, aged 25.

    0
    0
  • Portsmouth DAY TWO - SUNDAY Early rising, in time to catch the fast ferry from Portsmouth to Caen.

    0
    0
  • The walls of the church, which are of considerable thickness, are constructed chiefly of Kentish rag, with dressings of Caen stone.

    0
    0
  • Besides these three chief eye-witnesses we may also mention the Annales Genuenses by the Genoese consul Caffarus,' and the Annales Pisani of Bernardus Marago, useful as giving the mercantile and Italian side of the Crusade; the Hierosolymita of Ekkehard, the German abbot of Aura, who first came to Jerusalem about 1101 (partly based on the Gesta, but also of independent value: see Hagenmeyer's edition, Tubingen, 1877); and Raoul of Caen's Gesta Tancredi, composed on the basis of information supplied by Tancred himself.

    0
    0
  • His mother was a native of Caen; his father, who came of a family of small Norman landowners, had been a citizen of Rouen, but migrated to London before the birth of Thomas, and held at one time the dignified office of portreeve, although he ended his life in straitened circumstances.

    0
    0
  • Accompanied by King Henry, he met and overthrew the rebels at Val-des-Dunes near Caen (1047).

    0
    0
  • Pluquet, in his Essai historique sur la vale de Bayeux (Caen, 1829), was the first to reject this belief, and to connect it with the Conqueror's half-brother Odo, bishop of Bayeux, and this view, which is now accepted, is confirmed by the fact that three of the bishop's followers mentioned in Domesday Book are among the very few named figures on the tapestry.

    0
    0
  • See also Pericaud, Fragments biographiques sur Jacob Sadolet (Lyons, 1849); Joty, Etude sur Sadolet (Caen, 1857); Balan, Monumenta, vol.

    0
    0
  • He took holy orders in 1676, and two years later the king gave him the abbey of Aulnay, where he wrote his Questiones Aletuanae (Caen, 1690), his Censura philosophiae Cartesianae (Paris, 1689), his Nouveau memoire pour servir a l'histoire du Cantesianisme (1692), and his discussion with Boileau on the Sublime.

    0
    0
  • Two years later, the Chronicle hired a writer whose name would go on to become synonymous with both the paper and San Francisco-Herb Caen.

    0
    0
Browse other sentences examples →