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cachet

cachet

cachet Sentence Examples

  • He incurred great unpopularity by his abuse of lettres de cachet, and had to resign in 1775.

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  • But neither Necker nor his wife cared to remain out of office, and in 1787 Necker was banished by "lettre de cachet" 40 leagues from Paris for attacking Calonne.

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  • It has been used to test the question whether Roman Catholic religious orders could enter India, and in 1870 an attempt was made thereby to challenge the validity of a warrant in the nature of a lettre de cachet issued by the viceroy (Ind.

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  • After a period of work in Holland he betook himself to England, where his treatise on lettres de cachet had been much admired, being translated into English in 1787, and where he was soon admitted into the best Whig literary and political society of London, through his old schoolfellow Gilbert Elliot, who had now inherited his father's baronetcy and estates, and become a leading Whig member of parliament.

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  • Protests against the lettres de cachet were made continually by the parlement of Paris and by the provincial parlements, and often also by the States-General.

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  • The affair ended by his escaping to Switzerland, where Sophie joined him; they then went to Holland, where he lived by hackwork for the booksellers; meanwhile Mirabeau had been condemned to death at Pontarlier for rapt et vol, and in May 1777 he was seized by the French police, and imprisoned by a lettre de cachet in the castle of Vincennes.

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  • The cachet of the Fukagawa atelier was indiscriminately applied to all such pieces, and has probably proved a source of confusion to collectors.

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  • The best-known lettres de cachet, however, were those which may be called penal, by which the king sentenced a subject without trial and without an opportunity of defence to imprisonment in a state prison or an ordinary gaol, confinement in a convent or a hospital, transportation to the colonies, or relegation to a given place within the realm.

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  • Lettres de cachet were abolished by the Constituent Assembly, but Napoleon reestablished their equivalent by a political measure in the decree of the 9th of March 1801 on the state prisons.

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  • He at once began love-making, and in spite of his ugliness succeeded in winning the heart of the lady to whom his colonel was attached; this led to such scandal that his father obtained a lettre de cachet, and the young scapegrace was imprisoned in the isle of Re.

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  • He at once began love-making, and in spite of his ugliness succeeded in winning the heart of the lady to whom his colonel was attached; this led to such scandal that his father obtained a lettre de cachet, and the young scapegrace was imprisoned in the isle of Re.

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  • Joun has produced, and is thorou~hly capable of producing, bronzes at least equal to the best of Seimin s masterpieces, yet he has often been induced to put Seimins name on objects for the sake of attracting buyers who attach more value to cachet than to quality.

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  • Joun has produced, and is thorou~hly capable of producing, bronzes at least equal to the best of Seimin s masterpieces, yet he has often been induced to put Seimins name on objects for the sake of attracting buyers who attach more value to cachet than to quality.

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  • The mother discouraged the affair, and, though Voltaire tried to avail himself of the mania for proselytizing which then distinguished France, his father stopped any idea of a match by procuring a lelire de cachet, which, however, he did not use.

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  • In order to enforce the registration of edicts the king would send lettres de cachet, known as lettres de jussion, which were not, however, always obeyed.

    3
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  • Fleury found no other remedy for this agitationin which appeal was made even to miraclesthan lits de justice and leUres de cachet; Jansenism remained a potent source of trouble within the heart of Catholicism.

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  • SIMON NICHOLAS HENRI LINGUET (1736-1794), French journalist and advocate, was born on the 14th of July 1736, at Reims, whither his father, the assistant principal in the College de Beauvais of Paris, had recently been exiled by lettre de cachet for engaging in the Jansenist controversy.

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  • SIMON NICHOLAS HENRI LINGUET (1736-1794), French journalist and advocate, was born on the 14th of July 1736, at Reims, whither his father, the assistant principal in the College de Beauvais of Paris, had recently been exiled by lettre de cachet for engaging in the Jansenist controversy.

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  • It does not, however, have the usual first flight cachet.

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  • His violent disposition now led him to quarrel with a country gentleman who had insulted his sister, and his semi-exile was changed by lettre de cachet into imprisonment in the Chateau d'If.

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  • While serving the government as a silent weapon against political adversaries or dangerous writers and as a means of punishing culprits of high birth without the scandal of a suit at law, the lettres de cachet had many other uses.

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  • The police, instituted in 1667 by La Reynie, became a public force independent of magistrates and under the direct orders of the ministers, making the arbitrary royal and ministerial authority absolute by means of lettres de cachet (qv.), which were very convenient for the government and very terrible for the individuals concerned.

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    10
  • His violent disposition now led him to quarrel with a country gentleman who had insulted his sister, and his semi-exile was changed by lettre de cachet into imprisonment in the Chateau d'If.

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  • The lettre de cachet belonged to the class of lettres closes, as opposed to lettres patentes, which contained the expression of the legal and permanent will of the king, and had to be furnished with the seal of state affixed by the chancellor.

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  • The lettres de cachet, on the contrary, were signed simply by a secretary of state (formerly known as secretaire des commandements) for the king; they bore merely the imprint of the king's privy seal, from which circumstance they were often called, in the r4th and r5th centuries, lettres de petit signet or lettres de petit cachet, and were entirely exempt from the control of the chancellor.

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  • See Honore Mirabeau, Les Lettres de cachet et des prisons d'etat (Hamburg, 1782), written in the dungeon at Vincennes into which his father had thrown him by a lettre de cachet, one of the ablest and most eloquent of his works, which had an immense circulation and was translated into English with a dedication to the duke of Norfolk in 1788; Frantz Funck-Brentano, Les Lettres de cachet d Paris (Paris, 1904); and Andre Chassaigne, Les Lettres de cachet sous l'ancien regime (Paris, 1903).

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  • Considered solely as French documents, lettres de cachet may be defined as letters signed by the king of France, countersigned by one of his ministers, and closed with the royal seal (cachet) .

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  • As to the marquess, his use of lettres de cachet is perfectly defensible on the theory of lettres de cachet, and Mirabeau, if any son, surely deserved such correction.

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  • The official dose of powdered colchicum is 2 to 5 grains, which may be given in a cachet.

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  • The volatile oil - oleum cubebae - is also official, and is the form in which this drug is most commonly used, the dose being 5 to 20 minims, which may be suspended in mucilage or given after meals in a cachet.

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  • LETTRES DE CACHET.

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  • But in the 14th century the principle was introduced that the order should be written, and hence arose the lettre de cachet.

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  • At the beginning of that reign Malesherbes during his short ministry endeavoured to infuse some measure of justice into the system, and in March 1784 the baron de Breteuil, a minister of the king's household, addressed a circular to the intendants and the lieutenant of police with a view to preventing the crying abuses connected with the issue of lettres de cachet.

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  • Mr Kebede appreciates that Addis Ababa, does not quite carry the same design cachet of Milan or Paris.

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  • The high level of fluorescence of fluorite from this classic area, adds an extra cachet other locations do not have.

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  • During the 1950s and 1960s it enjoyed enormous cachet among visitors from North West England, the Borders, Wales and Ireland.

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  • When he trails about in an abba he gives cachet to my garden I can tell you!

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  • cachet attached to doing the weekly shop at a farmers ' market as opposed to the local supermarket.

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  • Trout have star quality and a certain cachet: every knows what they look like: everyone knows what they taste like.

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  • Cocaine is still seen as the upmarket club and sex drug of choice and its use confers social cachet and respectability on its users.

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  • For advanced skiers, Schladming, with its World Cup pedigree and international cachet, must definitely not be sniffed at.

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  • With Sex and the City costume designer and stylist Patricia Fields dressing the Devil women, the bag has received added cachet.

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  • cachet on the back.

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  • The cover has a San Francisco to Hong Kong first flight cachet.

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  • In these the Richmond cachet is in black and the New Plymouth cachet in red as in the second example.

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  • cachet of listing may add to the value of residential property.

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  • Instead of the delicious illicit tang of the betting shop or brothel it had the sanctimonious cultural cachet of a collective confessional!

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  • Having provoked riots in Budapest & Berlin Antheil had exactly the right cachet for them.

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  • True, they had the unpleasantness of often witnessing acts of odious despotism, ' lettres de cachet ', etc.

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  • The official dose of powdered colchicum is 2 to 5 grains, which may be given in a cachet.

    0
    0
  • As to the marquess, his use of lettres de cachet is perfectly defensible on the theory of lettres de cachet, and Mirabeau, if any son, surely deserved such correction.

    0
    0
  • The affair ended by his escaping to Switzerland, where Sophie joined him; they then went to Holland, where he lived by hackwork for the booksellers; meanwhile Mirabeau had been condemned to death at Pontarlier for rapt et vol, and in May 1777 he was seized by the French police, and imprisoned by a lettre de cachet in the castle of Vincennes.

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    0
  • During his imprisonment he seems to have learnt to control his passions from their very exhaustion, for the early part of his confinement is marked by the indecent letters to Sophie (first published in 1793), and the obscene Erotica biblion and Ma conversion, while to the later months belongs his political work of any value, the Lettres de cachet, published after his liberation (1782).

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  • After a period of work in Holland he betook himself to England, where his treatise on lettres de cachet had been much admired, being translated into English in 1787, and where he was soon admitted into the best Whig literary and political society of London, through his old schoolfellow Gilbert Elliot, who had now inherited his father's baronetcy and estates, and become a leading Whig member of parliament.

    0
    0
  • The mother discouraged the affair, and, though Voltaire tried to avail himself of the mania for proselytizing which then distinguished France, his father stopped any idea of a match by procuring a lelire de cachet, which, however, he did not use.

    0
    0
  • The cachet of the Fukagawa atelier was indiscriminately applied to all such pieces, and has probably proved a source of confusion to collectors.

    0
    0
  • The volatile oil - oleum cubebae - is also official, and is the form in which this drug is most commonly used, the dose being 5 to 20 minims, which may be suspended in mucilage or given after meals in a cachet.

    0
    0
  • LETTRES DE CACHET.

    0
    0
  • Considered solely as French documents, lettres de cachet may be defined as letters signed by the king of France, countersigned by one of his ministers, and closed with the royal seal (cachet) .

    0
    0
  • In the case of organized bodies lettres de cachet were issued for the purpose of enjoining members to assemble or to accomplish some definite act; the provincial estates were convoked in this manner, and it was by a lettre de cachet (called lettre de jussion) that the king ordered a parlement to register a law in the teeth of its own remonstrances.

    0
    0
  • The best-known lettres de cachet, however, were those which may be called penal, by which the king sentenced a subject without trial and without an opportunity of defence to imprisonment in a state prison or an ordinary gaol, confinement in a convent or a hospital, transportation to the colonies, or relegation to a given place within the realm.

    0
    0
  • But in the 14th century the principle was introduced that the order should be written, and hence arose the lettre de cachet.

    0
    0
  • The lettre de cachet belonged to the class of lettres closes, as opposed to lettres patentes, which contained the expression of the legal and permanent will of the king, and had to be furnished with the seal of state affixed by the chancellor.

    0
    0
  • The lettres de cachet, on the contrary, were signed simply by a secretary of state (formerly known as secretaire des commandements) for the king; they bore merely the imprint of the king's privy seal, from which circumstance they were often called, in the r4th and r5th centuries, lettres de petit signet or lettres de petit cachet, and were entirely exempt from the control of the chancellor.

    0
    0
  • While serving the government as a silent weapon against political adversaries or dangerous writers and as a means of punishing culprits of high birth without the scandal of a suit at law, the lettres de cachet had many other uses.

    0
    0
  • Protests against the lettres de cachet were made continually by the parlement of Paris and by the provincial parlements, and often also by the States-General.

    0
    0
  • At the beginning of that reign Malesherbes during his short ministry endeavoured to infuse some measure of justice into the system, and in March 1784 the baron de Breteuil, a minister of the king's household, addressed a circular to the intendants and the lieutenant of police with a view to preventing the crying abuses connected with the issue of lettres de cachet.

    0
    0
  • Lettres de cachet were abolished by the Constituent Assembly, but Napoleon reestablished their equivalent by a political measure in the decree of the 9th of March 1801 on the state prisons.

    0
    0
  • See Honore Mirabeau, Les Lettres de cachet et des prisons d'etat (Hamburg, 1782), written in the dungeon at Vincennes into which his father had thrown him by a lettre de cachet, one of the ablest and most eloquent of his works, which had an immense circulation and was translated into English with a dedication to the duke of Norfolk in 1788; Frantz Funck-Brentano, Les Lettres de cachet d Paris (Paris, 1904); and Andre Chassaigne, Les Lettres de cachet sous l'ancien regime (Paris, 1903).

    0
    0
  • He incurred great unpopularity by his abuse of lettres de cachet, and had to resign in 1775.

    0
    0
  • It has been used to test the question whether Roman Catholic religious orders could enter India, and in 1870 an attempt was made thereby to challenge the validity of a warrant in the nature of a lettre de cachet issued by the viceroy (Ind.

    0
    0
  • In order to enforce the registration of edicts the king would send lettres de cachet, known as lettres de jussion, which were not, however, always obeyed.

    0
    0
  • The police, instituted in 1667 by La Reynie, became a public force independent of magistrates and under the direct orders of the ministers, making the arbitrary royal and ministerial authority absolute by means of lettres de cachet (qv.), which were very convenient for the government and very terrible for the individuals concerned.

    0
    0
  • Fleury found no other remedy for this agitationin which appeal was made even to miraclesthan lits de justice and leUres de cachet; Jansenism remained a potent source of trouble within the heart of Catholicism.

    0
    0
  • But neither Necker nor his wife cared to remain out of office, and in 1787 Necker was banished by "lettre de cachet" 40 leagues from Paris for attacking Calonne.

    0
    0
  • Having provoked riots in Budapest & Berlin Antheil had exactly the right cachet for them.

    0
    0
  • True, they had the unpleasantness of often witnessing acts of odious despotism, ' lettres de cachet ', etc.

    0
    0
  • The company was eventually acquired by fashion entrepreneur Mark Ecko, who bolstered the label's cachet by signing actor Ashton Kutcher as the face of Zoo York in 2004.

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  • Slaters menswear also adds to its outsider cachet by not having any retail shops in London, though almost every other area of England or Scotland has one or more.

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  • Leather can be casual, too, but it's a naturally polished material that instantly lends some cachet to any outfit.

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  • However, one of the few bad marks was that the car lacked "brand cachet".

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