This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

cable

cable

cable Sentence Examples

  • He used to make a cable for his anchor of strips of hickory bark tied together.

    81
    50
  • A submarine cable (figs.

    46
    40
  • A submarine cable (figs.

    46
    40
  • Communication with the United States is effected by land lines to Valparaiso, and thence by a cable along the west coast.

    23
    13
  • Communication with the United States is effected by land lines to Valparaiso, and thence by a cable along the west coast.

    23
    13
  • Even the splash of the anchor in the water, and the noise of the cable running out through the hawse-hole, in no way disturbed them at their occupation, or caused them to evince the slightest curiosity.

    21
    13
  • The cost of the cable before laying depends on the dimensions of its core, the gutta-percha, which still forms the only trustworthy insulator known, constituting the principal item of the expense; for an Atlantic cable of the most approved construction the cost may be taken at f250 to £300 per nautical mile.

    12
    10
  • The cost of the cable before laying depends on the dimensions of its core, the gutta-percha, which still forms the only trustworthy insulator known, constituting the principal item of the expense; for an Atlantic cable of the most approved construction the cost may be taken at f250 to £300 per nautical mile.

    12
    10
  • From the continuous records of slack and strain combined with the weight of the cable it is a simple matter to calculate and plot the depths along the whole route of the cable as actually laid.

    10
    5
  • On the same shaft with P is fixed a brake-wheel furnished with a powerful brake B, by the proper manipulation of which the speed of paying out is regulated, the pull on the cable being at the same time observed by means of D.

    10
    7
  • Between London and Birmingham a paper cable 116 m long and consisting of 72 copper conductors, each weighing 150 lb per statute mile, was laid in 1900.

    8
    7
  • The factors Af (u-v cos i) and Bf (v sin i) give the frictional resistance to sinking, per unit length of the cable, in the direction of the length and transverse to the length respectively.

    7
    5
  • The factors Af (u-v cos i) and Bf (v sin i) give the frictional resistance to sinking, per unit length of the cable, in the direction of the length and transverse to the length respectively.

    7
    5
  • As the cable is sheathed it is stored in large water-tight tanks and kept at a nearly uniform temperature by means of water.

    7
    6
  • For working long submarine cables the apparatus ordinarily employed on land lines cannot be used, as the retarding effect of the electrostatic capacity of the cable is so marked that signals fail to be recorded except at a very slow speed of working.

    5
    2
  • For working long submarine cables the apparatus ordinarily employed on land lines cannot be used, as the retarding effect of the electrostatic capacity of the cable is so marked that signals fail to be recorded except at a very slow speed of working.

    5
    2
  • The lower end e of the cable in the tank T is taken to the testing room, so that continuous tests for electrical condition can be made.

    5
    3
  • In the same way all the conducting sheets on the other side of the paper are connected together and form the earth-plate of this artificial cable, thus representing the sea.

    4
    2
  • Theoretically for a given outside diameter of core the greatest speed of signalling through a cable is obtained when the diameter of the conductor is 606 (1/,/e) the diameter of the core, but this ratio makes the thickness of the guttapercha covering insufficient for mechanical strength.

    4
    3
  • The transmitted signals or electric impulses, which on a land line are sharply defined when received, become attenuated and prolonged in the case of a long cable, and are unable to actuate the.

    4
    3
  • The transmitted signals or electric impulses, which on a land line are sharply defined when received, become attenuated and prolonged in the case of a long cable, and are unable to actuate the.

    4
    3
  • After the " final splice," as it is termed, between these ends has been made, the bight, made fast to a slip rope, is lowered overboard, the slip rope cut, and the cable allowed to sink by its own weight to its resting-place on the sea bed.

    4
    4
  • The grappling of the cable and raising it to the surface from a depth of 2000 fathoms seldom occupy less than twenty-four hours, and since any extra strain due to the pitching of the vessel must be avoided, it is clear that the state of the sea and weather is the predominating factor in the time necessary for effecting the long series of operations which, in the most favourable circumstances, are required for a repair.

    4
    4
  • of the deep-sea cables within the first twelve years, placed the probable life of a cable as low as fifteen years, but the weeding out of unserviceable types of construction, and the general improvement in materials, have by degrees extended that first estimate, until now the limit may be safely placed at not less than forty years.

    4
    4
  • In depths beyond the reach of wave motion, and apart from suspension across a submarine gully, which will sooner or later result in a rupture of the cable, the most frequent cause of interruption is seismic or other shifting of the ocean bed, while in shallower waters and near the shore the dragging of anchors or 40 fishing trawls has been mostly responsible.

    4
    4
  • The grappling of the cable and raising it to the surface from a depth of 2000 fathoms seldom occupy less than twenty-four hours, and since any extra strain due to the pitching of the vessel must be avoided, it is clear that the state of the sea and weather is the predominating factor in the time necessary for effecting the long series of operations which, in the most favourable circumstances, are required for a repair.

    4
    4
  • When this has been done an electrical test is applied, and if the original fracture is between ship and shore the heaving in of cable will continue until the end comes on board.

    4
    5
  • Since by international agreement the wilful damage of a cable has been constituted a criminal offence, and the cable companies have avoided crossing the fishing banks, or have adopted the wise policy of refunding the value of anchors lost on their cables, the number of such fractures has greatly diminished.

    4
    5
  • As to cost, one transatlantic cable repair cost 75,000; the repair of the Aden-Bombay cable, broken in a depth of 1900 fathoms, was effected with the expenditure of 176 miles of new cable, and after a lapse of 251 days, 103 being spent in actual work, which for the remainder of the time was interrupted by the monsoon; a repair of the Lisbon-Porthcurnow cable, broken in the Bay of Biscay in 2700 fathoms, eleven years after the cable was laid, took 215 days, with an expenditure of 300 miles of cable.

    3
    2
  • When the cable is to be laid it is transferred to a cable ship, provided with water-tight tanks similar to those used in the factory.

    3
    3
  • The cable is carefully coiled into the tanks in horizontal flakes, each of which is begun at the outside of the tank and coiled towards the centre.

    3
    3
  • The whole system provides the means of giving sufficient back-pull to the cable to make it grip the drum P, round which it passes several times to prevent slipping.

    3
    3
  • The shaft of P can be readily put in gear with a powerful engine for the purpose of hauling back the cable should it be found necessary to do so.

    3
    3
  • Grappling will be recommenced so as to hook the cable near enough to the end to allow of its being hove to the surface.

    3
    3
  • The gap between the two ends has now to be closed by splicing on new cable and paying out until the buoyed end is reached, which is then hove up and brought on board.

    3
    3
  • It was not, however, a sufficiently perfect representation of a laid cable to serve for duplexing cables of more than a few hundred miles in length.

    3
    3
  • As we have already stated, the distribution of the capacity along the resistance R must in submarine cable work be made to correspond very accurately with the distribution of the capacity along the resistance of the cable.

    3
    3
  • When the cable is to be laid it is transferred to a cable ship, provided with water-tight tanks similar to those used in the factory.

    3
    3
  • The shaft of P can be readily put in gear with a powerful engine for the purpose of hauling back the cable should it be found necessary to do so.

    3
    3
  • As we have already stated, the distribution of the capacity along the resistance R must in submarine cable work be made to correspond very accurately with the distribution of the capacity along the resistance of the cable.

    3
    3
  • On long circuits wcrked by the Wheatstone fast-speed apparatus, and especially on those in which a submarine cable is included, it.

    3
    4
  • On long circuits wcrked by the Wheatstone fast-speed apparatus, and especially on those in which a submarine cable is included, it.

    3
    4
  • Faults or any other irregularity in the cable may be represented by putting resistances of the proper kind into the artificial line.

    2
    1
  • Faults or any other irregularity in the cable may be represented by putting resistances of the proper kind into the artificial line.

    2
    1
  • Sometimes the wires are covered with the compound alone, and the whole cable after being sheathed is finally covered with tarred tape.

    2
    2
  • After the cable has been again subjected to the proper electrical tests and found to be in perfect condition, the ship is taken to the place where the shore end is to be landed.

    2
    2
  • A sufficient length of cable to reach the shore or the cable-house is paid overboard and coiled on a raft or rafts, or on the deck of a steam-launch, in order to be connected with the shore.

    2
    2
  • can be raised or lowered so as to give the cable less or more bend as it passes between them, while I, 3, 5, ...

    2
    2
  • Using these buoys to guide the direction of tow, a grapnel, a species of fivepronged anchor, attached to a strong compound rope formed of strands of steel and manila, is lowered to the bottom and dragged at a slow speed, as it were ploughing a furrow in the sea bottom, in a line at right angles to the cable route, until the behaviour of the dynamometer shows that the cable is hooked.

    2
    2
  • The ship is then stopped, and the cable gradually hove up towards the surface; but in deep water, unless it has been caught near a loose end, the cable will break on the grapnel before it reaches the surface, as the catenary strain on the bight will be greater than it will stand.

    2
    2
  • As an ordinary instance, it has been stated that the cost of repairing the Direct United States cable up to 1900 from its submergence in 1874 averaged £8000 per annum.

    2
    2
  • This fleet of cable ships now numbers over forty, ranging in size from vessels of 300 tons to 10,000 tons carrying capacity.

    2
    2
  • Sometimes the wires are covered with the compound alone, and the whole cable after being sheathed is finally covered with tarred tape.

    2
    2
  • But the mere paying out of sufficient slack is not a guarantee that the cable will always lie closely along the bottom or be free from spans.

    2
    3
  • It is important to observe that the risk is in no way obviated by the increasing slack paid out, except in so far as the amount of sliding which the strength of the cable is able to produce at the points of contact with the ground may be thereby increased.

    2
    3
  • Owing to the experience gained with many thousands of miles of cable in all depths and under varying conditions of weather and climate, the risk, and consequently the cost, of laying has been greatly reduced.

    2
    3
  • in the ordinary methods, a differentially wound receiving instrument was used, one coil being connected with the cable Company and the various Atlantic cables, are worked duplex on method of duplexing a cable was described by Lord Muirhead's plan.

    2
    3
  • Four years later Varley patented his artificial cable, which was the first near approach to a successful solution of the duplex problem on the principle now adopted.

    2
    3
  • Owing to the experience gained with many thousands of miles of cable in all depths and under varying conditions of weather and climate, the risk, and consequently the cost, of laying has been greatly reduced.

    2
    3
  • Four years later Varley patented his artificial cable, which was the first near approach to a successful solution of the duplex problem on the principle now adopted.

    2
    3
  • The leakage through the insulator of the cable is compensated for by connecting high resistances between different points of the strip conductor and the earth coating.

    2
    5
  • The leakage through the insulator of the cable is compensated for by connecting high resistances between different points of the strip conductor and the earth coating.

    2
    5
  • Each of the hotel rooms features a private bedroom with a living room, two cable televisions, mini fridge and microwave, coffee machine, sleep sofa and personal items like a hair dryer, iron and ironing board.

    1
    1
  • The end is taken into the testing room in the cable-house and the conductor connected with the testing instruments, and, should the electrical tests continue satisfactory, the ship is put on the proper course and steams slowly ahead, paying out the cable over her stern.

    1
    2
  • The cable must not be overstrained in the process of submersion, and must be paid out at the proper rate to give the requisite slack.

    1
    2
  • 12, compiled from the actual records obtained during the laying of the Canso-Fayal section of the Commercial Cable Company's system, shows by the full line the actual strain recorded which secured the even distribution of 8 per cent.

    1
    2
  • The life of a cable is usually considered to continue until it is no longer capable of being lifted for repair, but in some cases the duration and frequency of interruptions as affecting Life.

    1
    2
  • The end is taken into the testing room in the cable-house and the conductor connected with the testing instruments, and, should the electrical tests continue satisfactory, the ship is put on the proper course and steams slowly ahead, paying out the cable over her stern.

    1
    2
  • 1 It is evident from equation (13) that the angle of immersion depends solely on the speed of the ship; hence in laying a cable on an irregular bottom it is of great importance that the speed should be sufficiently low.

    1
    3
  • 1 It is evident from equation (13) that the angle of immersion depends solely on the speed of the ship; hence in laying a cable on an irregular bottom it is of great importance that the speed should be sufficiently low.

    1
    3
  • Nearly all the cable companies possess their own steamers, of sufficient dimensions and specially equipped for making ordinary repairs; but for exceptional cases, where a considerable quantity of new cable may have to be inserted, it may be necessary to charter the services of one of the larger vessels owned by a cable-manufacturing company, at a certain sum per day, which may well reach £200 to £300.

    1
    4
  • Guest rooms include cable television with pay-per-view movies, coffee maker, microwave oven, refrigerator and private bathrooms with complimentary amenities.

    1
    4
  • George Washington Cable >>

    0
    0
  • Thomson (Lord Kelvin) at a meeting of the Philosophical Society of Glasgow in 1854, because its greater flexibility renders it less likely to damage the insulating envelope during the manipulation of the cable.

    0
    0
  • This involves the introduction of machinery for measuring and controlling the speed at which it leaves the ship and for measuring the pull on the cable.

    0
    0
  • public convenience, with the loss of revenue and cost of repairs, must together decide the question of either making very extensive renewals or even abandoning the whole cable.

    0
    0
  • In this, as Most important cables, such as those of the Eastern Telegraph and the other with the earth; but it differed from other methods in requiring no " artificial " or balancing cable.

    0
    0
  • A large number of such sheets are prepared and placed together, one over the other, the end of the strip of the first sheet being connected with the beginning of the strip of the second, and so on to the last sheet, the whole representing the conductor of the cable.

    0
    0
  • The cable is supposed to be worked duplex; but, if 5, C1, C2, and AC are removed and the key connected directly with C3, the arrangement for simplex working is obtained.

    0
    0
  • The conductor of the cable is practically insulated, as the condensers in the bridge have a very high resistance; hence no appreciable current ever flows into or out of the line.

    0
    0
  • Two receiving instruments, a siphon recorder and a mirror galvanometer, are shown; one only is absolutely necessary, but it is convenient Cable to have the galvanometer ready, so that in case of accident to the recorder it may be at once switched into circuit by the switch s.

    0
    0
  • After a very short interval of time, the length of which depends on the inductive retardation of the cable, the condensers corresponding to C 1 and C3 at the other end begin to be charged from the cable, and since the charge of C3 passes through the receiving instrument I or G the signal is recorded.

    0
    0
  • When the key is released the condensers and cables at once begin to return to zero potential, and if the key is depressed and released several times in rapid succession the cable is divided into sections of varying potential, which travel rapidly towards the receiving end, and indicate their arrival there by producing corresponding fluctuations in the charge of the condenser C3.

    0
    0
  • A modification (known as the cable code) of the ordinary single needle alphabet is used; that is to say, currents in one direction indicate dots and in the other direction dashes.

    0
    0
  • or similar undertakings, and to obviate this it is necessary to form the " earth " for the cable a few miles out at sea and make connexion thereto by an insulated return wire, which is enclosed in the same sheathing as the core of the main cable.

    0
    0
  • The heavier cores, with the consequent advance in speed of working attainable, have necessitated the introduction of automatic sending, the instruments adopted being in general a modification of the Wheatstone transmitter adapted to the form of cable signals, while the regularity of transmission thus secured has caused its introduction even on circuits where the speed cannot exceed that of the ordinary operator's hand signalling.

    0
    0
  • In ordinary hand-sending the Au c curb end of the cable is put to one or the other pole of the ti .

    0
    0
  • Owing to the difficulty of maintaining perfect balance on duplexed cables, curb sending is not now used, but the signals are transmitted by means of an apparatus similar to the Wheatstone automatic transmitter used on land lines and differing from the latter only in regard to the alphabet employed; the signals from the transmitter actuate a relay having heavy armatures which in turn transmit the signals to the cable; this arrangement gives very firm signals, a point of great importance for good working.

    0
    0
  • The speed of a cable is given in words per minute, the conventional number of five letters per word being understood, though in actual practice, owing to the extensive use of special codes, the number of letters per word is really between eight and nine; and this forms a considerable factor in lowering the earning capacity of a cable.

    0
    0
  • A relay capable of working at the end of a long cable has long been a desideratum.

    0
    0
  • By a modification of this apparatus the message, instead of being immediately re-transmitted into the second cable, can be punched on a paper slip, which can be inserted in the usual way into an automatic transmitter, so as to send either cable or Morse signals.

    0
    0
  • A, slip as received on recorder, using ordinary relays for translating on to second cable; B, slip as received on recorder, when interpolator is used at intermediate station, for sending on to second cable; C (four cells through a line, KR=3.6), signals with recorder under ordinary conditions; D, all conditions the same as in C, but magnifying relay inserted between the end of the line and the recorder.

    0
    0
  • a signal to take more, and at the end of the element less of the total arrival current from the cable than would traverse it if the shunt were non-inductive.

    0
    0
  • sending current enters an adjustable mid-point in the g coil and passes through the two halves of the winding to the ends connected to the cable and artificial line respectively.

    0
    0
  • The advantage of using the magnetic bridge duplex method is that the maximum current is sent to line or cable, and the receiving system benefits accordingly.

    0
    0
  • had been laid, the cable snapped, owing to a mistake in the manipulation of the brake, and the ships returned to Plymouth with what remained.

    0
    0
  • of new cable having been made, the attempt was renewed, with the same ships, but on this occasion it was * 5th February 1870.-Transfer of telegraphs to the state.

    0
    0
  • Submarine Telegraphs.-The first commercially successful cable was that laid across the straits of Dover from the South Foreland to Sangatte by T.

    0
    0
  • Gisborne for a land line connecting St John's, Newfoundland, and Cape Ray, in the Gulf of St Lawrence, and proceeded himself to get control of the points on the American coast most suitable as landing places for a cable.

    0
    0
  • On the British side the question of constructing an Atlantic cable was engaging the attention of the Magnetic Telegraph Company and its engineer Mr (afterwards Sir) Charles Bright.

    0
    0
  • Visiting England in 1856, Field entered into an agreement with Bright and with John Watkins Brett, who with his brother Jacob had proposed the constructing of an Atlantic cable eleven years previously, with the object of forming a company for establishing and working electric telegraphic communication between Newfoundland and Ireland.

    0
    0
  • The manufacture of the cable, begun early in the following year, was finished in June, and before the end of July it was stowed partly in the American ship " Niagara " and partly in decided to begin paying out in mid-ocean, the two vessels, after splicing together the ends of the cable they had on board, sailing away from each other in opposite directions.

    0
    0
  • A splice having been made they started on the 26th, but the cable broke almost immediately.

    0
    0
  • Although a good deal of cable had been lost, enough remained to connect the British and American shores, and accordingly it was determined to make another attempt immediately.

    0
    0
  • To this end the ships sailed from Queenstown on the 17th of July, and having spliced the cable in mid-ocean, started to pay it out on the 29th.

    0
    0
  • The electrical condition of the cable was then excellent, but unfortunately the electrician in charge, Wildman Whitehouse, conceived the wrong idea that it should be worked by currents of high potential.

    0
    0
  • The next attempt at laying an Atlantic cable was made in 1865, the necessary capital being again raised in England.

    0
    0
  • She started from Valentia at the end of July, but fault after fault was discovered in the cable and the final misfortune was that on the 2nd of August, when nearly 1200 m.

    0
    0
  • The Atlantic Telegraph Company was reconstituted as the AngloAmerican Telegraph Company with a capital of f600,000 and sufficient cable was ordered not only to lay a line across the ocean but also to complete the 1865 cable.

    0
    0
  • The " Great Eastern " was again employed, and leaving the south-west coast of Ireland on the 13th of July she reached Trinity Bay a fortnight later, without serious mishap. She then steamed eastwards again, and on the 13th of August made her first attempt to recover the lost cable.

    0
    0
  • of submarine cable had been laid, while ten years later it was computed that 162,000 nautical miles of cable were in existence, representing a capital of £40,000,000, 75 per cent.

    0
    0
  • The two cables to Holland and one of the cables to Germany were already the property of Great Britain, and the German Union Company's cable to Germany was purchased by the German government.

    0
    0
  • The offices of the Submarine Company in London, Dover, Ramsgate, East Dean and Jersey were purchased by the Post Office, as well as the cable ship; and the staff, 370 in number, was taken over by the government.

    0
    0
  • The following year an additional cable was laid from Bacton, in Norfolk, to Borkum, in Germany, at the joint expense of the British and German governments.

    0
    0
  • In 1893 a contract was made with the Eastern and South Africa Telegraph Company for the construction, laying and maintenance of a cable from Zanzibar to the Seychelles and Mauritius, a distance of 2210 m., for a subsidy of £28,000 a year for twenty years.

    0
    0
  • In 1894 the Eastern Extension Telegraph Company laid a cable from Singapore to Labuan and Hong Kong, thus duplicating the route and making it an all-British line.

    0
    0
  • In 1900 direct telegraph working was established between London and Genoa, and a third cable was laid to South Africa via St Helena and Ascension.

    0
    0
  • In 1896 a committee was appointed to consider the proposal for laying a telegraph cable between British North America and Australasia.

    0
    0
  • The committee was of opinion that the cable should be owned and worked by the governments interested, and that the general direction should be in the hands of a manager in London under the control of a small board at which the associated governments should be represented.

    0
    0
  • In the case of inland telegraphs and of cable communication with the continent of Europe government control has entirely superseded private companies.

    0
    0
  • Under the Pacific Cable Act 1901 the capital sum of £2,000,000 was provided in the following proportions: United Kingdom, 5/18ths with 3 representatives including the chairman.

    0
    0
  • The annual expenses of the board include £35,000 for cable repairs and reserve and a fixed payment to the National Debt Commissioners of £77,544 as sinking fund to amortise capital expenditure in fifty years.

    0
    0
  • Military School (1908) on " Submarine Cable Laying and Repairing," and articles in Quarterly Review (April 1903) on " Imperial Telegraphs," and in Edinburgh Review (April 1908) on " The International RadioTelegraphic Convention."

    0
    0
  • Following on this he made an interesting experiment, using Morse's method, to connect the Isle of Wight telegraphically with the mainland, by conduction across the Solent in two places, during a temporary failure of the submarine cable in 1882 in that channel.

    0
    0
  • or conductive telegraphy not necessitating a continuous cable.

    0
    0
  • Elec. Eng., 27, p. 938.) It may be explained as follows: - Suppose a battery on shore to have one pole earthed and the other connected to an insulated submarine cable, the distant end of which was also earthed; if now a galvanometer is inserted anywhere in the cable, a current will be found flowing through the cable and returning by various paths through the sea.

    0
    0
  • If we suppose the cable interrupted at any place, and both sides of the gap earthed by connexion to plates, then the same conditions will still hold.

    0
    0
  • A cable is carried out from the mainland at Crookhaven for 7 m., and the outer end earthed by connexion with a copper mushroom anchor.

    0
    0
  • If a battery on the mainland is connected through a key with the shore end of the main cable, and a speaking galvanometer is in circuit with the short cable crossing the Fastnet rock, then closing or opening the battery connexion will create a deflection of the galvanometer.

    0
    0
  • Owing to the rough seas sweeping over the Fastnet, the conditions are such that any ordinary submarine cable would be broken by the wearing action of the waves at the rock boundary in a very short time.

    0
    0
  • The station was opened shortly afterwards for public service, the rates being greatly below that then current for the cable service.

    0
    0
  • In the types of cable that were first used, the wires, usually with a cotton insulation, were drawn into lead tubes, and the tubes filled with paraffin or other similar compound, which kept the wires from the injurious effects of any moisture which might penetrate the lead tube.

    0
    0
  • This form of cable has been superseded by a type with paper insulation.

    0
    0
  • In the manufacture of the cable the wires are first enclosed in the paper, which is applied sometimes longitudinally and sometimes spirally.

    0
    0
  • The cable is then placed in an oven, and, after all moisture has been driven off, it is passed through a lead press whence it emerges protected by a continuous lead pipe.

    0
    0
  • The electrostatic capacity of a cable of this type is low, and its dimensions are small, the external diameter of a cable containing 1600 ten-lb conductors being only 24 in.

    0
    0
  • In this case the cables terminate upon the poles, the connexions between the cable wires and the open wires being made with rubber-covered leads.

    0
    0
  • Attempts have been made to improve submarine cables in this respect, and in 1906 a short cable " loaded " with Pupin coils was laid across Lake Constance.

    0
    0
  • The problem, however, of constructing a deep-sea cable satisfactorily, with suitable inductance coils inserted at short distances apart, is a difficult one, and one which it cannot be said has been solved.

    0
    0
  • There is a various reading «aµuAos (cable) for Ka/lfXos (camel), but Cheyne, in the Ency.

    0
    0
  • When an engineer has to construct a railway up a hill having a still steeper slope, he must secure practicable gradients by laying out the line in ascending spirals, if necessary tunnelling into the hill, as on the St Gothard railway, or in a series of zigzags, or he must resort to a rack or a cable railway.

    0
    0
  • For surmounting still steeper slopes, cable railways may be employed.

    0
    0
  • Of these there are two main systems: (1) a continuous cable is carried over two main drums at each end of the line, and the motion is derived either (a) from the weight of the descending load or (b) from a motor acting on one of the main drums; (2) each end of the cable is attached to wagons, one set of which accordingly ascends as the other descends.

    0
    0
  • The weight required to cause the downward motion is obtained either by means of the material which has to be transported to the bottom of the hill or by water ballast, while to aid and regulate the motion generally steam or electric motors are arranged to act on the main drums, round which the cable is passed with a sufficient number of turns to prevent slipping.

    0
    0
  • Its promoters recognized the unsuitability of ordinary steam locomotives for underground railways, and intended to work it by means of a moving cable; but before it was completed, electric traction had developed so far as to be available for use on such lines.

    0
    0
  • The cable is slow; and unless development along new lines of com p ressed air or some sort of chemical engine takes place, electricity will monopolize the field.

    0
    0
  • This custom of buying and selling through brokers continued unshaken until the laying of the Atlantic cable tempted selling brokers occasionally, and even some buying brokers, to buy direct from American factors by telegraph and thus transform themselves into quasi-importers.

    0
    0
  • To these publications were at various times added the annual report, issued in December, the American crop report, issued in September, and the daily advices by cable from America, issued every morning."

    0
    0
  • If a spinner is pressed by a shipper to make quotations with refusal for two or three days to give time for business to be settled by cable, it is evidently not impossible for the spinner to shift the risk involved by getting in turn from his broker refusal quotations for cotton.

    0
    0
  • Recent statistics bearing upon cotton are collected annually in the two publications, Shepperson's Cotton Facts and Jones's Handbook for Daily Cable Records of Cotton Crop Statistics.

    0
    0
  • Carll as follows: " Suppose the tools to have been just run to the bottom of the well, the jars closed and the cable slack.

    0
    0
  • When the jars come together they slack back about 4 in., and the cable is in position to be clamped in the temper-screw.

    0
    0
  • The tools may be standing at the bottom - while he is playing with the slack of the cable or they may be swinging all the time several feet from the bottom.

    0
    0
  • The temper-screw forms the connecting link between the walking-beam and cable, and it is ' let out ' gradually to regulate the play of the jars as fast as the drill penetrates.

    0
    0
  • In readiness for a fracture of the drilling tools or of the cable, special appliances known as fishing tools are provided.

    0
    0
  • The fishing tools are generally attached to the cable, and are used with portions of the ordinary string of tools, but some are fitted to pump-rods or tubing, and others to special rods.

    0
    0
  • The use of slender wooden boring-rods instead of a cable.

    0
    0
  • The system usually adopted is a modification of the Canadian system already described, the boring rods being, however, of iron instead of wood, but the cable system has also to some extent been used.

    0
    0
  • plain-laid manila cable a wire rope has in some cases been successfully substituted.

    0
    0
  • A submarine cable connects the town with Zanzibar.

    0
    0
  • He likewise refers to the use of byblus as tow for caulking the seams of ships; and the statement of Theophrastus that King Antigonus made the rigging of his fleet of the same material is illustrated by the ship's cable, ern-Nov (315(Ncvov, wherewith the doors were fastened when Ulysses slew the suitors in his hall (Odyss.

    0
    0
  • Havana, Santiago and Cienfuegos are cable ports.

    0
    0
  • A cable connects.

    0
    0
  • The cable and telegraph line from Otranto, in Italy, to Constantinople, has an important station here.

    0
    0
  • The telegraph lines, which date from 1852, are owned and operated by the national government, with the exception of the lines constructed by private railway companies, and the cable lines of the Amazon and the coast.

    0
    0
  • At Para connexion is made with the cable laid in the bed of the Amazon to Manaos, which is owned and operated by a subsidized English company.

    0
    0
  • At Vizeu, Para, connexion is made with a French cable to the West Indies and the United States, and at Pernambuco with two cable lines to Europe.

    0
    0
  • A coastwise cable runs from Para to Montevideo with double cables between Pernambuco and Montevideo.

    0
    0
  • The corporation has acquired the gas-works, the cable tramways (leased to a company), the electric lighting of the streets, and the water-supply from the Pentlands (reinforced by additional sources in the Moorfoot Hills and Talla Water).

    0
    0
  • These suburbs are connected with the city, some by railway, some by steam, cable and electric tramways, and others by ferry across Port Jackson.

    0
    0
  • A submarine cable from Durban goes to Zanzibar and Aden, whence there is communication with every quarter of the globe.

    0
    0
  • Iquique is a city of much commercial importance and is provided with banks, substantial business houses, newspapers, clubs, schools, railways, tramways, electric lights, telephone lines, and steamship and cable communication with the outside world.

    0
    0
  • Actively interested with Cyrus Field in the laying of the first Atlantic cable, he was president of the New York, Newfoundland & London Telegraph Company, and his frequent cash advances made the success of the company possible; he was president of the North American Telegraph Company also, which controlled more than one-half of the telegraph lines of the United States.

    0
    0
  • The Burma Oil Company since 1889 has worked by drilled wells on the American or cable system, and the amount produced is yearly becoming more and more important.

    0
    0
  • ih shows also a modern form of the hydraulic press, applied to the operation of covering an electric cable with a lead coating.

    0
    0
  • His talent for electrical engineering was soon shown, and his progress was rapid; so that in 1852 he was appointed engineer to the Magnetic Telegraph Company, and in that capacity superintended the laying of lines in various parts of the British Isles, including in 1853 the first cable between Great Britain and Ireland, from Portpatrick to Donaghadee.

    0
    0
  • His experiments convinced him of the practicability of an electric submarine cable connexion between Ireland and America; and having in 1855 already discussed the question with Cyrus Field, who with J.

    0
    0
  • Accra is connected by cable with Europe and South Africa, and is the sea terminus of a railway serving the districts N.E., where are flourishing cocoa plantations.

    0
    0
  • There are two submarine cable lines on the Peruvian coastthe (American) Central and South American Co.

    0
    0
  • extending from Panama to Valparaiso, and the (British) West Coast Cable Co., subsidiary to the Eastern Telegraph Co., with a cable between Callao and Valparaiso.

    0
    0
  • Finally, the third layer, known as "the Peak," and reached by a cable tramway, is dotted over with private houses and bungalows, the summer health resort of those who can afford them; here a new residence for the governor was begun in 1900.

    0
    0
  • Victoria is connected with the mainland by cable, and is a favourite tourist resort for the whole west coast of North America.

    0
    0
  • Another comparison method much used in submarine cable work is the method of mixtures, originally due to Lord Kelvin and usually called Thomson and Gott's method.

    0
    0
  • It has a depth of 6 to io fathoms, with a good bottom, and large ships can anchor at a cable's length from the shore.

    0
    0
  • They are identified with the ancient Insulae Zenobii, and were ceded by the sultan of Muscat to Britain in 1854 for the purposes of a cable station.

    0
    0
  • VALLOMBROSA, a summer resort of Tuscany, Italy, in the province of Florence, reached by a cable railway 5 m.

    0
    0
  • The telegraph cable companies were quick to apply and to extend the oceanographical methods useful in cable-laying, and to their practical acuteness many of the most important improvements in apparatus are due.

    0
    0
  • The influence of wind project for laying a telegraph cable between Ireland and on water-level is most remarkable in heavy storms on the flat Newfoundland.

    0
    0
  • The earliest deep-sea sounding on record is that of cruise in the North Pacific, sounding out lines for a projected Captain Phipps on the 4th of September 1773 in the Norwegian Pacific cable.

    0
    0
  • Siemens has pointed out that a profile of the sea-bed can be delineated by taking account of the varying strain on a submarine cable while it is being laid, and the average depth of a section can thus be ascertained with some accuracy.

    0
    0
  • Where the French telegraph cable between Brest and New York passes from the continental shelf of the Bay of Biscay to the depths of the Atlantic the angle of slope is.

    0
    0
  • There is a submarine cable from Dar-es-Salaam to Zanzibar, and an overland line connecting all the coast stations.

    0
    0
  • They consist of an electric battery cable and lamp-holders and small glow lamps; that for the hind-sight is coloured.

    0
    0
  • Peace, railways, telegraphs (including cable connexion with Europe), agricultural machinery and a larger population had carried New Zealand beyond the primitive stage.

    0
    0
  • Grand Bassam is connected with Europe by submarine cable via Dakar.

    0
    0
  • The island is a station of the British Pacific cable.

    0
    0
  • Some suspension bridges have broken down in consequence of the oscillations produced by bodies of men marching in step. In 1850 a suspension bridge cable was carried on a separate saddle on rollers on each pier.

    0
    0
  • in diameter; each was composed of seven strands, containing 520 parallel wires, or 3640 wires in each cable.

    0
    0
  • Each cable has 19 strands of 278 parallel steel wires, 7 B.W.G.

    0
    0
  • Each cable is composed of 37 strands of 208 wires, or 7696 parallel steel wires, No.

    0
    0
  • Cast steel clamps hold the cable together, and to these the suspending rods are attached.

    0
    0
  • The supporting structure is a cable suspension bridge with stiffening girders.

    0
    0
  • In narrow ravines a bridge of one span may be rolled out, if the projecting end is supported on a temporary suspension cable anchored on each side.

    0
    0
  • The free end is slung to a block running on the cable.

    0
    0
  • The exports, chiefly to the United States, include salt, sponges and sisal hemp. Grand Turk is in cable communication with Bermuda and with Kingston, Jamaica, some 420 m.

    0
    0
  • In April 1898, while with his fleet at Hong Kong, he was notified by cable that war had begun between the United States and Spain, and was ordered to "capture or destroy the Spanish fleet" then in Philippine waters.

    0
    0
  • in circumference, but it has no value other than that of an ocean cable station.

    0
    0
  • There are complete postal and telegraphic facilities in all parts of the colony save the Saharan Territories, and cable communication with France.

    0
    0
  • The United States telegraph ship " Nero," while surveying for a cable between Hawaii and the Philippines, sounded in 1900 the greatest depth yet known between Midway Islands and Guam (12° 43' N., 1 45° 49' E.) in 5269 fathoms, or almost exactly 6 m.

    0
    0
  • " Challenger," 1873-1876; " Egeria, " 1888-1889 and 1899; " Elisabeth," 1877; " Gazelle," 1875-1876; " Planet," 1906; " Penguin," 1891-1903; " Tuscarora," 1873-1874; " Vettor Pisani," 1884; " Vitraz," 1887-1888; also observations of surveying and cable ships, and special papers in the Annalen der Hydrographie (for distribution of temperature see G.

    0
    0
  • Marcus Island, in 23° 10' N., 154° E., was annexed by Japan in 1899 with a view to its becoming a cable station.

    0
    0
  • Melbourne has a complete tramway system; all the chief suburbs are connected with the city by cable trams. The tramways are controlled by a trust, representing twelve of the metropolitan municipalities.

    0
    0
  • It is the seaward terminus of the Yukon & White Pass railway, by which goods and passengers reach the Klondike; and is connected with Dawson by telegraph and with Seattle by cable, and with Seattle, San Francisco and other Pacific ports by steamers.

    0
    0
  • On the Schlossberg, which can be ascended by a cable tramway, beautiful parks have been laid out, and on its top is the bell-tower, 60 ft.

    0
    0
  • In bringing about a system of penny postage throughout the empire; in forwarding the construction of the Pacific cable to secure close and safe imperial telegraphic connexion; in creating rapid and efficient lines of steamship communication with the motherland and all the colonies; in granting tariff preference to British goods and in striving for preferential treatment of inter-imperial trade; in assuming responsibility for imperial defence at the two important stations of Halifax and Esquimalt, - Canada, under the guidance of Sir Wilfrid Laurier and his party, took a leading part and showed a truly national spirit.

    0
    0
  • The chief features of his administration were the fiscal preference of 333% in favour of goods imported into Canada from Great Britain, the despatch of Canadian contingents to South Africa during the Boer war, the contract with the Grand Trunk railway for the construction of a second transcontinental road from ocean to ocean, the assumption by Canada of the imperial fortresses at Halifax and Esquimault, the appointment of a federal railway commission with power to regulate freight charges, express rates and telephone rates, and the relations between competing companies, the reduction of the postal rate to Great Britain from 5 cents to 2 cents and of the domestic rate from 3 cents to 2 cents, a substantial contribution to the Pacific cable, a practical and courageous policy of settlement and development in the Western territories, the division of the North-West territories into the provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan and the enactment of the legislation necessary to give them provincial status, and finally (1910), a tariff arrangement with the United States, which, if not all that Canada might claim in the way of reciprocity, showed how entirely the course of events had changed the balance of commercial interests in North America.

    0
    0
  • The city is lighted by gas and electricity, has an abundant water-supply, and cable connexion with Europe, the United States, other Antilles and South America.

    0
    0
  • Under its provisions it is a punishable offence " to break or injure a submarine cable wilfully or by culpable negligence in such manner as might interrupt or obstruct telegraphic communication either wholly or partially, such punishment being without prejudice to any civil action for damages.

    0
    0
  • When a ship engaged in repairing a cable exhibits the said signals, other vessels which see them or are able to see them shall withdraw to or keep beyond a distance of one nautical mile at least from the ship in question so as not to interfere with her operations " (art.

    0
    0
  • " Owners of ships or vessels who can prove that they have sacrificed an anchor, a net or other fishing-gear in order to avoid injuring a submarine cable shall receive compensation from the owner of the cable," and " in order to establish a claim to such compensation a statement supported by the evidence of the crew should whenever possible be drawn up immediately after the occurrence and the master must within twenty-four hours after his return to or next putting into port make a declaration to the proper authorities " (art.

    0
    0
  • Section 3 of the earlier act provides that a person who injures the cable either wilfully or by culpable negligence is " guilty of a misdemeanour and on conviction: (a) if he acted wilfully, shall be liable to penal servitude for a term not exceeding five years, or to imprisonment with or without hard labour for a term not exceeding two years, and to a fine either in lieu of or in addition to such penal servitude or imprisonment; and (b) if he acted by culpable negligence shall be liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding three months without hard labour, and to a fine not exceeding £100 either in lieu of or in addition to such imprisonment."

    0
    0
  • Honolulu has cable connexion with San Francisco and the East, and the several islands of the group are served by wireless telegraph.

    0
    0
  • from Honolulu, a Pacific cable relay station and a post of the U.S. navy marines; and the county of Kauai, including Kauai and Niihau islands.

    0
    0
  • Transactions with distant markets are now done almost entirely by cable, and a remarkable development of the telegraphic code has enabled merchants to pack a good deal into a brief message.

    0
    0
  • A cable sent to India in the evening may bring a reply next morning, and in these days of rapid cotton fluctuations mail advices are confined mainly to general discussion, hypothetical inquiry, advice, admonition and complaint.

    0
    0
  • Peterhead is the terminus of a cable to Norway.

    0
    0
  • The other six are connected to each other and to the lowest one by wire cables and pulleys in such a way that when the cable which connects the two lowest tubes is wound in by means of a winch, each of the tubes except the fixed one will rise within the next one through the same distance.

    0
    0
  • The grapnels tore away, and the "Iris II.," slipping her cable, dropped alongside the "Vindictive" to land her men across her.

    0
    0
  • From 1852 to 1867 he was in charge of the longitude department of the United States coast survey; he developed and organized the service, was one of the first to determine longitudes by telegraphic means, and employed the Atlantic cable in 1866 to establish longitude-relations between Europe and America.

    0
    0
  • GG; Flanges on the ore bucket; P, Cinder notch; HH, Fixed flanges on the top of RR', Water cooled boxes; the furnace; S, Blast pipe; J, Counterweighted false bell; T, Cable for allowing conical K, Main bell; bottom of bucket to 0, Tuyere; drop.

    0
    0
  • The farther descent of the bucket being thus arrested, the special cable T is now slackened, so that the conical bottom of the bucket drops down, pressing down by its weight the the string of moulds, each thus containing a pig, moves slowly forward, the pigs solidify and cool, the more quickly because in transit they are sprayed with water or even submerged in L Winter Stock Pile .?t' S ..

    0
    0
  • The special cable T is now tightened again, and lifts the bottom of the bucket so as both to close it and to close the space between J and K, by allowing J to rise back to its initial place.

    0
    0
  • On the south, the Lower Town is separated from the other districts by the Ilica, a long street traversed by a cable tramway.

    0
    0
  • In 1903 the offices of the governor-general and of the court of appeal of French West Africa were transferred from St Louis to Dakar, which is also the seat of a bishop. In February 1905 a submarine cable was laid between Brest and Dakar, affording direct telegraphic communication between France and her West African colonies by an all French route.

    0
    0
  • The protectorate belongs to the Postal Union, and is connected by cable with the British telegraph station at Bonny in the Niger delta.

    0
    0
  • Roebling's Sons Company has an immense wire and cable manufactory here - iron and steel bridge building materials and other structural work, plumbers' supplies (manufactured by the J.

    0
    0
  • There is telegraphic communication between Brass and Bonny and Europe by submarine cable, and land lines from Calabar to Lagos and from Lagos to Jebba, Lokoja, Zungeru, Kano, &c., a connexion being also effected with the telegraph system of French West Africa.

    0
    0
  • By order of the Government the former were diverted to the Bureau by the Post Office and cable companies.

    0
    0
  • Cable and Postal Censorship. - In addition to the Press Bureau, censorships of incoming and outgoing cables, letters and parcels, were established by the War Office at the commencement of the war with the three-fold object of preventing information of military value from reaching the enemy, of acquiring similar information for British purposes and of checking the dissemination of information likely to be useful to the enemy or prejudicial to the Allies.

    0
    0
  • The cable censorship extended throughout the Empire, and the number of persons employed in the United Kingdom, exclusive of those in the Press Bureau, was about 200.

    0
    0
  • The department was divided into three branches - (r) the section which censored the correspondence of prisoners of war in the United Kingdom and British prisoners in enemy countries; (2) the private correspondence section which dealt with letters from members of the British Expeditionary Force, letters and parcels to and from certain foreign countries, press messages sent abroad by other means than cable, and newspapers.

    0
    0
  • In the early part of the war a great outcry was made by the British (and also the American) newspapers concerning the working of the Press cable censorship in London.

    0
    0
  • He started cable works of his own at Elmer's End, Kent, in 1896, and gave valuable evidence before the commission appointed to inquire into the possibility of laying a Pacific cable.

    0
    0
  • It is the landing-place for two transatlantic and one coastwise cable lines.

    0
    0
  • Immediately north of the Gulf of Guayaquil is the Bay of Santa Plena, with a small port of the same name, which has a good, well-sheltered anchorage and is the landing-place of the West Coast cable.

    0
    0
  • When of one cable, called the taravita, the passenger and his luggage are drawn across in a rude kind of basket suspended from it; but when two or more cables are used, transverse sticks of bamboo and reeds are laid upon them, forming a rude prototype of the regular suspension bridge.

    0
    0
  • The national capital is connected with the submarine cable at Santa Elena (via Guayaquil) and at Tumaco, in Colombia.

    0
    0
  • The city is provided with tramway and telephone services, the streets are lighted with gas and electricity, and telegraph communication with the outside world is maintained by means of the West Coast cable, which lands at the small port of Santa Elena, on the Pacific coast, about 65 m.

    0
    0
  • In 1857, after some unfruitful preliminary attempts, the Turkish Government agreed to the construction of a line from Scutari to Bagdad on their behalf; this was finished in 1861 and was extended to Fao by 1864, after further lengthy negotiations, when it was linked up with the cable from Karachi which had been laid meanwhile.

    0
    0
  • They now run from Karachi to Jask, whence a cable runs to Muscat; from Jask one cable runs to Hanjam, and thence to Bushire; another cable runs direct to Bushire.

    0
    0
Browse other sentences examples →