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c-section

c-section

c-section Sentence Examples

  • I had a really traumatic birth, he was born 2 mths early by emergency c-section due to me having a placenta abruption.

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  • They can also be great for a new mom who is recovering from a C-section or difficult delivery.

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  • Reportedly, Spears' original intent was to schedule a c-section delivery on September 14, the same day her first child was born, but hubby Kevin Federline opposed to the idea.

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  • This could turn into a dangerous pregnancy that could require a C-section.

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  • This could turn into a dangerous pregnancy that could require a C-section.

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  • This will help determine if your bitch will need a C-section to deliver her litter.

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  • A cesarean section, also called a c-section, is a surgical procedure in which an incision is made through a woman's abdomen and uterus to deliver her baby.

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  • The procedure is performed in the United States on nearly one in every four women resulting in more than 900,000 babies each year being delivered by c-section.

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  • The procedure is often used in women who have had a previous c-section, but if the incision on the uterus is not vertical, the woman can try a vaginal birth after cesarean (VBAC).

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  • Other conditions which might indicate a need for c-section include: vaginal herpes, hypertension (high blood pressure), and uncontrolled diabetes in the mother.

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  • The use of continuous monitoring does result in a higher c-section rate partly because the tracing can be misinterpreted or because the mother usually requires more interventions when she cannot be mobile.

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  • Spinal anesthesia operates on the same principle as epidural anesthesia and is used primarily in cases of c-section delivery.

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  • However, some physicians are concerned that the late 1990s and early 2000s trend toward decreasing elective c-section deliveries will result in more cases of brachial plexopathy among newborns.

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  • Cesarean section-Delivery of a baby through an incision in the mother's abdomen instead of through the vagina; also called a C-section, Cesarean birth, or Cesarean delivery.

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  • A cesarean section (also referred to as c-section) is the birth of a fetus accomplished by performing a surgical incision through the maternal abdomen and uterus.

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  • As of 2004, the average c-section rate is one out of every four births or approximately 26 percent of all births.

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  • A c-section allows safe and quick delivery of a baby when a vaginal delivery is not possible.

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  • Indications that are more controversial include breech presentation, previous c-section, major congenital anomalies, cervical cerclage, and severe Rh isoimmunization.

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  • According to the United States Public Health Service, 35 percent of all c-sections are performed because the woman has had a previous c-section.

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  • The skin incision for a c-section is either transverse (Pfannenstiel) or vertical and does not indicate the type of incision made into the uterus.

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  • Failure to progress and/or dystocia is the second most common reason for a c-section and represents about 30 percent of all cases.

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  • Breech presentations were still delivered vaginally in the 1970s, but with the advent of the malpractice climate, many doctors shied away from this practice, opting to perform a c-section.

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  • At this point, if a woman is in early labor, a c-section may have to be performed.

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  • The birth attendant must insert a hand into the vagina and relieve pressure on the cord until a c-section is performed.

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  • This situation demands an immediate c-section.

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  • With a complete previa, a c-section is mandatory as cervical dilation would cause bleeding.

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  • Women with partial previas will usually need a c-section due to bleeding problems, but those with marginal previas can often deliver vaginally.

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  • There are some precautions any pregnant woman can follow to enhance her chances of preventing a c-section.

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  • She should check her doctor's c-section rate to see if it is unnecessarily high.

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  • From the beginning, she should discuss with her doctor that she wants to avoid having a c-section if at all possible and enlist his opinion on how to achieve it.

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  • Studies show that women who go to the hospital early have a higher c-section rate than those who do not.

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  • Doulas have a lower c-section rate and can offer massage, different positions, and support alternatives during the difficult phases of labor.

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  • There is no perfect anesthesia for a c-section because every choice has its advantages and disadvantages.

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  • When a c-section becomes necessary and if it is not an emergency, the mother and her significant other should take part in the choice of anesthetic by being informed of risks and side effects.

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  • In some cases, a general anesthetic will be administered if the regional does not work or if it is an emergency c-section.

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  • Immediate postpartal care after a c-section is similar to post-operative care with the exception of palpating the fundus (top of the uterus) for firmness.

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  • The maternal death rate for c-section is less than 0.02 percent (5.8 per 100,000 live births), but that is four times the maternal death rate associated with vaginal delivery.

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  • The mother is at risk for increased bleeding from two incision sites and a c-section usually has twice as much blood loss as a vaginal delivery during surgery.

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  • The after-effects of a c-section vary, depending on the woman's age, physical fitness, and overall health.

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  • The prognosis for a successful vaginal birth after a cesarean (VBAC) may be at least 75 percent, especially when the c-section involved a low transverse incision in the uterus, and there were no complications during or after delivery.

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  • Of the hundreds of thousands of women in the United States who undergo a c-section each year, about 500 die from serious infections, hemorrhaging, or other complications.

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  • Undergoing a c-section may inflict psychological distress on the mother, beyond hormonal mood swings and postpartum depression.

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  • To overcome these feelings, the woman needs to understand why the c-section was crucial.

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  • It is important that she be able to verbalize an understanding that she could not control the events that made the c-section necessary and recognize the importance of preserving the health and safety of both herself and her child.

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  • Women who undergo a c-section should be encouraged to share their feelings with others.

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  • If a fetus is in the breech position in the last weeks of pregnancy, there are three possible courses of action: cesarean section (or c-section), attempted external cephalic version, or vaginal breech delivery.

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  • A c-section is performed by an obstetrician, who makes an incision in the lower abdomen through which the baby is delivered.

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  • Like any surgical procedure, c-section carries a risk of infection and hemorrhage.

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  • Postpartum recovery is also longer with c-section than with vaginal delivery.

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  • C-section is generally the delivery mode of choice for premature babies due to the other risks these infants face (such as lung immaturity).

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  • Open prenatal surgery requires a procedure similar to a cesarean section (C-section) for delivering a baby through the mother's abdomen.

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  • Cesarean section-Delivery of a baby through an incision in the mother's abdomen instead of through the vagina; also called a C-section, Cesarean birth, or Cesarean delivery.

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  • In that case, a c-section may be necessary.

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  • Cesarean section-Delivery of a baby through an incision in the mother's abdomen instead of through the vagina; also called a c-section, cesarean birth, or cesarean delivery.

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  • A 2006 meta-analysis by the Child and Family Research Institute also shows that an epidural given too early can also double the C-section rate.

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  • He weighed in at 6 lbs. 11 oz. Britney was originally scheduled for a C-section the next day, but the operation was moved up after she began having mild contractions.

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  • Some positions are ok for a vaginal delivery, but some are too dangerous and require delivery by C-section.

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  • He weighed 6 lbs. 11 oz. and was born via a scheduled C-section.

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  • A baby that's too large can actually get stuck, so that a C-section is essential.

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  • Labor and delivery typically begins the same for every woman, unless a prescheduled C-section is in order.

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  • The C-section is a surgical procedure that involves removing the baby from the uterus through the lower abdomen.

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  • Knowing how developed the baby's lungs are helps doctors determine how safe it is to induce labor or perform a C-section.

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  • This tells the doctors if the baby's lungs are developed enough for the baby to breathe on his own after an induced labor or C-section.

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  • A cesarean can save your life and that of your baby in an emergency, but c-section complications can also occur.

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  • A c-section, also known as cesarean section, is the surgical delivery of a baby if there are complications in the pregnancy or birth process.

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  • Because it is a major surgery, there can be c-section complications related to the surgery.

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  • In rare situations, there could be a minor or a major complication resulting from a c-section.

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  • Minor complications are more common than major complications when you have a c-section.

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  • Because it does take longer to recover, most maternity disability laws allow women who give birth by c-section extra time off work.

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  • Constipation: Constipation for a few weeks after having a c-section is common because you may be afraid to bear down during a bowel movement due to the pain.

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  • Damage to other organs or the baby: Very rarely, the baby or other internal organs may be cut during the incision process of having a c-section.

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  • If you are considering an elective c-section, it is important to understand that the risks involved are higher than vaginal birth.

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  • The benefits of having a c-section will outweigh the risks of a vaginal birth if you are in a high-risk situation and your doctor recommends a cesarean.

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  • However, a tubal ligation can be performed after giving birth vaginally or via C-section.

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  • And, having had a C-section, I knew I wasn't going to be able to exercise for at least six weeks.

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  • Besides, I don't do bikinis, what with my C-section scar and all.

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  • Sean Preston was born via c-section in 2005.

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  • Michelle had originally gone to the hospital with gall stones, but the doctor discovered she was suffering from pre-eclampsia and ordered an emergency C-Section.

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  • Doctors decided that the pre-eclampsia was so severe that they had no choice but to perform an emergency C-section, three months before the baby was due.

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