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byron

byron

byron Sentence Examples

  • While the heroism of the Montenegrins has been lauded by writers of all countries, the Albanians - if we except Byron's eulogy of the Suloits - still remain unsung.

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  • But a romantic interest attaches to the wreck of the " Wager," one of Anson's fleet, on a desert island near Chiloe, for it bore fruit in the charming narrative of Captain John Byron, which will endure for all time.

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  • In 1764 Byron himself was sent on a voyage of discovery round the world, which led immediately after his return to the despatch of another to complete his work, under the command of Captain Samuel Wallis.

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  • Meanwhile in 1765 Commodore Byron had taken possession on the part of England on the ground of prior discovery, and had formed a settlement at Port Egmont on the small island of Saunders.

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  • The author might almost have said, as Lord Byron after the publication of Childe Harold, that " he awoke one morning and found himself famous."

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  • Byron's description, "[The] immemorial wood Rooted where once the Adrian wave flowed o'er," is probably true; but there is no evidence that it was in historic time that this change took place.

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  • The marble urn containing the body of the poet still rests at Ravenna, where what Byron calls "a little cupola more neat than solemn" has been erected over it.

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  • Lord Byron resided at Ravenna for eighteen months in 1820-21, attracted by the charms of the Countess Guiccioli.

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  • Moreover, he wrote an article in the Edinburgh Review of July 1805 criticizing Sir William Gill's Topography of Troy, and these circumstances led Lord Byron to refer to him in English Bards and Scotch Reviewers as "the travell'd thane, Athenian Aberdeen."

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  • On the arrival of Admiral John Byron from England with reinforcements, Howe left the station in September.

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  • In the public garden is the Zappeion, a large building with a Corinthian portico, intended for the display of Greek industries; here also is a monument to Byron, erected in 1896.

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  • The whole family returned to Coppet in June, and Byron now frequently visited Mme de Stael there.

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  • Take away her assiduous frequentation of society, from the later philosophe coteries to the age of Byron - take away the influence of Constant and Schlegel and her other literary friends - and probably little of her will remain.

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  • When fourteen he drew sketches to illustrate a trip to the ruins of Newstead Abbey, which afterwards appeared on the title-page of Moore's Life of Lord Byron.

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  • There is a touch of Byron, Swinburne and even of Schopenhauer in many of his rubais, which clearly proves that the modern pessimist is by no means a novel creature in the realm of philo- sophic thought and poetical imagination.

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  • He is the Magyarizer of Shakespeare's Anthony and Cleopatra, Othello, Macbeth, Henry VIII., Winter's Tale, Romeo and Juliet and Tempest, as also of some of the best pieces of Burns, Moore, Byron, Shelley, Milton, Beranger, Lamartine, Victor Hugo, Goethe and others.

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  • A translator from Byron and Pope appeared also in Maurice Lukacs.6 Unitarian bishop of Transylvania, author of Vadrozsdk, or " Wild Roses " (1863), a collection of Szekler folk-songs, ballads and sayings.

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  • Abranyi excels also as a translator, more particularly of Byron.

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  • He availed himself of the reviving interest in legitimism and Catholicism which was represented by Bonald and Joseph de Maistre, of the nature worship of Rousseau and Bernardin de Saint Pierre, of the sentimentalism of Madame de Stael, of the medievalism and the romance of Chateaubriand and Scott, of the maladie du siecle of Chateaubriand and Byron.

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  • Examples of acts of indemnity are two private acts passed in 1880 to relieve Lords Byron and Plunket from the disabilities and penalties to which they were liable for sitting and voting in the House of Peers without taking the oath.

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  • From the summit, to which there is a funicular railway, there is a magnificent view, celebrated by Byron in Childe Harold's Pilgrimage.

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  • Charles Jackson,' Democrat Byron Diman, Whig.

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  • The news of Byron's death (19th April 1824) made a deep impression on him: it was a day, he said, "when the whole world seemed to be darkened for me"; he went out into the woods and carved "Byron is dead" upon a rock.

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  • This book would have been astonishing as the production of a youth of twenty-one, even if, since the death of Byron six years before, there had not been a singular dearth of good poetry in England.

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  • In the summer of 1859 the first series of Idylls of the King was at length given to the world, and achieved a popular success far beyond anything experienced before by any English poets, save perhaps Byron and Scott.

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  • The distance between the generation of Wordsworth and Coleridge and that of Byron and Shelley is not less - it is even probably greater - than that which divides Keats from Tennyson, and he is more the last of that great school than the first of any new one.

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  • Great numbers of European and American authors were rendered into JapaneseCalderon, Lytton, Disraeli, Byron, Shakespeare, Milton, Turgueniev, Carlyle, Daudet, Emerson, Hugo, Heine, De Quincey, Dickens, Krner, Goethetheir name is legion and their influence upon Japanese literature is conspicuous.

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  • John BYRON (1723-1786), British vice-admiral, second son of the 4th Lord Byron, and grandfather of the poet, was born on the 8th of November 1723.

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  • It is to this that Lord Byron alludes in his Epistle to Augusta:- " A strange doom is thy father's son's, and past Recalling as it lies beyond redress, Reversed for him our grandsire's fate of yore, He had no rest at sea, nor I on shore."

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  • The east side was platted in the summer of 1835, and very soon afterward the plat of a settlement on the west side was also recorded, Byron Kilbourn being the chief projector and proprietor of the latter.

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  • Byron's fervid panegyric enlisted on his side all who admired Byron - that is to say, the majority of the younger men and women of Europe between 1820 and 1850 - and thus different sides of his tradition were continued for a full century after the publication of his chief books.

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  • Just when these feuds were at their height, in the autumn of 1823, the most famous of the Philhellenes who sacrificed themselves for the cause of Greece, Lord Byron, arrived in Greece.

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  • The large loans raised in Europe, the first instalment of which Byron had himself brought over, while providing the Greeks with the sinews of war, provided seco n d civil w them also with fresh material for strife.

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  • From St George 's Channel at the south, separating it from New Pomerania, it sweeps north and then north-west, being divided from New Hanover at the other extremity by Byron Strait.

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  • We can trace in them the influence of Byron and Victor Hugo.

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  • His most celebrated pieces are Hugo; Mnich (" The Monk"); Lambro, a Greek corsair, quite in the style of Byron; Anhelli, a very Dantesque poem expressing under the form of an allegory the sufferings of Poland; Krol duck (" The Spirit King"), another mysterious and allegorical poem; Waclaw, on the same subject as the Marya of Malczewski, to be afterwards noticed; Beniowski, a long poem in ottava rima on this strange adventurer, something in the style of Byron's humorous poems; Kordyan, of the same school as the English poet's Manfred; Lilla Weneda, a poem dealing with the early period of Slavonic history.

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  • Malczewski was one of Napoleon's officers; he led a wandering life and was intimate with Byron at Venice; he is said to have suggested to the latter the story of Mazeppa.

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  • Marya is a narrative in verse in the manner of Byron.

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  • The Dutchman Jacob Roggeveen, in the course of a voyage round the world in 1721-1722, crossed the Pacific from east to west, and discovered Easter Island, some of the northern islands of the Paumotu Archipelago, and (as is generally supposed) a part of the Samoan group. The voyage of Commodore George (afterwards Lord) Anson in 1740-1744 was for purposes rather of war than of exploration, and Commodore John Byron's voyage in 1765 had little result beyond gaining some additional knowledge of the Paumotu Archipelago.

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  • FRANCOIS BONIVARD (1493-1570), the hero of Byron's poem, The Prisoner of Chillon, was born at Seyssel of an old Savoyard family.

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  • His real character and history are, however, widely different from the legendary account which was popularized by Byron.

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  • supported Byron and Campbell against Bowles and Hazlitt by a defence of Pope in the form of a criticism of Joseph Spence's, Anecdotes contributed to the Quarterly Review (July 1820).

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  • The British government, having neglected to occupy the Straits of Gibraltar in time, despatched Admiral Byron from Plymouth on the 9th of June with thirteen sail of the line to join Admiral (Lord) Howe, Sir William's brother, in America, and collected a strong force at home, called the Western Squadron, under Viscount Keppel.

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  • Howe received no help from Byron, whose badly appointed fleet was damaged and scattered by a gale on the 3rd of July in midAtlantic. His ships dropped in by degrees during September.

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  • Howe resigned on the 2 5th of that month, and was succeeded by Byron.

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  • On the 6th of January 1779 Admiral Byron reached the West Indies.

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  • But in June, while Byron had gone to Antigua to guard the trade convoy on its way home, d'Estaing first captured St Vincent, and then on the 4th of July Grenada.

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  • Admiral Byron, who had returned, sailed in hopes of saving the island, but arrived too late.

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  • Byron returned home in August.

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  • The forest of Soignies extended in the middle ages over the southern part of Brabant up to the walls of Brussels, and is immortalized in Byron's Childe Harold.

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  • Ballatrich farm, where Byron spent part of his boyhood, lies some 4 m.

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  • Byron died here in 1824, and is commemorated by a cenotaph and a statue.

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  • His father read to him Shakespeare, Scott, Don Quixote, Pope and Byron, and most of the great.

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  • of verse, and began dramas, romances and imitations of Byron, Pope, Scott and Shelley.

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  • The effigies of Margaret Byron, wife of Sir Robert Harcourt, K.G., at Stanton Harcourt, and of Alice Chaucer, wife of William de la Pole, duke of Suffolk, K.G., at Ewelme, which date from the reigns of Henry VI.

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  • On issuing at Geneva from the lake the waters of the Rhone are very limpid and blue, as it has left all its impurities in the great settling vat of the lake, so that Byron might well speak of the "blue rushing of the arrowy Rhone" (Childe Harold, canto iii.

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  • He concluded his years of preparation by a European tour, in the course of which he received kind attention from almost every distinguished man in the world of letters, science and art; among others, from Goethe, Humboldt, Schleiermacher, Hegel, Byron, Niebuhr, Bunsen, Savigny, Cousin, Constant and Manzoni.

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  • She was a widow with two children, one of whom, Clara Mary Jane Clairmont, became the mistress of Lord Byron.

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  • But fired by enthusiasm for the Greek revolution and by Byron's example, he was no sooner qualified and admitted to practice than he abandoned these prospects and took ship for Greece, where he joined the army and spent six years of hardship amid scenes of warfare.

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  • Amongst others, Byron came, and has left a record of his impressions in " Childe Harold's Pilgrimage," less interesting and vivid than the prose accounts of Pouqueville, T.

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  • At Cambridge he founded the "Whig Club," and the "Amicable Society," and became very intimate with Byron, who accompanied him on a tour in Spain, Greece and Turkey in 1809.

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  • Hobhouse shared Byron's enthusiasm for the liberation of Greece; after the poet's death in 1824 he proved his will, and superintended the arrangements for his funeral.

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  • Alhama was taken by the Spanish marquis of Cadiz in 1482; and its fall is celebrated in an ancient ballad, Ay de mi, Alhama, which Byron translated into English.

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  • The Irrational Knot, written in 1880, and Love among the Artists (written in 1881) first appeared as serials in Our Corner, a monthly edited by Mrs Annie Besant; Cashel Byron's Profession (reprinted in 1901 in the series of "Novels of his Nonage") and An Unsocial Socialist first appeared in a Socialist magazine To-day, which no longer exists.

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  • The pieces which followed are: The Man of Destiny (written in 1895, played at Croydon in 1897 by Mr Murray Carson), a Napoleonic drama, which was revived at New York by Arnold Daly in 1904; You Never Can Tell (written in 1896, produced at the Strand Theatre in 1900), a farcical comedy; The Devil's Disciple (produced at New York by Richard Mansfield in 1897, and in London in 1899), the scene of which is laid in the War of American Independence, Caesar and Cleopatra (1898) and Captain Brassbound's Conversion (1898) - printed as Three Plays for Puritans (1900); The Admirable Bashville (Stage Society,' Imperial Theatre, 1903), a dramatization of Cashel Byron's Profession.

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  • Art, science, literature - little escaped his ken - and that not merely in Germany: English writers, Byron, Scott and Carlyle, Italians like Manzoni, French scientists and poets, could all depend on friendly words of appreciation and encouragement from Weimar.

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  • The site of Cape Colonna is extolled by Byron, and is the scene of Falconer's "Shipwreck."

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  • On the 6th of July 1779 he fought a drawn battle with Admiral John Byron, who retired to St Christopher.

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  • He stayed for a time in Venice, where Byron was then living; but the two did not meet.

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  • He entered the navy in 1759, and obtained his commission as lieutenant in June 1770, when he was appointed to the "Princess Royal," the flagship of Admiral Byron, in which he sailed to the West Indies.

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  • Eventually Mackintosh obtained a grant of ioo a year for him in 1824 during the lifetime of George IV., as one of the royal associates of the Society of Literature, and at different times he received help principally from Stuart, the publisher, Poole, Sotheby, Sir George Beaumont, Byron and Wordsworth, while his children shared Southey's home at Keswick.

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  • The most conspicuous of his earlier works were: - A History of Civilization in the First Five Centuries of Christianity, Recollections of Italy, Life of Lord Byron, The History of the Republican Movement in Europe, The Redemption of Slaves, The Religious Revolution, Historical Essays on the Middle Ages, The Eastern Question, Fra Filippo Lippi, History of the Discovery of America, and some historical novels.

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  • Utley and Byron M.

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  • She returned to Paris in 1781, but went in the following year to London, where she painted the portraits of Lord Byron and the prince of Wales, and in 1808 to Switzerland.

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  • de Gennes and the Sieur Froger (1696), Commodore John Byron (1764), Samuel Wallis and Philip Carteret (1767), James Cook (1768) and James Weddell (1822).

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  • A little to the west is the Auld Brig o' Balgownie, a picturesque single arch spanning the deep black stream, said to have been built by King Robert I., and celebrated by Byron in the tenth canto of Don Juan.

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  • He was grossly attacked by the Opposition in parliament and by irresponsible critics, of the type of Byron, outside; historians, bred in the atmosphere of mid-Victorian Liberalism, have re-echoed the cry against him and the government of which he was the most distinguished member; but history has largely justified his attitude.

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  • Aegaleos, which here descends to the sea, was the spot where, as Byron wrote "A king sate on the rocky brow Which looks o'er sea-born Salamis."

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  • He was an intimate friend of Lord Byron.

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  • He wrote Recollections of Lord Byron (1824), and several novels, plays and miscellaneous works.

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  • Byron compares ("A captain bold of Halifax who lived in country quarters."

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  • With him began the " enthusiasm of humanity " that was afterwards to become so marked in the poetry of Burns and Shelley, Wordsworth and Byron.

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  • The influence of Byron is seen in his Belshazzar (1822).

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  • Among the foreigners who joined it for love of Italy was Lord Byron.

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  • The former of these, who died in 1439, was father to the Parisina beheaded in Ferrara, whose tragic love story has been sung by Byron.

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  • A network television station announced the arrest of Byron John Jacobson for the murder of Elsie Otis whose nude body was found in rural Kentucky!

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  • Do you know how long we've been chasing that bastard Byron Jacobson?

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  • The piece will include musical accompaniment by Byron Thomas.

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  • appointed colonel of a cavalry regiment In August 1642, Byron was sent to secure the city of Oxford in the King's name.

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  • We commissioned young British jazz composer Byron Wallen to write new music inspired by Langston's poems.

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  • cremated on the beach witnessed by a small group of friends, including Byron.

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  • It was around 1808 that Lord Byron wrote his famous epitaph in honor of his Newfoundland, Boatswain.

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  • famed poet Lord Byron on a trip through Europe.

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  • Receiving no support from the welsh gentry, however, Byron was unable to join Hamilton.

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  • Mercifully, Tom Byron and his mullet hairdo split up in '93.

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  • Long sonnets by Shakespeare or romantic poems by Browning and Lord Byron are the norm for love poetry.

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  • Browning's work is prescient - modern, cool, adroit, in contrast to someone like Byron who is all overblown presentiment.

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  • This is known as the Spenserian stanza, and was quite widely used by Wordsworth, Byron and Keats.

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  • Although this design does not appear to have been used in the Byron pattern tableware it records the first use of the trellis border.

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  • A stunning start to Byron Rogers ' book is a long tirade from Thomas ' son Gwydion.

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  • Byron, now running a scout troop in Leicestershire, says he would be delighted to hear from old classmates.

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  • virginal purity among Byron Society lags.

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  • Rienzi was the hero of one of the finest of Petrarch's odes, Spirit() gentil, and also of some beautiful verses by Lord Byron.

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  • Lelia is a female Manfred, and Dumas had some reason to complain that George Sand was giving them " du Lord Byron au kilo."

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  • While the heroism of the Montenegrins has been lauded by writers of all countries, the Albanians - if we except Byron's eulogy of the Suloits - still remain unsung.

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  • But a romantic interest attaches to the wreck of the " Wager," one of Anson's fleet, on a desert island near Chiloe, for it bore fruit in the charming narrative of Captain John Byron, which will endure for all time.

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  • In 1764 Byron himself was sent on a voyage of discovery round the world, which led immediately after his return to the despatch of another to complete his work, under the command of Captain Samuel Wallis.

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  • Meanwhile in 1765 Commodore Byron had taken possession on the part of England on the ground of prior discovery, and had formed a settlement at Port Egmont on the small island of Saunders.

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  • The Spanish and English settlers remained in ignorance, real or assumed, of each other's presence until 1769-1770, when Byron's action was nearly the cause of a war between England and Spain, both countries having armed fleets to contest the barren sovereignty.

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  • A review of Byron's Letters on Pope in 1821 constituted his first contribution to the North American Review, to which he continued for many years to send the results of his slighter researches.

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  • The author might almost have said, as Lord Byron after the publication of Childe Harold, that " he awoke one morning and found himself famous."

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  • Byron's description, "[The] immemorial wood Rooted where once the Adrian wave flowed o'er," is probably true; but there is no evidence that it was in historic time that this change took place.

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  • The marble urn containing the body of the poet still rests at Ravenna, where what Byron calls "a little cupola more neat than solemn" has been erected over it.

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  • Lord Byron resided at Ravenna for eighteen months in 1820-21, attracted by the charms of the Countess Guiccioli.

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  • Moreover, he wrote an article in the Edinburgh Review of July 1805 criticizing Sir William Gill's Topography of Troy, and these circumstances led Lord Byron to refer to him in English Bards and Scotch Reviewers as "the travell'd thane, Athenian Aberdeen."

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  • On the arrival of Admiral John Byron from England with reinforcements, Howe left the station in September.

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  • In the public garden is the Zappeion, a large building with a Corinthian portico, intended for the display of Greek industries; here also is a monument to Byron, erected in 1896.

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  • The whole family returned to Coppet in June, and Byron now frequently visited Mme de Stael there.

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  • Take away her assiduous frequentation of society, from the later philosophe coteries to the age of Byron - take away the influence of Constant and Schlegel and her other literary friends - and probably little of her will remain.

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  • When fourteen he drew sketches to illustrate a trip to the ruins of Newstead Abbey, which afterwards appeared on the title-page of Moore's Life of Lord Byron.

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  • There is a touch of Byron, Swinburne and even of Schopenhauer in many of his rubais, which clearly proves that the modern pessimist is by no means a novel creature in the realm of philo- sophic thought and poetical imagination.

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  • He is the Magyarizer of Shakespeare's Anthony and Cleopatra, Othello, Macbeth, Henry VIII., Winter's Tale, Romeo and Juliet and Tempest, as also of some of the best pieces of Burns, Moore, Byron, Shelley, Milton, Beranger, Lamartine, Victor Hugo, Goethe and others.

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  • A translator from Byron and Pope appeared also in Maurice Lukacs.6 Unitarian bishop of Transylvania, author of Vadrozsdk, or " Wild Roses " (1863), a collection of Szekler folk-songs, ballads and sayings.

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  • Abranyi excels also as a translator, more particularly of Byron.

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  • He availed himself of the reviving interest in legitimism and Catholicism which was represented by Bonald and Joseph de Maistre, of the nature worship of Rousseau and Bernardin de Saint Pierre, of the sentimentalism of Madame de Stael, of the medievalism and the romance of Chateaubriand and Scott, of the maladie du siecle of Chateaubriand and Byron.

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  • Examples of acts of indemnity are two private acts passed in 1880 to relieve Lords Byron and Plunket from the disabilities and penalties to which they were liable for sitting and voting in the House of Peers without taking the oath.

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  • From the summit, to which there is a funicular railway, there is a magnificent view, celebrated by Byron in Childe Harold's Pilgrimage.

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  • Charles Jackson,' Democrat Byron Diman, Whig.

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  • The news of Byron's death (19th April 1824) made a deep impression on him: it was a day, he said, "when the whole world seemed to be darkened for me"; he went out into the woods and carved "Byron is dead" upon a rock.

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  • This book would have been astonishing as the production of a youth of twenty-one, even if, since the death of Byron six years before, there had not been a singular dearth of good poetry in England.

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  • In the summer of 1859 the first series of Idylls of the King was at length given to the world, and achieved a popular success far beyond anything experienced before by any English poets, save perhaps Byron and Scott.

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  • The distance between the generation of Wordsworth and Coleridge and that of Byron and Shelley is not less - it is even probably greater - than that which divides Keats from Tennyson, and he is more the last of that great school than the first of any new one.

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  • We still look to the earlier masters for supreme excellence in particular directions: to Wordsworth for sublime philosophy, to Coleridge for ethereal magic, to Byron for passion, to Shelley for lyric intensity, to Keats for richness.

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  • Great numbers of European and American authors were rendered into JapaneseCalderon, Lytton, Disraeli, Byron, Shakespeare, Milton, Turgueniev, Carlyle, Daudet, Emerson, Hugo, Heine, De Quincey, Dickens, Krner, Goethetheir name is legion and their influence upon Japanese literature is conspicuous.

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  • John BYRON (1723-1786), British vice-admiral, second son of the 4th Lord Byron, and grandfather of the poet, was born on the 8th of November 1723.

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  • It is to this that Lord Byron alludes in his Epistle to Augusta:- " A strange doom is thy father's son's, and past Recalling as it lies beyond redress, Reversed for him our grandsire's fate of yore, He had no rest at sea, nor I on shore."

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  • (1893); George Byron Gordon, "Researches in Central America," Memoirs of the Peabody Museum, vol.

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  • The east side was platted in the summer of 1835, and very soon afterward the plat of a settlement on the west side was also recorded, Byron Kilbourn being the chief projector and proprietor of the latter.

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  • Byron's fervid panegyric enlisted on his side all who admired Byron - that is to say, the majority of the younger men and women of Europe between 1820 and 1850 - and thus different sides of his tradition were continued for a full century after the publication of his chief books.

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  • Just when these feuds were at their height, in the autumn of 1823, the most famous of the Philhellenes who sacrificed themselves for the cause of Greece, Lord Byron, arrived in Greece.

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  • The large loans raised in Europe, the first instalment of which Byron had himself brought over, while providing the Greeks with the sinews of war, provided seco n d civil w them also with fresh material for strife.

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  • From St George 's Channel at the south, separating it from New Pomerania, it sweeps north and then north-west, being divided from New Hanover at the other extremity by Byron Strait.

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  • We can trace in them the influence of Byron and Victor Hugo.

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  • His most celebrated pieces are Hugo; Mnich (" The Monk"); Lambro, a Greek corsair, quite in the style of Byron; Anhelli, a very Dantesque poem expressing under the form of an allegory the sufferings of Poland; Krol duck (" The Spirit King"), another mysterious and allegorical poem; Waclaw, on the same subject as the Marya of Malczewski, to be afterwards noticed; Beniowski, a long poem in ottava rima on this strange adventurer, something in the style of Byron's humorous poems; Kordyan, of the same school as the English poet's Manfred; Lilla Weneda, a poem dealing with the early period of Slavonic history.

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  • Malczewski was one of Napoleon's officers; he led a wandering life and was intimate with Byron at Venice; he is said to have suggested to the latter the story of Mazeppa.

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  • Marya is a narrative in verse in the manner of Byron.

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  • So in Byron and Heine, and, in a sense, in Walter Pater (Marius the Epicurean), there is the same tendency to seek relief from the intellectual cul-de-sac in frankly aesthetic satisfaction.

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  • The Dutchman Jacob Roggeveen, in the course of a voyage round the world in 1721-1722, crossed the Pacific from east to west, and discovered Easter Island, some of the northern islands of the Paumotu Archipelago, and (as is generally supposed) a part of the Samoan group. The voyage of Commodore George (afterwards Lord) Anson in 1740-1744 was for purposes rather of war than of exploration, and Commodore John Byron's voyage in 1765 had little result beyond gaining some additional knowledge of the Paumotu Archipelago.

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  • FRANCOIS BONIVARD (1493-1570), the hero of Byron's poem, The Prisoner of Chillon, was born at Seyssel of an old Savoyard family.

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  • His real character and history are, however, widely different from the legendary account which was popularized by Byron.

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  • supported Byron and Campbell against Bowles and Hazlitt by a defence of Pope in the form of a criticism of Joseph Spence's, Anecdotes contributed to the Quarterly Review (July 1820).

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  • The British government, having neglected to occupy the Straits of Gibraltar in time, despatched Admiral Byron from Plymouth on the 9th of June with thirteen sail of the line to join Admiral (Lord) Howe, Sir William's brother, in America, and collected a strong force at home, called the Western Squadron, under Viscount Keppel.

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  • Howe received no help from Byron, whose badly appointed fleet was damaged and scattered by a gale on the 3rd of July in midAtlantic. His ships dropped in by degrees during September.

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  • Howe resigned on the 2 5th of that month, and was succeeded by Byron.

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  • On the 6th of January 1779 Admiral Byron reached the West Indies.

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  • But in June, while Byron had gone to Antigua to guard the trade convoy on its way home, d'Estaing first captured St Vincent, and then on the 4th of July Grenada.

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  • Admiral Byron, who had returned, sailed in hopes of saving the island, but arrived too late.

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  • Byron returned home in August.

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  • As a poet he is imitative: reminiscences of Quintana are noticeable in his patriotic songs, of Zorrilla in his historical ballads, of Byron in his lyrical poems. He wrote too hastily to satisfy artistic canons; but if he has the faults he has also the merits of a pioneer, and in Catalonia his name will endure.

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  • The forest of Soignies extended in the middle ages over the southern part of Brabant up to the walls of Brussels, and is immortalized in Byron's Childe Harold.

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  • Ballatrich farm, where Byron spent part of his boyhood, lies some 4 m.

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  • Byron died here in 1824, and is commemorated by a cenotaph and a statue.

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  • His father read to him Shakespeare, Scott, Don Quixote, Pope and Byron, and most of the great.

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  • of verse, and began dramas, romances and imitations of Byron, Pope, Scott and Shelley.

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  • The effigies of Margaret Byron, wife of Sir Robert Harcourt, K.G., at Stanton Harcourt, and of Alice Chaucer, wife of William de la Pole, duke of Suffolk, K.G., at Ewelme, which date from the reigns of Henry VI.

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  • On issuing at Geneva from the lake the waters of the Rhone are very limpid and blue, as it has left all its impurities in the great settling vat of the lake, so that Byron might well speak of the "blue rushing of the arrowy Rhone" (Childe Harold, canto iii.

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  • He concluded his years of preparation by a European tour, in the course of which he received kind attention from almost every distinguished man in the world of letters, science and art; among others, from Goethe, Humboldt, Schleiermacher, Hegel, Byron, Niebuhr, Bunsen, Savigny, Cousin, Constant and Manzoni.

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  • Shortly afterwards he removed to Washington, where from 1895 to 1899 he was the associate pastor, with Dr Byron Sunderland (d.

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  • She was a widow with two children, one of whom, Clara Mary Jane Clairmont, became the mistress of Lord Byron.

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  • But fired by enthusiasm for the Greek revolution and by Byron's example, he was no sooner qualified and admitted to practice than he abandoned these prospects and took ship for Greece, where he joined the army and spent six years of hardship amid scenes of warfare.

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  • Amongst others, Byron came, and has left a record of his impressions in " Childe Harold's Pilgrimage," less interesting and vivid than the prose accounts of Pouqueville, T.

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  • At Cambridge he founded the "Whig Club," and the "Amicable Society," and became very intimate with Byron, who accompanied him on a tour in Spain, Greece and Turkey in 1809.

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  • A further period of travel with Byron followed, and at this time Hobhouse wrote some notes to the fourth canto of Childe Harold.

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  • Hobhouse shared Byron's enthusiasm for the liberation of Greece; after the poet's death in 1824 he proved his will, and superintended the arrangements for his funeral.

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  • Moore, Life of Lord Byron (London, 1837-1840); Greville Memoirs (London, 1896); Dictionary of National Biography, vol.

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  • Alhama was taken by the Spanish marquis of Cadiz in 1482; and its fall is celebrated in an ancient ballad, Ay de mi, Alhama, which Byron translated into English.

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  • The Irrational Knot, written in 1880, and Love among the Artists (written in 1881) first appeared as serials in Our Corner, a monthly edited by Mrs Annie Besant; Cashel Byron's Profession (reprinted in 1901 in the series of "Novels of his Nonage") and An Unsocial Socialist first appeared in a Socialist magazine To-day, which no longer exists.

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  • The pieces which followed are: The Man of Destiny (written in 1895, played at Croydon in 1897 by Mr Murray Carson), a Napoleonic drama, which was revived at New York by Arnold Daly in 1904; You Never Can Tell (written in 1896, produced at the Strand Theatre in 1900), a farcical comedy; The Devil's Disciple (produced at New York by Richard Mansfield in 1897, and in London in 1899), the scene of which is laid in the War of American Independence, Caesar and Cleopatra (1898) and Captain Brassbound's Conversion (1898) - printed as Three Plays for Puritans (1900); The Admirable Bashville (Stage Society,' Imperial Theatre, 1903), a dramatization of Cashel Byron's Profession.

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  • Art, science, literature - little escaped his ken - and that not merely in Germany: English writers, Byron, Scott and Carlyle, Italians like Manzoni, French scientists and poets, could all depend on friendly words of appreciation and encouragement from Weimar.

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  • The site of Cape Colonna is extolled by Byron, and is the scene of Falconer's "Shipwreck."

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  • On the 6th of July 1779 he fought a drawn battle with Admiral John Byron, who retired to St Christopher.

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  • He stayed for a time in Venice, where Byron was then living; but the two did not meet.

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  • He entered the navy in 1759, and obtained his commission as lieutenant in June 1770, when he was appointed to the "Princess Royal," the flagship of Admiral Byron, in which he sailed to the West Indies.

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  • Eventually Mackintosh obtained a grant of ioo a year for him in 1824 during the lifetime of George IV., as one of the royal associates of the Society of Literature, and at different times he received help principally from Stuart, the publisher, Poole, Sotheby, Sir George Beaumont, Byron and Wordsworth, while his children shared Southey's home at Keswick.

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  • The most conspicuous of his earlier works were: - A History of Civilization in the First Five Centuries of Christianity, Recollections of Italy, Life of Lord Byron, The History of the Republican Movement in Europe, The Redemption of Slaves, The Religious Revolution, Historical Essays on the Middle Ages, The Eastern Question, Fra Filippo Lippi, History of the Discovery of America, and some historical novels.

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  • Utley and Byron M.

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  • She returned to Paris in 1781, but went in the following year to London, where she painted the portraits of Lord Byron and the prince of Wales, and in 1808 to Switzerland.

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  • His sojourn in Europe fell exactly in the time when, in England, the reaction against the sentimental atheism of Shelley, the pagan sensitivity of Keats, and the sublime, Satanic outcastness of Byron was at its height; when, in the Catholic countries, the negative exaggerations of the French Revolution were inducing a counter current of positive faith, which threw men into the arms of a half-sentimental, half-aesthetic medievalism; and when, in Germany, the aristocratic paganism of Goethe was being swept aside by that tide of dutiful, romantic patriotism which flooded the country, as soon as it began to feel that it still existed after being run over by Napoleon's war-chariot.

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  • de Gennes and the Sieur Froger (1696), Commodore John Byron (1764), Samuel Wallis and Philip Carteret (1767), James Cook (1768) and James Weddell (1822).

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  • A little to the west is the Auld Brig o' Balgownie, a picturesque single arch spanning the deep black stream, said to have been built by King Robert I., and celebrated by Byron in the tenth canto of Don Juan.

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  • He was grossly attacked by the Opposition in parliament and by irresponsible critics, of the type of Byron, outside; historians, bred in the atmosphere of mid-Victorian Liberalism, have re-echoed the cry against him and the government of which he was the most distinguished member; but history has largely justified his attitude.

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  • Aegaleos, which here descends to the sea, was the spot where, as Byron wrote "A king sate on the rocky brow Which looks o'er sea-born Salamis."

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  • He was an intimate friend of Lord Byron.

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  • He wrote Recollections of Lord Byron (1824), and several novels, plays and miscellaneous works.

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  • Byron compares ("A captain bold of Halifax who lived in country quarters."

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  • With him began the " enthusiasm of humanity " that was afterwards to become so marked in the poetry of Burns and Shelley, Wordsworth and Byron.

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  • The influence of Byron is seen in his Belshazzar (1822).

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  • Among the foreigners who joined it for love of Italy was Lord Byron.

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  • The former of these, who died in 1439, was father to the Parisina beheaded in Ferrara, whose tragic love story has been sung by Byron.

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  • So when I knocked on the door of Jim's atelier and said, "Hey, I'm Byron Reese," he said, "Oh, Byron, come over here, I want you to meet this guy.

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  • Byron, now running a scout troop in Leicestershire, says he would be delighted to hear from old classmates.

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  • This is known as the Spenserian stanza, and was quite widely used by Wordsworth, Byron and Keats.

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  • Although this design does not appear to have been used in the Byron pattern tableware it records the first use of the trellis border.

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  • A stunning start to Byron Rogers ' book is a long tirade from Thomas ' son Gwydion.

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  • In one of his letters, Byron cheekily suggests that his ursine friend " should sit for a fellowship ".

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  • Trinity Bards and Oxford Reviewers by Richard Schulze; A lament for the lack of virginal purity among Byron Society lags.

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  • Mary Delgado was a contestant on The Bachelor 6, and went on to win the heart of bachelor Byron Velvick (pictured above on right) in the finale.

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  • Only two of the 12 couples, Mary Delgado and Byron Velvick and Tessa Horst and Andy Baldwin are reportedly still together, making the success rate for the show around 16 percent.

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  • Shortly after she was fingerprinted and had her mug shot taken (she must know the drill by now), Ms. Delgado called Byron to come bail her out of jail…again.

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  • Fore Rain: Here, you'll find a few suits like the Sun Ice Ultimate Golf Rain Suit, the Sun Ice Baranah Paclite Golf Suit, the Sun Ice Byron Paclite Golf Suit, and the Sun Ice Carnegie Paclite Golf Suit.

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  • The following are some good choices: Fess Parker, Foley Estates, Melville, Byron, Sanford, Ken Brown, Foxen, and Cambria to name a few.

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  • Wicked Weasel (WW) makes it's home in Byron Bay, Australia, locating both its business and manufacturing center there.

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  • Other famous designers who have put their touch on Barbie include Bill Blass, Donna Karan and Byron Lars.

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  • Scorpio is the Lord Byron of the zodiac.

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  • Among the intrepid travelers were the poets Lord Byron and Percy Shelley.

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  • Fisherman Byron Velvick selected Mary Delgado from the field of 25 in this edition.

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  • Mary Delgado, who was chosen by The Bachelor Byron Velvick to win the show's sixth season, was arrested in 2007 on suspicion of assault following a dispute at the couple's Florida home.

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  • Our sixth Bachelor was pro bass fisherman Byron Velvick.

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  • Byron proposed to Mary in the final episode, and the pair are still engaged.

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  • Mary has been arrested twice for assaulting Byron, yet the couple remains together and continues to claim that they will be married.

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  • Kari Byron was born on December 18, 1974 in California.

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