SentencesSentence examples

But Sentence Examples

  • It was going to be nice having nothing to do but enjoy their little family for the next two weeks.
  • She objected at first, but finally submitted.
  • He said no more, but expressed his resignation to cruel fate by a gesture.
  • Such a pleasant day and evening should have ended with a restful night and happy dreams, but it didn't.
  • The prince answered nothing, but she looked at him significantly, awaiting a reply.
  • I know it still galls you that he was willing to help pay for your college education, but not Katie's.
  • We were sadly in the way, but that did not interfere with our pleasure in the least.
  • They did not seem frightened, but chirped softly, as if they knew they were safe.
  • But I am making a simple statement that life is better now than it has ever been.
  • Benjamin Franklin lived to be a very old man, but he never forgot that lesson.
  • But this I know, I love to play In the meadow, among the hay-- Up the water, and o'er the lea, That's the way for Billy and me.
  • In business transactions Alex was frugal with his money, but when it came to his family, he was generous.
  • The Christmas tree could only be seen from the back of the house, but that didn't matter.
  • "Don't know," said Dorothy, "but it must have been humbug."
  • But he was anxious to learn.
  • I tried hard to teach her my sign language, but she was dull and inattentive.
  • She was only a month into two years old, but she was big for her age.
  • But even old Jim has been saying things since we had our accident.
  • But there was no shepherd in Scotland that could have done better than Sirrah did that night.
  • All change is a miracle to contemplate; but it is a miracle which is taking place every instant.
  • Dorothy and Zeb jumped out of the buggy and ran after them, but the Sorcerer remained calmly in his throne.
  • But I cannot remember any instance in which this feeling prevented me from repeating the naughtiness when I failed to get what I wanted.
  • It is to solve some of the problems of life, not only theoretically, but practically.
  • The highest Petersburg society was assembled there: people differing widely in age and character but alike in the social circle to which they belonged.
  • He was respectful of her concerns, but they didn't see eye-to-eye on any of it - except the fact that they both wanted another child.
  • His tone suggested impatience, but his expression gave no clue as to why.
  • Discontinuity happens, but it is not unpredictable.
  • But right or wrong, she isn't his daughter.
  • But never mind; something will happen pretty soon.
  • Princess Mary noticed to her surprise that during this illness the old prince not only excluded her from his room, but did not admit Mademoiselle Bourienne either.
  • What could he do about it but lose more sleep?
  • He intended it as a joke, but the memory it resurrected was painful.
  • We needed the car fixed so I had no choice but to pay the huge amount the repair shop  was asking.
  • Maybe not, but it would have made a difference if I had known how you felt.
  • A few impressions stand out vividly from the first years of my life; but "the shadows of the prison-house are on the rest."
  • Pierre wished to say that he was ready to sacrifice his money, his serfs, or himself, only one ought to know the state of affairs in order to be able to improve it, but he was unable to speak.
  • It was one thing to tell herself everything was resolved, but quite another to thoroughly accept something she had always considered wrong.
  • But you're still not comfortable with the decision, are you?
  • But I guess if we have, it's no worse than having a child out of wedlock.
  • I’d love to come to the concert, but I already have plans that night.
  • I’m trying a new diet. My breakfast is going to be nothing but fruit for the next month.
  • "Yes; but we're used to such things in California," he replied.
  • He was not a very large man, but was well formed and had a beautiful face--calm and serene as the face of a fine portrait.
  • There were men and women, but no children at all, and the folks were all beautifully formed and attractively dressed and had wonderfully handsome faces.
  • But Dorothy, seeing his perplexity, answered:
  • On some of the bushes might be seen a bud, a blossom, a baby, a half-grown person and a ripe one; but even those ready to pluck were motionless and silent, as if devoid of life.
  • I've been picked over six years, but our family is known to be especially long lived.
  • He led them within another but smaller circle of hedge, where grew one large and beautiful bush.
  • In the vegetable gardens they found the strawberries and melons, and several other unknown but delicious fruits, of which they ate heartily.
  • In the strict sense of the word I am not a Wizard, but only a humbug.
  • "But I saw the little pigs with my own eyes!" exclaimed Zeb.
  • Eureka stuck up her nose at such food, but the tiny piglets squealed delightedly at the sight of the crackers and ate them up in a jiffy.
  • But it is a long time since I have had any sleep, and I'm tired.
  • "The Princess is lovely to look at," continued Dorothy, thoughtfully; "but I don't care much for her, after all.
  • The mouth of the hole was nearly filled up now, but the kitten gave a leap through the remaining opening and at once scampered up into the air.
  • History is full of radical breaks with the past that only seem to have come out of nowhere but were, in fact, predictable.
  • Many incidents of those early years are fixed in my memory, isolated, but clear and distinct, making the sense of that silent, aimless, dayless life all the more intense.
  • But why do men degenerate ever?
  • Yes, I have heard of his scheme for perpetual peace, and it is very interesting but hardly feasible.
  • Pierre wished to reply, but could not get in a word.
  • Not only was Pierre's attempt to speak unsuccessful, but he was rudely interrupted, pushed aside, and people turned away from him as from a common enemy.
  • Millions will pour forth from there"--he pointed to the merchants' hall--"but our business is to supply men and not spare ourselves...
  • Despite his seniority in rank Bagration, in this contest of magnanimity, took his orders from Barclay, but, having submitted, agreed with him less than ever.
  • He wrote to Arakcheev, the Emperor's confidant: It must be as my sovereign pleases, but I cannot work with the Minister (meaning Barclay).
  • She feared for her brother who was in it, was horrified by and amazed at the strange cruelty that impels men to kill one another, but she did not understand the significance of this war, which seemed to her like all previous wars.
  • "But, Prince," Dessalles began timidly, "the letter mentions Vitebsk...."
  • It was possible after all - but was it moral?
  • Alex had provided the money to remodel the home, but insisted that it stay in her name only.
  • Talking about it might help her, but they had already talked the subject lifeless.
  • But you're so warm.
  • It was nice having Alex home all day and having the family together, but all good things come to an end.
  • Broccoli soup for dinner? Thanks, but no thanks.
  • It's feminine enough, but it looks like something grandma would wear.
  • Dorothy thought he just wiggled one of his drooping ears, but that was all.
  • "But Jim knows his business all right--don't you, Jim?" patting the long nose of the animal.
  • He was not going very fast, but on his flanks specks of foam began to appear and at times he would tremble like a leaf.
  • But they continued to fall, all together, and the boy and girl had no difficulty in remaining upon the seat, just as they were before.
  • They saw a landscape with mountains and plains, lakes and rivers, very like those upon the earth's surface; but all the scene was splendidly colored by the variegated lights from the six suns.
  • But not a sound had broken the stillness since the strangers had arrived, except that of their own voices.
  • But he did not wish the little girl to think him a coward, so he advanced slowly to the edge of the roof.
  • But he smiled and bowed as he answered:
  • But I've just had the bad luck to come out of the sky, skip the solid earth, and land lower down than I intended.
  • The Mangaboo people listened, but showed no great interest.
  • But it took a good many years for them to grow as large and fine as they are now.
  • But I noticed some strawberries growing in one of the gardens, and some melons in another place.
  • They did not bother to cross the bridges over the brooks, but when they came to a stream they stepped high and walked in the air to the other side.
  • But the pulling of them apart and pushing them together again was only a sleight-of-hand trick.
  • "But won't they be veg'table, like everything else here?" asked the kitten.
  • The only bait he could find was a bright red blossom from a flower; but he knew fishes are easy to fool if anything bright attracts their attention, so he decided to try the blossom.
  • Then the three held a counsel to decide what they should do next, but could think of no way to better their condition.
  • "But IS there any other place?" asked the Wizard.
  • But even that did not satisfy the Princess.
  • "Don't be rough!" he would call out, if Eureka knocked over one of the round, fat piglets with her paw; but the pigs never minded, and enjoyed the sport very greatly.
  • Slowly but steadily the heartless Mangaboos drove them on, until they had passed through the city and the gardens and come to the broad plains leading to the mountain.
  • But the foes were too many to be repulsed for long.
  • But never mind; be brave, my friends, and I will go and tell our masters where you are, and get them to come to your rescue.
  • But we can't live long in this cavern, that's certain.
  • The cavern did not come to an end, as they had expected it would, but slanted upward through the great glass mountain, running in a direction that promised to lead them to the side opposite the Mangaboo country.
  • None of them were in clusters, such as villages or towns, but each had ample grounds of its own, with orchards and gardens surrounding it.
  • From their elevated position they could overlook the entire valley, but not a single moving object could they see.
  • "But where are the people?" asked Dorothy.
  • They heard the sudden twittering of a bird, but could not find the creature anywhere.
  • They all looked around, but the piglets had disappeared.
  • But I didn't see them go; did you?
  • Several squeals and grunts were instantly heard at his feet, but the Wizard could not discover a single piglet.
  • He picked it up, but could not see what he held.
  • "But WE mus'n't eat them," the Wizard warned the children, "or we too may become invisible, and lose each other.
  • But not a single person appeared to be in the room.
  • And--pardon me for the foolish question--but, are you all invisible?
  • "We belong upon the face of the earth," explained the Wizard, "but recently, during an earthquake, we fell down a crack and landed in the Country of the Mangaboos."
  • "They walled us up in a mountain," continued the Wizard; "but we found there was a tunnel through to this side, so we came here.
  • "But we do not wish to intrude, I assure you," the Wizard hastened to say.
  • "No! he can kick pretty hard with his heels, and bite a little; but Jim can't 'zactly fight," she replied.
  • Many large and fierce bears roam in the Valley of Voe, and when they can catch any of us they eat us up; but as they cannot see us, we seldom get caught.
  • But now, good wanderers, your luncheon is on the table, so please sit down and eat as much as you like.
  • "But I make you wash it, every time I think of it," said the mother; "for it stands to reason your face is dirty, Ianu, whether I can see it or not."
  • But the fishes that swim in our brooks we can see, and often we catch them to eat.
  • The children were inclined to be frightened by the sight of the small animal, which reminded them of the bears; but Dorothy reassured them by explaining that Eureka was a pet and could do no harm even if she wished to.
  • "I don't know," Dorothy answered; "but it would hurt me dre'fully to lose you."
  • "Very well, I won't touch it," decided the kitten; "but you must keep it away from me, for the smell is very tempting."
  • "The Valley of Voe is certainly a charming place," resumed the Wizard; "but we cannot be contented in any other land than our own, for long."
  • Our greatest Champion, Overman-Anu, once climbed the spiral stairway and fought nine days with the Gargoyles before he could escape them and come back; but he could never be induced to describe the dreadful creatures, and soon afterward a bear caught him and ate him up.
  • The wanders were rather discouraged by this gloomy report, but Dorothy said with a sigh:
  • But they were in great numbers, and the Champion could not shout much because he had to save his breath for fighting.
  • "But tell me," said Dorothy, "how did such a brave Champion happen to let the bears eat him?
  • They now bade farewell to the kind but unseen people of the cottage, and after the man had called their attention to a high, pyramid-shaped mountain on the opposite side of the Valley, and told them how to travel in order to reach it, they again started upon their journey.
  • They followed the course of a broad stream and passed several more pretty cottages; but of course they saw no one, nor did any one speak to them.
  • "But we would be drowned!" exclaimed the girl.
  • Once a little fish swam too near the surface, and the kitten grabbed it in her mouth and ate it up as quick as a wink; but Dorothy cautioned her to be careful what she ate in this valley of enchantments, and no more fishes were careless enough to swim within reach.
  • But you must remember I'm old, and my dashing days are past and gone.
  • Dorothy nearly went with them, but she was holding fast to the iron rail of the seat, and that saved her.
  • But this enabled them to proceed steadily until they came to a landing where there was a rift in the side of the mountain that let in both light and air.
  • Mortals who stand upon the earth and look up at the sky cannot often distinguish these forms, but our friends were now so near to the clouds that they observed the dainty fairies very clearly.
  • He was a very old man, bent nearly double; but the queerest thing about him was his white hair and beard.
  • Once I lived on top the earth, but for many years I have had my factory in this spot--half way up Pyramid Mountain.
  • But I would like very much a blue hair-ribbon.
  • You will notice my braids are tied with yellow, pink, brown, red, green, white and black; but I have no blue ribbons.
  • It is a sad story, but if you will try to restrain your tears I will tell you about it.
  • But the travellers were obliged to rest, and while they were sitting on the rocky floor the Wizard felt in his pocket and brought out the nine tiny piglets.
  • There are certain things proper for a kitten to eat; but I never heard of a kitten eating a pig, under ANY cir'stances.
  • You haven't many teeth left, Jim, but the few you have are sharp enough to make me shudder.
  • "I've always loved the piglets," she said; "but they don't love me."
  • Wooden birds fluttered among the trees and wooden cows were browsing upon the wooden grass; but the most amazing things of all were the wooden people--the creatures known as Gargoyles.
  • There were many types, indeed, scarcely two being alike; but all were equally disagreeable in appearance.
  • The tops of their heads had no hair, but were carved into a variety of fantastic shapes, some having a row of points or balls around the top, others designs resembling flowers or vegetables, and still others having squares that looked like waffles cut criss-cross on their heads.
  • "But why fight at all, in that case?" asked the girl.
  • But we dropped into this adventure rather unexpectedly.
  • But Jim was ready for them, and when he saw them coming he turned his heels toward them and began kicking out as hard as he could.
  • But the noise and clatter seemed as dreadful to them as Jim's heels, for all who were able swiftly turned and flew away to a great distance.
  • But the Wizard was not so confident.
  • But the Gargoyles were clever enough not to attack the horse the next time.
  • Some of the wooden beings fell flat upon the ground, where they quivered and trembled in every limb; but most of them managed to wheel and escape again to a distance.
  • "But only for a time," replied the Wizard, shaking his head gloomily.
  • These revolvers are good for six shots each, but when those are gone we shall be helpless.
  • This daunted the enemy for a time, but the defenders were soon out of breath.
  • To one of these houses which had neither doors nor windows, but only one broad opening far up underneath the roof, the prisoners were brought by their captors.
  • "They are probably keeping us for some ceremony," the Wizard answered, reflectively; "but there is no doubt they intend to kill us as dead as possible in a short time."
  • Several stories of empty rooms rewarded their search, but nothing more; so after a time they came back to the platform again.
  • They all looked around, but the kitten was no place to be seen.
  • "But how would it help us to be able to fly?" questioned the girl.
  • "Yes; it's a good way off, but I can see it," she replied.
  • "But how can you get down?" enquired the girl, wonderingly.
  • You may GO down, but you can only CLIMB up.
  • The boy was no longer sleepy, but full of energy and excitement.
  • They were a bit wiggley, but secure enough if only the harness held together.
  • These preparations had not consumed a great deal of time, but the sleeping Gargoyles were beginning to wake up and move around, and soon some of them would be hunting for their missing wings.
  • But come, my children; let us explore the mountain and discover which way we must go in order to escape from this cavern, which is getting to be almost as hot as a bake-oven.
  • These were motionless at first, but soon began to flicker more brightly and to sway slowly from side to side and then up and down.
  • But their bodies don't seem very big.
  • We hope to grow to be dragons some day, but just now we're only dragonettes.
  • "Young dragons, of course; but we are not allowed to call ourselves real dragons until we get our full growth," was the reply.
  • But they've been very scarce for a few years and we usually have to be content with elephants or buffaloes, answered the creature, in a regretful tone.
  • "But that isn't young!" cried Dorothy, in amazement.
  • Mother's about two thousand years old; but she carelessly lost track of her age a few centuries ago and skipped several hundreds.
  • Mother usually knows what she is about, but she made a mistake this time; for you are sure to escape us unless you come too near, and you probably won't do that.
  • "You may be right," replied the Wizard, "but we're a little particular about associating with strangers.
  • But at length they came unexpectedly upon a huge rock that shut off the passage and blocked them from proceeding a single step farther.
  • But they knew now that there was a means of escape and so waited patiently until the path appeared for the second time.
  • But there is another thing to consider.
  • But their journey was almost over, for in a short time they reached a small cave from which there was no further outlet.
  • "But we're ALMOST on earth again," cried Dorothy, "for there is the sun--the most BEAU'FUL sun that shines!" and she pointed eagerly at the crack in the distant roof.
  • But don't you lose heart, Jim, for I'm sure this isn't the end of our story, by any means.
  • But I'm not, my piggy-wees; I'm a humbug wizard.
  • But he can't wiz a single thing if he hasn't the tools and machinery to work with.
  • "Then we must wait for half an hour," she continued; "but it won't take long, after that, to carry us all to the Emerald City."
  • But she's a girl now, and the sweetest, loveliest girl in all the world.
  • But this sawhorse can trot as fast as you can, Jim; and he's very wise, too.
  • But I'm afraid you cannot rule the Emerald City, as you used to, because we now have a beautiful Princess whom everyone loves dearly.
  • "Yes," said the soldier; "but I shaved them off long ago, and since then I have risen from a private to be the Chief General of the Royal Armies."
  • "But I assure you, my good people, that I do not wish to rule the Emerald City," he added, earnestly.
  • But she has ordered me to make you welcome and to show you to your apartments.
  • But Dorothy sprang up and ran to seize her friend's hand drawing him impulsively toward the lovely Princess, who smiled most graciously upon her guest.
  • But didn't you cut it almost too short?
  • "That is quite a history," said Ozma; "but there is a little more history about the Land of Oz that you do not seem to understand--perhaps for the reason that no one ever told it you.
  • One wicked witch named Mombi stole him and carried him away, keeping him as a prisoner.
  • "But, at that time," said the Wizard, thoughtfully, "there were two Good Witches and two Wicked Witches ruling in the land."
  • But Mombi was still my grandfather's jailor, and afterward my father's jailor.
  • But I escaped from her and am now the Ruler of my people.
  • "But you ruled it wisely and well for many years," said she, "and made the people proud of your magical art.
  • But Ozma soon conquered her, with the help of Glinda the Good, and after that I went to live with Nick Chopper, the Tin Woodman.
  • But the little girl gave the angry kitten such a severe cuff that it jumped down again without daring to scratch.
  • But it was never noticed that they became very warm friends, for all of that.
  • But he became nervous again when the next visitor was announced.
  • But I don't doubt your word in the least.
  • The servants were a little discouraged, but soon they brought in a great tray containing two dozen nicely roasted quail on toast.
  • But there is any quantity of oatmeal, which we often cook for breakfast.
  • Fetch it on, but don't cook it, as you value your life.
  • But the royal attendants did not heed the animal's ill temper.
  • But a rickety wooden thing like you has no right to be alive.
  • I know I'm not much account; but I'm the only horse in all the Land of Oz, so they treat me with great respect.
  • But I'm a splendid imitation of one.
  • "Not only possible, but true," replied Jim, who was gratified by the impression he had created.
  • But I am glad to meet a last a Real Horse.
  • Jim did not know, but he would not tell the Sawhorse that.
  • "But I am never hurt," said the Sawhorse.
  • Once in a while I get broken up some, but I am easily repaired and put in good order again.
  • But the Sawhorse introduced the stranger in a calm tone, saying:
  • This, noble Horse, is my friend the Cowardly Lion, who is the valiant King of the Forest, but at the same time a faithful vassal of Princess Ozma.
  • And this is the Hungry Tiger, the terror of the jungle, who longs to devour fat babies but is prevented by his conscience from doing so.
  • But here comes Ozma; so I'd better hush up, for the Princess doesn't like me to chatter since she changed her name from Tip to Ozma.
  • But although the Munchkin was hardly tall enough to come to Zeb's shoulder he was so strong and clever that he laid the boy three times on his back with apparent ease.
  • "It isn't that," said the Sawhorse, modestly; "but I never tire, and you do."
  • "But you're old, now, Jim," suggested Zeb.
  • But the Sawhorse was swifter than the wind.
  • He has won the race, and won it fairly; but what can a horse of flesh do against a tireless beast of wood?
  • But not a trace could they find of the tiny creature they sought.
  • The green maiden hastened away, but presently returned and said:
  • If you can prove I'm guilty, I'll be willing to die nine times, but a mind's eye is no proof, because the Woggle-Bug has no mind to see with.
  • But don't try to make out I'm too innocent to eat a fat piglet if I could do it and not be found out.
  • But I remember that our great poet once said:
  • As the Princess held the white piglet in her arms and stroked its soft hair she said: Let Eureka out of the cage, for she is no longer a prisoner, but our good friend.
  • "But justice prevailed at the last," said Ozma, "for here is my pet, and Eureka is once more free."
  • If he can produce but seven, then this is not the piglet that was lost, but another one.
  • At first the piglet stuck in the neck of the vase and I thought I should get him, after all, but he wriggled himself through and fell down into the deep bottom part--and I suppose he's there yet.
  • "But why didn't you tell us at first?" she asked.
  • Eureka was much surprised to find herself in disgrace; but she was, in spite of the fact that she had not eaten the piglet.
  • "But Uncle Henry and Aunt Em need me to help them," she added, "so I can't ever be very long away from the farm in Kansas."
  • I think this is the loveliest country in the world; but not being fairies Jim and I feel we ought to be where we belong--and that's at the ranch.
  • But Mr. Lincoln could climb.
  • But they marched straight onward.
  • But this was not true.
  • Boston is now a great city, but at that time it was only a little town.
  • He tried first one plan and then another; but none of them proved anything at all.
  • But you must help me.
  • He knew where the old North Church stood, but he could not see much in the darkness.
  • The town seemed very still; but now and then he could hear the beating of a drum or the shouting of some soldier.
  • He walked up and down the river bank, leading his horse behind him; but he kept his eyes turned always toward the dim, dark spot which he knew was the old North Church.
  • They could not see the speeding horse, but they heard the clatter of its hoofs far down the road, and they understood the cry, "Up! up! and defend yourselves!"
  • But the king's soldiers did not find the gunpowder.
  • But don't be afraid.
  • He walked quickly, but very quietly, down the pathway into the darker woods.
  • He looked eagerly around, but saw only a squirrel frisking among the trees and a rabbit hopping across the road.
  • But it jumped quickly forward and threw Gilbert upon the ground.
  • Tears were in his eyes; but he tried to look brave.
  • "We don't know," was the answer, "but we saw her tracks down there by the brook.
  • But the wolf was too wise to show herself.
  • They feared that the wolf was upon him; but he wished only to get his gun.
  • But Putnam was not afraid.
  • It was no fun to be pulled over the sharp stones in that way; but it was better than to be bitten by the wolf.
  • But there was no horse for him.
  • Oh, but he must be.
  • But George had made up his mind to go.
  • But I must do as father says.
  • He tried to brush it off, but it remained there.
  • But Cimabue only praised him for his great skill.
  • I deceived only the birds, but you have deceived me, a painter.
  • But he had never seen any pictures except a few small ones in a book.
  • He had no paper, but he knew where there was a smooth board.
  • He had no pencil, but there was a piece of black charcoal on the hearth.
  • The baby smiled but did not wake up.
  • I couldn't help but do it.
  • But I am afraid.
  • He was not old enough to be a soldier, but he could be a scout--and a good scout he was.
  • He was not strong enough to work on the farm like his brothers; but he loved books and study.
  • The schoolhouse was two or three miles from home, but he did not mind the long walk through the woods and over the hills.
  • "But," said he, "no man can rightly succeed without an education."
  • But Daniel's father did not say anything about college.
  • But I don't want a sidesaddle.
  • But our neighbor, Johnson, is sending the nag to Exeter for the use of a lady who is to ride back with me.
  • But won't it look rather funny for me to ride to Exeter on a sidesaddle?
  • But still they would whisper, and he could not prevent it.
  • He stood on one leg and then on the other, and watched very closely; but nobody whispered.
  • But Tommy didn't care for that.
  • Little Lucy Martin saw him through her tears, but said nothing.
  • But tell me why you so deliberately broke the rule against whispering.
  • "But the best part of it is the story which it tells," said their mother.
  • But I am a prince, and it is foolish for princes to waste their time with such things.
  • "But I should like to know the story which this book tells," said Alfred.
  • But his mother kissed him and gave him the beautiful book.
  • But after he had learned to read, she taught him to look in books for that which he wished to know.
  • But you can learn many things from books.
  • He was a very little boy, but before he was three years old he could read quite well.
  • But no guests came.
  • The feast is ready, but no one has come to partake of it.
  • But you neglected one important thing.
  • For in that country, people never wear shoes in the house, but take them off at the door.
  • It is the man who rose to go out, and two young princes contended for the honor of giving him his shoes but at last agreed that each should offer him one.
  • Al Farra bowed low, but said nothing; and the caliph went on.
  • They went but slowly, for the sun was hot and the way was rough.
  • They could do nothing but give up all their goods and money.
  • But they wouldn't believe me.
  • "If I had answered your questions differently, I should have told a lie," said Otanes; "and none but cowards tell lies"
  • This treasure does not belong to me, for I bought only the ground; but when I offered it to my neighbor he refused it.
  • The second man then spoke up and said, It is true that I sold him the ground, but I did not reserve anything he might find in it.
  • But are there any gentle, harmless animals in your fields?
  • But that is not likely.
  • He groped around in the dim light, but could not find any way of escape.
  • But soon the way became too narrow for his body to pass through.
  • The officer began to write, but just as he finished the first word, a bomb came through the roof of the house and struck the floor close by him.
  • But what has the bomb to do with what I wish you to write?
  • But one of the rulers was not willing to do this.
  • They did not kill him, but they drove him out of the city and bade him never return.
  • But he drove them back with scornful words.
  • Rome was saved; but Coriolanus could never return to his home, his mother, his wife and children.
  • But they had made up their minds to get rid of him.
  • And now they would have spared him; but he was true to his promise,-- as soon as the song was finished, he threw himself headlong into the sea.
  • He told his wonderful story to the king; but the king would not believe him.
  • Other people think that the dolphin which saved Arion was not a fish, but a ship named the _Dolphin_.
  • Very kind and loving was St. Francis--kind and loving not only to men but to all living things.
  • So, do not be ungrateful, but sing His praises and thank Him for his goodness toward you.
  • His face was white, but very homely.
  • But he threw it upon his shoulders and seemed well satisfied.
  • But I am sure that it is my duty to stand at my post as long as I live.
  • But his surly guest said scarcely a word.
  • But he was still headstrong and ill-tempered; and he was often in trouble with the other sailors.
  • He tried to make signals to them; he called as loudly as he could; but he was neither seen nor heard, and the ships came no nearer.
  • All the sailors were drowned but Robinson Crusoe.
  • But there were birds in the woods and some wild goats on the hills.
  • He rang the little bell which was used to call the page, but no page answered.
  • It is true that I have been asleep, but I know nothing about this money.
  • He is now being hunted with hounds, but I hope soon to see him king over all Scotland.
  • But at last his army was beaten; his men were scattered; and Tamerlane fled alone from the field of battle.
  • "You are a brave fellow, Mr. Ant," he said; "but you have a heavy load to carry."
  • But it still held on to the grain of wheat.
  • It tried three times, four times, a dozen times, twenty times--but always with the same result.
  • But we have no oars.
  • "Well, I can make some oars," said Robert; "but I think there ought to be still another and a better way.
  • They were very rough and crude, but strong and serviceable.
  • "She goes ahead all right," said Christopher, "but how shall we guide her?"
  • But it was no use.
  • The poor man could do nothing but dress himself and go sorrowing on his way.
  • But I have met with such bad luck that I am forced to sell them.
  • Do you know of any person who was once poor but who has lately and suddenly become well-to-do?
  • But lately everything had changed for him.
  • But, as I came to your palace this morning, I kept saying to myself, 'When our lord Al Mansour learns just how it was that I borrowed the gold, I have no doubt that in his kindness of heart he will forgive me the debt.'
  • "There is nothing lacking," he said, "but the ten pieces he has told you about; and I will give him these as a reward."
  • But in the corner, almost hidden from his fellows, one poor man was sitting who did not enjoy the singing.
  • But when they looked, they saw that his seat was vacant.
  • But one day after he had become a man, he said: Tell me about the great world which, you say, lies outside of these palace walls.
  • But when they saw that his mind was set on going, they said no more.
  • But suddenly, at a narrow place, they met a very old man, hobbling slowly along over the stony way.
  • The coachman made no answer, but drove onward.
  • But first get a blanket and warm it, quick.
  • But if I had not helped you, you would have been in a worse place.
  • He was senseless; but I knew he wasn't drowned.
  • But they will be looking for you.
  • But she has servants to attend to me.
  • But come, children, let us have our supper.
  • But he would not eat anything.
  • "Of course she will be glad to know that," said the boy; "but she has no time to bother about me to-night."
  • But ours is better.
  • But our dear mother waits on us herself.
  • But really, I fell into the pool at the fountain, and this kind man brought me here to get me dry.
  • But I hope you are now ready to come home with us.
  • But first I must thank these poor people.
  • All the other men will take off their hats, but the king will keep his on.
  • But it held a beautiful golden tripod that was worth more than a thousand fishes.
  • Give not the merchant nor the fishermen the prize; But give it to that one who is wisest of the wise.
  • "But what shall we do with it?" said the messengers.
  • The people of his country had made him their king; but as soon as he had made good laws for them he gave up his crown.
  • Give not the merchant nor the fishermen the prize; But give it to that one who is wisest of the wise.
  • I should be delighted to own so beautiful a piece of workmanship, but I know I am not worthy.
  • They told him that it was not for sale, but that it was to be given to the wisest of the wise.
  • But when they came into Lacedaemon, they heard his praises on every side.
  • But all along, they believed they would ultimately prevail—and not just win the war, but also do something epic that would change the course of history for all time.
  • But nowhere in it was there even a hint that it might not be possible.
  • They may have missed on specifics (such as each of us owning a personal jet pack and a flying car) but in general were dead-on.
  • Not just a little better, but gloriously and fantastically better.
  • But that is changing.
  • But the five phenomena I chose to tackle in this book are among the great blights on humanity that I believe the Internet and technology will help solve.
  • But my car is not a CD player, GPS navigation system, or air conditioner.
  • But sometimes it is hard to tell them apart when we don't have an offline frame of reference.
  • I may be connected to other people, but still it is all about me.
  • But Linda decides to give it a try.
  • Today, success still requires good execution, but the larger question is: "Can you discover and fulfill a hitherto-unknown, latent desire in people that the Internet enables?"
  • But I do think we will see an end to any effective constraints relating to computers' ability to process data and transfer information.
  • But a single example will suffice to illustrate the whole.
  • But at a certain point, you don't need any more, and the technology is mature.
  • But once cars improved enough, for all intents and purposes we stopped increasing their top speed.
  • Sure, but we don't need that from the technology.
  • But that movement was, by its nature, backward looking.
  • But the Internet Renaissance dwarfs by a hundredfold, a thousandfold, the Renaissance of Europe.
  • I can't tell you which clips will be watched in a century, but I'm certain that some will be.
  • Actually, I could make guesses, but they might well be spectacularly wrong and a guy doesn't want that haunting him ten years from now.
  • But in some ways, it's like antique furniture.
  • But the truth is that almost all furniture back in the day was cheaply made junk and only a very few high-quality pieces survived.
  • But the inventors of our age have put a billion transistors on an area the size of a postage stamp.
  • But all that is about to change.
  • But then something totally unexpected happened.
  • But even if I had a robot that knew everything, I couldn't really say, "Tell me every custom they have here" and be fully informed.
  • But even that is not enough.
  • But knowing isn't enough.
  • Not just that you went to a certain address but that the address was a movie theater and—based on where you sat and that you ordered tickets online—you saw Episode VII of Star Wars.
  • Everything you saw, that your eyeballs tracked to, how long you looked at it—and not just everything you ever looked at, but your physiological response.
  • But let's not stop there.
  • The statement is not there because you want the log per se but because the logging of the actions is what documents how much you need to pay.
  • Remember the notion that the Internet wouldn't turn out to be only for one purpose—that while my car is clearly for taking me places, the Internet won't be for doing one single task, but many?
  • But as I watch how we are building and using the Internet, the one-on-one encounters impress me most.
  • But let's say everyone had their device set to "broadcast my location but not my identity" constantly.
  • But let's say everyone had their device set to "broadcast my location but not my identity" constantly.
  • In our modern age, people disagree not just in terms of values they apply to knowledge, but they disagree on actual pieces of knowledge.
  • These are not differences of values but disagreements in terms of knowledge.
  • It is an answer engine, but one that attempts to answer questions that have never before been asked.
  • I say "could" because I doubt they have all those databases loaded yet, but you get the idea.
  • But take it a step further.
  • This section shows not complementary products but, essentially, competitive products.
  • Most people buy Apple TV, but a few buy the Roku XDS Streaming Player.
  • Two hundred years later, William Rutherford thought he had calculated it to 208 digits but only got the first 152 correct, so we will give him credit that far.
  • But give credit where credit is due: For certain tasks, machines perform vastly better than humans.
  • But it would be eerily, astonishingly, mind-blowingly accurate.
  • I like this goal, and I would like to do it as well, but in bits, not bites.
  • (It would have many more, but for now let's just say it includes a million things about you.)
  • But you still were working with the biased, anecdotal opinions of a few people not very like you.
  • In the future, something very much like the Amazon suggestion engine, but for all of life, will change that.
  • And not just where do they go, but where is it that people drive the farthest to get to?
  • But I contend that only matters of degree separate it from the weightier matters we conventionally associate with wisdom.
  • But that has nothing to do with the anonymous sharing of data.
  • The future system I foresee will not be different in substance, but only in degree.
  • But human beings are not machines.
  • But as we do them yet again and capture them, we finally can begin to develop a planet-wide memory system.
  • But these are the exceptions.
  • But in a world where great wisdom is available to everyone, the end of ignorance will be within our grasp.
  • But at times in history, left-handedness was thought to be a malady in need of curing (and in some parts of the world still is).
  • Perhaps we all have such remarkable abilities but are impaired in a way—maybe the rest of us have a disease to which these savants are immune.
  • But I stress the word "reasonably."
  • During his campaign and his time in office, the extent of the effect of his polio was kept from the public, but the fact he had the disease was commonly known.
  • The name and idea caught on, and by mid-January the biggest names of the day were promoting it on their shows: Jack Benny, Bing Crosby, and Rudy Vallee, to name but a few.
  • It often left them partially paralyzed, in wheelchairs or iron lungs (a term that's now all but forgotten and will likely send younger readers to Wikipedia).
  • But by 1952, there was also hope.
  • But in other cases, variolation worked: The person who survived it did not subsequently get smallpox.
  • But with time, technology worked through all these problems.
  • I think that is the case with polio and smallpox, which means they weren't eliminated because they were easy, but because they were awful.
  • If my reasoning elsewhere in this book is correct, we are moving toward a future where there will be nothing but healthy, well-developed, rich countries with modern infrastructure.
  • And then we come to Greece, the home of Hippocrates, the "Father of Modern Medicine," who left us not just the oath that bears his name but also a corpus of roughly sixty medical texts based on his teaching.
  • Hippocrates was remarkable not only as a surgeon but also because he systematized medicine in his spare time.
  • When the ancients could not find these solutions, it was not for a lack of intelligence but for a lack of technology.
  • The pace of innovation and accomplishment is already fast but will grow even faster.
  • And not just certain farms, but farms that used a certain pesticide.
  • Not just a certain pesticide, but pesticides that contained a certain chemical.
  • Is it actually that blue-eyed redheads have the same number of accidents as non-redheads, but brown-eyed redheads are even more clumsy, accident prone, and traffic hazards?
  • Why do people who win Academy Awards outlive people who are nominated but do not win?
  • In the future, we'll not only know if that is so, but why: Perhaps mental agility is a result of their extensive exposure to a chemical in pencil lead and newsprint that they got by doing all those puzzles.
  • But the choice will be ours and will be made based on facts.
  • Finally, this system will not just solve for human illness, but all kinds of other problems as well.
  • But because it can be misused doesn't mean it cannot be used well.
  • But no one had any idea of the mechanism by which this could be achieved.
  • But we have a copy of it.
  • But every now and then there would be a little difference.
  • Some chunks of your DNA do nothing useful (that we know of yet), but other chunks we call genes.
  • Some of it is known, but the function of each of the thirty thousand genes has to be figured out one at a time.
  • But my guess is that we will be able to do this and even make existing "good" genes perform better.
  • But scientists have been busy sequencing all manner of things.
  • We cannot only see our enemy but have deconstructed it to its very core.
  • With all due respect to Nietzsche, we have looked long into the Abyss, but the Abyss has not looked back into us.
  • Well, not literally, but close.
  • When "human testing" is done almost immediately, but within the safe confines of a CPU.
  • This will likely not ever be perfect, but any insight it can offer us is a gain.
  • Imagine if everyone frequently disputed charges: "I never got my order!" or "It wasn't what they promised it would be!" or "Yeah, I got a box in the mail, but it was full of rocks."
  • But today, trade is encouraged by specialization.
  • But if each of ten people specialized on just one-tenth of the task, they could together make 48,000, an increase in per-person productivity from one pin a day to 4,800 pins per day.
  • It may have some limit in theory, because there is an optimal arrangement of atoms in the universe; but for practical purposes, it has no limit.
  • Technology marches forward—perhaps not forever, but as close to forever as we can understand.
  • But for now, I want to leave you with a preposterous thought: In the future, a new Mercedes Benz will cost just $50.
  • You have ten kids but only nine chairs.
  • But in many areas, scarcity is so profound it has huge societal impact.
  • But think about how it could play out: If energy truly were free and unlimited, you could, for instance, power tractors everywhere in the world.
  • But the price of the tractor would have plummeted, for a constellation of reasons.
  • But what if that energy cost fell to zero?
  • But is energy really scarce—or is it like air?
  • We know how to power a clock with this energy but haven't yet cracked the code on doing it at scale.
  • But these are questions of technology, not of scarcity, and technology is about to rocket forward.
  • I don't mean that in a motivational poster kind of way but in a literal sense: Failures (and what we learn from them) will help build the energy solutions for our future.
  • But technology and human innovation know no scarcity.
  • We compute the maximum amount of food the world can produce by beginning with total acres of land considered arable, but that is based on assumptions about the future of technology and agriculture.
  • But that, too, is a function of present technology.
  • But in spite of the relative economic displacement they all cause, free trade, outsourcing, and technological displacement all have a positive net effect on the economics of the planet.
  • Let's consider examples of how the effect is positive for some, negative for some, but the net is a gain in the overall wealth of the system.
  • But it is quite likely you will need fewer workers.
  • The net effect is positive, but the laid-off workers will probably have a hard time appreciating it.
  • We are sympathetic to the laid-off workers, but no one would suggest the cotton gin not be installed.
  • It is tempting to say that but entirely wrong.
  • But Chad merely stopped selling his labor to the employer for that price.
  • But even in this case, the result is still a massive overall gain in efficiency.
  • But that is not what will happen.
  • But I intend to show you how in the next chapter: Chad Gets a Better Job .
  • But if you can tolerate it, what follows will explain why free trade sometimes hurts the (net) world economy.
  • This is seldom discussed but very real.
  • However, the company likely won't choose this outcome because the $10 cost of cleanup is not paid by the company but by society.
  • But realize, no new net efficiencies are gained from this move.
  • But change is inevitable.
  • The maximum wage you can earn, though, is defined by supply and demand for labor, and by your negotiating ability, but it also has a cap.
  • But what if a machine did everything people really don't want to do?
  • They make wonderful servants, but I think they have really terrible jobs.
  • As I have pointed out, technology may in fact have limits, but we do not know what they are.
  • But what if dogs didn't exist and your only experience with them was watching Scooby-Doo?
  • But I know of no one who would want to have a conversation with a computer program pretending to be his dog.
  • But in terms of wanting to converse with robots at an emotional level, I just don't see it.
  • But that's because I would be sharing the experience with another human being, and human beings form connections with other human beings.
  • But not a machine.
  • They still have the hand-operated machine from the 1940s that was used to make the first Legos, but it is of course now a museum piece.
  • But wait (as they say on late-night TV commercials), there's more!
  • Choose whichever of those you are comfortable with, but let me illustrate with a single example.
  • Not a cure, but it sure beats insulin shots.
  • But let's move on to other jobs they can do outside our bodies.
  • But wait, there's more!
  • But more than that, nanotechnology will create new opportunities that we cannot now see.
  • But that won't happen with the Mercedes.
  • That could be true, but I don't think so, for reasons laid out in the chapter on scarcity.
  • But surely a pan that warns you if your house is burning down or your food will kill you has to be worth $200 to you.
  • But your house will do more.
  • The house will need scheduled maintenance but will remember when and will ask you for permission.
  • Not 20 percent better and 20 percent cheaper, but a thousand times better.
  • Vacationing should fall in price but requires much direct labor, so it will not fall by a thousandfold.
  • And not just chairs, but bread and muskets and plows.
  • But I expect that technology and free enterprise will take us across a threshold where things formerly regarded as scarce will not be so any more.
  • But let's say only 10 percent of industries will experience this thousandfold increase in productivity.
  • The overall economic output of the planet, GWP (gross world product), will rise dramatically in the years to come, but its distribution will be quite skewed.
  • But this is merely a footnote, an asterisk in the record book of humanity.
  • But the relative definition certainly kicks in here.
  • I referred to it as a dance, but it is a dance to economic death.
  • Where I come from the term is "thievery," but believe it or not, they don't call it that.
  • I beg to differ, but I am seldom consulted when such decisions are made.
  • Such radical redistribution attempts are dangerous games, for the rich are creators of economic opportunity, not just for themselves, but as employers, for society.
  • You are right to quote Jefferson, but you chose the wrong quote.
  • But this is not the case historically.
  • In fact, we don't simply buy more government, but we give it a disproportionate amount of our increased income.
  • After the death of Gracchus, a conservative government under Sulla withdrew the subsidy, but shortly afterward, in a period of great unrest, restored it, and two hundred thousand persons stood in line.
  • He worked to apply a means test, pared the rolls back, then died; the rolls swelled again, and his successor again tried to bring them in line, but it was hard.
  • But the big question is whether these same economics would apply in a world one hundred times richer than we are right now.
  • But think of it this way: Before, you made $33,000 and paid 40 percent in taxes, so you were left with $20,000 in take-home pay.
  • That is something like what I expect will happen, but on a worldwide scale.
  • In other words, the average person will make more money, pay a higher percentage as taxes, but still bring home vastly more than before.
  • Before recorded music, the best musicians made a good living but weren't extremely wealthy.
  • But it really is no different than me thinking it is my birthright to be able to have freedom of speech.
  • But in a world without scarcity, socialism can't even exist.
  • But in describing that job spectrum, I never said anything about his absolute ability—I said only that he was at the bottom of the list relative to others.
  • But upon reflection, it is entirely inconsistent with our experience.
  • But soon, we will.
  • But it is my belief that many more people will choose the first choice.
  • But many people's lives do follow humdrum, dispiriting patterns because we employ too many people doing work that machines should be doing.
  • But I am not talking about a state of affairs where overnight someone with a "machine job" gets unlimited wealth.
  • But over time, these dehumanizing jobs are what will be "left behind," not the people who perform them.
  • But as we grew up, reality set in that market forces did not allow those activities to pay enough to support us, so at some point we all figured out we had to "earn a living."
  • But sadly, other people don't think his work is any good.
  • In fact, let's say his own mother considered donating the portrait he painted of her to Goodwill but decided not to because "the poor have enough problems already."
  • They have something they love and want to do, but if market forces are not such that they can support themselves doing that, they have to do something else.
  • But we take it largely for granted—and I think that is just fine.
  • They are not distinct buckets but rather broad characterizations: actual famine, weaponized famine, and structural famine.
  • But before the twentieth century, this was not the case and actual famines were much more common.
  • Structural famine exists when enough food is technically on hand or able to be imported, but some portion of the population is economically separated from it.
  • In other words, food is present, but some cannot afford it.
  • The poor, knowing there to be bread but being economically unable to get it, rioted.
  • He writes how in Europe when there is a problem, people turn to the government to solve it, but in America, they form what he calls "voluntary associations"—what we might term charities and nonprofits.
  • But it is hard to deny the underlying need.
  • There is undoubtedly a cause and effect between what we eat and our health, but I believe it is still poorly understood.
  • I am not only what I eat but am also what I do, what I drink, what I think about, and more.
  • We tend to notice every time the expected effect is triggered by the cause, but may not notice all the times it isn't.
  • Well, yeah, but you also drink a Coca-Cola every day, too.
  • But in the future when we have more and better information, if it turns out that some of these methods are not net gains, we will know that and look elsewhere for solutions.
  • But in a real sense, it also makes the problem that much easier to solve in the future.
  • But hunger has numerous and complicated causes and can only be eliminated by addressing the chief ones.
  • You can be a subsistence farmer and perhaps produce some excess, but given the prior observation about the fundamental volatility of farming, you will always be at risk of not producing enough.
  • In essence, they would become like Japan, which exports essentially no food, imports US$44 billion in food annually, but still enjoys a high standard of living.
  • Cheap food is great for the poor but bad for the poor farmer.
  • But the problem, of course, was that food prices went up, the people went hungry, and riots ensued.
  • But the industry as a whole has shot forward.)
  • The advances were not merely mechanical but chemical as well.
  • But if ever there was a textbook case of one guy making a difference, this is it.
  • Farmers don't optimize per plant but per farm.
  • Then he noticed when he bred tall pea plants with another tall plant, he occasionally got a short offspring, but usually tall ones.
  • I say we can improve things not by 20 or so percent, but by twenty times or more.
  • When I use a term like factory farm, I am envisioning not what these things are now but what they will be.
  • But the food would not only be produced with maximum efficiency; it would be extremely fresh and very healthy.
  • But I do not believe these technological leaps forward are a threat to good food.
  • But when the farm of tomorrow delivers on this holistic promise, I think all people will embrace it.
  • The proverbial "Little Timmy" will find it hard to believe that food isn't manufactured like electronics but grown like an animal.
  • But what if manufactured food was tastier?
  • And we all know about those that optimize for cost and nutrition but the resulting food tastes awful; I have consumed enough wheatgrass to attest to this.
  • It will undoubtedly make the most profitable seeds possible but not necessarily the healthiest.
  • The gene mutated accidently, but once noticed, breeders bred for it.
  • Thus we had genetic modifications in plants that could have occurred in nature but probably wouldn't have.
  • But sometimes it was like lightning in a bottle, and magic happened.
  • But again, this could happen in nature, so it is hard to see how we can object to this.
  • This couldn't happen in nature (or, more precisely, could in theory, but is extremely unlikely).
  • UNICEF has said a program that gives children two large doses a year of vitamin A could all but eliminate VAD, although more frequent, smaller doses would be better.
  • American ethanol policies do not "kill" the poor, but they do drive up corn prices.
  • Me ordering a second helping of corn on the cob while dining at the Black Eyed Pea also increases demand for corn, but for doing so, I shouldn't stand trial for murder.
  • They should be advocating that genetically modified crops be created not because it would result in better looking strawberries, but because GM crops don't require fertilizer or pesticides.
  • But they are very remote.
  • But the end of hunger also will be hastened by a host of Internet technologies that will dramatically change agriculture.
  • We are really good on the reasoning part, but as far as our sensory inputs go, we are massively outclassed by cheap sensors.
  • The ultimate goal, I submit, is not to optimize just meter by meter but what I call "grape by grape," down to each individual piece of flora and fauna.
  • And advances in drip irrigation, which itself isn't exactly new but is becoming far more widespread and ever more efficient, allows crops to be grown with massively less water.
  • I know it sounds all futuristic and expensive now, but what if this technology falls to just a few dollars per acre?
  • But micro-lending via the Internet is different.
  • But in the meantime, hunger will stay with us even in the world of plenty.
  • It is akin to saying you have a right to life but not a right to a heart.
  • That is, agree in principle but decline any personal accountability.
  • Before his death, Pol Pot conceded that his regime certainly killed people, but ''to say that millions died is too much.''
  • But the cost is so negligible that no one thinks much of it.
  • The full quote runs: "Necessitous men are not, truly speaking, free men, but, to answer a present exigency, will submit to any terms that the crafty may impose upon them."
  • But this is a misreading of both Roosevelt and history.
  • The individual had no liberties, or at least very few, but in exchange was, in theory, entitled to certain economic rights.
  • In the United States, you could do it via the tax code, with government only acting as an income redistribution agent but not as a food distributor.
  • But what if everyone in the nation, rich and poor, were to be mailed a $2,000 food card annually, redeemable at the grocery store for any of several hundred nutritious foods?
  • But of course, I am not most worried about the United States.
  • If you knew someone who was a good business partner, was fun to hang out with, but let one of his children starve to death so that he could enjoy a higher standard of living, what would be your opinion of this person?
  • But over time, as incomes around the world rise, people will migrate more and more to products associated with social practices that match their own ideals.
  • But I also believe that hunger will end when we decide to end it, not only at the point when we are able to end it.
  • That is a hard truth, but a truth nonetheless.
  • Now, I'm faced with explaining why the past was full of war but somehow the future will not be.
  • But in making the case that war can and will be ended, I have my work cut out for me.
  • Maybe you will agree it to be possible, but after reading this chapter, you will likely think it is improbable.
  • All right then, not the cavalry, but a marshaling of arguments and observations that will show how the end of war is inevitable, or nearly so.
  • They are not tales of aberrant individuals but of societal norms.
  • I want to spend some time talking about civilization, but first I want to recount the progress that we have made through civilization.
  • Boxing matches still occur, but the boxers participate voluntarily.
  • The idea that a person can be a political prisoner, jailed for his beliefs about government, politics, or politicians, is ancient but happily fading.
  • We use democracy as a method of selecting representatives.
  • We have not only outlawed cruelty to animals, but increasingly, people care about the living conditions of even the animals they eat.
  • But I get his point.)
  • It is true that there is much disagreement over how to achieve these ideals, but the fact remains we want a just society for all.
  • As Eisenhower's presidency neared an end, he spoke of war again, but less in terms of economic costs.
  • Albert Einstein reflected this when he famously said, "I know not with what weapons World War III will be fought, but World War IV will be fought with sticks and stones."
  • But in the future this will not be the case.
  • But it is obvious to me that we can end war.
  • This is not me fighting against the tide of history but being swept along with it.
  • (Yes, I know that statement should earn the "Screamingly Obvious Statement of the Year Award," but bear with me.)
  • But I am making a case I believe I can defend and will begin by defining my terms.
  • I won't speculate on what that size is, but it certainly is not a size 0.
  • When the Soviet Union dissolved only two years later, not with a bang but with a whimper, we were slack-jawed with surprise.
  • But just because it is an old dream, doesn't mean it is an impossible one.
  • You could have the libertarian state, the green state, the clothing-optional state, the state with free public housing for all, the state where puns are outlawed, the state with a two-drink minimum, the fiercely pro-business state—even a state that guarantees free speech but requires that you sing your speech like a show tune.
  • But not, to be sure, without obstacles.
  • But this politics of war have in fact worked this way repeated, across place and time.
  • Technically speaking, I have included a few that are not dependent on the Internet per se, but in which the Internet and technology plays some role.
  • They didn't enter war to satisfy a desire to kill and maim but to be victorious in the way their society rewarded.
  • But at the time the doctrine was in force, MAD was effective (or at least, not proven ineffective).
  • MAD is now back, but in economic form.
  • It is nothing but downside for them.
  • But let's adopt the cynic's view for a moment and assume people in these corporations are chiefly concerned about their financial benefit, not about human suffering, when it comes to war.
  • But now we have introduced uncertainty.
  • But in addition, when nations trade, the underlying economies themselves grow ever more intertwined.
  • But the point really is different.
  • In the modern age, money is once again represented by bits, but a different kind altogether: Money went from gold to paper and is now digital.
  • More wealth is digital, to be sure, but immeasurably more wealth is tied up in the intricacies of society itself.
  • They cannot destroy the strong, but they can inflict significant damage.
  • In one sense, it's a peaceful world: The bully insists on the lunch money of the small kid, who has no recourse but to capitulate.
  • (Of course, when a king proves himself through battle, he is not risking his life but the lives of thousands of his subjects.
  • Notable examples exist, but the flow of history in this regard has rendered its verdict.
  • But all in all, the theory seems to hold.
  • We could go on here and talk about other military powers and alliances, but the simple fact is that large countries are less willing to risk war in defense of small ones.
  • This was fine with Great Britain but not with Maine.
  • But having your starlet drive eighty mph whilst liquored up, well, that was fine.
  • But war is seldom the answer.
  • But maybe as a civilization, we have to talk out loud to figure out where we stand, to make progress.
  • I have no doubt there are all kinds of things in the Twitterverse that I want to know about, but I only find the ones that I first knew to look for.
  • Everyone will be on Facebook, as will be every business, every idea, every brand, and all the people who were once members but have since passed away.
  • Our "strong ties"—family, close friends and the like—we can always count on, but they are relatively few.
  • They may not bump into them very often in what we call "everyday life" but do know them well enough to friend them.
  • The system we have is not perfect, but it is highly distributed and bottom up.
  • I realize in these pages I must seem very distrustful of government, but it is not really true.
  • But if these other news outlets contradict the official account, then all the better.
  • But along with wealth, these technologies bring information and thereby sow the seeds of their undoing.
  • But a sizable number are attempting this, and the direction the world is heading is obvious.
  • But if that is the case, they will fall in due course.
  • But it is worth noting.
  • I know this is a controversial forecast, and to many people a very depressing one, but I think it is both inevitable and good.
  • But learning two languages comes at a cost.
  • But English seems to have taken hold, thanks to the Internet.
  • The future German man will not just be a man of books, but a man of character.
  • This list goes on, but I will spare you.
  • But the notion of "elites" is broadening, as is the number of non-Americans who study in the United States.
  • It isn't just that we can communicate better but that we actually relate to each other better.
  • One might have expected to find YouTube making its cameo in the earlier "communication" section, but I deliberately moved it here.
  • Let's talk a moment about patriotism and nationalism, words frequently used but seldom clearly defined.
  • But the decline of nationalism is a force for peace.
  • But we do not have to rely solely on those.
  • There are pros and cons to this, to be sure, but overall, this has increased our empathy.
  • But the critical question is, will they resort to war to resolve them?
  • All kinds of artists have come and gone in the last four centuries, popular in their time but forgotten now.
  • In Othello is a character named Iago, an evil man who never does anything illegal himself but is always planting ideas in other people's minds, to get them to do his dirty work.
  • King Lear is about a father who has three daughters—two who flatter him, but a third who speaks honestly and bluntly to him because she loves him.
  • But first we must go further back, from Shakespeare at the end of the sixteenth century to Plato around 370 BC.
  • You have invented an elixir not of memory, but of reminding.
  • He went to the door but didn't see anyone so went outside to look for them.
  • But with rare exceptions, we simply don't train our brains to do this particular task.
  • In this way, you are processing aurally, which is much slower but more focused than silent reading.
  • In one case, the technology, writing, probably resulted in our memories getting worse, but we gained much more than we lost.
  • As we approached the end of the flawless narrative, one of us would invariably ask sardonically (but never sarcastically), "What could possibly go wrong?"
  • But imagine the difference if the world had ten billion healthy, well-educated people!
  • Many technological problems I don't address in this book, but I believe technology will provide solutions for those also.
  • But a world without want and without disease, a world with opportunity for all, is a world where getting along—even when we don't see eye to eye—is going to be a good bit easier.
  • But we will see it begin to take shape and will know that we were there the moment the world changed.
  • But in the excitement of carrying me to church my father lost the name on the way, very naturally, since it was one in which he had declined to have a part.
  • But, except for these fleeting memories, if, indeed, they be memories, it all seems very unreal, like a nightmare.
  • We were busy cutting out paper dolls; but we soon wearied of this amusement, and after cutting up our shoestrings and clipping all the leaves off the honeysuckle that were within reach, I turned my attention to Martha's corkscrews.
  • Throwing a blanket over me, she almost suffocated me, but she put out the fire.
  • But I did not find out the secret for several years.
  • I guarded both doll and cradle with the most jealous care; but once I discovered my little sister sleeping peacefully in the cradle.
  • I pointed this out to everybody with provoking persistency, but no one seemed equal to the task of providing the doll with eyes.
  • The beads were sewed in the right place and I could not contain myself for joy; but immediately I lost all interest in the doll.
  • When we arrived in Baltimore, Dr. Chisholm received us kindly: but he could do nothing.
  • But Miss Sullivan did not arrive until the following March.
  • The little blind children at the Perkins Institution had sent it and Laura Bridgman had dressed it; but I did not know this until afterward.
  • But my teacher had been with me several weeks before I understood that everything has a name.
  • There were barriers still, it is true, but barriers that could in time be swept away.
  • I do not remember what they all were; but I do know that mother, father, sister, teacher were among them--words that were to make the world blossom for me, "like Aaron's rod, with flowers."
  • I did nothing but explore with my hands and learn the name of every object that I touched; and the more I handled things and learned their names and uses, the more joyous and confident grew my sense of kinship with the rest of the world.
  • But about this time I had an experience which taught me that nature is not always kind.
  • The morning had been fine, but it was growing warm and sultry when at last we turned our faces homeward.
  • I longed for my teacher's return; but above all things I wanted to get down from that tree.
  • A wild impulse to jump seized me, but terror held me fast.
  • But whatever the process, the result is wonderful.
  • But Miss Sullivan shook her head, and I was greatly puzzled and disappointed.
  • For a long time I was still--I was not thinking of the beads in my lap, but trying to find a meaning for "love" in the light of this new idea.
  • The sun had been under a cloud all day, and there had been brief showers; but suddenly the sun broke forth in all its southern splendour.
  • You cannot touch love either; but you feel the sweetness that it pours into everything.
  • But it was a long time before I ventured to take the initiative, and still longer before I could find something appropriate to say at the right time.
  • From the printed slip it was but a step to the printed book.
  • I liked this, too; but the division of the earth into zones and poles confused and teased my mind.
  • Every one in the family prepared surprises for me, but what pleased me most, Miss Sullivan and I prepared surprises for everybody else.
  • In the pleasure of doing this, I did not stop to look at my own gifts; but when I was ready for them, my impatience for the real Christmas to begin almost got beyond control.
  • I found surprises, not in the stocking only, but on the table, on all the chairs, at the door, on the very window-sill; indeed, I could hardly walk without stumbling on a bit of Christmas wrapped up in tissue paper.
  • But when my teacher presented me with a canary, my cup of happiness overflowed.
  • I knew I could not see; but it did not seem possible that all the eager, loving children who gathered round me and joined heartily in my frolics were also blind.
  • But they were so happy and contented that I lost all sense of pain in the pleasure of their companionship.
  • But the rumble of the machinery made me think it was thundering, and I began to cry, because I feared if it rained we should not be able to have our picnic out of doors.
  • But all my frantic efforts were in vain.
  • But next morning I went to the trough, and lo, he had disappeared!
  • I did not eat them; but I loved their fragrance and enjoyed hunting for them in the leaves and grass.
  • We would have taken any way rather than this; but it was late and growing dark, and the trestle was a short cut home.
  • I had to feel for the rails with my toe; but I was not afraid, and got on very well, until all at once there came a faint "puff, puff" from the distance.
  • But during the night the fury of the wind increased to such a degree that it thrilled us with a vague terror.
  • As the days wore on, the drifts gradually shrunk, but before they were wholly gone another storm came, so that I scarcely felt the earth under my feet once all winter.
  • At intervals the trees lost their icy covering, and the bulrushes and underbrush were bare; but the lake lay frozen and hard beneath the sun.
  • But I persisted, and an accident soon occurred which resulted in the breaking down of this great barrier--I heard the story of Ragnhild Kaata.
  • True, they were broken and stammering syllables; but they were human speech.
  • But it must not be supposed that I could really talk in this short time.
  • Miss Fuller and Miss Sullivan could understand me, but most people would not have understood one word in a hundred.
  • Discouragement and weariness cast me down frequently; but the next moment the thought that I should soon be at home and show my loved ones what I had accomplished, spurred me on, and I eagerly looked forward to their pleasure in my achievement.
  • It astonished me to find how much easier it is to talk than to spell with the fingers, and I discarded the manual alphabet as a medium of communication on my part; but Miss Sullivan and a few friends still use it in speaking to me, for it is more convenient and more rapid than lip-reading.
  • I had made my homeward journey, talking constantly to Miss Sullivan, not for the sake of talking, but determined to improve to the last minute.
  • Now, if words and images come to me without effort, it is a pretty sure sign that they are not the offspring of my own mind, but stray waifs that I regretfully dismiss.
  • It was difficult to make me understand this; but when I did understand I was astonished and grieved.
  • But the angel of forgetfulness has gathered up and carried away much of the misery and all the bitterness of those sad days.
  • But the fact remains that Miss Canby's story was read to me once, and that long after I had forgotten it, it came back to me so naturally that I never suspected that it was the child of another mind.
  • But this kind prophecy has never been fulfilled.
  • But I do not understand how he ever thought a blind and deaf child of eleven could have invented them.
  • I wrote timidly, fearfully, but resolutely, urged on by my teacher, who knew that if I persevered, I should find my mental foothold again and get a grip on my faculties.
  • He taught me Latin grammar principally; but he often helped me in arithmetic, which I found as troublesome as it was uninteresting.
  • I had read many books before, but never from a critical point of view.
  • It was very amusing but I did not like it nearly so well as "Wilhelm Tell."
  • Of course my instructors had had no experience in teaching any but normal pupils, and my only means of conversing with them was reading their lips.
  • I had had, moreover, a good start in French, and received six months' instruction in Latin; but German was the subject with which I was most familiar.
  • I could not make notes in class or write exercises; but I wrote all my compositions and translations at home on my typewriter.
  • But, though everybody was kind and ready to help us, there was only one hand that could turn drudgery into pleasure.
  • I rejoiced over all his successes, I shut my eyes to his faults, and wondered, not that he had them, but that they had not crushed or dwarfed his soul.
  • Each candidate was known, not by his name, but by a number.
  • But during the first few weeks I was confronted with unforeseen difficulties.
  • At the beginning we had agreed that I should, if necessary, take five years to prepare for college, but at the end of the first year the success of my examinations showed Miss Sullivan, Miss Harbaugh (Mr.
  • Mr. Gilman at first agreed to this; but when my tasks had become somewhat perplexing, he insisted that I was overworked, and that I should remain at his school three years longer.
  • The braille worked well enough in the languages, but when it came to geometry and algebra, difficulties arose.
  • It is true that I was familiar with all literary braille in common use in this country--English, American, and New York Point; but the various signs and symbols in geometry and algebra in the three systems are very different, and I had used only the English braille in my algebra.
  • But on the night before the algebra examination, while I was struggling over some very complicated examples, I could not tell the combinations of bracket, brace and radical.
  • Both Mr. Keith and I were distressed and full of forebodings for the morrow; but we went over to the college a little before the examination began, and had Mr. Vining explain more fully the American symbols.
  • But when I took up algebra I had a harder time still.
  • But I do not blame any one.
  • But if they unintentionally placed obstacles in my way, I have the consolation of knowing that I overcame them all.
  • I knew that there were obstacles in the way; but I was eager to overcome them.
  • I had taken to heart the words of the wise Roman who said, "To be banished from Rome is but to live outside of Rome."
  • But I soon discovered that college was not quite the romantic lyceum I had imagined.
  • But in college there is no time to commune with one's thoughts.
  • But college is not the universal Athens I thought it was.
  • They are there, it is true; but they seem mummified.
  • But when a great scholar like Professor Kittredge interprets what the master said, it is "as if new sight were given the blind."
  • But the examinations are the chief bugbears of my college life.
  • But where is it now?
  • While my days at Radcliffe were still in the future, they were encircled with a halo of romance, which they have lost; but in the transition from romantic to actual I have learned many things I should never have known had I not tried the experiment.
  • I think that was all; but I read them over and over, until the words were so worn and pressed I could scarcely make them out.
  • The words themselves fascinated me; but I took no conscious account of what I read.
  • But we did not begin the story until August; the first few weeks of my stay at the seashore were so full of discoveries and excitement that I forgot the very existence of books.
  • I do not know why it is, but stories in which animals are made to talk and act like human beings have never appealed to me very strongly.
  • But I love "The Jungle Book" and "Wild Animals I Have Known."
  • My admiration for the Aeneid is not so great, but it is none the less real.
  • But how shall I speak of the glories I have since discovered in the Bible?
  • I cannot tell exactly when I began Lamb's "Tales from Shakespeare"; but I know that I read them at first with a child's understanding and a child's wonder.
  • I have since read Shakespeare's plays many times and know parts of them by heart, but I cannot tell which of them I like best.
  • But, with all my love for Shakespeare, it is often weary work to read all the meanings into his lines which critics and commentators have given them.
  • When he speaks, it is not to impress others, but because his heart would burst if he did not find an outlet for the thoughts that burn in his soul.
  • Then, too, there is in German literature a fine reserve which I like; but its chief glory is the recognition I find in it of the redeeming potency of woman's self-sacrificing love.
  • All things transitory But as symbols are sent.
  • But I must not forget that I was going to write about last summer in particular.
  • But we little heeded these things.
  • The sun and the air are God's free gifts to all we say, but are they so?
  • Of course the little ones cannot spell on their fingers; but I manage to read their lips.
  • I had often read the story, but I had never felt the charm of Rip's slow, quaint, kind ways as I did in the play.
  • Of course, I have no sense whatever of dramatic action, and could make only random guesses; but with masterful art he suited the action to the word.
  • Beyond there is light, and music, and sweet companionship; but I may not enter.
  • My spirit could not reach up to his, but he gave me a real sense of joy in life, and I never left him without carrying away a fine thought that grew in beauty and depth of meaning as I grew.
  • Bishop Brooks taught me no special creed or dogma; but he impressed upon my mind two great ideas--the fatherhood of God and the brotherhood of man, and made me feel that these truths underlie all creeds and forms of worship.
  • But I stopped suddenly.
  • I promised to visit him again the following summer, but he died before the promise was fulfilled.
  • But they spoke many gracious words to me.
  • Helen Keller's letters are important, not only as a supplementary story of her life, but as a demonstration of her growth in thought and expression--the growth which in itself has made her distinguished.
  • I have done nothing but select and cut.
  • Mr. Drew says little girls in China cannot talk on their fingers but I think when I go to China I will teach them.
  • Many years ago there lived in England many good people, but the king and his friends were not kind and gentle and patient with good people, because the king did not like to have the people disobey him.
  • People did not like to go to church with the king; but they did like to build very nice little churches for themselves.
  • But soon they learned some Dutch words; but they loved their own language and they did not want little boys and girls to forget it and learn to talk funny Dutch.
  • But soon they learned some Dutch words; but they loved their own language and they did not want little boys and girls to forget it and learn to talk funny Dutch.
  • The other day I broke my doll's head off; but that was not a dreadful accident, because dolls do not live and feel, like people.
  • It made me feel very sad to leave Boston and I missed all of my friends greatly, but of course I was glad to get back to my lovely home once more.
  • Sometimes she tries to spell very short words on her small [fingers] but she is too young to remember hard words.
  • I should like to send a kiss to Vittorio, the little prince of Naples, but teacher says she is afraid you will not remember so many messages.
  • Oh, it was a lovely and delicate doll! but the little girl's brother, a tall lad, had taken the doll, and set it up in a high tree in the garden, and had run away.
  • It hobbled, and that made me laugh; but it is wrong to laugh at the poor animals!
  • She is going home to rest, but she will come back to me next autumn.
  • But I am afraid you cannot come to Tuscumbia; so I will write to you, and send you a sweet kiss and my love.
  • Daisy is happy, but she would be happy ever if she had a little mate.
  • Her little brown mate has flown away with the other birds; but Annie is not sad, for she likes to stay with me.
  • When I walk out in my garden I cannot see the beautiful flowers but I know that they are all around me; for is not the air sweet with their fragrance?
  • Her throat was very sore and the doctor thought she would have to go away to the hospital, but she is better now.
  • They are going to give me a lovely present, but I cannot guess what it will be.
  • I hope I have written my letter nicely, but it is very difficult to write on this paper and teacher is not here to give me better.
  • The flowers were wilted, but the kind thought which came with them was as sweet and as fresh as newly pulled violets.
  • I am sorry that you have no little children to play with you sometimes; but I think you are very happy with your books, and your many, many friends.
  • Jakey was the sweetest little fellow you can imagine, but he was poor and blind.
  • They do not make honey for us, like the bees, but many of them are as beautiful as the flowers they light upon, and they always delight the hearts of little children.
  • I was very, very sad to part with all of my friends in Boston, but I was so eager to see my baby sister I could hardly wait for the train to take me home.
  • But I tried very hard to be patient for teacher's sake.
  • I am always happy and so was Little Lord Fauntleroy, but dear Little Jakey's life was full of sadness.
  • But now I want to tell you how glad I am that you are so happy and enjoying your home so very much.
  • But do you not think that God is happy too because you are happy?
  • And He is happier than any of us because He is greater than any of us, and also because He not merely SEES your happiness as we do, but He also MADE it.
  • And we are always most glad of what we not merely see our friends enjoy, but of what we give them to enjoy.
  • But God does not only want us to be HAPPY; He wants us to be good.
  • A great deal of the trouble that is in the world is medicine which is very bad to take, but which it is good to take because it makes us better.
  • And Jesus, who is His Son, but is nearer to Him than all of us His other Children, came into the world on purpose to tell us all about our Father's Love.
  • It does great credit, not only to you, but to your instructors, who have so broken down the walls that seemed to shut you in that now your outlook seems more bright and cheerful than that of many seeing and hearing children.
  • But I cannot see you and talk to you, so I will write and tell you all that I can think of.
  • We surprised our dear friends, however, for they did not expect us Saturday; but when the bell rung Miss Marrett guessed who was at the door, and Mrs. Hopkins jumped up from the breakfast table and ran to the door to meet us; she was indeed much astonished to see us.
  • But I suppose he is very busy now.
  • At first I was very sorry when I found that the sun had hidden his shining face behind dull clouds, but afterwards I thought why he did it, and then I was happy.
  • Of course the sun did not shine, but we had great open wood fires in the rooms, which were all very sweet with roses and other flowers, which were sent to me from distant friends; and fruits of all kinds from California and other places.
  • I have read that the English and Americans are cousins; but I am sure it would be much truer to say that we are brothers and sisters.
  • But when I read "Spring Has Come," lo!
  • He is poor and helpless and lonely now, but before another April education will have brought light and gladness into Tommy's life.
  • I used to think, when I read in my books about your great city, that when I visited it the people would be strangers to me, but now I feel differently.
  • He loves to climb much better than to spell, but that is because he does not know yet what a wonderful thing language is.
  • He has found out that doors have locks, and that little sticks and bits of paper can be got into the key-hole quite easily; but he does not seem very eager to get them out after they are in.
  • He loves to climb the bed-posts and unscrew the steam valves much better than to spell, but that is because he does not understand that words would help him to make new and interesting discoveries.
  • It is evident that something has displeased his Majesty but I cannot imagine what it can be.
  • But lo! the lovely maiden only smiles more sweetly, and breathes upon the icy battlements of her enemies, and in a moment they vanish, and the glad Earth gives her a royal welcome.
  • But I must put away these idle fancies until we meet again.
  • It is undated, but must have been written two or three months before it was published.
  • We thought everything was arranged: but we found Monday that Mrs. Elliott would not be willing to let us invite more than fifty people, because Mrs. Howe's house is quite small.
  • But teacher came to me and taught my little fingers to use the beautiful key that has unlocked the door of my dark prison and set my spirit free.
  • I do not write on a Braille tablet, as you suppose, but on a grooved board like the piece which I enclose.
  • I have loved you for a long time, but I did not think you had ever heard of me until your sweet message came.
  • I had intended to write the sketch during my vacation: but I was not well, and I did not feel able to write even to my friends.
  • But when the bright, pleasant autumn days came, and I felt strong again I began to think about the sketch.
  • I love all living things,--I suppose everyone does; but of course I cannot have a menagerie.
  • I would like to feel a parrot talk, it would be so much fun! but I would be pleased with, and love any little creature you send me.
  • I do try to think that he is still near, very near; but sometimes the thought that he is not here, that I shall not see him when I go to Boston,--that he is gone,--rushes over my soul like a great wave of sorrow.
  • But of course, it is not alone for their bright colors that we love the flowers....
  • But after a minute I answered that beauty was a form of goodness--and he went away.
  • But I do not think so.
  • Every day I find how little I know, but I do not feel discouraged since God has given me an eternity in which to learn more.
  • I used to say I did not like arithmetic very well, but now I have changed my mind.
  • But bless me, how time does fly.
  • But in the meantime the club has rented a little room in a central part of the town, and the books which we already have are free to all. 3.
  • I do not know what books we have, but I think it is a miscellaneous (I think that is the word) collection....
  • It is a very interesting souvenir of Columbus, and of the Fair White City; but I cannot imagine what discoveries I have made,--I mean new discoveries.
  • We are all discoverers in one sense, being born quite ignorant of all things; but I hardly think that is what she meant.
  • I shall prize the little book always, not only for its own value; but because of its associations with you.
  • The experiment was interesting, but of course came to little.
  • The ancient cannon, which look seaward, wear a very menacing expression; but I doubt if there is any unkindness in their rusty old hearts.
  • But they are so good natured and friendly, one cannot help liking them.
  • I had known about them for a long time; but I had never thought that I should see them, and talk to them; and I can scarcely realize now that this great pleasure has been mine!
  • I might have seen Mrs. Wiggin, the sweet author of "Birds' Christmas Carol," but she had a dangerous cough and could not come.
  • I was much disappointed not to see her, but I hope I shall have that pleasure some other time.
  • We had to change cars at Philadelphia; but we did not mind it much.
  • He said no, it would not be called for about fifteen minutes; so we sat down to wait; but in a moment the man came back and asked Teacher if we would like to go to the train at once.
  • We had a quiet but very pleasant time in Hulton.
  • It was very exciting; but I must say I did not enjoy it very much.
  • But I try hard not to be discouraged.
  • But, however this may be, I cannot now write the letter which has lain in my thought for you so long.
  • The "examinations" mentioned in this letter were merely tests given in the school, but as they were old Harvard papers, it is evident that in some subjects Miss Keller was already fairly well prepared for Radcliffe.
  • But it is harder for Teacher than it is for me because the strain on her poor eyes is so great, and I cannot help worrying about them.
  • Sometimes it really seems as if the task which we have set ourselves were more than we can accomplish; but at other times I enjoy my work more than I can say.
  • But Johnson, and "The Plague" and everything else must wait a few minutes this afternoon, while I say, thank you, my dear Mrs. Hutton....
  • But I know you want to hear about my examinations.
  • But what I consider my crown of success is the happiness and pleasure that my victory has brought dear Teacher.
  • I ride with a divided skirt, and so does my teacher; but it would be easier for her to mount a man's wheel than for me; so, if it could be arranged to have the ladies' seat behind, I think it would be better....
  • But the weather and the scenery were so beautiful, and it was such fun to go scooting over the smoother part of the road, I didn't mind the mishaps in the least.
  • But alas! they are not, and I shall have to content myself with a stroll in the Gardens.
  • I do miss Red Farm and the dear ones there dreadfully; but I am not unhappy.
  • But I must not waste my time wishing idle wishes; and after all my ancient friends are very wise and interesting, and I usually enjoy their society very much indeed.
  • But, as you know, my heart is usually brimful of happiness.
  • But somehow, I should prefer to see the originals in the place where Genius meant them to remain, not only as a hymn of praise to the gods, but also as a monument of the glory of Greece.
  • But somehow, I should prefer to see the originals in the place where Genius meant them to remain, not only as a hymn of praise to the gods, but also as a monument of the glory of Greece.
  • Why, only a little while ago people thought it quite impossible to teach the deaf-blind anything; but no sooner was it proved possible than hundreds of kind, sympathetic hearts were fired with the desire to help them, and now we see how many of those poor, unfortunate persons are being taught to see the beauty and reality of life.
  • As to the two-handed alphabet, I think it is much easier for those who have sight than the manual alphabet; for most of the letters look like the large capitals in books; but I think when it comes to teaching a deaf-blind person to spell, the manual alphabet is much more convenient, and less conspicuous....
  • There is but one cloud in my sky at present; but that is one which casts a dark shadow over my life, and makes me very anxious at times.
  • But it is most distressing to me to feel that she is sacrificing her sight for me.
  • The "Iliad" tells of almost nothing but war, and one sometimes wearies of the clash of spears and the din of battle; but the "Odyssey" tells of nobler courage--the courage of a soul sore tried, but steadfast to the end.
  • But we shall not be quite separated; we shall see each other every day, I hope.
  • Cicero is splendid, but his orations are very difficult to translate.
  • But I must confess, I had a hard time on the second day of my examinations.
  • This arrangement worked very well in the languages, but not nearly so well in the Mathematics.
  • But you must not think I blame any one.
  • Not only do we enjoy being together; but we also find our little home most delightful.
  • She said she did not consider a degree of any real value, but thought it was much more desirable to do something original than to waste one's energies only for a degree.
  • Her arguments seemed so wise and practical, that I could not but yield.
  • But, while we were discussing plans for the winter, a suggestion which Dr. Hale had made long ago flashed across Teacher's mind--that I might take courses somewhat like those offered at Radcliffe, under the instruction of the professors in these courses.
  • However, the braille worked well enough in the languages; but when it came to Geometry and Algebra, it was different.
  • But, when I took up Algebra, I had a harder time still--I was terribly handicapped by my imperfect knowledge of the notation.
  • Dear Frau Grote learned the manual alphabet, and used to teach me herself; but this was in private lessons, which were paid for by my friends.
  • Colonel Roosevelt was there, on Harvard's side; but bless you, he wore a white sweater, and no crimson that we know of!
  • But, in spite of all their wild efforts, neither side was scored, and we all laughed and said, "Oh, well now the pot can't call the kettle black!"...
  • My friends think it very strange that they should hesitate so long, especially when I have not asked them to simplify my work in the least, but only to modify it so as to meet the existing circumstances.
  • They were very kind; but I could not help feeling that they spoke more from a business than a humanitarian point of view.
  • I had had misgivings on this point; but I could not see how we were to help it.
  • It is hard, very hard at times; but it hasn't swamped me yet.
  • Perhaps I shall take up these studies later; but I've said goodbye to Mathematics forever, and I assure you, I was delighted to see the last of those horrid goblins!
  • Many of my friends would be well pleased if I would take two or even one course a year, but I rather object to spending the rest of my life in college....
  • She has never been taught; but they say she can sew and likes to help others in this sort of work.
  • But Miss Watkins seems to be just the kind of teacher she needs.
  • The latter wished to send her some books; but she could not find anything simple enough for her!
  • She said Katie was very sweet indeed, but sadly in need of proper instruction.
  • I have worn it only once, but then I felt that Solomon in all his glory was not to be compared with me!
  • It is evident that the blind should have a good magazine, not a special magazine for the blind, but one of our best monthlies, printed in embossed letters.
  • The blind alone could not support it, but it would not take very much money to make up the additional expense.
  • A little bird had already sung the good news in my ear; but it was doubly pleasant to have it straight from you.
  • But why should not the friends of the blind assist The Great Round World, if necessary?
  • What is remarkable in her career is already accomplished, and whatever she may do in the future will be but a relatively slight addition to the success which distinguishes her now.
  • But it is to be remembered that Miss Keller has written many things in her autobiography for the fun of writing them, and the disillusion, which the writer of the editorial took seriously, is in great part humorous.
  • I ought to apologize to the reader and to Miss Keller for presuming to say what her subject matter is worth, but one more explanation is necessary.
  • "Yes," she replied, "but I like to play also, and I feel sometimes as if I were a music box with all the play shut up inside me."
  • But she was not satisfied until she had carried out her purpose and entered college.
  • Music probably can mean little to her but beat and pulsation.
  • But she seems to feel the pulsation of the air itself.
  • When the organ was played for her in St. Bartholomew's, the whole building shook with the great pedal notes, but that does not altogether account for what she felt and enjoyed.
  • But every one who has met her has given his best ideas to her and she has taken them.
  • She does not see with her eyes, but through the inner faculty to serve which eyes were given to us.
  • Many of the detached incidents and facts of our daily life pass around and over her unobserved; but she has enough detailed acquaintance with the world to keep her view of it from being essentially defective.
  • Miss Keller used to knit and crochet, but she has had better things to do.
  • The deaf person with sight looks at the fingers of his companion, but it is also possible to feel them.
  • Most educated blind people know several, but it would save trouble if, as Miss Keller suggests, English braille were universally adopted.
  • They cost a great deal to publish and they have not a large enough sale to make them profitable to the publisher; but there are several institutions with special funds to pay for embossed books.
  • Miss Keller does not as a rule read very fast, but she reads deliberately, not so much because she feels the words less quickly than we see then, as because it is one of her habits of mind to do things thoroughly and well.
  • Her sense of time is excellent, but whether it would have developed as a special faculty cannot be known, for she has had a watch since she was seven years old.
  • In consequence her mind is not only vigorous, but it is pure.
  • After the first year or two Dr. Howe did not teach Laura Bridgman himself, but gave her over to other teachers, who under his direction carried on the work of teaching her language.
  • But neither temperament nor training allowed her to make her pupil the object of any experiment or observation which did not help in the child's development.
  • Doubtless the work of the past few months does seem like a triumphal march to him; but then people seldom see the halting and painful steps by which the most insignificant success is achieved.
  • Many people have thought that any attempt to find the principles in her method would be nothing but a later theory superimposed on Miss Sullivan's work.
  • But it is evident that in these letters she was making a clear analysis of what she was doing.
  • It was Dr. Howe who, by his work with Laura Bridgman, made Miss Sullivan's work possible: but it was Miss Sullivan who discovered the way to teach language to the deaf-blind.
  • But whether Helen stays at home or makes visits in other parts of the country, her education is always under the immediate direction and exclusive control of her teacher.
  • But there's nothing pale or delicate about Helen.
  • It is intelligent, but lacks mobility, or soul, or something.
  • I shall not attempt to conquer her by force alone; but I shall insist on reasonable obedience from the start.
  • Her hands are in everything; but nothing holds her attention for long.
  • Then I took the doll, meaning to give it back to her when she had made the letters; but she thought I meant to take it from her, and in an instant she was in a temper, and tried to seize the doll.
  • I shook my head and tried to form the letters with her fingers; but she got more and more angry.
  • I let her go, but refused to give up the doll.
  • Of course she wanted it and tried to take it; but I spelled the word again and patted her hand.
  • The two letters "c-a," you see, had reminded her of Fridays "lesson"--not that she had any idea that cake was the name of the thing, but it was simply a matter of association, I suppose.
  • I let her see that I was eating, but did not let her put her hand in the plate.
  • Then she went all round the table to see who was there, and finding no one but me, she seemed bewildered.
  • But I soon found that I was cut off from all the usual approaches to the child's heart.
  • She devoted herself to her dolls the first evening, and when it was bedtime she undressed very quietly, but when she felt me get into bed with her, she jumped out on the other side, and nothing that I could do would induce her to get in again.
  • But I was afraid she would take cold, and I insisted that she must go to bed.
  • But fortunately for us both, I am a little stronger, and quite as obstinate when I set out.
  • The next morning she was very docile, but evidently homesick.
  • I don't think she has any special tenderness for them--I have never seen her caress them; but she dresses and undresses them many times during the day and handles them exactly as she has seen her mother and the nurse handle her baby sister.
  • Helen knows several words now, but has no idea how to use them, or that everything has a name.
  • She has learned three new words, and when I give her the objects, the names of which she has learned, she spells them unhesitatingly; but she seems glad when the lesson is over.
  • He says the gentleman was not particularly interested, but said he would see if anything could be done.
  • She lets me kiss her now, and when she is in a particularly gentle mood, she will sit in my lap for a minute or two; but she does not return my caresses.
  • I don't agree with him; but I suppose we shall have to leave our little bower very soon.
  • This morning she planted her doll and showed me that she expected her to grow as tall as I. You must see that she is very bright, but you have no idea how cunning she is.
  • But I am always glad when this work is over for the day.
  • Mrs. Keller wanted to get a nurse for her, but I concluded I'd rather be her nurse than look after a stupid, lazy negress.
  • BUT LONG BEFORE HE UTTERS HIS FIRST WORD, HE UNDERSTANDS WHAT IS SAID TO HIM.
  • I SHALL USE COMPLETE SENTENCES IN TALKING TO HER, and fill out the meaning with gestures and her descriptive signs when necessity requires it; but I shall not try to keep her mind fixed on any one thing.
  • But don't imagine that she "talks fluently."
  • But when I spell into her hand, "Give me some bread," she hands me the bread, or if I say, "Get your hat and we will go to walk," she obeys instantly.
  • I used my little stock of beads, cards and straws at first because I didn't know what else to do; but the need for them is past, for the present at any rate.
  • My first thought was, one of the dogs has hurt Mildred; but Helen's beaming face set my fears at rest.
  • Nothing would do but I must go somewhere with her to see something.
  • Helen noticed that the puppies' eyes were closed, and she said, "Eyes--shut. Sleep--no," meaning, "The eyes are shut, but the puppies are not asleep."
  • Keller's Landing was used during the war to land troops, but has long since gone to pieces, and is overgrown with moss and weeds.
  • She makes many mistakes, of course, twists words and phrases, puts the cart before the horse, and gets herself into hopeless tangles of nouns and verbs; but so does the hearing child.
  • My mind is full of ideas; but I cannot get them into working shape.
  • The doctor says her mind is too active; but how are we to keep her from thinking?
  • She knew, too, that I sometimes write "letters to blind girls" on the slate; but I didn't suppose that she had any clear idea what a letter was.
  • But "genius" and "originality" are words we should not use lightly.
  • I had no idea a short time ago how to go to work; I was feeling about in the dark; but somehow I know now, and I know that I know.
  • I cannot explain it; but when difficulties arise, I am not perplexed or doubtful.
  • Helen is about the same--pale and thin; but you mustn't think she is really ill.
  • But so far nobody seems to have thought of chloroforming her, which is, I think, the only effective way of stopping the natural exercise of her faculties.
  • But her appetite, which left her a few weeks ago, has returned, and her sleep seems more quiet and natural.
  • The next day I found that she remembered all but spread.
  • She enjoys punching holes in paper with the stiletto, and I supposed it was because she could examine the result of her work; but we watched her one day, and I was much surprised to find that she imagined she was writing a letter.
  • She is always ready to share whatever she has with those about her, often keeping but very little for herself.
  • I told her that she had better not talk about it any more, but think.
  • She knew that I was much troubled, and would have liked to stay near me; but I thought it best for her to sit by herself.
  • But I told her that my heart was sad, and I didn't feel like eating.
  • But the poor little girl couldn't fix her attention.
  • I remember how unbearable I used to find the inquisitiveness of my friends' children; but I know now that these questions indicate the child's growing interest in the cause of things.
  • But it hardly seems possible that any mere words should convey to one who has never seen a mountain the faintest idea of its grandeur; and I don't see how any one is ever to know what impression she did receive, or the cause of her pleasure in what was told her about it.
  • But in this case I don't think I made a mistake.
  • But she was surprised that hot water should come out of the ground.
  • We sat in the hammock; but there was no rest for the weary there.
  • But I seem to have lost the thread of my discourse.
  • I have two copies, and will send you one; but you mustn't show it to anybody.
  • A slip on which was printed, in raised letters, the word BOX was placed on the object, and the same experiment was tried with a great many articles, but she did not immediately comprehend that the label-name represented the thing.
  • Just then I had no sentences in raised letters which she could understand; but she would sit for hours feeling each word in her book.
  • But instantly she spelled the answer: "Fifteen threes make forty-five."
  • They were as gentle as kittens; but I told her they would get wild and fierce as they grew older.
  • She also felt a Greek chariot, and the charioteer would have liked to take her round the ring; but she was afraid of "many swift horses."
  • She has talked about nothing but the circus ever since.
  • My fingers and head ached; but Helen was as fresh and full of spirit as when we left home.
  • For weeks we did nothing but talk and read and tell each other stories about Christmas.
  • Constant repetition makes it easier to learn how to spell a word.
  • When I see that she is eager to tell me something, but is hampered because she does not know the words, I supply them and the necessary idioms, and we get along finely.
  • Captain Keller took my hand, but could not speak.
  • But his silence was more eloquent than words.
  • I appreciate the kind things Mr. Anagnos has said about Helen and me; but his extravagant way of saying them rubs me the wrong way.
  • I wanted her to write to her Uncle Frank this morning, but she objected.
  • I said, "But Uncle Frank cannot read braille."
  • Finally I persuaded her to write a few lines; but she broke her pencil six times before she finished it.
  • I told her they were tulips; but of course she didn't understand the word-play.
  • We had a splendid time in Memphis, but I didn't rest much.
  • It was nothing but excitement from first to last--drives, luncheons, receptions, and all that they involve when you have an eager, tireless child like Helen on your hands.
  • But even then I can never have a quiet half hour to myself.
  • Helen was petted and caressed enough to spoil an angel; but I do not think it is possible to spoil her, she is too unconscious of herself, and too loving.
  • The children were so pleased to see her at Sunday-school, they paid no attention to their teachers, but rushed out of their seats and surrounded us.
  • She seemed to think at first that the children all belonged to the visiting ministers; but soon she recognized some little friends among them, and I told her the ministers didn't bring their children with them.
  • When it was time for the church service to begin, she was in such a state of excitement that I thought it best to take her away; but Captain Keller said, "No, she will be all right."
  • He gave her his watch to play with; but that didn't keep her still.
  • I tried to hurry Helen out-of-doors, but she kept her arm extended, and every coat-tail she touched must needs turn round and give an account of the children he left at home, and receive kisses according to their number.
  • We talk and plan and dream about nothing but Boston, Boston, Boston.
  • I think Mrs. Keller has definitely decided to go with us, but she will not stay all summer.
  • I am too happy to write letters; but I must tell you about our visit to Cincinnati.
  • Another said, "Damn me! but I'd give everything I own in the world to have that little girl always near me."
  • But I haven't time to write all the pleasant things people said--they would make a very large book, and the kind things they did for us would fill another volume.
  • He took us to drive one afternoon, and wanted to give Helen a doll; but she said: I do not like too many children.
  • He had never heard of "talking-gloves"; but I explained that she had seen a glove on which the alphabet was printed, and evidently thought they could be bought.
  • If you had called these sensations respectively BLACK and WHITE, he would have adopted them as readily; but he would mean by BLACK and WHITE the same things that he means by SWEET and SOUR.
  • It is not the word, but the capacity to experience the sensation that counts in his education.
  • I was incredulous when he first told me the secret.
  • "No," she replied, "I think not; but children learn better if they write about things that concern them personally."
  • These children were older in years, it is true, than the baby who lisps, "Papa kiss baby--pretty," and fills out her meaning by pointing to her new dress; but their ability to understand and use language was no greater.
  • She is able not only to distinguish with great accuracy the different undulations of the air and the vibrations of the floor made by various sounds and motions, and to recognize her friends and acquaintances the instant she touches their hands or clothing, but she also perceives the state of mind of those around her.
  • In my account of Helen last year, I mentioned several instances where she seemed to have called into use an inexplicable mental faculty; but it now seems to me, after carefully considering the matter, that this power may be explained by her perfect familiarity with the muscular variations of those with whom she comes into contact, caused by their emotions.
  • All present were astonished when she appeared not only to hear a whistle, but also an ordinary tone of voice.
  • This time her countenance changed whenever she was spoken to, but there was not such a decided lighting up of the features as when I had held her hand.
  • She smelt of the flowers, but showed no desire to pluck them; and, when I gathered a few for her, she refused to have them pinned on her dress.
  • I evaded the question, but she persisted.
  • Doctor gave her medicine to make her well, but poor Florence did not get well.
  • She has a very sociable disposition, and delights in the companionship of those who can follow the rapid motions of her fingers; but if left alone she will amuse herself for hours at a time with her knitting or sewing.
  • She bends over her book with a look of intense interest, and as the forefinger of her left hand runs along the line, she spells out the words with the other hand; but often her motions are so rapid as to be unintelligible even to those accustomed to reading the swift and varied movements of her fingers.
  • She does not realize that one can be anything but kind-hearted and tender.
  • I got the milk to show her that she had used the correct word; but I did not let her drink it until she had, with my assistance, made a complete sentence, as "Give Helen some milk to drink."
  • But PERHAPS his mother sent him to a store to buy something for dinner.
  • I tried to describe to her the appearance of a camel; but, as we were not allowed to touch the animal, I feared that she did not get a correct idea of its shape.
  • But this advantage involves a corresponding disadvantage, the danger of unduly severe mental application.
  • After a time I became discouraged, and told her I was afraid she could not make it stand, but that I would build it for her; but she did not approve of this plan.
  • She had learned the printed letters, and for some time had amused herself by making simple sentences, using slips on which the words were printed in raised letters; but these sentences had no special relation to one another.
  • It was hoped that one so peculiarly endowed by nature as Helen, would, if left entirely to her own resources, throw some light upon such psychological questions as were not exhaustively investigated by Dr. Howe; but their hopes were not to be realized.
  • Children ask profound questions, but they often receive shallow answers, or, to speak more correctly, they are quieted by such answers.
  • A. says God made me and every one out of sand; but it must be a joke.
  • After a moment she went on: A. says God is everywhere, and that He is all love; but I do not think a person can be made out of love.
  • I think my mother got me from heaven, but I do not know where that place is.
  • But I cannot imagine who made Mother Nature, can you?
  • But after a great deal of thought and study, I told her, men came to believe that all forces were manifestations of one power, and to that power they gave the name GOD.
  • I told her that God was everywhere, and that she must not think of Him as a person, but as the life, the mind, the soul of everything.
  • "No one knows what the soul is like," I replied; "but we know that it is not the body, and it is that part of us which thinks and loves and hopes."
  • "Oh, yes!" she replied; "because last hour I was thinking very hard of Mr. Anagnos, and then my mind,"--then changing the word--"my soul was in Athens, but my body was here in the study."
  • At this moment another thought seemed to flash through her mind, and she added, "But Mr. Anagnos did not speak to my soul."
  • "But if I write what my soul thinks," she said, "then it will be visible, and the words will be its body."
  • I was obliged to confess that I did not know, but suggested that it might be on one of the stars.
  • "But," said Helen, quickly, "I think God could make some more worlds as well as He made this one."
  • At first my little pupil's mind was all but vacant.
  • I believe every child has hidden away somewhere in his being noble capacities which may be quickened and developed if we go about it in the right way; but we shall never properly develop the higher natures of our little ones while we continue to fill their minds with the so-called rudiments.
  • It may be true, as some maintain, that language cannot express to us much beyond what we have lived and experienced; but I have always observed that children manifest the greatest delight in the lofty, poetic language which we are too ready to think beyond their comprehension.
  • We do not take in a sentence word by word, but as a whole.
  • True, single words do suggest and express ideas; the child may say simply "mamma" when he means "Where is mamma?" but he learns the expression of the ideas that relate to mamma--he learns language--by hearing complete sentences.
  • He learns not by reading what he understands, but by reading and remembering words he does not understand.
  • It was not a special subject, like geography or arithmetic, but her way to outward things.
  • When at the age of fourteen she had had but a few lessons in German, she read over the words of "Wilhelm Tell" and managed to get the story.
  • In the same way she played with Latin, learning not only from the lessons her first Latin teacher gave her, but from going over and over the words of a text, a game she played by herself.
  • It was not a lesson, but only one of her recreations.
  • But it is evident that precisely what the deaf child needs to be taught is what other children learn before they go to school at all.
  • How far she could receive communications is hard to determine, but she knew much that was going on around her.
  • Miss Keller will never be able, I believe, to speak loud without destroying the pleasant quality and the distinctness of her words, but she can do much to make her speech clearer.
  • When she was at the Wright-Humason School in New York, Dr. Humason tried to improve her voice, not only her word pronunciation, but the voice itself, and gave her lessons in tone and vocal exercises.
  • I explained to her that some deaf children were taught to speak, but that they could see their teachers' mouths, and that that was a very great assistance to them.
  • But she interrupted me to say she was very sure she could feel my mouth very well.
  • From the first she was not content to be drilled in single sounds, but was impatient to pronounce words and sentences.
  • But, with all her eagerness and intelligence, learning to speak taxed her powers to the utmost.
  • But there was satisfaction in seeing from day to day the evidence of growing mastery and the possibility of final success.
  • The ability to read the lips helps Miss Keller in getting corrections of her pronunciation from Miss Sullivan and others, just as it was the means of her learning to speak at all, but it is rather an accomplishment than a necessity.
  • But she knows better than any one else what value speech has had for her.
  • Do not think of to-days failures, but of the success that may come to-morrow.
  • But the extracts from Miss Sullivan's letters and from her reports, although they are clear and accurate, have not the beauty which distinguishes Miss Keller's English.
  • The teachers at the Institution expressed the opinion that the description did not appear in any book in raised print in that library; but one lady, Miss Marrett, took upon herself the task of examining books of poems in ordinary type, and was rewarded by finding the following lines in one of Longfellow's minor poems, entitled 'Snowflakes':
  • Careful examination was made of the books in raised print in the library of the Perkins Institution to learn if any extracts from this volume could be found there; but nothing was discovered.
  • But as she was not able to find her copy, and applications for the volume at bookstores in Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Albany, and other places resulted only in failure, search was instituted for the author herself.
  • I have now (March, 1892) read to Helen "The Frost Fairies," "The Rose Fairies," and a portion of "The Dew Fairies," but she is unable to throw any light on the matter.
  • She thinks it is wonderful that two people should write stories so much alike; but she still considers her own as original.
  • "Lazy roses, wake up," said he, giving the branches a gentle shake; but only the dew fell off in bright drops, and the flowers were still shut up.
  • Every year Santa Claus takes a journey over the world in a sleigh drawn by a strong and rapid steed called "Rudolph."
  • But his most wonderful work is the painting of the trees, which look, after his task is done, as if they were covered with the brightest layers of gold and rubies; and are beautiful enough to comfort us for the flight of summer.
  • He has two neighbours, who live still farther north; one is King Winter, a cross and churlish old monarch, who is hard and cruel, and delights in making the poor suffer and weep; but the other neighbour is Santa Claus, a fine, good-natured, jolly old soul, who loves to do good, and who brings presents to the poor, and to nice little children at Christmas.
  • "He will know how to make good use of the treasure," added Jack Frost; then he told the fairies not to loiter by the way, but to do his bidding quickly.
  • Still, for awhile, the frost fairies did not notice this strange occurrence, for they were down on the grass, so far below the tree-tops that the wonderful shower of treasure was a long time in reaching them; but at last one of them said, Hark!
  • It was very beautiful; but the idle fairies were too much frightened at the mischief their disobedience had caused, to admire the beauty of the forest, and at once tried to hide themselves among the bushes, lest King Frost should come and punish them.
  • But on nearer approach we should discover our error.
  • But, children, you must make King Frost a visit the very first opportunity you have, and see for yourselves this wonderful palace.
  • You must know that King Frost, like all other kings, has great treasures of gold and precious stones; but as he is a generous old monarch, he endeavours to make a right use of his riches.
  • It was very beautiful, but the disobedient fairies were too frightened to notice the beauty of the trees.
  • 'I thought everybody had the same thought about the leaves, but I do not know now.
  • She could not remember that any one had ever read to her any stories about King Frost, but said she had talked with her teacher about Jack Frost and the wonderful things he did.
  • But the child has no recollection whatever of this fact.
  • A child with but few sources may keep distinct what he draws from each.
  • In the early years of her education she had only good things to read; some were, indeed, trivial and not excellent in style, but not one was positively bad in manner or substance.
  • But the brightest summer has winter behind it.
  • But the fever grew and flamed in my eyes, and for several days my kind physician thought I would die.
  • But early one morning the fever left me as mysteriously and unexpectedly as it had come, and I fell into a quiet sleep.
  • But I was too young to realize what had happened.
  • But all was not lost!
  • After all, sight and hearing are but two of the beautiful blessings which God had given me.
  • When I was a little older I felt the need of some means of communication with those around me, and I began to make simple signs which my parents and friends readily understood; but it often happened that I was unable to express my thoughts intelligibly, and at such times I would give way to my angry feelings utterly....
  • I do not remember what they all were; but I do know that MOTHER, FATHER, SISTER and TEACHER were among them.
  • But, unfortunately, I struck my foot on a rock and fell forward into the cold water.
  • Beside the tomb sits a weary soul, rejoicing neither in the joys of the past nor in the possibilities of the future, but seeking consolation in forgetfulness.
  • Of course I do not refer to beautiful sentiments, but to the higher truths relating to everyday life.
  • To be sure, I take the keenest interest in everything that concerns those who surround me; it is this very interest which makes it so difficult for me to carry on a conversation with some people who will not talk or say what they think, but I should not be sorry to find more friends ready to talk with me now and then about the wonderful things I read.
  • You forget that death comes to the rich and the poor alike, and comes once for all; but remember, Acheron could not be bribed by gold to ferry the crafty Prometheus back to the sunlit world.
  • I rarely have dreams that are not in keeping with what I really think and feel, but one night my very nature seemed to change, and I stood in the eye of the world a mighty man and a terrible.
  • It was only a dream, but I thought it real, and my heart sank within me.
  • They have no friend Iolaus to burn with a hot iron the root of the hydra's head, but as soon as one head is crushed, two spring up.
  • Here is life, an experiment to a great extent untried by me; but it does not avail me that they have tried it.
  • To many creatures there is in this sense but one necessary of life, Food.
  • Of course the vital heat is not to be confounded with fire; but so much for analogy.
  • I too had woven a kind of basket of a delicate texture, but I had not made it worth any one's while to buy them.
  • The life which men praise and regard as successful is but one kind.
  • Kings and queens who wear a suit but once, though made by some tailor or dressmaker to their majesties, cannot know the comfort of wearing a suit that fits.
  • But even if the rent is not mended, perhaps the worst vice betrayed is improvidence.
  • We know but few men, a great many coats and breeches.
  • I have heard of a dog that barked at every stranger who approached his master's premises with clothes on, but was easily quieted by a naked thief.
  • But if my jacket and trousers, my hat and shoes, are fit to worship God in, they will do; will they not?
  • All men want, not something to do with, but something to do, or rather something to be.
  • Of what use this measuring of me if she does not measure my character, but only the breadth of my shoulders, as it were a peg to bang the coat on?
  • We worship not the Graces, nor the Parcae, but Fashion.
  • Every generation laughs at the old fashions, but follows religiously the new.
  • The condition of the operatives is becoming every day more like that of the English; and it cannot be wondered at, since, as far as I have heard or observed, the principal object is, not that mankind may be well and honestly clad, but, unquestionably, that corporations may be enriched.
  • The meaner sort are covered with mats which they make of a kind of bulrush, and are also indifferently tight and warm, but not so good as the former....
  • In the savage state every family owns a shelter as good as the best, and sufficient for its coarser and simpler wants; but I think that I speak within bounds when I say that, though the birds of the air have their nests, and the foxes their holes, and the savages their wigwams, in modern civilized society not more than one half the families own a shelter.
  • The rest pay an annual tax for this outside garment of all, become indispensable summer and winter, which would buy a village of Indian wigwams, but now helps to keep them poor as long as they live.
  • But, answers one, by merely paying this tax, the poor civilized man secures an abode which is a palace compared with the savage's.
  • But how happens it that he who is said to enjoy these things is so commonly a poor civilized man, while the savage, who has them not, is rich as a savage?
  • But perhaps a man is not required to bury himself.
  • But this puts an infinitely worse face on the matter, and suggests, beside, that probably not even the other three succeed in saving their souls, but are perchance bankrupt in a worse sense than they who fail honestly.
  • But this puts an infinitely worse face on the matter, and suggests, beside, that probably not even the other three succeed in saving their souls, but are perchance bankrupt in a worse sense than they who fail honestly.
  • And when the farmer has got his house, he may not be the richer but the poorer for it, and it be the house that has got him.
  • It has created palaces, but it was not so easy to create noblemen and kings.
  • But how do the poor minority fare?
  • But to confine myself to those who are said to be in moderate circumstances.
  • But lo! men have become the tools of their tools.
  • We now no longer camp as for a night, but have settled down on earth and forgotten heaven.
  • The best works of art are the expression of man's struggle to free himself from this condition, but the effect of our art is merely to make this low state comfortable and that higher state to be forgotten.
  • But are the more pressing wants satisfied now?
  • But to make haste to my own experiment.
  • The owner of the axe, as he released his hold on it, said that it was the apple of his eye; but I returned it sharper than I received it.
  • By the middle of April, for I made no haste in my work, but rather made the most of it, my house was framed and ready for the raising.
  • Doorsill there was none, but a perennial passage for the hens under the door board.
  • One large bundle held their all--bed, coffee-mill, looking-glass, hens--all but the cat; she took to the woods and became a wild cat, and, as I learned afterward, trod in a trap set for woodchucks, and so became a dead cat at last.
  • The sides were left shelving, and not stoned; but the sun having never shone on them, the sand still keeps its place.
  • It was but two hours' work.
  • The house is still but a sort of porch at the entrance of a burrow.
  • Who knows but if men constructed their dwellings with their own hands, and provided food for themselves and families simply and honestly enough, the poetic faculty would be universally developed, as birds universally sing when they are so engaged?
  • All very well perhaps from his point of view, but only a little better than the common dilettantism.
  • But a man has no more to do with the style of architecture of his house than a tortoise with that of its shell: nor need the soldier be so idle as to try to paint the precise color of his virtue on his standard.
  • It would signify somewhat, if, in any earnest sense, he slanted them and daubed it; but the spirit having departed out of the tenant, it is of a piece with constructing his own coffin--the architecture of the grave--and "carpenter" is but another name for "coffin-maker."
  • The student who secures his coveted leisure and retirement by systematically shirking any labor necessary to man obtains but an ignoble and unprofitable leisure, defrauding himself of the experience which alone can make leisure fruitful.
  • "But," says one, "you do not mean that the students should go to work with their hands instead of their heads?"
  • I do not mean that exactly, but I mean something which he might think a good deal like that; I mean that they should not play life, or study it merely, while the community supports them at this expensive game, but earnestly live it from beginning to end.
  • They are but improved means to an unimproved end, an end which it was already but too easy to arrive at; as railroads lead to Boston or New York.
  • One farmer said that it was "good for nothing but to raise cheeping squirrels on."
  • I was more independent than any farmer in Concord, for I was not anchored to a house or farm, but could follow the bent of my genius, which is a very crooked one, every moment.
  • Man thus not only works for the animal within him, but, for a symbol of this, he works for the animal without him.
  • This town is said to have the largest houses for oxen, cows, and horses hereabouts, and it is not behindhand in its public buildings; but there are very few halls for free worship or free speech in this county.
  • It should not be by their architecture, but why not even by their power of abstract thought, that nations should seek to commemorate themselves?
  • I might possibly invent some excuse for them and him, but I have no time for it.
  • Bread I at first made of pure Indian meal and salt, genuine hoe-cakes, which I baked before my fire out of doors on a shingle or the end of a stick of timber sawed off in building my house; but it was wont to get smoked and to have a piny flavor.
  • I tried flour also; but have at last found a mixture of rye and Indian meal most convenient and agreeable.
  • But I did not always use this staff of life.
  • But as it was, I considered that I enhanced the value of the land by squatting on it.
  • What man but a philosopher would not be ashamed to see his furniture packed in a cart and going up country exposed to the light of heaven and the eyes of men, a beggarly account of empty boxes?
  • Pray, for what do we move ever but to get rid of our furniture, our exuviæ: at last to go from this world to another newly furnished, and leave this to be burned?
  • "But what shall I do with my furniture?"--My gay butterfly is entangled in a spider's web then.
  • But perchance it would be wisest never to put one's paw into it.
  • As I did not teach for the good of my fellow-men, but simply for a livelihood, this was a failure.
  • I have tried trade but I found that it would take ten years to get under way in that, and that then I should probably be on my way to the devil.
  • But I have since learned that trade curses everything it handles; and though you trade in messages from heaven, the whole curse of trade attaches to the business.
  • The laborer's day ends with the going down of the sun, and he is then free to devote himself to his chosen pursuit, independent of his labor; but his employer, who speculates from month to month, has no respite from one end of the year to the other.
  • It is by a mathematical point only that we are wise, as the sailor or the fugitive slave keeps the polestar in his eye; but that is sufficient guidance for all our life.
  • We may not arrive at our port within a calculable period, but we would preserve the true course.
  • But for my part, I preferred the solitary dwelling.
  • But all this is very selfish, I have heard some of my townsmen say.
  • Probably I should not consciously and deliberately forsake my particular calling to do the good which society demands of me, to save the universe from annihilation; and I believe that a like but infinitely greater steadfastness elsewhere is all that now preserves it.
  • Howard was no doubt an exceedingly kind and worthy man in his way, and has his reward; but, comparatively speaking, what are a hundred Howards to us, if their philanthropy do not help us in our best estate, when we are most worthy to be helped?
  • Those plants of whose greenness withered we make herb tea for the sick serve but a humble use, and are most employed by quacks.
  • I believe that what so saddens the reformer is not his sympathy with his fellows in distress, but, though he be the holiest son of God, is his private ail.
  • Do not stay to be an overseer of the poor, but endeavor to become one of the worthies of the world.
  • What is a house but a sedes, a seat?--better if a country seat.
  • I discovered many a site for a house not likely to be soon improved, which some might have thought too far from the village, but to my eyes the village was too far from it.
  • My imagination carried me so far that I even had the refusal of several farms--the refusal was all I wanted--but I never got my fingers burned by actual possession.
  • The nearest that I came to actual possession was when I bought the Hollowell place, and had begun to sort my seeds, and collected materials with which to make a wheelbarrow to carry it on or off with; but before the owner gave me a deed of it, his wife--every man has such a wife--changed her mind and wished to keep it, and he offered me ten dollars to release him.
  • Now, to speak the truth, I had but ten cents in the world, and it surpassed my arithmetic to tell, if I was that man who had ten cents, or who had a farm, or ten dollars, or all together.
  • But it turned out as I have said.
  • But I would say to my fellows, once for all, As long as possible live free and uncommitted.
  • It makes but little difference whether you are committed to a farm or the county jail.
  • I think I shall not buy greedily, but go round and round it as long as I live, and be buried in it first, that it may please me the more at last.
  • The morning wind forever blows, the poem of creation is uninterrupted; but few are the ears that hear it.
  • Olympus is but the outside of the earth everywhere.
  • Such was not my abode, for I found myself suddenly neighbor to the birds; not by having imprisoned one, but having caged myself near them.
  • But in other directions, even from this point, I could not see over or beyond the woods which surrounded me.
  • One value even of the smallest well is, that when you look into it you see that earth is not continent but insular.
  • I discovered that my house actually had its site in such a withdrawn, but forever new and unprofaned, part of the universe.
  • The millions are awake enough for physical labor; but only one in a million is awake enough for effective intellectual exertion, only one in a hundred millions to a poetic or divine life.
  • It is something to be able to paint a particular picture, or to carve a statue, and so to make a few objects beautiful; but it is far more glorious to carve and paint the very atmosphere and medium through which we look, which morally we can do.
  • Instead of three meals a day, if it be necessary eat but one; instead of a hundred dishes, five; and reduce other things in proportion.
  • If we do not get out sleepers, and forge rails, and devote days and nights to the work, but go to tinkering upon our lives to improve them, who will build railroads?
  • But if we stay at home and mind our business, who will want railroads?
  • Hardly a man takes a half-hour's nap after dinner, but when he wakes he holds up his head and asks, "What's the news?" as if the rest of mankind had stood his sentinels.
  • "Pray tell me anything new that has happened to a man anywhere on this globe"--and he reads it over his coffee and rolls, that a man has had his eyes gouged out this morning on the Wachito River; never dreaming the while that he lives in the dark unfathomed mammoth cave of this world, and has but the rudiment of an eye himself.
  • The messenger answered with respect: My master desires to diminish the number of his faults, but he cannot come to the end of them.
  • Why so seeming fast, but deadly slow?
  • Children, who play life, discern its true law and relations more clearly than men, who fail to live it worthily, but who think that they are wiser by experience, that is, by failure.
  • But all these times and places and occasions are now and here.
  • Time is but the stream I go a-fishing in.
  • I drink at it; but while I drink I see the sandy bottom and detect how shallow it is.
  • Its thin current slides away, but eternity remains.
  • In accumulating property for ourselves or our posterity, in founding a family or a state, or acquiring fame even, we are mortal; but in dealing with truth we are immortal, and need fear no change nor accident.
  • For what are the classics but the noblest recorded thoughts of man?
  • The crowds of men who merely spoke the Greek and Latin tongues in the Middle Ages were not entitled by the accident of birth to read the works of genius written in those languages; for these were not written in that Greek or Latin which they knew, but in the select language of literature.
  • They had not learned the nobler dialects of Greece and Rome, but the very materials on which they were written were waste paper to them, and they prized instead a cheap contemporary literature.
  • But when the several nations of Europe had acquired distinct though rude written languages of their own, sufficient for the purposes of their rising literatures, then first learning revived, and scholars were enabled to discern from that remoteness the treasures of antiquity.
  • It may be translated into every language, and not only be read but actually breathed from all human lips;--not be represented on canvas or in marble only, but be carved out of the breath of life itself.
  • They have no cause of their own to plead, but while they enlighten and sustain the reader his common sense will not refuse them.
  • I know a woodchopper, of middle age, who takes a French paper, not for news as he says, for he is above that, but to "keep himself in practice," he being a Canadian by birth; and when I ask him what he considers the best thing he can do in this world, he says, beside this, to keep up and add to his English.
  • Or suppose he comes from reading a Greek or Latin classic in the original, whose praises are familiar even to the so-called illiterate; he will find nobody at all to speak to, but must keep silence about it.
  • Most men do not know that any nation but the Hebrews have had a scripture.
  • But how actually is it?
  • We should be as good as the worthies of antiquity, but partly by first knowing how good they were.
  • But consider how little this village does for its own culture.
  • We have a comparatively decent system of common schools, schools for infants only; but excepting the half-starved Lyceum in the winter, and latterly the puny beginning of a library suggested by the State, no school for ourselves.
  • It can spend money enough on such things as farmers and traders value, but it is thought Utopian to propose spending money for things which more intelligent men know to be of far more worth.
  • Much is published, but little printed.
  • They were not time subtracted from my life, but so much over and above my usual allowance.
  • When my floor was dirty, I rose early, and, setting all my furniture out of doors on the grass, bed and bedstead making but one budget, dashed water on the floor, and sprinkled white sand from the pond on it, and then with a broom scrubbed it clean and white; and by the time the villagers had broken their fast the morning sun had dried my house sufficiently to allow me to move in again, and my meditations were almost uninterupted.
  • Up comes the cotton, down goes the woven cloth; up comes the silk, down goes the woollen; up come the books, but down goes the wit that writes them.
  • Every path but your own is the path of fate.
  • And hark! here comes the cattle-train bearing the cattle of a thousand hills, sheepcots, stables, and cow-yards in the air, drovers with their sticks, and shepherd boys in the midst of their flocks, all but the mountain pastures, whirled along like leaves blown from the mountains by the September gales.
  • A carload of drovers, too, in the midst, on a level with their droves now, their vocation gone, but still clinging to their useless sticks as their badge of office.
  • But their dogs, where are they?
  • It is new information and not merely a repetition of what was presented in the first chapter.
  • At evening, the distant lowing of some cow in the horizon beyond the woods sounded sweet and melodious, and at first I would mistake it for the voices of certain minstrels by whom I was sometimes serenaded, who might be straying over hill and dale; but soon I was not unpleasantly disappointed when it was prolonged into the cheap and natural music of the cow.
  • But now one answers from far woods in a strain made really melodious by distance--Hoo hoo hoo, hoorer hoo; and indeed for the most part it suggested only pleasing associations, whether heard by day or night, summer or winter.
  • Even the sailor on the Atlantic and Pacific is awakened by his voice; but its shrill sound never roused me from my slumbers.
  • No yard! but unfenced nature reaching up to your very sills.
  • The wildest animals do not repose, but seek their prey now; the fox, and skunk, and rabbit, now roam the fields and woods without fear.
  • The thick wood is not just at our door, nor the pond, but somewhat is always clearing, familiar and worn by us, appropriated and fenced in some way, and reclaimed from Nature.
  • My nearest neighbor is a mile distant, and no house is visible from any place but the hill-tops within half a mile of my own.
  • But for the most part it is as solitary where I live as on the prairies.
  • I do not flatter myself, but if it be possible they flatter me.
  • I have never felt lonesome, or in the least oppressed by a sense of solitude, but once, and that was a few weeks after I came to the woods, when, for an hour, I doubted if the near neighborhood of man was not essential to a serene and healthy life.
  • But I was at the same time conscious of a slight insanity in my mood, and seemed to foresee my recovery.
  • I am tempted to reply to such--This whole earth which we inhabit is but a point in space.
  • Next to us is not the workman whom we have hired, with whom we love so well to talk, but the workman whose work we are.
  • It would be better if there were but one inhabitant to a square mile, as where I live.
  • So also, owing to bodily and mental health and strength, we may be continually cheered by a like but more normal and natural society, and come to know that we are never alone.
  • The sun is alone, except in thick weather, when there sometimes appear to be two, but one is a mock sun.
  • God is alone--but the devil, he is far from being alone; he sees a great deal of company; he is legion.
  • Not my or thy great-grandfather's, but our great-grandmother Nature's universal, vegetable, botanic medicines, by which she has kept herself young always, outlived so many old Parrs in her day, and fed her health with their decaying fatness.
  • When visitors came in larger and unexpected numbers there was but the third chair for them all, but they generally economized the room by standing up.
  • As for lodging, it is true they were but poorly entertained, though what they found an inconvenience was no doubt intended for an honor; but as far as eating was concerned, I do not see how the Indians could have done better.
  • But fewer came to see me on trivial business.
  • But the intellectual and what is called spiritual man in him were slumbering as in an infant.
  • If you told him that such a one was coming, he did as if he thought that anything so grand would expect nothing of himself, but take all the responsibility on itself, and let him be forgotten still.
  • Half-witted men from the almshouse and elsewhere came to see me; but I endeavored to make them exercise all the wit they had, and make their confessions to me; in such cases making wit the theme of our conversation; and so was compensated.
  • I did not know at first but it was the result of a wise policy.
  • One man proposed a book in which visitors should write their names, as at the White Mountains; but, alas!
  • I could not but notice some of the peculiarities of my visitors.
  • But why should I raise them?
  • But what right had I to oust johnswort and the rest, and break up their ancient herb garden?
  • Early in the morning I worked barefooted, dabbling like a plastic artist in the dewy and crumbling sand, but later in the day the sun blistered my feet.
  • But labor of the hands, even when pursued to the verge of drudgery, is perhaps never the worst form of idleness.
  • But soon my homestead was out of their sight and thought.
  • The crop of English hay is carefully weighed, the moisture calculated, the silicates and the potash; but in all dells and pond-holes in the woods and pastures and swamps grows a rich and various crop only unreaped by man.
  • But this was not corn, and so it was safe from such enemies as he.
  • But sometimes it was a really noble and inspiring strain that reached these woods, and the trumpet that sings of fame, and I felt as if I could spit a Mexican with a good relish--for why should we always stand for trifles?--and looked round for a woodchuck or a skunk to exercise my chivalry upon.
  • A long war, not with cranes, but with weeds, those Trojans who had sun and rain and dews on their side.
  • "The earth," he adds elsewhere, "especially if fresh, has a certain magnetism in it, by which it attracts the salt, power, or virtue (call it either) which gives it life, and is the logic of all the labor and stir we keep about it, to sustain us; all dungings and other sordid temperings being but the vicars succedaneous to this improvement."
  • But above all harvest as early as possible, if you would escape frosts and have a fair and salable crop; you may save much loss by this means.
  • But why should not the New Englander try new adventures, and not lay so much stress on his grain, his potato and grass crop, and his orchards--raise other crops than these?
  • We should really be fed and cheered if when we met a man we were sure to see that some of the qualities which I have named, which we all prize more than those other productions, but which are for the most part broadcast and floating in the air, had taken root and grown in him.
  • He knows Nature but as a robber.
  • They all reflect and absorb his rays alike, and the former make but a small part of the glorious picture which he beholds in his daily course.
  • This broad field which I have looked at so long looks not to me as the principal cultivator, but away from me to influences more genial to it, which water and make it green.
  • I was never molested by any person but those who represented the State.
  • There is but one way to obtain it, yet few take that way.
  • Once in a while we sat together on the pond, he at one end of the boat, and I at the other; but not many words passed between us, for he had grown deaf in his later years, but he occasionally hummed a psalm, which harmonized well enough with my philosophy.
  • But now I had made my home by the shore.
  • But, looking directly down into our waters from a boat, they are seen to be of very different colors.
  • Viewed from a hilltop it reflects the color of the sky; but near at hand it is of a yellowish tint next the shore where you can see the sand, then a light green, which gradually deepens to a uniform dark green in the body of the pond.
  • It is well known that a large plate of glass will have a green tint, owing, as the makers say, to its "body," but a small piece of the same will be colorless.
  • The pond rises and falls, but whether regularly or not, and within what period, nobody knows, though, as usual, many pretend to know.
  • I have sometimes disturbed a fish hawk sitting on a white pine over the water; but I doubt if it is ever profaned by the wind of a gull, like Fair Haven.
  • They are similar to those found in rivers; but as there are no suckers nor lampreys here, I know not by what fish they could be made.
  • The forest has never so good a setting, nor is so distinctly beautiful, as when seen from the middle of a small lake amid hills which rise from the water's edge; for the water in which it is reflected not only makes the best foreground in such a case, but, with its winding shore, the most natural and agreeable boundary to it.
  • It is like molten glass cooled but not congealed, and the few motes in it are pure and beautiful like the imperfections in glass.
  • From a hilltop you can see a fish leap in almost any part; for not a pickerel or shiner picks an insect from this smooth surface but it manifestly disturbs the equilibrium of the whole lake.
  • It is a mirror which no stone can crack, whose quicksilver will never wear off, whose gilding Nature continually repairs; no storms, no dust, can dim its surface ever fresh;--a mirror in which all impurity presented to it sinks, swept and dusted by the sun's hazy brush--this the light dust-cloth--which retains no breath that is breathed on it, but sends its own to float as clouds high above its surface, and be reflected in its bosom still.
  • On land only the grass and trees wave, but the water itself is rippled by the wind.
  • But suddenly the dimples ceased, for they were produced by the perch, which the noise of my oars had seared into the depths, and I saw their schools dimly disappearing; so I spent a dry afternoon after all.
  • It was very clumsy, but lasted a great many years before it became water-logged and perhaps sank to the bottom.
  • Sometimes it would come floating up to the shore; but when you went toward it, it would go back into deep water and disappear.
  • Many men have been likened to it, but few deserve that honor.
  • Though seen but once, it helps to wash out State Street and the engine's soot.
  • I have said that Walden has no visible inlet nor outlet, but it is on the one hand distantly and indirectly related to Flint's Pond, which is more elevated, by a chain of small ponds coming from that quarter, and on the other directly and manifestly to Concord River, which is lower, by a similar chain of ponds through which in some other geological period it may have flowed, and by a little digging, which God forbid, it can be made to flow thither again.
  • It is much larger, being said to contain one hundred and ninety-seven acres, and is more fertile in fish; but it is comparatively shallow, and not remarkably pure.
  • He sawed a channel in the ice toward the shore, and hauled it over and along and out on to the ice with oxen; but, before he had gone far in his work, he was surprised to find that it was wrong end upward, with the stumps of the branches pointing down, and the small end firmly fastened in the sandy bottom.
  • It was about a foot in diameter at the big end, and he had expected to get a good saw-log, but it was so rotten as to be fit only for fuel, if for that.
  • If they were permanently congealed, and small enough to be clutched, they would, perchance, be carried off by slaves, like precious stones, to adorn the heads of emperors; but being liquid, and ample, and secured to us and our successors forever, we disregard them, and run after the diamond of Kohinoor.
  • The birds with their plumage and their notes are in harmony with the flowers, but what youth or maiden conspires with the wild luxuriant beauty of Nature?
  • This was probably the same phenomenon to which I have referred, which is especially observed in the morning, but also at other times, and even by moonlight.
  • But the only true America is that country where you are at liberty to pursue such a mode of life as may enable you to do without these, and where the state does not endeavor to compel you to sustain the slavery and war and other superfluous expenses which directly or indirectly result from the use of such things.
  • Let not to get a living be thy trade, but thy sport.
  • Enjoy the land, but own it not.
  • But he, poor man, disturbed only a couple of fins while I was catching a fair string, and he said it was his luck; but when we changed seats in the boat luck changed seats too.
  • But he, poor man, disturbed only a couple of fins while I was catching a fair string, and he said it was his luck; but when we changed seats in the boat luck changed seats too.
  • Almost every New England boy among my contemporaries shouldered a fowling-piece between the ages of ten and fourteen; and his hunting and fishing grounds were not limited, like the preserves of an English nobleman, but were more boundless even than those of a savage.
  • But already a change is taking place, owing, not to an increased humanity, but to an increased scarcity of game, for perhaps the hunter is the greatest friend of the animals hunted, not excepting the Humane Society.
  • But already a change is taking place, owing, not to an increased humanity, but to an increased scarcity of game, for perhaps the hunter is the greatest friend of the animals hunted, not excepting the Humane Society.
  • Not that I am less humane than others, but I did not perceive that my feelings were much affected.
  • Such a one might make a good shepherd's dog, but is far from being the Good Shepherd.
  • But I see that if I were to live in a wilderness I should again be tempted to become a fisher and hunter in earnest.
  • The repugnance to animal food is not the effect of experience, but is an instinct.
  • But put an extra condiment into your dish, and it will poison you.
  • But to tell the truth, I find myself at present somewhat less particular in these respects.
  • Not that food which entereth into the mouth defileth a man, but the appetite with which it is eaten.
  • Though the youth at last grows indifferent, the laws of the universe are not indifferent, but are forever on the side of the most sensitive.
  • Possibly we may withdraw from it, but never change its nature.
  • Chastity is the flowering of man; and what are called Genius, Heroism, Holiness, and the like, are but various fruits which succeed it.
  • They are but one appetite, and we only need to see a person do any one of these things to know how great a sensualist he is.
  • We have heard of this virtue, but we know not what it is.
  • Nature is hard to be overcome, but she must be overcome.
  • I hesitate to say these things, but it is not because of the subject--I care not how obscene my words are--but because I cannot speak of them without betraying my impurity.
  • But the notes of the flute came home to his ears out of a different sphere from that he worked in, and suggested work for certain faculties which slumbered in him.
  • Those same stars twinkle over other fields than these.--But how to come out of this condition and actually migrate thither?
  • I will go with you gladly soon, but I am just concluding a serious meditation.
  • But that we may not be delayed, you shall be digging the bait meanwhile.
  • Why has man just these species of animals for his neighbors; as if nothing but a mouse could have filled this crevice?
  • They are not callow like the young of most birds, but more perfectly developed and precocious even than chickens.
  • They suggest not merely the purity of infancy, but a wisdom clarified by experience.
  • Such an eye was not born when the bird was, but is coeval with the sky it reflects.
  • Having once got hold they never let go, but struggled and wrestled and rolled on the chips incessantly.
  • Looking farther, I was surprised to find that the chips were covered with such combatants, that it was not a duellum, but a bellum, a war between two races of ants, the red always pitted against the black, and frequently two red ones to one black.
  • A similar engagement between great and small ants is recorded by Olaus Magnus, in which the small ones, being victorious, are said to have buried the bodies of their own soldiers, but left those of their giant enemies a prey to the birds.
  • But now the kind October wind rises, rustling the leaves and rippling the surface of the water, so that no loon can be heard or seen, though his foes sweep the pond with spy-glasses, and make the woods resound with their discharges.
  • But they were too often successful.
  • But I was more than a match for him on the surface.
  • I pursued with a paddle and he dived, but when he came up I was nearer than before.
  • He dived again, but I miscalculated the direction he would take, and we were fifty rods apart when he came to the surface this time, for I had helped to widen the interval; and again he laughed long and loud, and with more reason than before.
  • But why, after displaying so much cunning, did he invariably betray himself the moment he came up by that loud laugh?
  • But after an hour he seemed as fresh as ever, dived as willingly, and swam yet farther than at first.
  • The barberry's brilliant fruit was likewise food for my eyes merely; but I collected a small store of wild apples for coddling, which the proprietor and travellers had overlooked.
  • They grew also behind my house, and one large tree, which almost overshadowed it, was, when in flower, a bouquet which scented the whole neighborhood, but the squirrels and the jays got most of its fruit; the last coming in flocks early in the morning and picking the nuts out of the burs before they fell, I relinquished these trees to them and visited the more distant woods composed wholly of chestnut.
  • Each morning, when they were numbed with cold, I swept some of them out, but I did not trouble myself much to get rid of them; I even felt complimented by their regarding my house as a desirable shelter.
  • The mortar on them was fifty years old, and was said to be still growing harder; but this is one of those sayings which men love to repeat whether they are true or not.
  • My dwelling was small, and I could hardly entertain an echo in it; but it seemed larger for being a single apartment and remote from neighbors.
  • Nowadays the host does not admit you to his hearth, but has got the mason to build one for yourself somewhere in his alley, and hospitality is the art of keeping you at the greatest distance.
  • But the ice itself is the object of most interest, though you must improve the earliest opportunity to study it.
  • But these within the ice are not so numerous nor obvious as those beneath.
  • Though completely waterlogged and almost as heavy as lead, they not only burned long, but made a very hot fire; nay, I thought that they burned better for the soaking, as if the pitch, being confined by the water, burned longer, as in a lamp.
  • As for the axe, I was advised to get the village blacksmith to "jump" it; but I jumped him, and, putting a hickory helve from the woods into it, made it do.
  • But commonly I kindled my fire with the dry leaves of the forest, which I had stored up in my shed before the snow came.
  • Hard green wood just cut, though I used but little of that, answered my purpose better than any other.
  • But my house occupied so sunny and sheltered a position, and its roof was so low, that I could afford to let the fire go out in the middle of almost any winter day.
  • But the most luxuriously housed has little to boast of in this respect, nor need we trouble ourselves to speculate how the human race may be at last destroyed.
  • The next winter I used a small cooking-stove for economy, since I did not own the forest; but it did not keep fire so well as the open fireplace.
  • Cooking was then, for the most part, no longer a poetic, but merely a chemic process.
  • The stove not only took up room and scented the house, but it concealed the fire, and I felt as if I had lost a companion.
  • But I could no longer sit and look into the fire, and the pertinent words of a poet recurred to me with new force.
  • For many weeks I met no one in my walks but those who came occasionally to cut wood and sled it to the village.
  • Though mainly but a humble route to neighboring villages, or for the woodman's team, it once amused the traveller more than now by its variety, and lingered longer in his memory.
  • East of my bean-field, across the road, lived Cato Ingraham, slave of Duncan Ingraham, Esquire, gentleman, of Concord village, who built his slave a house, and gave him permission to live in Walden Woods;--Cato, not Uticensis, but Concordiensis.
  • There are a few who remember his little patch among the walnuts, which he let grow up till he should be old and need them; but a younger and whiter speculator got them at last.
  • Farther down the hill, on the left, on the old road in the woods, are marks of some homestead of the Stratton family; whose orchard once covered all the slope of Brister's Hill, but was long since killed out by pitch pines, excepting a few stumps, whose old roots furnish still the wild stocks of many a thrifty village tree.
  • The very nearness of the fire but cooled our ardor.
  • At first we thought to throw a frog-pond on to it; but concluded to let it burn, it was so far gone and so worthless.
  • He gazed into the cellar from all sides and points of view by turns, always lying down to it, as if there was some treasure, which he remembered, concealed between the stones, where there was absolutely nothing but a heap of bricks and ashes.
  • But to return toward Lincoln.
  • I had read of the potter's clay and wheel in Scripture, but it had never occurred to me that the pots we use were not such as had come down unbroken from those days, or grown on trees like gourds somewhere, and I was pleased to hear that so fictile an art was ever practiced in my neighborhood.
  • The skin of a woodchuck was freshly stretched upon the back of the house, a trophy of his last Waterloo; but no warm cap or mittens would he want more.
  • But all I can learn of their conclusions amounts to just this, that "Cato and Brister pulled wool"; which is about as edifying as the history of more famous schools of philosophy.
  • But this small village, germ of something more, why did it fail while Concord keeps its ground?
  • Ay, the deep Walden Pond and cool Brister's Spring--privilege to drink long and healthy draughts at these, all unimproved by these men but to dilute their glass.
  • But no friendly Indian concerned himself about me; nor needed he, for the master of the house was at home.
  • He could hear me when I moved and cronched the snow with my feet, but could not plainly see me.
  • When I made most noise he would stretch out his neck, and erect his neck feathers, and open his eyes wide; but their lids soon fell again, and he began to nod.
  • But though comparatively disregarded now, when his day comes, laws unsuspected by most will take effect, and masters of families and rulers will come to him for advice.
  • We waded so gently and reverently, or we pulled together so smoothly, that the fishes of thought were not scared from the stream, nor feared any angler on the bank, but came and went grandly, like the clouds which float through the western sky, and the mother-o'-pearl flocks which sometimes form and dissolve there.
  • There was one other with whom I had "solid seasons," long to be remembered, at his house in the village, and who looked in upon me from time to time; but I had no more for society there.
  • I often performed this duty of hospitality, waited long enough to milk a whole herd of cows, but did not see the man approaching from the town.
  • When the ponds were firmly frozen, they afforded not only new and shorter routes to many points, but new views from their surfaces of the familiar landscape around them.
  • When I crossed Flint's Pond, after it was covered with snow, though I had often paddled about and skated over it, it was so unexpectedly wide and so strange that I could think of nothing but Baffin's Bay.
  • They were manifestly thieves, and I had not much respect for them; but the squirrels, though at first shy, went to work as if they were taking what was their own.
  • They tell me that if the fox would remain in the bosom of the frozen earth he would be safe, or if he would run in a straight line away no foxhound could overtake him; but, having left his pursuers far behind, he stops to rest and listen till they come up, and when he runs he circles round to his old haunts, where the hunters await him.
  • Ere long the hounds arrived, but here they lost the scent.
  • But I fear that he was not the wiser for all I told him, for every time I attempted to answer his questions he interrupted me by asking, "What do you do here?"
  • He had lost a dog, but found a man.
  • At length the old hound burst into view with muzzle to the ground, and snapping the air as if possessed, and ran directly to the rock; but, spying the dead fox, she suddenly ceased her hounding as if struck dumb with amazement, and walked round and round him in silence; and one by one her pups arrived, and, like their mother, were sobered into silence by the mystery.
  • The Concord hunter told him what he knew and offered him the skin; but the other declined it and departed.
  • These trees were alive and apparently flourishing at midsummer, and many of them had grown a foot, though completely girdled; but after another winter such were without exception dead.
  • It looked as if Nature no longer contained the breed of nobler bloods, but stood on her last toes.
  • The night veils without doubt a part of this glorious creation; but day comes to reveal to us this great work, which extends from earth even into the plains of the ether.
  • But I can assure my readers that Walden has a reasonably tight bottom at a not unreasonable, though at an unusual, depth.
  • But the deepest ponds are not so deep in proportion to their area as most suppose, and, if drained, would not leave very remarkable valleys.
  • But if, using the shortest diameter of Loch Fyne, we apply these proportions to Walden, which, as we have seen, appears already in a vertical section only like a shallow plate, it will appear four times as shallow.
  • But it is easiest, as they who work on the highways know, to find the hollows by the puddles after a shower.
  • In order to see how nearly I could guess, with this experience, at the deepest point in a pond, by observing the outlines of a surface and the character of its shores alone, I made a plan of White Pond, which contains about forty-one acres, and, like this, has no island in it, nor any visible inlet or outlet; and as the line of greatest breadth fell very near the line of least breadth, where two opposite capes approached each other and two opposite bays receded, I ventured to mark a point a short distance from the latter line, but still on the line of greatest length, as the deepest.
  • Our notions of law and harmony are commonly confined to those instances which we detect; but the harmony which results from a far greater number of seemingly conflicting, but really concurring, laws, which we have not detected, is still more wonderful.
  • The particular laws are as our points of view, as, to the traveller, a mountain outline varies with every step, and it has an infinite number of profiles, though absolutely but one form.
  • Such a rule of the two diameters not only guides us toward the sun in the system and the heart in man, but draws lines through the length and breadth of the aggregate of a man's particular daily behaviors and waves of life into his coves and inlets, and where they intersect will be the height or depth of his character.
  • But a low and smooth shore proves him shallow on that side.
  • It was a small cavity under ten feet of water; but I think that I can warrant the pond not to need soldering till they find a worse leak than that.
  • Who knows but if our instruments were delicate enough we might detect an undulation in the crust of the earth?
  • They said that a gentleman farmer, who was behind the scenes, wanted to double his money, which, as I understood, amounted to half a million already; but in order to cover each one of his dollars with another, he took off the only coat, ay, the skin itself, of Walden Pond in the midst of a hard winter.
  • Like the water, the Walden ice, seen near at hand, has a green tint, but at a distance is beautifully blue, and you can easily tell it from the white ice of the river, or the merely greenish ice of some ponds, a quarter of a mile off.
  • So the hollows about this pond will, sometimes, in the winter, be filled with a greenish water somewhat like its own, but the next day will have frozen blue.
  • Why is it that a bucket of water soon becomes putrid, but frozen remains sweet forever?
  • But such was not the effect on Walden that year, for she had soon got a thick new garment to take the place of the old.
  • The whole tree itself is but one leaf, and rivers are still vaster leaves whose pulp is intervening earth, and towns and cities are the ova of insects in their axils.
  • What is man but a mass of thawing clay?
  • The ball of the human finger is but a drop congealed.
  • The Maker of this earth but patented a leaf.
  • And not only it, but the institutions upon it are plastic like clay in the hands of the potter.
  • The one melts, the other but breaks in pieces.
  • So our human life but dies down to its root, and still puts forth its green blade to eternity.
  • How handsome the great sweeping curves in the edge of the ice, answering somewhat to those of the shore, but more regular!
  • It is unusually hard, owing to the recent severe but transient cold, and all watered or waved like a palace floor.
  • But the wind slides eastward over its opaque surface in vain, till it reaches the living surface beyond.
  • But this spring it broke up more steadily, as I have said.
  • But when I stood on the shore they at once rose up with a great flapping of wings at the signal of their commander, and when they had got into rank circled about over my head, twenty-nine of them, and then steered straight to Canada, with a regular honk from the leader at intervals, trusting to break their fast in muddier pools.
  • Punishment and fear were not; nor were threatening words read On suspended brass; nor did the suppliant crowd fear The words of their judge; but were safe without an avenger.
  • The Merlin it seemed to me it might be called: but I care not for its name.
  • It appeared to have no companion in the universe--sporting there alone--and to need none but the morning and the ether with which it played.
  • It was not lonely, but made all the earth lonely beneath it.
  • The tenant of the air, it seemed related to the earth but by an egg hatched some time in the crevice of a crag;--or was its native nest made in the angle of a cloud, woven of the rainbow's trimmings and the sunset sky, and lined with some soft midsummer haze caught up from earth?
  • If you are chosen town clerk, forsooth, you cannot go to Tierra del Fuego this summer: but you may go to the land of infernal fire nevertheless.
  • The other side of the globe is but the home of our correspondent.
  • One hastens to southern Africa to chase the giraffe; but surely that is not the game he would be after.
  • Nay, be a Columbus to whole new continents and worlds within you, opening new channels, not of trade, but of thought.
  • They love the soil which makes their graves, but have no sympathy with the spirit which may still animate their clay.
  • England and France, Spain and Portugal, Gold Coast and Slave Coast, all front on this private sea; but no bark from them has ventured out of sight of land, though it is without doubt the direct way to India.
  • As if Nature could support but one order of understandings, could not sustain birds as well as quadrupeds, flying as well as creeping things, and hush and whoa, which Bright can understand, were the best English.
  • "They pretend," as I hear, "that the verses of Kabir have four different senses; illusion, spirit, intellect, and the exoteric doctrine of the Vedas"; but in this part of the world it is considered a ground for complaint if a man's writings admit of more than one interpretation.
  • I do not suppose that I have attained to obscurity, but I should be proud if no more fatal fault were found with my pages on this score than was found with the Walden ice.
  • Southern customers objected to its blue color, which is the evidence of its purity, as if it were muddy, and preferred the Cambridge ice, which is white, but tastes of weeds.
  • But what is that to the purpose?
  • He proceeded instantly to the forest for wood, being resolved that it should not be made of unsuitable material; and as he searched for and rejected stick after stick, his friends gradually deserted him, for they grew old in their works and died, but he grew not older by a moment.
  • But why do I stay to mention these things?
  • For the most part, we are not where we are, but in a false position.
  • I do not see but a quiet mind may live as contentedly there, and have as cheering thoughts, as in a palace.
  • The interest and the conversation are about costume and manners chiefly; but a goose is a goose still, dress it as you will.
  • But presently the traveller's horse sank in up to the girths, and he observed to the boy, "I thought you said that this bog had a hard bottom."
  • "So it has," answered the latter, "but you have not got half way to it yet."
  • So it is with the bogs and quicksands of society; but he is an old boy that knows it.
  • I sat at a table where were rich food and wine in abundance, and obsequious attendance, but sincerity and truth were not; and I went away hungry from the inhospitable board.
  • They talked to me of the age of the wine and the fame of the vintage; but I thought of an older, a newer, and purer wine, of a more glorious vintage, which they had not got, and could not buy.
  • I called on the king, but he made me wait in his hall, and conducted like a man incapacitated for hospitality.
  • These may be but the spring months in the life of the race.
  • There are such words as joy and sorrow, but they are only the burden of a psalm, sung with a nasal twang, while we believe in the ordinary and mean.
  • The sun is but a morning star.
  • Government is at best but an expedient; but most governments are usually, and all governments are sometimes, inexpedient.
  • But it is not the less necessary for this; for the people must have some complicated machinery or other, and hear its din, to satisfy that idea of government which they have.
  • After all, the practical reason why, when the power is once in the hands of the people, a majority are permitted, and for a long period continue, to rule, is not because they are most likely to be in the right, nor because this seems fairest to the minority, but because they are physically the strongest.
  • But a government in which the majority rule in all cases cannot be based on justice, even as far as men understand it.
  • It is truly enough said that a corporation has no conscience; but a corporation of conscientious men is a corporation with a conscience.
  • But almost all say that such is not the case now.
  • What makes this duty the more urgent is the fact that the country so overrun is not our own, but ours is the invading army.
  • But he that would save his life, in such a case, shall lose it.
  • I quarrel not with far-off foes, but with those who, near at home, co-operate with, and do the bidding of those far away, and without whom the latter would be harmless.
  • We are accustomed to say, that the mass of men are unprepared; but improvement is slow, because the few are not materially wiser or better than the many.
  • They hesitate, and they regret, and sometimes they petition; but they do nothing in earnest and with effect.
  • I cast my vote, perchance, as I think right; but I am not vitally concerned that that right should prevail.
  • There is but little virtue in the action of masses of men.
  • When the majority shall at length vote for the abolition of slavery, it will be because they are indifferent to slavery, or because there is but little slavery left to be abolished by their vote.
  • But no: I find that the respectable man, so called, has immediately drifted from his position, and despairs of his country, when his country has more reason to despair of him.
  • It is not a man's duty, as a matter of course, to devote himself to the eradication of any, even the most enormous wrong; he may still properly have other concerns to engage him; but it is his duty, at least, to wash his hands of it, and, if he gives it no thought longer, not to give it practically his support.
  • But it is the fault of the government itself that the remedy is worse than the evil.
  • I came into this world, not chiefly to make this a good place to live in, but to live in it, be it good or bad.
  • A man has not everything to do, but something; and because he cannot do everything, it is not necessary that he should do something wrong.
  • But we love better to talk about it: that we say is our mission.
  • Cast your whole vote, not a strip of paper merely, but your whole influence.
  • A minority is powerless while it conforms to the majority; it is not even a minority then; but it is irresistible when it clogs by its whole weight.
  • But even suppose blood should flow.
  • But the rich man--not to make any invidious comparison--is always sold to the institution which makes him rich.
  • It puts to rest many questions which he would otherwise be taxed to answer; while the only new question which it puts is the hard but superfluous one, how to spend it.
  • You must hire or squat somewhere, and raise but a small crop, and eat that soon.
  • Some years ago, the State met me in behalf of the Church, and commanded me to pay a certain sum toward the support of a clergyman whose preaching my father attended, but never I myself.
  • But, unfortunately, another man saw fit to pay it.
  • I did not see why the schoolmaster should be taxed to support the priest, and not the priest the schoolmaster: for I was not the State's schoolmaster, but I supported myself by voluntary subscription.
  • If I had known how to name them, I should then have signed off in detail from all the societies which I never signed on to; but I did not know where to find a complete list.
  • They plainly did not know how to treat me, but behaved like persons who are underbred.
  • But the jailer said, "Come, boys, it is time to lock up"; and so they dispersed, and I heard the sound of their steps returning into the hollow apartments.
  • Probably this is the only house in the town where verses are composed, which are afterward printed in a circular form, but not published.
  • I pumped my fellow-prisoner as dry as I could, for fear I should never see him again; but at length he showed me which was my bed, and left me to blow out the lamp.
  • When they called for the vessels again, I was green enough to return what bread I had left; but my comrade seized it, and said that I should lay that up for lunch or dinner.
  • My neighbors did not thus salute me, but first looked at me, and then at one another, as if I had returned from a long journey.
  • But I think, again, This is no reason why I should do as they do, or permit others to suffer much greater pain of a different kind.
  • I am but too ready to conform to them.
  • They speak of moving society, but have no resting-place without it.
  • His words are wisdom to those legislators who contemplate no essential reform in the existing government; but for thinkers, and those who legislate for all time, he never once glances at the subject.
  • There are really no blows to be given by him but defensive ones.
  • He is not a leader, but a follower.
  • It can have no pure right over my person and property but what I concede to it.
  • But I warn you, if you don't tell me that this means war, if you still try to defend the infamies and horrors perpetrated by that Antichrist--I really believe he is Antichrist--I will have nothing more to do with you and you are no longer my friend, no longer my 'faithful slave,' as you call yourself!
  • But how do you do?
  • Perhaps I don't understand things, but Austria never has wished, and does not wish, for war.
  • But amid these cares her anxiety about Pierre was evident.
  • Helene was so lovely that not only did she not show any trace of coquetry, but on the contrary she even appeared shy of her unquestionable and all too victorious beauty.
  • But how are you to get that balance?
  • It was evident that he not only knew everyone in the drawing room, but had found them to be so tiresome that it wearied him to look at or listen to them.
  • He wished to say something more, but at that moment Prince Vasili and his daughter got up to go and the two young men rose to let them pass.
  • No, but do promise!
  • Certainly; but about Kutuzov, I don't promise.
  • But as soon as the prince had gone her face resumed its former cold, artificial expression.
  • Pierre wished to make a remark, for the conversation interested him, but Anna Pavlovna, who had him under observation, interrupted:
  • "'I showed them the path to glory, but they did not follow it,'" Prince Andrew continued after a short silence, again quoting Napoleon's words.
  • But Pierre continued his speech without heeding her.
  • But won't you come to this other table? repeated Anna Pavlovna.
  • Those were extremes, no doubt, but they are not what is most important.
  • We wanted liberty, but Buonaparte has destroyed it.
  • But when she saw that Pierre's sacrilegious words had not exasperated the vicomte, and had convinced herself that it was impossible to stop him, she rallied her forces and joined the vicomte in a vigorous attack on the orator.
  • "But, my dear Monsieur Pierre," said she, "how do you explain the fact of a great man executing a duc--or even an ordinary man who--is innocent and untried?"
  • They listened to the French sentences which to them were meaningless, with an air of understanding but not wishing to appear to do so.
  • "I am expecting you, Pierre," said the same voice, but gently and affectionately.
  • In my opinion perpetual peace is possible but--I do not know how to express it... not by a balance of political power....
  • But you must decide on something!
  • If it were a war for freedom I could understand it and should be the first to enter the army; but to help England and Austria against the greatest man in the world is not right.
  • Very likely it would be splendid, but it will never come about...
  • Excuse me for saying so, but you have no sense about women.
  • Her tone was now querulous and her lip drawn up, giving her not a joyful, but an animal, squirrel-like expression.
  • The princess said nothing, but suddenly her short downy lip quivered.
  • Pierre looked over his spectacles with naive surprise, now at him and now at her, moved as if about to rise too, but changed his mind.
  • But that one word expressed an entreaty, a threat, and above all conviction that she would herself regret her words.
  • But she went on hurriedly:
  • Her beautiful eyes glanced askance at her husband's face, and her own assumed the timid, deprecating expression of a dog when it rapidly but feebly wags its drooping tail.
  • But what's the good?... and he waved his arm.
  • "You don't understand why I say this," he continued, "but it is the whole story of life.
  • He was free, he had nothing but his aim to consider, and he reached it.
  • But tie yourself up with a woman and, like a chained convict, you lose all freedom!
  • When you meet them in society it seems as if there were something in them, but there's nothing, nothing, nothing!
  • He did not finish his sentence, but his tone showed how highly he thought of his friend and how much he expected of him in the future.
  • Pierre was always astonished at Prince Andrew's calm manner of treating everybody, his extraordinary memory, his extensive reading (he had read everything, knew everything, and had an opinion about everything), but above all at his capacity for work and study.
  • And if Pierre was often struck by Andrew's lack of capacity for philosophical meditation (to which he himself was particularly addicted), he regarded even this not as a defect but as a sign of strength.
  • "But what is there to say about me?" said Pierre, his face relaxing into a careless, merry smile.
  • But he did not say what "it really" was.
  • But look here: give up visiting those Kuragins and leading that sort of life.
  • Women who are comme il faut, that's a different matter; but the Kuragins' set of women, 'women and wine' I don't understand!
  • He asked me for tonight, but I won't go.
  • But the nearer he drew to the house the more he felt the impossibility of going to sleep on such a night.
  • But he immediately recalled his promise to Prince Andrew not to go there.
  • Pushing away the footmen he tugged at the frame, but could not move it.
  • The Englishman nodded, but gave no indication whether he intended to accept this challenge or not.
  • Pierre stood smiling but silent.
  • One hand moved as if to clutch the window sill, but refrained from touching it.
  • He looked up: Dolokhov was standing on the window sill, with a pale but radiant face.
  • They seized him by his arms; but he was so strong that everyone who touched him was sent flying.
  • I'll take your bet tomorrow, but now we are all going to ----'s.
  • But mind you come to dinner or I shall be offended, ma chere!
  • Anatole Kuragin's father managed somehow to get his son's affair hushed up, but even he was ordered out of Petersburg.
  • He is a son of Marya Ivanovna Dolokhova, such a worthy woman, but there, just fancy!
  • They wanted to introduce him to me, but I quite declined: I have my daughters to consider.
  • He has lost count of his children, but this Pierre was his favorite.
  • "Yes, but between ourselves," said the princess, "that is a pretext.
  • "But do you know, my dear, that was a capital joke," said the count; and seeing that the elder visitor was not listening, he turned to the young ladies.
  • The countess looked at her callers, smiling affably, but not concealing the fact that she would not be distressed if they now rose and took their leave.
  • She did not reply, but looked at her seriously.
  • He evidently tried to find something to say, but failed.
  • "But they say that war has been declared," replied the visitor.
  • Perhaps I spoil her, but really that seems the best plan.
  • Natasha was about to call him but changed her mind.
  • Boris looked attentively and kindly at her eager face, but did not reply.
  • "How funny you are!" he said, bending down to her and blushing still more, but he waited and did nothing.
  • Yes, I am, but please don't let us do like that....
  • After receiving her visitors, the countess was so tired that she gave orders to admit no more, but the porter was told to be sure to invite to dinner all who came "to congratulate."
  • Anna Mikhaylovna, with her tear-worn but pleasant face, drew her chair nearer to that of the countess.
  • The handsome Vera smiled contemptuously but did not seem at all hurt.
  • But as she passed the sitting room she noticed two couples sitting, one pair at each window.
  • It was pleasant and touching to see these little girls in love; but apparently the sight of them roused no pleasant feeling in Vera.
  • But I'll just tell Mamma how you are behaving with Boris.
  • But don't let's talk about me; tell me how you managed everything.
  • But, Nataly, you know my love for my son: I would do anything for his happiness!
  • But I have promised and will do it for your sake.
  • Boris said no more, but looked inquiringly at his mother without taking off his cloak.
  • "Prince, humanum est errare, * but..." replied the doctor, swallowing his r's, and pronouncing the Latin words with a French accent.
  • But one cannot delay, Prince, at such a moment!
  • "Still the same; but what can you expect, this noise..." said the princess, looking at Anna Mikhaylovna as at a stranger.
  • Can I see him? asked Pierre, awkwardly as usual, but unabashed.
  • And he left the room, followed by the low but ringing laughter of the sister with the mole.
  • But before Pierre--who at that moment imagined himself to be Napoleon in person and to have just effected the dangerous crossing of the Straits of Dover and captured London--could pronounce Pitt's sentence, he saw a well-built and handsome young officer entering his room.
  • He had left Moscow when Boris was a boy of fourteen, and had quite forgotten him, but in his usual impulsive and hearty way he took Boris by the hand with a friendly smile.
  • I have come with my mother to see the count, but it seems he is not well.
  • But Boris spoke distinctly, clearly, and dryly, looking straight into Pierre's eyes.
  • "Moscow has nothing else to do but gossip," Boris went on.
  • "And it must seem to you," said Boris flushing slightly, but not changing his tone or attitude, "it must seem to you that everyone is trying to get something out of the rich man?"
  • But I just wish to say, to avoid misunderstandings, that you are quite mistaken if you reckon me or my mother among such people.
  • For a long time Pierre could not understand, but when he did, he jumped up from the sofa, seized Boris under the elbow in his quick, clumsy way, and, blushing far more than Boris, began to speak with a feeling of mingled shame and vexation.
  • But Boris again interrupted him.
  • "No, but I say," said Pierre, calming down, "you are a wonderful fellow!
  • I could not have done it myself, I should not have had the courage, but it's splendid.
  • I am sorry for him as a man, but what can one do?
  • After he had gone Pierre continued pacing up and down the room for a long time, no longer piercing an imaginary foe with his imaginary sword, but smiling at the remembrance of that pleasant, intelligent, and resolute young man.
  • "It is dreadful, dreadful!" she was saying, "but cost me what it may I shall do my duty.
  • But why do you expect that he will leave us anything?
  • But mind, don't bring me such tattered and dirty notes as last time, but nice clean ones for the countess.
  • But mind, don't bring me such tattered and dirty notes as last time, but nice clean ones for the countess.
  • But, don't be uneasy, he added, noticing that the count was beginning to breathe heavily and quickly which was always a sign of approaching anger.
  • But I am in great need of this sum.
  • But those tears were pleasant to them both.
  • None of them had yet seen the manifesto, but they all knew it had appeared.
  • But all he said was so prettily sedate, and the naivete of his youthful egotism was so obvious, that he disarmed his hearers.
  • It was just the moment before a big dinner when the assembled guests, expecting the summons to zakuska, * avoid engaging in any long conversation but think it necessary to move about and talk, in order to show that they are not at all impatient for their food.
  • The latter understood that she was being asked to entertain this young man, and sitting down beside him she began to speak about his father; but he answered her, as he had the countess, only in monosyllables.
  • But what is to be done, old man?
  • I know she's a scamp of a girl, but I like her.
  • Pierre spoke little but examined the new faces, and ate a great deal.
  • "Connaissez-vous le Proverbe: * 'Jerome, Jerome, do not roam, but turn spindles at home!'?" said Shinshin, puckering his brows and smiling.
  • I have four sons in the army but still I don't fret.
  • The countess tried to frown, but could not.
  • "Ice pudding, but you won't get any," said Marya Dmitrievna.
  • Again the footmen rushed about, chairs scraped, and in the same order in which they had entered but with redder faces, the guests returned to the drawing room and to the count's study.
  • Natasha, who was treated as though she were grown up, was evidently very proud of this but at the same time felt shy.
  • But where is Sonya?
  • Sonya tried to lift her head to answer but could not, and hid her face still deeper in the bed.
  • "Nicholas is going away in a week's time, his... papers... have come... he told me himself... but still I should not cry," and she showed a paper she held in her hand--with the verses Nicholas had written, "still, I should not cry, but you can't... no one can understand... what a soul he has!"
  • But Nicholas is my cousin... one would have to... the Metropolitan himself... and even then it can't be done.
  • Yes, these verses Nicholas wrote himself and I copied some others, and she found them on my table and said she'd show them to Mamma, and that I was ungrateful, and that Mamma would never allow him to marry me, but that he'll marry Julie.
  • I don't quite remember how, but don't you remember that it could all be arranged and how nice it all was?
  • At nighttime in the moon's fair glow How sweet, as fancies wander free, To feel that in this world there's one Who still is thinking but of thee!
  • A day or two, then bliss unspoilt, But oh! till then I cannot live!...
  • But his partner could not and did not want to dance well.
  • Her enormous figure stood erect, her powerful arms hanging down (she had handed her reticule to the countess), and only her stern but handsome face really joined in the dance.
  • I wished to get a nap, mon cousin, but I can't.
  • Prince Vasili looked questioningly at the princess, but could not make out whether she was considering what he had just said or whether she was simply looking at him.
  • But... in short, the fact is... you know yourself that last winter the count made a will by which he left all his property, not to us his direct heirs, but to Pierre.
  • But... in short, the fact is... you know yourself that last winter the count made a will by which he left all his property, not to us his direct heirs, but to Pierre.
  • But he cannot leave the estate to Pierre.
  • But, my poor Catiche, it is as clear as daylight!
  • "My dear Princess Catherine Semenovna," began Prince Vasili impatiently, "I came here not to wrangle with you, but to talk about your interests as with a kinswoman, a good, kind, true relation.
  • Yes, but you are not the only one.
  • But the princess did not listen to him.
  • Yes, I knew it long ago but had forgotten.
  • The princess wished to rise, but the prince held her by the hand.
  • But I will give her a piece of my mind.
  • He noticed that they had not come to the front entrance but to the back door.
  • But neither Anna Mikhaylovna nor the footman nor the coachman, who could not help seeing these people, took any notice of them.
  • "Ah, my friend!" she said, touching his arm as she had done her son's when speaking to him that afternoon, "believe me I suffer no less than you do, but be a man!"
  • "But really, hadn't I better go away?" he asked, looking kindly at her over his spectacles.
  • Pierre did not understand a word, but the conviction that all this had to be grew stronger, and he meekly followed Anna Mikhaylovna who was already opening a door.
  • Pierre could not make out what it was all about, and still less what "watching over his interests" meant, but he decided that all these things had to be.
  • She evidently felt unable to look at him without laughing, but could not resist looking at him: so to be out of temptation she slipped quietly behind one of the columns.
  • On leaving the bed both Prince Vasili and the princess passed out by a back door, but returned to their places one after the other before the service was concluded.
  • But now this head was swaying helplessly with the uneven movements of the bearers, and the cold listless gaze fixed itself upon nothing.
  • When Pierre came up the count was gazing straight at him, but with a look the significance of which could not be understood by mortal man.
  • Either this look meant nothing but that as long as one has eyes they must look somewhere, or it meant too much.
  • "But, my dear princess," answered Anna Mikhaylovna blandly but impressively, blocking the way to the bedroom and preventing the other from passing, "won't this be too much for poor Uncle at a moment when he needs repose?
  • "But, my dear princess," answered Anna Mikhaylovna blandly but impressively, blocking the way to the bedroom and preventing the other from passing, "won't this be too much for poor Uncle at a moment when he needs repose?
  • His cheeks, which were so flabby that they looked heavier below, were twitching violently; but he wore the air of a man little concerned in what the two ladies were saying.
  • She tried to pass Anna Mikhaylovna, but the latter sprang so as to bar her path.
  • Their efforts in the struggle for the portfolio were the only sounds audible, but it was evident that if the princess did speak, her words would not be flattering to Anna Mikhaylovna.
  • But Anna Mikhaylovna went forward a step or two to keep her hold on the portfolio, and changed her grip.
  • But Anna Mikhaylovna did not obey him.
  • "But, Prince," said Anna Mikhaylovna, "after such a solemn sacrament, allow him a moment's peace!
  • I know you well enough to be sure that this will not turn your head, but it imposes duties on you, and you must be a man.
  • But he had no time.
  • She said the count had died as she would herself wish to die, that his end was not only touching but edifying.
  • Of the behavior of the eldest princess and Prince Vasili she spoke disapprovingly, but in whispers and as a great secret.
  • At Bald Hills, Prince Nicholas Andreevich Bolkonski's estate, the arrival of young Prince Andrew and his wife was daily expected, but this expectation did not upset the regular routine of life in the old prince's household.
  • He always came to table under precisely the same conditions, and not only at the same hour but at the same minute.
  • "Well now, isn't she a fool!" shouted the prince, pushing the book aside and turning sharply away; but rising immediately, he paced up and down, lightly touched his daughter's hair and sat down again.
  • She turned to go, but he stopped her with a gesture and took an uncut book from the high desk.
  • But the princess never saw the beautiful expression of her own eyes--the look they had when she was not thinking of herself.
  • All Moscow talks of nothing but war.
  • But enough of this!
  • But you will understand that I have no desire for the post.
  • I don't know what you will think of it, but I consider it my duty to let you know of it.
  • But enough of gossip.
  • He says the count was the last representative but one of the great century, and that it is his own turn now, but that he will do all he can to let his turn come as late as possible.
  • I pity Prince Vasili but am still more sorry for Pierre.
  • My father has not spoken to me of a suitor, but has only told me that he has received a letter and is expecting a visit from Prince Vasili.
  • My father talks of nothing but marches and countermarches, things of which I understand nothing; and the day before yesterday during my daily walk through the village I witnessed a heartrending scene....
  • The little princess had grown stouter during this time, but her eyes and her short, downy, smiling lip lifted when she began to speak just as merrily and prettily as ever.
  • Prince Andrew followed her with a courteous but sad expression.
  • Princess Mary did not listen to the end, but continuing her train of thought turned to her sister-in-law with a tender glance at her figure.
  • The old prince always dressed in old-fashioned style, wearing an antique coat and powdered hair; and when Prince Andrew entered his father's dressing room (not with the contemptuous look and manner he wore in drawing rooms, but with the animated face with which he talked to Pierre), the old man was sitting on a large leather-covered chair, wrapped in a powdering mantle, entrusting his head to Tikhon.
  • But what's the southern army to do?
  • Prince Andrew, seeing that his father insisted, began--at first reluctantly, but gradually with more and more animation, and from habit changing unconsciously from Russian to French as he went on--to explain the plan of operation for the coming campaign.
  • The old prince did not evince the least interest during this explanation, but as if he were not listening to it continued to dress while walking about, and three times unexpectedly interrupted.
  • Michael Ivanovich did not at all know when "you and I" had said such things about Bonaparte, but understanding that he was wanted as a peg on which to hang the prince's favorite topic, he looked inquiringly at the young prince, wondering what would follow.
  • "The past always seems good," said he, "but did not Suvorov himself fall into a trap Moreau set him, and from which he did not know how to escape?"
  • May God help you, but we'll see what will happen.
  • You may laugh as much as you like, but all the same Bonaparte is a great general!
  • His son made no rejoinder, but it was evident that whatever arguments were presented he was as little able as his father to change his opinion.
  • But it troubles me.
  • Prince Andrew was silent, but the princess noticed the ironical and contemptuous look that showed itself on his face.
  • But think, Andrew: for a young society woman to be buried in the country during the best years of her life, all alone--for Papa is always busy, and I... well, you know what poor resources I have for entertaining a woman used to the best society.
  • "You are good in every way, Andrew, but you have a kind of intellectual pride," said the princess, following the train of her own thoughts rather than the trend of the conversation--"and that's a great sin.
  • But even if one might, what feeling except veneration could such a man as my father evoke?
  • But even in this I can see lately a shade of improvement.
  • It will give you no trouble and is nothing unworthy of you, but it will comfort me.
  • Think as you please, but do this for my sake!
  • Her brother would have taken the icon, but she stopped him.
  • There was a look of tenderness, for he was touched, but also a gleam of irony on his face.
  • I have said nothing to you, but you have already been talked to.
  • She tried to say something but could not.
  • But why this is so I don't know...
  • His fine eyes lit up with a thoughtful, kindly, and unaccustomed brightness, but he was looking not at his sister but over her head toward the darkness of the open doorway.
  • He said nothing to her but looked at her forehead and hair, without looking at her eyes, with such contempt that the Frenchwoman blushed and went away without a word.
  • No, but imagine the old Countess Zubova, with false curls and her mouth full of false teeth, as if she were trying to cheat old age....
  • When Prince Andrew entered the study the old man in his old-age spectacles and white dressing gown, in which he received no one but his son, sat at the table writing.
  • I know that out of a million cases only one goes wrong, but it is her fancy and mine.
  • Don't be afraid; I won't tell anyone, but you know it yourself.
  • He spoke so rapidly that he did not finish half his words, but his son was accustomed to understand him.
  • "Remember this, Prince Andrew, if they kill you it will hurt me, your old father..." he paused unexpectedly, and then in a querulous voice suddenly shrieked: "but if I hear that you have not behaved like a son of Nicholas Bolkonski, I shall be ashamed!"
  • When the eager but misrepeated words had reached their destination in a cry of: "The general to the third company," the missing officer appeared from behind his company and, though he was a middle-aged man and not in the habit of running, trotted awkwardly stumbling on his toes toward the general.
  • But what about your excellency?... nobody knows.
  • Looking at their boots he several times shook his head sadly, pointing them out to the Austrian general with an expression which seemed to say that he was not blaming anyone, but could not help noticing what a bad state of things it was.
  • "As far as the service goes he is quite punctilious, your excellency; but his character..." said Timokhin.
  • Dolokhov looked round but did not say anything, nor did the mocking smile on his lips change.
  • There they all seemed to be Poles--all under the Russian crown--but here they're all regular Germans.
  • But now that Kutuzov had spoken to the gentleman ranker, he addressed him with the cordiality of an old friend.
  • And Kutuzov smiled in a way that seemed to say, You are quite at liberty not to believe me and I don't even care whether you do or not, but you have no grounds for telling me so.
  • The Austrian general looked dissatisfied, but had no option but to reply in the same tone.
  • But Kutuzov went on blandly smiling with the same expression, which seemed to say that he had a right to suppose so.
  • "But you know the wise maxim your excellency, advising one to expect the worst," said the Austrian general, evidently wishing to have done with jests and to come to business.
  • He now looked like a man who has time to think of the impression he makes on others, but is occupied with agreeable and interesting work.
  • But among these people Prince Andrew knew how to take his stand so that they respected and even feared him.
  • But at that instant a tall Austrian general in a greatcoat, with the order of Maria Theresa on his neck and a black bandage round his head, who had evidently just arrived, entered quickly, slamming the door.
  • Then he lifted his head, stretched his neck as if he intended to say something, but immediately, with affected indifference, began to hum to himself, producing a queer sound which immediately broke off.
  • Nesvitski with a laugh threw his arms round Prince Andrew, but Bolkonski, turning still paler, pushed him away with an angry look and turned to Zherkov.
  • *(2) Only a hobbledehoy could amuse himself in this way, he added in Russian--but pronouncing the word with a French accent--having noticed that Zherkov could still hear him.
  • * (2) "It is all very well for that good-for-nothing fellow of whom you have made a friend, but not for you, not for you."
  • He waited a moment to see whether the cornet would answer, but he turned and went out of the corridor.
  • Another hussar also rushed toward the horse, but Bondarenko had already thrown the reins of the snaffle bridle over the horse's head.
  • I know by now, if he wins he comes back early to brag about it, but if he stays out till morning it means he's lost and will come back in a rage.
  • If at least we had some women here; but there's nothing foh one to do but dwink.
  • Rostov shrugged his shoulders as much as to say: "Nor do I, but what's one to do?" and, having given his order, he returned to Telyanin.
  • But where are you off to?
  • We are childwen of the dust... but one falls in love and one is a God, one is pua' as on the first day of cweation...
  • Denisov frowned and was about to shout some reply but stopped.
  • "No, if I hadn't thought of it being a treasure," said Rostov, "but I remember putting it there."
  • But Rostov pulled away his arm and, with as much anger as though Denisov were his worst enemy, firmly fixed his eyes directly on his face.
  • With shifting eyes but eyebrows still raised, Telyanin handed him the purse.
  • "If we get to Vienna I'll get rid of it there but in these wretched little towns there's nowhere to spend it," said he.
  • But these words came like a piteous, despairing cry and an entreaty for pardon.
  • He was glad, and at the same instant began to pity the miserable man who stood before him, but the task he had begun had to be completed.
  • Every muscle of Telyanin's pale, terrified face began to quiver, his eyes still shifted from side to side but with a downward look not rising to Rostov's face, and his sobs were audible.
  • But at the door he stopped and then retraced his steps.
  • He may keep me on duty every day, or may place me under arrest, but no one can make me apologize, because if he, as commander of this regiment, thinks it beneath his dignity to give me satisfaction, then...
  • Perhaps I ought not to have spoken before them, but I am not a diplomatist.
  • No one thinks you a coward, but that's not the point.
  • It's not pleasant, but what's to be done, my dear fellow?
  • You are offended at being put on duty a bit, but why not apologize to an old and honorable officer?
  • You're quick at taking offense, but you don't mind disgracing the whole regiment!
  • But it's not all the same to us!
  • Denisov remained silent and did not move, but occasionally looked with his glittering black eyes at Rostov.
  • You may take offense or not but I always stick to mother truth.
  • No one shall hear a word from me," said Rostov in an imploring voice, "but I can't apologize, by God I can't, do what you will!
  • But how did you come here?
  • "No, but what I should like," added he, munching a pie in his moist-lipped handsome mouth, "would be to slip in over there."
  • Everyone got up and began watching the movements of our troops below, as plainly visible as if but a stone's throw away, and the movements of the approaching enemy farther off.
  • But the convoyman took no notice of the word "general" and shouted at the soldiers who were blocking his way.
  • But the soldiers, crowded together shoulder to shoulder, their bayonets interlocking, moved over the bridge in a dense mass.
  • "A million all but one!" replied a waggish soldier in a torn coat, with a wink, and passed on followed by another, an old man.
  • Nesvitski looked round and saw, some fifteen paces away but separated by the living mass of moving infantry, Vaska Denisov, red and shaggy, with his cap on the back of his black head and a cloak hanging jauntily over his shoulder.
  • But the devil knows what this is.
  • No one knows, but one wants to know.
  • But you are strong, healthy, cheerful, and excited, and are surrounded by other such excitedly animated and healthy men.
  • Evidently they were firing at the hussars, but the balls with rapid rhythmic whistle flew over the heads of the horsemen and fell somewhere beyond them.
  • But despite himself, on his face too that same indication of something new and stern showed round the mouth.
  • The high-shouldered figure of Zherkov, familiar to the Pavlograds as he had but recently left their regiment, rode up to the colonel.
  • "I don't myself know 'to who,'" replied the cornet in a serious tone, "but the prince told me to 'go and tell the colonel that the hussars must return quickly and fire the bridge.'"
  • "You spoke to me of inflammable material," said he, "but you said nothing about firing it."
  • You said the bridge would be burned, but who would it burn, I could not know by the holy spirit!
  • But you are damp!
  • Rostov saw nothing but the hussars running all around him, their spurs catching and their sabers clattering.
  • Rostov did not think what this call for stretchers meant; he ran on, trying only to be ahead of the others; but just at the bridge, not looking at the ground, he came on some sticky, trodden mud, stumbled, and fell on his hands.
  • But Bogdanich, without looking at or recognizing Rostov, shouted to him:
  • But now, even if they do get peppered, the squadron may be recommended for honors and he may get a ribbon.
  • Two were misdirected and the shot went too high, but the last round fell in the midst of a group of hussars and knocked three of them over.
  • For Christ's sake let me alone! cried the wounded man, but still he was lifted and laid on the stretcher.
  • But this sort of thing is the very devil, with them shooting at you like a target.
  • For the first time, after a fortnight's retreat, the Russian troops had halted and after a fight had not only held the field but had repulsed the French.
  • As a mark of the commander-in-chief's special favor he was sent with the news of this victory to the Austrian court, now no longer at Vienna (which was threatened by the French) but at Brunn.
  • Despite his apparently delicate build Prince Andrew could endure physical fatigue far better than many very muscular men, and on the night of the battle, having arrived at Krems excited but not weary, with dispatches from Dokhturov to Kutuzov, he was sent immediately with a special dispatch to Brunn.
  • To be so sent meant not only a reward but an important step toward promotion.
  • The night was dark but starry, the road showed black in the snow that had fallen the previous day--the day of the battle.
  • Then he began to imagine that the Russians were running away and that he himself was killed, but he quickly roused himself with a feeling of joy, as if learning afresh that this was not so but that on the contrary the French had run away.
  • He again vividly recalled the details of the battle, no longer dim, but definite and in the concise form in which he imagined himself stating them to the Emperor Francis.
  • "But that is a matter of perfect indifference to me," he thought.
  • He had an intellectual and distinctive head, but the instant he turned to Prince Andrew the firm, intelligent expression on his face changed in a way evidently deliberate and habitual to him.
  • But Mortier is not captured.
  • His Majesty will no doubt wish to see you, but not today.
  • They had known each other previously in Petersburg, but had become more intimate when Prince Andrew was in Vienna with Kutuzov.
  • It was not the question "What for?" but the question "How?" that interested him.
  • What the diplomatic matter might be he did not care, but it gave him great pleasure to prepare a circular, memorandum, or report, skillfully, pointedly, and elegantly.
  • Bilibin's services were valued not only for what he wrote, but also for his skill in dealing and conversing with those in the highest spheres.
  • * "But my dear fellow, with all my respect for the Orthodox Russian army, I must say that your victory was not particularly victorious."
  • We had expected, as I told you, to get at their rear by seven in the morning but had not reached it by five in the afternoon.
  • That is true, but still why didn't you capture him?
  • So don't be surprised if not only the Minister of War but also his Most August Majesty the Emperor and King Francis is not much delighted by your victory.
  • I confess I do not understand: perhaps there are diplomatic subtleties here beyond my feeble intelligence, but I can't make it out.
  • All that is beautiful, but what do we, I mean the Austrian court, care for your victories?
  • But this destruction seems to have been done on purpose to vex us.
  • You abandon Vienna, give up its defense--as much as to say: 'Heaven is with us, but heaven help you and your capital!'
  • Not only occupied, but Bonaparte is at Schonbrunn, and the count, our dear Count Vrbna, goes to him for orders.
  • Prince Auersperg is on this, on our side of the river, and is defending us--doing it very badly, I think, but still he is defending us.
  • But Vienna is on the other side.
  • "But still this does not mean that the campaign is over," said Prince Andrew.
  • The bigwigs here think so too, but they daren't say so.
  • "But joking apart," said Prince Andrew, "do you really think the campaign is over?"
  • He was evidently distressed, and breathed painfully, but could not restrain the wild laughter that convulsed his usually impassive features.
  • If we were in Vienna it would be easy, but here, in this wretched Moravian hole, it is more difficult, and I beg you all to help me.
  • "I should like to speak well of them, but as far as I know the facts, I can't," replied Bolkonski, smiling.
  • He has a passion for giving audiences, but he does not like talking himself and can't do it, as you will see.
  • But after it was over, the adjutant he had seen the previous day ceremoniously informed Bolkonski that the Emperor desired to give him an audience.
  • "I cannot inform Your Majesty at what o'clock the battle began at the front, but at Durrenstein, where I was, our attack began after five in the afternoon," replied Bolkonski growing more animated and expecting that he would have a chance to give a reliable account, which he had ready in his mind, of all he knew and had seen.
  • But the Emperor smiled and interrupted him.
  • But where do you come from not to know what every coachman in the town knows?
  • But why did they not blow up the bridge, if it was mined?
  • But if the bridge is crossed it means that the army too is lost?
  • But it will please our sovereign the Emperor Napoleon if we take this bridge, so let us three go and take it!' 'Yes, let's!' say the others.
  • But what is best of all," he went on, his excitement subsiding under the delightful interest of his own story, "is that the sergeant in charge of the cannon which was to give the signal to fire the mines and blow up the bridge, this sergeant, seeing that the French troops were running onto the bridge, was about to fire, but Lannes stayed his hand.
  • But what is best of all," he went on, his excitement subsiding under the delightful interest of his own story, "is that the sergeant in charge of the cannon which was to give the signal to fire the mines and blow up the bridge, this sergeant, seeing that the French troops were running onto the bridge, was about to fire, but Lannes stayed his hand.
  • But you meant to stay another two days?
  • But now I am off at once.
  • But as you are a philosopher, be a consistent one, look at the other side of the question and you will see that your duty, on the contrary, is to take care of yourself.
  • "And should there be nothing left but to die?" he thought.
  • He saw that his championship of the doctor's wife in her queer trap might expose him to what he dreaded more than anything in the world--to ridicule; but his instinct urged him on.
  • On reaching the village he dismounted and went to the nearest house, intending to rest if but for a moment, eat something, and try to sort out the stinging and tormenting thoughts that confused his mind.
  • But sit down and have something to eat.
  • But what's the matter with you?
  • Prince Andrew stood right in front of Kutuzov but the expression of the commander in chief's one sound eye showed him to be so preoccupied with thoughts and anxieties as to be oblivious of his presence.
  • With his left hand he drew Bagration toward him, and with his right, on which he wore a ring, he made the sign of the cross over him with a gesture evidently habitual, offering his puffy cheek, but Bagration kissed him on the neck instead.
  • But to forestall the French with his whole army was impossible.
  • A truce was Kutuzov's sole chance of gaining time, giving Bagration's exhausted troops some rest, and letting the transport and heavy convoys (whose movements were concealed from the French) advance if but one stage nearer Znaim.
  • Inform him that the general who signed that capitulation had no right to do so, and that no one but the Emperor of Russia has that right.
  • They talked of peace but did not believe in its possibility; others talked of a battle but also disbelieved in the nearness of an engagement.
  • "If he is one of the ordinary little staff dandies sent to earn a medal he can get his reward just as well in the rearguard, but if he wishes to stay with me, let him... he'll be of use here if he's a brave officer," thought Bagration.
  • But before he had finished he felt that his jest was unacceptable and had not come off.
  • There was something peculiar about it, quite unsoldierly, rather comic, but extremely attractive.
  • At Grunth also some apprehension and alarm could be felt, but the nearer Prince Andrew came to the French lines the more confident was the appearance of our troops.
  • It's a shame for a soldier to steal; a soldier must be honest, honorable, and brave, but if he robs his fellows there is no honor in him, he's a scoundrel.
  • So the swishing sound of the strokes, and the desperate but unnatural screams, continued.
  • Our front line and that of the enemy were far apart on the right and left flanks, but in the center where the men with a flag of truce had passed that morning, the lines were so near together that the men could see one another's faces and speak to one another.
  • The soldiers forming the picket line, like showmen exhibiting a curiosity, no longer looked at the French but paid attention to the sight-seers and grew weary waiting to be relieved.
  • "Bonaparte..." began Dolokhov, but the Frenchman interrupted him.
  • But the guns remained loaded, the loopholes in blockhouses and entrenchments looked out just as menacingly, and the unlimbered cannon confronted one another as before.
  • Before the guns an artillery sentry was pacing up and down; he stood at attention when the officer arrived, but at a sign resumed his measured, monotonous pacing.
  • To the left from that village, amid the smoke, was something resembling a battery, but it was impossible to see it clearly with the naked eye.
  • Suddenly, however, he was struck by a voice coming from the shed, and its tone was so sincere that he could not but listen.
  • Whatever we may say about the soul going to the sky... we know there is no sky but only an atmosphere.
  • But still, to conceive a future life...
  • His eyes ran rapidly over the wide space, but he only saw that the hitherto motionless masses of the French now swayed and that there really was a battery to their left.
  • A small but distinctly visible enemy column was moving down the hill, probably to strengthen the front line.
  • But where and how will my Toulon present itself?
  • "He wants to see a battle," said Zherkov to Bolkonski, pointing to the accountant, "but he feels a pain in the pit of his stomach already."
  • The Cossack was dead, but the horse still struggled.
  • He asked, "Whose company?" but he really meant, "Are you frightened here?" and the artilleryman understood him.
  • No one had given Tushin orders where and at what to fire, but after consulting his sergeant major, Zakharchenko, for whom he had great respect, he had decided that it would be a good thing to set fire to the village.
  • Prince Andrew listened attentively to Bagration's colloquies with the commanding officers and the orders he gave them and, to his surprise, found that no orders were really given, but that Prince Bagration tried to make it appear that everything done by necessity, by accident, or by the will of subordinate commanders was done, if not by his direct command, at least in accord with his intentions.
  • Prince Bagration, having reached the highest point of our right flank, began riding downhill to where the roll of musketry was heard but where on account of the smoke nothing could be seen.
  • The nearer they got to the hollow the less they could see but the more they felt the nearness of the actual battlefield.
  • They were still firing, not at the cavalry which had disappeared, but at French infantry who had come into the hollow and were firing at our men.
  • The staff officer joined in the colonel's appeals, but Bagration did not reply; he only gave an order to cease firing and re-form, so as to give room for the two approaching battalions.
  • At that moment he was clearly thinking of nothing but how dashing a fellow he would appear as he passed the commander.
  • But at the moment the first report was heard, Bagration looked round and shouted, "Hurrah!"
  • The retirement of the center to the other side of the dip in the ground at the rear was hurried and noisy, but the different companies did not get mixed.
  • But our left--which consisted of the Azov and Podolsk infantry and the Pavlograd hussars--was simultaneously attacked and outflanked by superior French forces under Lannes and was thrown into confusion.
  • But no sooner had he left Bagration than his courage failed him.
  • But the regiments, both cavalry and infantry, were by no means ready for the impending action.
  • "He higher iss dan I in rank," said the German colonel of the hussars, flushing and addressing an adjutant who had ridden up, "so let him do what he vill, but I cannot sacrifice my hussars...
  • But haste was becoming imperative.
  • The commanders met with polite bows but with secret malevolence in their hearts.
  • No one said anything definite, but the rumor of an attack spread through the squadron.
  • Before him, on the right, Rostov saw the front lines of his hussars and still farther ahead a dark line which he could not see distinctly but took to be the enemy.
  • Shots could be heard, but some way off.
  • Instead of the moving horses and hussars' backs, he saw nothing before him but the motionless earth and the stubble around him.
  • Rook tried to rise on his forelegs but fell back, pinning his rider's leg.
  • Blood was flowing from his head; he struggled but could not rise.
  • Rostov also tried to rise but fell back, his sabretache having become entangled in the saddle.
  • But perhaps they may do it!
  • He did not now run with the feeling of doubt and conflict with which he had trodden the Enns bridge, but with the feeling of a hare fleeing from the hounds.
  • A shudder of terror went through him: "No, better not look," he thought, but having reached the bushes he glanced round once more.
  • But at the same time, his left arm felt as heavy as if a seventy-pound weight were tied to it.
  • But at that moment the French who were attacking, suddenly and without any apparent reason, ran back and disappeared from the outskirts, and Russian sharpshooters showed themselves in the copse.
  • But Dolokhov did not go away; he untied the handkerchief around his head, pulled it off, and showed the blood congealed on his hair.
  • The French columns that had advanced beyond the village went back; but as though in revenge for this failure, the enemy placed ten guns to the right of the village and began firing them at Tushin's battery.
  • Their spirits once roused were, however, not diminished, but only changed character.
  • The enemy's guns were in his fancy not guns but pipes from which occasional puffs were blown by an invisible smoker.
  • But the staff officer did not finish what he wanted to say.
  • But the mere thought of being afraid roused him again.
  • "A staff officer was here a minute ago, but skipped off," said an artilleryman to Prince Andrew.
  • The cannonade was dying down, but the rattle of musketry behind and on the right sounded oftener and nearer.
  • They all rushed out of the village again, but Tushin's guns could not move, and the artillerymen, Tushin, and the cadet exchanged silent glances as they awaited their fate.
  • Drowsiness was irresistibly mastering him, but he kept awake by an excruciating pain in his arm, for which he could find no satisfactory position.
  • Tushin's large, kind, intelligent eyes were fixed with sympathy and commiseration on Rostov, who saw that Tushin with his whole heart wished to help him but could not.
  • It was no longer, as before, a dark, unseen river flowing through the gloom, but a dark sea swelling and gradually subsiding after a storm.
  • He had not seen the hussars all that day, but had heard about them from an infantry officer.
  • Several of those present smiled at Zherkov's words, expecting one of his usual jokes, but noticing that what he was saying redounded to the glory of our arms and of the day's work, they assumed a serious expression, though many of them knew that what he was saying was a lie devoid of any foundation.
  • "Oh, but you were there?" said Prince Bagration, addressing Prince Andrew.
  • Prince Andrew gave him a look, but said nothing and went away.
  • For a moment he dozed, but in that short interval innumerable things appeared to him in a dream: his mother and her large white hand, Sonya's thin little shoulders, Natasha's eyes and laughter, Denisov with his voice and mustache, and Telyanin and all that affair with Telyanin and Bogdanich.
  • He tried to get away from them, but they would not for an instant let his shoulder move a hair's breadth.
  • It would not ache--it would be well--if only they did not pull it, but it was impossible to get rid of them.
  • Schemes and devices for which he never rightly accounted to himself, but which formed the whole interest of his life, were constantly shaping themselves in his mind, arising from the circumstances and persons he met.
  • Of these plans he had not merely one or two in his head but dozens, some only beginning to form themselves, some approaching achievement, and some in course of disintegration.
  • But when he came across a man of position his instinct immediately told him that this man could be useful, and without any premeditation Prince Vasili took the first opportunity to gain his confidence, flatter him, become intimate with him, and finally make his request.
  • It seemed so natural to Pierre that everyone should like him, and it would have seemed so unnatural had anyone disliked him, that he could not but believe in the sincerity of those around him.
  • But you will see everything for yourself when you get to Petersburg.
  • The beauty went to the aunt, but Anna Pavlovna detained Pierre, looking as if she had to give some final necessary instructions.
  • The old aunt received the two young people in her corner, but seemed desirous of hiding her adoration for Helene and inclined rather to show her fear of Anna Pavlovna.
  • He half rose, meaning to go round, but the aunt handed him the snuffbox, passing it across Helene's back.
  • He did not see her marble beauty forming a complete whole with her dress, but all the charm of her body only covered by her garments.
  • And at that moment Pierre felt that Helene not only could, but must, be his wife, and that it could not be otherwise.
  • How and when this would be he did not know, he did not even know if it would be a good thing (he even felt, he knew not why, that it would be a bad thing), but he knew it would happen.
  • That's a good thing, but don't move from Prince Vasili's.
  • But she was just as terribly close to him.
  • And he again saw her not as the daughter of Prince Vasili, but visualized her whole body only veiled by its gray dress.
  • But at the very time he was expressing this conviction to himself, in another part of his mind her image rose in all its womanly beauty.
  • "This is all very fine, but things must be settled," said Prince Vasili to himself, with a sorrowful sigh, one morning, feeling that Pierre who was under such obligations to him ("But never mind that") was not behaving very well in this matter.
  • "This is all very fine, but things must be settled," said Prince Vasili to himself, with a sorrowful sigh, one morning, feeling that Pierre who was under such obligations to him ("But never mind that") was not behaving very well in this matter.
  • "Youth, frivolity... well, God be with him," thought he, relishing his own goodness of heart, "but it must be brought to a head.
  • She says little, but what she does say is always clear and simple, so she is not stupid.
  • Pierre knew that everyone was waiting for him to say a word and cross a certain line, and he knew that sooner or later he would step across it, but an incomprehensible terror seized him at the thought of that dreadful step.
  • He wished to take a decision, but felt with dismay that in this matter he lacked that strength of will which he had known in himself and really possessed.
  • But much as all the rest laughed, talked, and joked, much as they enjoyed their Rhine wine, saute, and ices, and however they avoided looking at the young couple, and heedless and unobservant as they seemed of them, one could feel by the occasional glances they gave that the story about Sergey Kuzmich, the laughter, and the food were all a pretense, and that the whole attention of that company was directed to-- Pierre and Helene.
  • The old princess sighed sadly as she offered some wine to the old lady next to her and glanced angrily at her daughter, and her sigh seemed to say: "Yes, there's nothing left for you and me but to sip sweet wine, my dear, now that the time has come for these young ones to be thus boldly, provocatively happy."
  • Now I know that not because of her alone, nor of myself alone, but because of everyone, it must inevitably come about.
  • But how will it be?
  • I do not know, but it will certainly happen! thought Pierre, glancing at those dazzling shoulders close to his eyes.
  • "But no doubt it always is and must be so!" he consoled himself.
  • Then it would suddenly seem to him that it was not she but he was so unusually beautiful, and that that was why they all looked so at him, and flattered by this general admiration he would expand his chest, raise his head, and rejoice at his good fortune.
  • But Pierre was so absorbed that he did not understand what was said.
  • He had often before, during the last six weeks, remained alone with her, but had never spoken to her of love.
  • Now he felt that it was inevitable, but he could not make up his mind to take the final step.
  • But, as he had to say something, he began by asking her whether she was satisfied with the party.
  • But then the expression of severity changed, and he drew Pierre's hand downwards, made him sit down, and smiled affectionately.
  • "Well, Lelya?" he asked, turning instantly to his daughter and addressing her with the careless tone of habitual tenderness natural to parents who have petted their children from babyhood, but which Prince Vasili had only acquired by imitating other parents.
  • "The step must be taken but I cannot, I cannot!" thought Pierre, and he again began speaking about indifferent matters, about Sergey Kuzmich, asking what the point of the story was as he had not heard it properly.
  • Of course, it is a very brilliant match, but happiness, my dear...
  • "Something special is always said in such cases," he thought, but could not remember what it was that people say.
  • He was about to stoop over her hand and kiss it, but with a rapid, almost brutal movement of her head, she intercepted his lips and met them with her own.
  • Prince Nicholas frowned, but said nothing.
  • The road is not swept for the princess my daughter, but for a minister!
  • What she found hardest to bear was to know that on such occasions she ought to behave like Mademoiselle Bourienne, but could not.
  • The little princess was not unwell, but had such an overpowering fear of the prince that, hearing he was in a bad humor, she had decided not to appear.
  • The prince reciprocated this antipathy, but it was overpowered by his contempt for her.
  • She was no longer in the loose gown she generally wore in the morning, but had on one of her best dresses.
  • But this one is too light, it's not becoming!
  • It was not the dress, but the face and whole figure of Princess Mary that was not pretty, but neither Mademoiselle Bourienne nor the little princess felt this; they still thought that if a blue ribbon were placed in the hair, the hair combed up, and the blue scarf arranged lower on the best maroon dress, and so on, all would be well.
  • Mademoiselle Bourienne and the little princess had to own to themselves that Princess Mary in this guise looked very plain, worse than usual, but it was too late.
  • This expression in Princess Mary did not frighten them (she never inspired fear in anyone), but they knew that when it appeared on her face, she became mute and was not to be shaken in her determination.
  • She did not comply with Lise's request, she not only left her hair as it was, but did not even look in her glass.
  • "But no, it is impossible, I am too ugly," she thought.
  • In her thoughts of marriage Princess Mary dreamed of happiness and of children, but her strongest, most deeply hidden longing was for earthly love.
  • She saw Prince Vasili's face, serious for an instant at the sight of her, but immediately smiling again, and the little princess curiously noting the impression "Marie" produced on the visitors.
  • And she saw Mademoiselle Bourienne, with her ribbon and pretty face, and her unusually animated look which was fixed on him, but him she could not see, she only saw something large, brilliant, and handsome moving toward her as she entered the room.
  • Anatole was not quick-witted, nor ready or eloquent in conversation, but he had the faculty, so invaluable in society, of composure and imperturbable self-possession.
  • But Anatole was dumb, swung his foot, and smilingly examined the princess' hair.
  • "If anyone finds this silence inconvenient, let him talk, but I don't want to," he seemed to say.
  • It was as if he said to them: I know you, I know you, but why should I bother about you?
  • Perhaps he did not really think this when he met women--even probably he did not, for in general he thought very little--but his looks and manner gave that impression.
  • "Well, I've nothing against it," the prince said to himself, "but he must be worthy of her.
  • He seemed to listen attentively to what Prince Vasili said, but kept glancing at Princess Mary.
  • "You must do as you please," said Prince Bolkonski, bowing to his daughter-in-law, "but she need not make a fool of herself, she's plain enough as it is."
  • Anatole is no genius, but he is an honest, goodhearted lad; an excellent son or kinsman.
  • "But am I not too cold with him?" thought the princess.
  • I try to be reserved because in the depth of my soul I feel too near to him already, but then he cannot know what I think of him and may imagine that I do not like him.
  • Mademoiselle Bourienne knew a story, heard from her aunt but finished in her own way, which she liked to repeat to herself.
  • The little princess, like an old war horse that hears the trumpet, unconsciously and quite forgetting her condition, prepared for the familiar gallop of coquetry, without any ulterior motive or any struggle, but with naive and lighthearted gaiety.
  • But Anatole's expression, though his eyes were fixed on her, referred not to her but to the movements of Mademoiselle Bourienne's little foot, which he was then touching with his own under the clavichord.
  • But Anatole's expression, though his eyes were fixed on her, referred not to her but to the movements of Mademoiselle Bourienne's little foot, which he was then touching with his own under the clavichord.
  • Can it be possible? she thought, not daring to look at his face, but still feeling his eyes gazing at her.
  • She did not know how she found the courage, but she looked straight into his handsome face as it came near to her shortsighted eyes.
  • They all separated, but, except Anatole who fell asleep as soon as he got into bed, all kept awake a long time that night.
  • The insult was the more pointed because it concerned not himself but another, his daughter, whom he loved more than himself.
  • He kept telling himself that he would consider the whole matter and decide what was right and how he should act, but instead of that he only excited himself more and more.
  • But I do not know, Father!
  • He receives his orders and will marry you or anybody; but you are free to choose....
  • Well, pray if you like, but you had better think it over.
  • But what her father had said about Mademoiselle Bourienne was dreadful.
  • It was untrue to be sure, but still it was terrible, and she could not help thinking of it.
  • But, my dear, will you not give us a little hope of touching this heart, so kind and generous?
  • I thank you for the honor, but I shall never be your son's wife.
  • But for God's sake, be careful, you know how it may affect your mamma.
  • No, but she said that it was all over and that he's now an officer.
  • But perhaps she deceived you.
  • "I'm not a goose, but they are who cry about trifles," said Petya.
  • "No, Sonya, but do you remember so that you remember him perfectly, remember everything?" said Natasha, with an expressive gesture, evidently wishing to give her words a very definite meaning.
  • But I don't remember Boris.
  • It's not that I don't remember--I know what he is like, but not as I remember Nikolenka.
  • Him--I just shut my eyes and remember, but Boris...
  • But Natasha had not yet felt anything like it.
  • She believed it could be, but did not understand it.
  • This was quite true, but the count, the countess, and Natasha looked at her reproachfully.
  • Boris rose to meet Rostov, but in doing so did not omit to steady and replace some chessmen that were falling.
  • He was about to embrace his friend, but Nicholas avoided him.
  • He wanted to pinch him, push him, do anything but kiss him--a thing everybody did.
  • But notwithstanding this, Boris embraced him in a quiet, friendly way and kissed him three times.
  • But that's not the point...
  • So far everything's all right, but I confess I should much like to be an adjutant and not remain at the front.
  • It was not a matter of life but rather of death, as the saying is.
  • But Boris noticed that he was preparing to make fun of Berg, and skillfully changed the subject.
  • Rostov flushed up on noticing this, but he did not care, this was a mere stranger.
  • But they all stood in the same lines, under one command, and in a like order.
  • It seemed as though not the trumpeters were playing, but as if the army itself, rejoicing at the Emperors' approach, had naturally burst into music.
  • Till the Tsar reached it, each regiment in its silence and immobility seemed like a lifeless body, but as soon as he came up it became alive, its thunder joining the roar of the whole line along which he had already passed.
  • "How can the Emperor be undecided?" thought Rostov, but then even this indecision appeared to him majestic and enchanting, like everything else the Tsar did.
  • Rostov himself, his legs well back and his stomach drawn in and feeling himself one with his horse, rode past the Emperor with a frowning but blissful face "like a vewy devil," as Denisov expressed it.
  • But the talk in every group was chiefly about the Emperor Alexander.
  • They all had but one wish: to advance as soon as possible against the enemy under the Emperor's command.
  • He did not find Prince Andrew in Olmutz that day, but the appearance of the town where the headquarters and the diplomatic corps were stationed and the two Emperors were living with their suites, households, and courts only strengthened his desire to belong to that higher world.
  • Prince Andrew was in and Boris was shown into a large hall probably formerly used for dancing, but in which five beds now stood, and furniture of various kinds: a table, chairs, and a clavichord.
  • More than ever was Boris resolved to serve in future not according to the written code, but under this unwritten law.
  • But it was the first time he had heard Weyrother's name, or even the term "dispositions."
  • He would say a lot of pleasant things, ask you to dinner" ("That would not be bad as regards the unwritten code," thought Boris), "but nothing more would come of it.
  • But this is what we'll do: I have a good friend, an adjutant general and an excellent fellow, Prince Dolgorukov; and though you may not know it, the fact is that now Kutuzov with his staff and all of us count for nothing.
  • Prince Andrew introduced his protege, but Prince Dolgorukov politely and firmly pressing his hand said nothing to Boris and, evidently unable to suppress the thoughts which were uppermost in his mind at that moment, addressed Prince Andrew in French.
  • But what was most amusing," he continued, with a sudden, good-natured laugh, "was that we could not think how to address the reply!
  • But I have come to you, Prince, as a petitioner on behalf of this young man.
  • But you see... another time!
  • He is one of the most remarkable, but to me most unpleasant of men--the Minister of Foreign Affairs, Prince Adam Czartoryski....
  • The day was bright and sunny after a sharp night frost, and the cheerful glitter of that autumn day was in keeping with the news of victory which was conveyed, not only by the tales of those who had taken part in it, but also by the joyful expression on the faces of soldiers, officers, generals, and adjutants, as they passed Rostov going or coming.
  • And at every word he added: "But don't hurt my little horse!" and stroked the animal.
  • "But don't hurt my little horse!" said the Alsatian good-naturedly to Rostov when the animal was handed over to the hussar.
  • He felt it not only from the sound of the hoofs of the approaching cavalcade, but because as he drew near everything grew brighter, more joyful, more significant, and more festive around him.
  • "Not 'our Sovereign, the Emperor,' as they say at official dinners," said he, "but the health of our Sovereign, that good, enchanting, and great man!
  • And Rostov got up and went wandering among the campfires, dreaming of what happiness it would be to die--not in saving the Emperor's life (he did not even dare to dream of that), but simply to die before his eyes.
  • But on the afternoon of that day, this activity reached Kutuzov's headquarters and the staffs of the commanders of columns.
  • Wheels creak on their axles as the cogs engage one another and the revolving pulleys whirr with the rapidity of their movement, but a neighboring wheel is as quiet and motionless as though it were prepared to remain so for a hundred years; but the moment comes when the lever catches it and obeying the impulse that wheel begins to creak and joins in the common motion the result and aim of which are beyond its ken.
  • At six in the evening, Kutuzov went to the Emperor's headquarters and after staying but a short time with the Tsar went to see the grand marshal of the court, Count Tolstoy.
  • I won't say he is out of sorts, but I fancy he would like to be heard.
  • But they heard him at the council of war and will hear him when he talks sense, but to temporize and wait for something now when Bonaparte fears nothing so much as a general battle is impossible.
  • But they heard him at the council of war and will hear him when he talks sense, but to temporize and wait for something now when Bonaparte fears nothing so much as a general battle is impossible.
  • "But tell me, what is he like, eh?" said Prince Andrew again.
  • He is a man in a gray overcoat, very anxious that I should call him 'Your Majesty,' but who, to his chagrin, got no title from me!
  • But in what position are we going to attack him?
  • And Prince Dolgorukov rapidly but indistinctly explained Weyrother's plan of a flanking movement.
  • As soon as Prince Andrew began to demonstrate the defects of the latter and the merits of his own plan, Prince Dolgorukov ceased to listen to him and gazed absent-mindedly not at the map, but at Prince Andrew's face.
  • Whether he was pulling it or being pushed by it he did not know, but rushed along at headlong speed with no time to consider what this movement might lead to.
  • But the Austrian general, continuing to read, frowned angrily and jerked his elbows, as if to say: "You can tell me your views later, but now be so good as to look at the map and listen."
  • But the Austrian general, continuing to read, frowned angrily and jerked his elbows, as if to say: "You can tell me your views later, but now be so good as to look at the map and listen."
  • Langeron lifted his eyes with an expression of perplexity, turned round to Miloradovich as if seeking an explanation, but meeting the latter's impressive but meaningless gaze drooped his eyes sadly and again took to twirling his snuffbox.
  • "A geography lesson!" he muttered as if to himself, but loud enough to be heard.
  • Langeron's objections were valid but it was obvious that their chief aim was to show General Weyrother--who had read his dispositions with as much self-confidence as if he were addressing school children--that he had to do, not with fools, but with men who could teach him something in military matters.
  • But Miloradovich was at that moment evidently thinking of anything rather than of what the generals were disputing about.
  • But even if he also took up a position in the Thuerassa, he merely saves us a great deal of trouble and all our arrangements to the minutest detail remain the same.
  • But was it really not possible for Kutuzov to state his views plainly to the Emperor?
  • All are struck by the justness of his views, but no one undertakes to carry them out, so he takes a regiment, a division-stipulates that no one is to interfere with his arrangements--leads his division to the decisive point, and gains the victory alone.
  • "But death and suffering?" suggested another voice.
  • Nominally he is only an adjutant on Kutuzov's staff, but he does everything alone.
  • "Well then," Prince Andrew answered himself, "I don't know what will happen and don't want to know, and can't, but if I want this--want glory, want to be known to men, want to be loved by them, it is not my fault that I want it and want nothing but that and live only for that.
  • All the same, I love and value nothing but triumph over them all, I value this mystic power and glory that is floating here above me in this mist!
  • But what was I thinking?
  • Oh, but Denisov's a fine fellow.
  • But that's all nonsense.
  • How he looked at me and wished to say something, but dared not....
  • But that's nonsense, the chief thing is not to forget the important thing I was thinking of.
  • Rostov could hear the sound of French words but could not distinguish them.
  • "Believe me," said Prince Dolgorukov, addressing Bagration, "it is nothing but a trick!
  • They were there this evening, but now I don't know, your excellency.
  • Bagration called to him from the hill not to go beyond the stream, but Rostov pretended not to hear him and did not stop but rode on and on, continually mistaking bushes for trees and gullies for men and continually discovering his mistakes.
  • Having descended the hill at a trot, he no longer saw either our own or the enemy's fires, but heard the shouting of the French more loudly and distinctly.
  • In the valley he saw before him something like a river, but when he reached it he found it was a road.
  • Another musket missed fire but flashed in the pan.
  • But no more shots came.
  • But Rostov did not reply.
  • Yes, I'd send them on in front, but no fear, they're crowding up behind.
  • But what he's jabbering no one can make out, said a soldier, mimicking the general who had ridden away.
  • We were ordered to be at the place before nine, but we haven't got halfway.
  • The general shouted a demand that the cavalry should be halted, the Austrian argued that not he, but the higher command, was to blame.
  • The fog lay unbroken like a sea down below, but higher up at the village of Schlappanitz where Napoleon stood with his marshals around him, it was quite light.
  • The whole French army, and even Napoleon himself with his staff, were not on the far side of the streams and hollows of Sokolnitz and Schlappanitz beyond which we intended to take up our position and begin the action, but were on this side, so close to our own forces that Napoleon with the naked eye could distinguish a mounted man from one on foot.
  • But still he did not begin the engagement.
  • How it would come about he did not know, but he felt sure it would do so.
  • In the morning all that was left of the night mist on the heights was a hoar frost now turning to dew, but in the valleys it still lay like a milk-white sea.
  • The troops were no longer moving, but stood with the butts of their muskets on the ground.
  • The Tsar heard but obviously did not like the reply; he shrugged his rather round shoulders and glanced at Novosiltsev who was near him, as if complaining of Kutuzov.
  • But the Emperor Francis continued to look about him and did not listen.
  • But Kutuzov, with respectfully bowed head, seemed also to be waiting.
  • "However, if you command it, Your Majesty," said Kutuzov, lifting his head and again assuming his former tone of a dull, unreasoning, but submissive general.
  • "Look, look!" said this adjutant, looking not at the troops in the distance, but down the hill before him.
  • The French were supposed to be a mile and a half away, but had suddenly and unexpectedly appeared just in front of us.
  • But how is that? said different voices.
  • But at that very instant a cloud of smoke spread all round, firing was heard quite close at hand, and a voice of naive terror barely two steps from Prince Andrew shouted, Brothers!
  • "Stop those wretches!" gasped Kutuzov to the regimental commander, pointing to the flying soldiers; but at that instant, as if to punish him for those words, bullets flew hissing across the regiment and across Kutuzov's suite like a flock of little birds.
  • It swayed and fell, but caught on the muskets of the nearest soldiers.
  • But before he had finished speaking, Prince Andrew, feeling tears of shame and anger choking him, had already leapt from his horse and run to the standard.
  • A sergeant of the battalion ran up and took the flag that was swaying from its weight in Prince Andrew's hands, but he was immediately killed.
  • But he did not look at them: he looked only at what was going on in front of him--at the battery.
  • But Prince Andrew did not see how it ended.
  • But he saw nothing.
  • Above him there was now nothing but the sky--the lofty sky, not clear yet still immeasurably lofty, with gray clouds gliding slowly across it.
  • There is nothing, nothing, but that.
  • But even it does not exist, there is nothing but quiet and peace.
  • But even it does not exist, there is nothing but quiet and peace.
  • "How it will be there I don't know, but all will be well!" thought Rostov.
  • The Horse Guards were galloping, but still holding in their horses.
  • Rostov, fearing to be crushed or swept into the attack on the French, galloped along the front as hard as his horse could go, but still was not in time to avoid them.
  • "But that's the Grand Duke, and I want the commander-in-chief or the Emperor," said Rostov, and was about to spur his horse.
  • He said something more, but Rostov did not wait to hear it and rode away.
  • "But be that what it may," he reflected, "there is no riding round it now.
  • But no, these must be only a handful of scoundrels.
  • But neither they nor a single commanding officer were there, only disorganized crowds of troops of various kinds.
  • He urged on his already weary horse to get quickly past these crowds, but the farther he went the more disorganized they were.
  • Rostov kept asking everyone he could stop, but got no answer from anyone.
  • One officer told Rostov that he had seen someone from headquarters behind the village to the left, and thither Rostov rode, not hoping to find anyone but merely to ease his conscience.
  • "But it can't be he, alone in the midst of this empty field!" thought Rostov.
  • The Emperor was pale, his cheeks sunken and his eyes hollow, but the charm, the mildness of his features, was all the greater.
  • He might... not only might but should, have gone up to the sovereign.
  • And he turned round and galloped back to the place where he had seen the Emperor, but there was no one beyond the ditch now.
  • The ice bore him but it swayed and creaked, and it was plain that it would give way not only under a cannon or a crowd, but very soon even under his weight alone.
  • He tried to right himself but fell in up to his waist.
  • The nearest soldiers shrank back, the gun driver stopped his horse, but from behind still came the shouts: Onto the ice, why do you stop?
  • "Where is it, that lofty sky that I did not know till now, but saw today?" was his first thought.
  • But where am I?
  • But he heard the words as he might have heard the buzzing of a fly.
  • Not only did they not interest him, but he took no notice of them and at once forgot them.
  • He knew it was Napoleon--his hero--but at that moment Napoleon seemed to him such a small, insignificant creature compared with what was passing now between himself and that lofty infinite sky with the clouds flying over it.
  • The soldiers who had carried Prince Andrew had noticed and taken the little gold icon Princess Mary had hung round her brother's neck, but seeing the favor the Emperor showed the prisoners, they now hastened to return the holy image.
  • Prince Andrew did not see how and by whom it was replaced, but the little icon with its thin gold chain suddenly appeared upon his chest outside his uniform.
  • But to whom should I say that?
  • There is nothing certain, nothing at all except the unimportance of everything I understand, and the greatness of something incomprehensible but all-important.
  • Meeting a comrade at the last post station but one before Moscow, Denisov had drunk three bottles of wine with him and, despite the jolting ruts across the snow-covered road, did not once wake up on the way to Moscow, but lay at the bottom of the sleigh beside Rostov, who grew more and more impatient the nearer they got to Moscow.
  • My treasure! and Prokofy, trembling with excitement, rushed toward the drawing-room door, probably in order to announce him, but, changing his mind, came back and stooped to kiss the young man's shoulder.
  • He gave her a grateful look, but was still expectant and looking for someone.
  • But now steps were heard at the door, steps so rapid that they could hardly be his mother's.
  • She could not lift her face, but only pressed it to the cold braiding of his hussar's jacket.
  • Denisov blushed too, but smiled and, taking Natasha's hand, kissed it.
  • Sonya ran away, but Natasha, taking her brother's arm, led him into the sitting room, where they began talking.
  • They hardly gave one another time to ask questions and give replies concerning a thousand little matters which could not interest anyone but themselves.
  • "No, but listen," she said, "now you are quite a man, aren't you?
  • Sitting on the sofa with the little cushions on its arms, in what used to be his old schoolroom, and looking into Natasha's wildly bright eyes, Rostov re-entered that world of home and childhood which had no meaning for anyone else, but gave him some of the best joys of his life; and the burning of an arm with a ruler as a proof of love did not seem to him senseless, he understood and was not surprised at it.
  • All that ruler business was just nonsense, but we are friends forever.
  • She, if she loves anyone, does it for life, but I don't understand that, I forget quickly.
  • She says: 'I shall love him always, but let him be free.'
  • Why should he not love her now, and even marry her, Rostov thought, but just now there were so many other pleasures and interests before him!
  • See! she said, but could not maintain herself on her toes any longer.
  • I'll never marry anyone, but will be a dancer.
  • "No, but don't you think it's nice?" she kept repeating.
  • "But that's all rubbish," Natasha chattered on.
  • And Natasha rose and went out of the room on tiptoe, like a ballet dancer, but smiling as only happy girls of fifteen can smile.
  • He kissed her hand and addressed her not as thou but as you--Sonya.
  • Vera's remark was correct, as her remarks always were, but, like most of her observations, it made everyone feel uncomfortable, not only Sonya, Nicholas, and Natasha, but even the old countess, who--dreading this love affair which might hinder Nicholas from making a brilliant match-- blushed like a girl.
  • During Rostov's short stay in Moscow, before rejoining the army, he did not draw closer to Sonya, but rather drifted away from her.
  • There will be time enough to think about love when I want to, but now I have no time.
  • I shall have my own orchestra, but shouldn't we get the gypsy singers as well?
  • Yes, you talk, but try it yourself!
  • That's so, your excellency, all they have to do is to eat a good dinner, but providing it and serving it all up, that's not their business!
  • But I'll go to Bezukhov's myself.
  • But still tell him to come to the club--it will all blow over.
  • The men who set the tone in conversation--Count Rostopchin, Prince Yuri Dolgorukov, Valuev, Count Markov, and Prince Vyazemski--did not show themselves at the club, but met in private houses in intimate circles, and the Moscovites who took their opinions from others--Ilya Rostov among them--remained for a while without any definite opinion on the subject of the war and without leaders.
  • But after a while, just as a jury comes out of its room, the bigwigs who guided the club's opinion reappeared, and everybody began speaking clearly and definitely.
  • All Moscow repeated Prince Dolgorukov's saying: "If you go on modeling and modeling you must get smeared with clay," suggesting consolation for our defeat by the memory of former victories; and the words of Rostopchin, that French soldiers have to be incited to battle by highfalutin words, and Germans by logical arguments to show them that it is more dangerous to run away than to advance, but that Russian soldiers only need to be restrained and held back!
  • Pierre, who at his wife's command had let his hair grow and abandoned his spectacles, went about the rooms fashionably dressed but looking sad and dull.
  • By his age he should have belonged to the younger men, but by his wealth and connections he belonged to the groups of old and honored guests, and so he went from one group to another.
  • He had no lambskin cap on his head, nor had he a loaded whip over his shoulder, as when Rostov had seen him on the eve of the battle of Austerlitz, but wore a tight new uniform with Russian and foreign Orders, and the Star of St. George on his left breast.
  • Bagration was embarrassed, not wishing to avail himself of their courtesy, and this caused some delay at the doors, but after all he did at last enter first.
  • But all eyes demanded that he should submit.
  • But the author himself took the verses and began reading them aloud.
  • But before he had finished reading, a stentorian major-domo announced that dinner was ready!
  • But those who knew him intimately noticed that some great change had come over him that day.
  • Pierre absolutely disbelieved both the princess' hints and the letter, but he feared now to look at Dolokhov, who was sitting opposite him.
  • Yes, if it were true, but I do not believe it.
  • But Rostov was otherwise engaged; he was shouting "Hurrah!"
  • Pierre did not catch what they were saying, but knew they were talking about him.
  • Pierre went home, but Rostov with Dolokhov and Denisov stayed on at the club till late, listening to the gypsies and other singers.
  • But go with the firm intention of killing your man as quickly and surely as possible, and then all will be right, as our bear huntsman at Kostroma used to tell me.
  • But just at moments when such thoughts occurred to him, he would ask in a particularly calm and absent-minded way, which inspired the respect of the onlookers, Will it be long?
  • It was evident that the affair so lightly begun could no longer be averted but was taking its course independently of men's will.
  • The smoke, rendered denser by the mist, prevented him from seeing anything for an instant, but there was no second report as he had expected.
  • "Plea..." began Dolokhov, but could not at first pronounce the word.
  • He sucked and swallowed the cold snow, his lips quivered but his eyes, still smiling, glittered with effort and exasperation as he mustered his remaining strength.
  • But on entering Moscow he suddenly came to and, lifting his head with an effort, took Rostov, who was sitting beside him, by the hand.
  • But it's not that, my friend- said Dolokhov with a gasping voice.
  • I don't matter, but I have killed her, killed...
  • The night after the duel he did not go to his bedroom but, as he often did, remained in his father's room, that huge room in which Count Bezukhov had died.
  • He lay down on the sofa meaning to fall asleep and forget all that had happened to him, but could not do so.
  • Such a storm of feelings, thoughts, and memories suddenly arose within him that he could not fall asleep, nor even remain in one place, but had to jump up and pace the room with rapid steps.
  • "But in what was I to blame?" he asked.
  • She did not give him the money, but let herself be kissed.
  • "Yes, I never loved her," said he to himself; "I knew she was a depraved woman," he repeated, "but dared not admit it to myself.
  • "It is all, all her fault," he said to himself; "but what of that?
  • But if you are alive--live: tomorrow you'll die as I might have died an hour ago.
  • But at the moment when he imagined himself calmed by such reflections, she suddenly came into his mind as she was at the moments when he had most strongly expressed his insincere love for her, and he felt the blood rush to his heart and had again to get up and move about and break and tear whatever came to his hand.
  • * "But what the devil was he doing in that galley?"
  • But feeling this to be senseless and impossible, he again glanced timidly at her.
  • She did not sit down but looked at him with a contemptuous smile, waiting for the valet to go.
  • Pierre turned over heavily on the ottoman and opened his mouth, but could not reply.
  • That you're a fool, que vous etes un sot, but everybody knew that.
  • He knew that he must do something to put an end to this suffering, but what he wanted to do was too terrible.
  • Very well, but only if you give me a fortune, said Helene.
  • She was already pale, but on hearing these words her face changed and something brightened in her beautiful, radiant eyes.
  • It was evident that her eyes did not see Princess Mary but were looking within... into herself... at something joyful and mysterious taking place within her.
  • She said nothing but looked about uneasily as if in search of something.
  • But my father is anxious and I feel afraid.
  • He tried not to change his former way of life, but his strength failed him.
  • "But how is it the doctor from Moscow is not here yet?" said the princess.
  • Yes, it was he, pale, thin, with a changed and strangely softened but agitated expression on his face.
  • She saw her husband, but did not realize the significance of his appearance before her now.
  • They began talking in whispers, but their talk broke off at every moment.
  • Prince Andrew turned to him, but the doctor gave him a bewildered look and passed by without a word.
  • He looked up joyfully at the baby when the nurse brought it to him and nodded approval when she told him that the wax with the baby's hair had not sunk in the font but had floated.
  • As a result he could not go to the country with the rest of the family, but was kept all summer in Moscow by his new duties.
  • Why, if he was so jealous, as I see things he should have shown it sooner, but he lets it go on for months.
  • I don't care a straw about anyone but those I love; but those I love, I love so that I would give my life for them, and the others I'd throttle if they stood in my way.
  • But those!... and he made a gesture of contempt.
  • But you don't understand it.
  • Well, I don't know about that, but I am uncomfortable with him.
  • He was pointedly attentive to Sonya and looked at her in such a way that not only could she not bear his glances without coloring, but even the old countess and Natasha blushed when they saw his looks.
  • Rostov noticed something new in Dolokhov's relations with Sonya, but he did not explain to himself what these new relations were.
  • But he was not as much at ease with Sonya and Dolokhov as before and was less frequently at home.
  • Everywhere Bonaparte was anathematized and in Moscow nothing but the coming war was talked of.
  • His approaching departure did not prevent his amusing himself, but rather gave zest to his pleasures.
  • But I promised the Arkharovs; they have a party.
  • "I told you, but you would not believe it," she said triumphantly.
  • He tried to say, "That's capital; of course she'll forget her childish promises and accept the offer," but before he had time to say it Natasha began again.
  • Do you know, Nicholas--don't be angry--but I know you will not marry her.
  • I know, heaven knows how, but I know for certain that you won't marry her.
  • But I must talk to her.
  • No, but I must.
  • It may be arrogant of me, but still it is best to say it.
  • You are an angel: I am not worthy of you, but I am afraid of misleading you.
  • She was not in love with anyone in particular, but with everyone.
  • You were only inattentive, but you had talent--oh yes, you had talent!
  • But she does dance splendidly.
  • "None but fools trust to luck in play," Dolokhov had then said.
  • He tried, but failed, to find some joke with which to reply to Dolokhov's words.
  • But before he had thought of anything, Dolokhov, looking straight in his face, said slowly and deliberately so that everyone could hear:
  • Yes, you might, but I am afraid of getting the accounts mixed.
  • He wrote "800 rubles" on a card, but while the waiter filled his glass he changed his mind and altered it to his usual stake of twenty rubles.
  • I lose to the others but win from you.
  • Now only twelve hundred rubles was left of that money, so that this seven of hearts meant for him not only the loss of sixteen hundred rubles, but the necessity of going back on his word.
  • An hour and a half later most of the players were but little interested in their own play.
  • Instead of sixteen hundred rubles he had a long column of figures scored against him, which he had reckoned up to ten thousand, but that now, as he vaguely supposed, must have risen to fifteen thousand.
  • Dolokhov was no longer listening to stories or telling them, but followed every movement of Rostov's hands and occasionally ran his eyes over the score against him.
  • Sometimes he staked a large sum, but Dolokhov refused to accept it and fixed the stake himself.
  • But it's not his fault.
  • He knew what a shock he would inflict on his father and mother by the news of this loss, he knew what a relief it would be to escape it all, and felt that Dolokhov knew that he could save him from all this shame and sorrow, but wanted now to play with him as a cat does with a mouse.
  • Dolokhov started to say, but Nicholas interrupted him.
  • To say "tomorrow" and keep up a dignified tone was not difficult, but to go home alone, see his sisters, brother, mother, and father, confess and ask for money he had no right to after giving his word of honor, was terrible.
  • Denisov, with sparkling eyes and ruffled hair, sat at the clavichord striking chords with his short fingers, his legs thrown back and his eyes rolling as he sang, with his small, husky, but true voice, some verses called "Enchantress," which he had composed, and to which he was trying to fit music:
  • But, though she noticed it, she was herself in such high spirits at that moment, so far from sorrow, sadness, or self-reproach, that she purposely deceived herself as young people often do.
  • At that moment she was oblivious of her surroundings, and from her smiling lips flowed sounds which anyone may produce at the same intervals and hold for the same time, but which leave you cold a thousand times and the thousand and first time thrill you and make you weep.
  • All this misery, and money, and Dolokhov, and anger, and honor--it's all nonsense... but this is real....
  • But no sooner had Natasha finished her barcarolle than reality again presented itself.
  • Nicholas tried to say "Yes," but could not: and he nearly burst into sobs.
  • No, but what is it, my dear?
  • I know he did not mean to say it, but it came out accidently.
  • No, Mamma, but I'm so sorry for him.
  • No, but you are so nice... but it won't do...not that... but as a friend, I shall always love you.
  • "Vasili Dmitrich, I thank you for the honor," she said, with an embarrassed voice, though it sounded severe to Denisov--"but my daughter is so young, and I thought that, as my son's friend, you would have addressed yourself first to me.
  • He tried to say more, but faltered.
  • "Countess, I have done w'ong," Denisov went on in an unsteady voice, "but believe me, I so adore your daughter and all your family that I would give my life twice over..."
  • It was as if she wanted to show him that his losses were an achievement that made her love him all the more, but Nicholas now considered himself unworthy of her.
  • But now, in the solitude of the journey, they seized him with special force.
  • It was as if the thread of the chief screw which held his life together were stripped, so that the screw could not get in or out, but went on turning uselessly in the same place.
  • But the officer thrashed him because he had to get on as quickly as possible.
  • But dying was also dreadful.
  • His servant was also a yellow, wrinkled old man, without beard or mustache, evidently not because he was shaven but because they had never grown.
  • Pierre felt confused and wished to avoid that look, but the bright old eyes attracted him irresistibly.
  • The stranger's face was not genial, it was even cold and severe, but in spite of this, both the face and words of his new acquaintance were irresistibly attractive to Pierre.
  • "But if for reason you don't feel inclined to talk to me," said the old man, "say so, my dear sir."
  • But what am I to do?
  • "He exists, but to understand Him is hard," the Mason began again, looking not at Pierre but straight before him, and turning the leaves of his book with his old hands which from excitement he could not keep still.
  • Pierre listened with swelling heart, gazing into the Mason's face with shining eyes, not interrupting or questioning him, but believing with his whole soul what the stranger said.
  • "He is not to be apprehended by reason, but by life," said the Mason.
  • The highest wisdom has but one science--the science of the whole--the science explaining the whole creation and man's place in it.
  • "Yes, I never thought of it, but I have led a contemptible and profligate life, though I did not like it and did not want to," thought Pierre.
  • But this man knows the truth and, if he wished to, could disclose it to me.
  • Pierre wished to say this to the Mason, but did not dare to.
  • But do not suppose me to be so bad.
  • With my whole soul I wish to be what you would have me be, but I have never had help from anyone....
  • But it is I, above all, who am to blame for everything.
  • "One more question, Count," he said, "which I beg you to answer in all sincerity--not as a future Mason but as an honest man: have you renounced your former convictions--do you believe in God?"
  • "In that case..." began Willarski, but Pierre interrupted him.
  • Once or twice he shrugged his shoulders and raised his hand to the kerchief, as if wishing to take it off, but let it drop again.
  • But since this mystery is of such a nature that nobody can know or use it unless he be prepared by long and diligent self-purification, not everyone can hope to attain it quickly.
  • "In the seventh place, try, by the frequent thought of death," the Rhetor said, "to bring yourself to regard it not as a dreaded foe, but as a friend that frees the soul grown weary in the labors of virtue from this distressful life, and leads it to its place of recompense and peace."
  • It must be so, but I am still so weak that I love my life, the meaning of which is only now gradually opening before me.
  • "I must also inform you," said the Rhetor, "that our Order delivers its teaching not in words only but also by other means, which may perhaps have a stronger effect on the sincere seeker after wisdom and virtue than mere words.
  • A hieroglyph," said the Rhetor, "is an emblem of something not cognizable by the senses but which possesses qualities resembling those of the symbol."
  • Pierre knew very well what a hieroglyph was, but dared not speak.
  • "But I have nothing here," replied Pierre, supposing that he was asked to give up all he possessed.
  • Pierre quickly took out his purse and watch, but could not manage for some time to get the wedding ring off his fat finger.
  • Pierre hurriedly began taking off his right boot also and was going to tuck up the other trouser leg to save this stranger the trouble, but the Mason told him that was not necessary and gave him a slipper for his left foot.
  • The source of blessedness is not without us but within....
  • Soon after this there came into the dark chamber to fetch Pierre, not the Rhetor but Pierre's sponsor, Willarski, whom he recognized by his voice.
  • But the swords were drawn back from him and he was at once blindfolded again.
  • But these doubts only lasted a moment.
  • As to the first pair of gloves, a man's, he said that Pierre could not know their meaning but must keep them.
  • And after a pause, he added: "But beware, dear brother, that these gloves do not deck hands that are unclean."
  • "In our temples we recognize no other distinctions," read the Grand Master, "but those between virtue and vice.
  • He acknowledged no acquaintances but saw in all these men only brothers, and burned with impatience to set to work with them.
  • Pierre would have liked to subscribe all he had, but fearing that it might look like pride subscribed the same amount as the others.
  • Pierre was about to reply, but Prince Vasili interrupted him.
  • You behaved as becomes a man who values his honor, perhaps too hastily, but we won't go into that.
  • But consider the position in which you are placing her and me in the eyes of society, and even of the court, he added, lowering his voice.
  • Pierre tried several times to speak, but, on one hand, Prince Vasili did not let him and, on the other, Pierre himself feared to begin to speak in the tone of decided refusal and disagreement in which he had firmly resolved to answer his father-in-law.
  • But before Prince Vasili had finished his playful speech, Pierre, without looking at him, and with a kind of fury that made him like his father, muttered in a whisper:
  • But the story of the duel, confirmed by Pierre's rupture with his wife, was the talk of society.
  • And when after Pierre's departure Helene returned to Petersburg, she was received by all her acquaintances not only cordially, but even with a shade of deference due to her misfortune.
  • Anna Pavlovna waited for him to go on, but as he seemed quite decided to say no more she began to tell of how at Potsdam the impious Bonaparte had stolen the sword of Frederick the Great.
  • "It is the sword of Frederick the Great which I..." she began, but Hippolyte interrupted her with the words: "Le Roi de Prusse..." and again, as soon as all turned toward him, excused himself and said no more.
  • "Your joke is too bad, it's witty but unjust," said Anna Pavlovna, shaking her little shriveled finger at him.
  • We are not fighting pour le Roi de Prusse, but for right principles.
  • A snuffbox with the Emperor's portrait is a reward but not a distinction," said the diplomatist--"a gift, rather."
  • But what was still stranger, though of this Prince Andrew said nothing to his sister, was that in the expression the sculptor had happened to give the angel's face, Prince Andrew read the same mild reproach he had read on the face of his dead wife: "Ah, why have you done this to me?"
  • Not finding the young prince in his study the valet went with the letters to Princess Mary's apartments, but did not find him there.
  • I think so... but as you please, said Princess Mary, evidently intimidated and confused that her opinion had prevailed.
  • But he scowled at her angrily though also with suffering in his eyes, and stooped glass in hand over the infant.
  • "But I wish it," he said.
  • Princess Mary shrugged her shoulders but took the glass submissively and calling the nurse began giving the medicine.
  • We search, but none are to be found.
  • Buxhowden is commander-in-chief by seniority, but General Bennigsen does not quite see it; more particularly as it is he and his corps who are within sight of the enemy and he wishes to profit by the opportunity to fight a battle 'on his own hand' as the Germans say.
  • This is the battle of Pultusk, which is considered a great victory but in my opinion was nothing of the kind.
  • In short, we retreat after the battle but send a courier to Petersburg with news of a victory, and General Bennigsen, hoping to receive from Petersburg the post of commander in chief as a reward for his victory, does not give up the command of the army to General Buxhowden.
  • Our aim is no longer, as it should be, to avoid or attack the enemy, but solely to avoid General Buxhowden who by right of seniority should be our chief.
  • So energetically do we pursue this aim that after crossing an unfordable river we burn the bridges to separate ourselves from our enemy, who at the moment is not Bonaparte but Buxhowden.
  • General Buxhowden was all but attacked and captured by a superior enemy force as a result of one of these maneuvers that enabled us to escape him.
  • But as it turns out, just at that moment a third enemy rises before us--namely the Orthodox Russian soldiers, loudly demanding bread, meat, biscuits, fodder, and whatnot!
  • The Emperor proposes to give all commanders of divisions the right to shoot marauders, but I much fear this will oblige one half the army to shoot the other.
  • At first Prince Andrew read with his eyes only, but after a while, in spite of himself (although he knew how far it was safe to trust Bilibin), what he had read began to interest him more and more.
  • It was not what he had read that vexed him, but the fact that the life out there in which he had now no part could perturb him.
  • He was not dead, but evidently the crisis was over and he was convalescent.
  • Prince Andrew longed to snatch up, to squeeze, to hold to his heart, this helpless little creature, but dared not do so.
  • He did not look round, but still gazing at the infant's face listened to his regular breathing.
  • But he felt that this did not forward matters at all.
  • Everywhere preparations were made not for ceremonious welcomes (which he knew Pierre would not like), but for just such gratefully religious ones, with offerings of icons and the bread and salt of hospitality, as, according to his understanding of his master, would touch and delude him.
  • What Pierre did not know was that the place where they presented him with bread and salt and wished to build a chantry in honor of Peter and Paul was a market village where a fair was held on St. Peter's day, and that the richest peasants (who formed the deputation) had begun the chantry long before, but that nine tenths of the peasants in that villages were in a state of the greatest poverty.
  • He was pleased at the gratitude he received, but felt abashed at receiving it.
  • He quickly entered the small reception room with its still-unplastered wooden walls redolent of pine, and would have gone farther, but Anton ran ahead on tiptoe and knocked at a door.
  • It was as if Prince Andrew would have liked to sympathize with what Pierre was saying, but could not.
  • Pierre began, but Prince Andrew interrupted him.
  • But why talk of me?...
  • But of course you know her already, he said, evidently trying to entertain a visitor with whom he now found nothing in common.
  • Prince Andrew spoke with some animation and interest only of the new homestead he was constructing and its buildings, but even here, while on the scaffolding, in the midst of a talk explaining the future arrangements of the house, he interrupted himself:
  • But you know it is all over, and forever.
  • But you know how it all ended, don't you?
  • "Perhaps you are right for yourself," he added after a short pause, "but everyone lives in his own way.
  • The same love of others, a desire to do something for them, a desire for their approval.--So I lived for others, and not almost, but quite, ruined my life.
  • "But what do you mean by living only for yourself?" asked Pierre, growing excited.
  • "But that's just the same as myself--they are not others," explained Prince Andrew.
  • But what's right and what's good must be judged by one who knows all, but not by us.
  • But what's right and what's good must be judged by one who knows all, but not by us.
  • I envy him, but you want to make him what I am, without giving him my means.
  • But as I see it, physical labor is as essential to him, as much a condition of his existence, as mental activity is to you or me.
  • I go to bed after two in the morning, thoughts come and I can't sleep but toss about till dawn, because I think and can't help thinking, just as he can't help plowing and mowing; if he didn't, he would go to the drink shop or fall ill.
  • Just as I could not stand his terrible physical labor but should die of it in a week, so he could not stand my physical idleness, but would grow fat and die.
  • It would be different if you grudged losing a laborer--that's how I regard him--but you want to cure him from love of him.
  • I had such moments myself not long ago, in Moscow and when traveling, but at such times I collapsed so that I don't live at all--everything seems hateful to me... myself most of all.
  • I should be thankful to do nothing, but here on the one hand the local nobility have done me the honor to choose me to be their marshal; it was all I could do to get out of it.
  • But he is growing old, and though not exactly cruel he has too energetic a character.
  • "Yes, but it is not as you imagine," Prince Andrew continued.
  • But it is a good thing for proprietors who perish morally, bring remorse upon themselves, stifle this remorse and grow callous, as a result of being able to inflict punishments justly and unjustly.
  • But as soon as he thought of what he should say, he felt that Prince Andrew with one word, one argument, would upset all his teaching, and he shrank from beginning, afraid of exposing to possible ridicule what to him was precious and sacred.
  • No, but why do you think so?
  • But who are we?
  • You see a reign of goodness and truth on earth, but I don't see it.
  • On earth, here on this earth" (Pierre pointed to the fields), "there is no truth, all is false and evil; but in the universe, in the whole universe there is a kingdom of truth, and we who are now the children of earth are--eternally--children of the whole universe.
  • I feel that I cannot vanish, since nothing vanishes in this world, but that I shall always exist and always have existed.
  • The sun had sunk half below the horizon and an evening frost was starring the puddles near the ferry, but Pierre and Andrew, to the astonishment of the footmen, coachmen, and ferrymen, still stood on the raft and talked.
  • We must live, we must love, and we must believe that we live not only today on this scrap of earth, but have lived and shall live forever, there, in the Whole, said Pierre, and he pointed to the sky.
  • It vanished as soon as he returned to the customary conditions of his life, but he knew that this feeling which he did not know how to develop existed within him.
  • He orders these pilgrims to be driven away, but she receives them.
  • "But what are 'God's folk'?" asked Pierre.
  • It will serve her right, she will be confused, but you will see her 'God's folk.'
  • She looked at him with her beautiful radiant eyes and seemed to say, "I like you very much, but please don't laugh at my people."
  • The old woman, lowering her eyes but casting side glances at the newcomers, had turned her cup upside down and placed a nibbled bit of sugar beside it, and sat quietly in her armchair, though hoping to be offered another cup of tea.
  • "But, dear me, that must be a fraud!" said Pierre, naively, who had listened attentively to the pilgrim.
  • Pelageya stopped doubtfully, but in Pierre's face there was such a look of sincere penitence, and Prince Andrew glanced so meekly now at her and now at Pierre, that she was gradually reassured.
  • His health was better in the winter, but last spring his wound reopened and the doctor said he ought to go away for a cure.
  • Today he is cheerful and in good spirits, but that is the effect of your visit--he is not often like that.
  • Others don't notice it, but I see it.
  • The old prince disputed it chaffingly, but without getting angry.
  • Old women's nonsense--old women's nonsense! he repeated, but still he patted Pierre affectionately on the shoulder, and then went up to the table where Prince Andrew, evidently not wishing to join in the conversation, was looking over the papers his father had brought from town.
  • Another says clever things and one doesn't care to listen, but this one talks rubbish yet stirs an old fellow up.
  • When Pierre had gone and the members of the household met together, they began to express their opinions of him as people always do after a new acquaintance has left, but as seldom happens, no one said anything but what was good of him.
  • He received ten thousand rubles a year, but now resolved to take only two thousand and leave the rest to repay the debt to his parents.
  • As no transports could arrive, the men dispersed about the abandoned and deserted villages, searching for potatoes, but found few even of these.
  • The Pavlograd regiment had had only two men wounded in action, but had lost nearly half its men from hunger and sickness.
  • It was very bitter, but they wandered about the fields seeking it and dug it out with their sabers and ate it, though they were ordered not to do so, as it was a noxious plant.
  • In April the troops were enlivened by news of the Emperor's arrival, but Rostov had no chance of being present at the review he held at Bartenstein, as the Pavlograds were at the outposts far beyond that place.
  • Denisov, who was living luxuriously because the soldiers of his squadron liked him, had also a board in the roof at the farther end, with a piece of (broken but mended) glass in it for a window.
  • One morning, between seven and eight, returning after a sleepless night, he sent for embers, changed his rain-soaked underclothes, said his prayers, drank tea, got warm, then tidied up the things on the table and in his own corner, and, his face glowing from exposure to the wind and with nothing on but his shirt, lay down on his back, putting his arms under his head.
  • "I have given the order again and again, your honor, but they don't obey," answered the quartermaster.
  • Let them twy me, but I'll always thwash scoundwels... and I'll tell the Empewo'...
  • Then he says: 'Go and give a weceipt to the commissioner, but your affair will be passed on to headquarters.'
  • No, but wait a bit!...
  • But what are you shouting for?
  • But at noon the adjutant of the regiment came into Rostov's and Denisov's dugout with a grave and serious face and regretfully showed them a paper addressed to Major Denisov from the regimental commander in which inquiries were made about yesterday's occurrence.
  • In answer to Rostov's renewed questions, Denisov said, laughing, that he thought he remembered that some other fellow had got mixed up in it, but that it was all nonsense and rubbish, and he did not in the least fear any kind of trial, and that if those scoundrels dared attack him he would give them an answer that they would not easily forget.
  • Perhaps at another time Denisov would not have left the regiment for so slight a wound, but now he took advantage of it to excuse himself from appearing at the staff and went into hospital.
  • Prussian doctors have been invited here, but our allies don't like it at all.
  • "But if you'll step into the officers' wards you'll see for yourself," he added, turning to Rostov.
  • But Rostov bowed himself away from the doctor and asked the assistant to show him the way.
  • But, just because the assistant evidently did not want him to go in, Rostov entered the soldiers' ward.
  • "Yes, your honor," the soldier replied complacently, and rolling his eyes more than ever he drew himself up still straighter, but did not move.
  • How are you, how are you? he called out, still in the same voice as in the regiment, but Rostov noticed sadly that under this habitual ease and animation some new, sinister, hidden feeling showed itself in the expression of Denisov's face and the intonations of his voice.
  • His face had the same swollen pallor as the faces of the other hospital patients, but it was not this that struck Rostov.
  • "Me petition the Empewo'!" exclaimed Denisov, in a voice to which he tried hard to give the old energy and fire, but which sounded like an expression of irritable impotence.
  • "It's certainly well written," said Tushin, "but that's not the point, Vasili Dmitrich," and he also turned to Rostov.
  • He did not finish, but gave a painfully unnatural smile.
  • He had not only become known, but people had grown accustomed to him and accepted him.
  • Only recently, talking with one of Platov's Cossack officers, Rostov had argued that if Napoleon were taken prisoner he would be treated not as a sovereign, but as a criminal.
  • But Rostov had noticed his first impulse.
  • I should not have come, but I have business, he said coldly.
  • As if you could come at a wrong time! said Boris, and he led him into the room where the supper table was laid and introduced him to his guests, explaining that he was not a civilian, but an hussar officer, and an old friend of his.
  • But if you are tired, come and lie down in my room and have a rest.
  • I think it would be best not to bring it before the Emperor, but to apply to the commander of the corps....
  • But in general, I think...
  • All is over between us, but I won't leave here without having done all I can for Denisov and certainly not without getting his letter to the Emperor.
  • On hearing this indifferent voice, Rostov grew frightened at what he was doing; the thought of meeting the Emperor at any moment was so fascinating and consequently so alarming that he was ready to run away, but the official who had questioned him opened the door, and Rostov entered.
  • "A good figure and in her first bloom," he was saying, but on seeing Rostov, he stopped short and frowned.
  • Rostov turned and was about to go, but the man in the braces stopped him.
  • Rostov, in dismay, began justifying himself, but seeing the kindly, jocular face of the general, he took him aside and in an excited voice told him the whole affair, asking him to intercede for Denisov, whom the general knew.
  • But we must give him an answer.
  • But receiving no orders, he remained for some time in that rigid position.
  • Yes, but what luck for Lazarev!
  • But Rostov did not listen to him.
  • That way we shall be saying there is no God--nothing! shouted Nicholas, banging the table--very little to the point as it seemed to his listeners, but quite relevantly to the course of his own thoughts.
  • But besides considerations of foreign policy, the attention of Russian society was at that time keenly directed on the internal changes that were being undertaken in all the departments of government.
  • He was not thinking of anything, but looked absent-mindedly and cheerfully from side to side.
  • But apparently the coachman's sympathy was not enough for Peter, and he turned on the box toward his master.
  • But the oaks show no sign yet.
  • Let others--the young--yield afresh to that fraud, but we know life, our life is finished!
  • During this journey he, as it were, considered his life afresh and arrived at his old conclusion, restful in its hopelessness: that it was not for him to begin anything anew--but that he must live out his life, content to do no harm, and not disturbing himself or desiring anything.
  • The girl was shouting something but, seeing that he was a stranger, ran back laughing without looking at him.
  • He read awhile and then put out his candle, but relit it.
  • "But when are you coming to bed?" replied another voice.
  • "You go to sleep, but I can't," said the first voice, coming nearer to the window.
  • Again all was silent, but Prince Andrew knew she was still sitting there.
  • Next morning, having taken leave of no one but the count, and not waiting for the ladies to appear, Prince Andrew set off for home.
  • Somewhere a storm was gathering, but only a small cloud had scattered some raindrops lightly, sprinkling the road and the sappy leaves.
  • "But where is it?" he again wondered, gazing at the left side of the road, and without recognizing it he looked with admiration at the very oak he sought.
  • She did not now say those former terrible words to him, but looked simply, merrily, and inquisitively at him.
  • "If it were hot," Prince Andrew would reply at such times very dryly to his sister, "he could go out in his smock, but as it is cold he must wear warm clothes, which were designed for that purpose.
  • He did not know Arakcheev personally, had never seen him, and all he had heard of him inspired him with but little respect for the man.
  • But the moment the door opened one feeling alone appeared on all faces-- that of fear.
  • Prince Andrew for the second time asked the adjutant on duty to take in his name, but received an ironical look and was told that his turn would come in due course.
  • There are many laws but no one to carry out the old ones.
  • It is easy to write laws, but difficult to rule....
  • Well, I have Pryanichnikov serving under me, a splendid man, a priceless man, but he's sixty.
  • "Si vous envisagez la question sous ce point de vue," * he began, pronouncing French with evident difficulty, and speaking even slower than in Russian but quite calmly.
  • An institution upholding honor, the source of emulation, is one similar to the Legion d'honneur of the great Emperor Napoleon, not harmful but helpful to the success of the service, but not a class or court privilege.
  • "I do not dispute that, but it cannot be denied that court privileges have attained the same end," returned Prince Andrew.
  • He did nothing, did not even think or find time to think, but only talked, and talked successfully, of what he had thought while in the country.
  • But he was so busy for whole days together that he had no time to notice that he was thinking of nothing.
  • Had Speranski sprung from the same class as himself and possessed the same breeding and traditions, Bolkonski would soon have discovered his weak, human, unheroic sides; but as it was, Speranski's strange and logical turn of mind inspired him with respect all the more because he did not quite understand him.
  • We want to give the Senate new juridical powers, but we have no laws.
  • But nobody possesses it, so what would you have?
  • Pierre respected this class of Brothers to which the elder ones chiefly belonged, including, Pierre thought, Joseph Alexeevich himself, but he did not share their interests.
  • He did not think of doubting Freemasonry itself, but suspected that Russian Masonry had taken a wrong path and deviated from its original principles.
  • We are drowsing, but we must act.
  • But in these great endeavors we are gravely hampered by the political institutions of today.
  • The novelty of Truth endowed her with special strength, but now we need much more powerful methods.
  • It is impossible to eradicate the passions; but we must strive to direct them to a noble aim, and it is therefore necessary that everyone should be able to satisfy his passions within the limits of virtue.
  • This speech not only made a strong impression, but created excitement in the lodge.
  • But if I forgive her for the sake of doing right, then let union with her have only a spiritual aim.
  • Her smile for him was the same as for everybody, but sometimes that smile made Pierre uncomfortable.
  • But a complex and difficult process of internal development was taking place all this time in Pierre's soul, revealing much to him and causing him many spiritual doubts and joys.
  • Read the Scriptures, but without proper feeling.
  • That is why I should really like to save him from evil and lead him into the path of truth, but evil thoughts of him did not leave me.
  • Awoke late, read the Scriptures but was apathetic.
  • I wished to meditate, but instead my imagination pictured an occurrence of four years ago, when Dolokhov, meeting me in Moscow after our duel, said he hoped I was enjoying perfect peace of mind in spite of my wife's absence.
  • I recollected myself and drove away that thought only when I found myself glowing with anger, but I did not sufficiently repent.
  • I dreamed that I was walking in the dark and was suddenly surrounded by dogs, but I went on undismayed.
  • I lifted it up, but the higher I lifted it the bigger and heavier it grew.
  • I stepped on it, but it bent and gave way and I began to clamber up a fence which I could scarcely reach with my hands.
  • But as soon as I drew near I saw that his face had changed and grown young, and he was quietly telling me something about the teaching of our order, but so softly that I could not hear it.
  • But as soon as I drew near I saw that his face had changed and grown young, and he was quietly telling me something about the teaching of our order, but so softly that I could not hear it.
  • But he looked at me with vexation and jumped up, breaking off his remarks.
  • But I replied that I should be ashamed to do it, and suddenly everything vanished.
  • I looked at him, still holding him in my arms, and saw that his face was young, but that he had no hair on his head and his features were quite changed.
  • And looking at those drawings I dreamed I felt that I was doing wrong, but could not tear myself away from them.
  • But on the contrary, my papa and mamma are now provided for--I have arranged that rent for them in the Baltic Provinces--and I can live in Petersburg on my pay, and with her fortune and my good management we can get along nicely.
  • Well, you will be coming," he was going to say, "to dine," but changed his mind and said "to take tea with us," and quickly doubling up his tongue he blew a small round ring of tobacco smoke, perfectly embodying his dream of happiness.
  • After the first feeling of perplexity aroused in the parents by Berg's proposal, the holiday tone of joyousness usual at such times took possession of the family, but the rejoicing was external and insincere.
  • But Berg, smiling pleasantly, explained that if he did not know for certain how much Vera would have and did not receive at least part of the dowry in advance, he would have to break matters off.
  • Berg smiled meekly, kissed the count on the shoulder, and said that he was very grateful, but that it was impossible for him to arrange his new life without receiving thirty thousand in ready money.
  • But in the secret depths of her soul the question whether her engagement to Boris was a jest or an important, binding promise tormented her.
  • But he went with the firm intention of letting her and her parents feel that the childish relations between himself and Natasha could not be binding either on her or on him.
  • Boris made up his mind to avoid meeting Natasha, but despite that resolution he called again a few days later and began calling often and spending whole days at the Rostovs'.
  • The countess finished her prayers and came to the bed with a stern face, but seeing, that Natasha's head was covered, she smiled in her kind, weak way.
  • In her behavior to her mother Natasha seemed rough, but she was so sensitive and tactful that however she clasped her mother she always managed to do it without hurting her or making her feel uncomfortable or displeased.
  • What is it tonight?--But I have to tell you...
  • "But if I want to..." said Natasha.
  • But if I want to...
  • Cyril Matveich... but he is old.
  • But this is what I'll do, Natasha, I'll have a talk with Boris.
  • Well, I won't marry, but let him come if he enjoys it and I enjoy it.
  • "Not to marry, but just so," she added.
  • But, Mamma, is he very much in love?
  • Police were stationed at the brightly lit entrance which was carpeted with red baize, and not only gendarmes but dozens of police officers and even the police master himself stood at the porch.
  • A third of the visitors had already arrived, but the Rostovs, who were to be present, were still hurrying to get dressed.
  • Sonya was finishing dressing and so was the countess, but Natasha, who had bustled about helping them all, was behindhand.
  • But it's already ten.
  • He would have embraced her but, blushing, she stepped aside fearing to be rumpled.
  • But they had still to call at the Taurida Gardens.
  • In spite of her age and plainness she had gone through the same process as the Rostovs, but with less flurry – for to her it was a matter of routine.
  • But, fortunately for her, she felt her eyes growing misty, she saw nothing clearly, her pulse beat a hundred to the minute, and the blood throbbed at her heart.
  • The two girls in their white dresses, each with a rose in her black hair, both curtsied in the same way, but the hostess' eye involuntarily rested longer on the slim Natasha.
  • But see, those two, though not good-looking, are even more run after.
  • But your cousin, Drubetskoy, is also very attentive to her.
  • But before he reached them Pierre stopped beside a very handsome, dark man of middle height, and in a white uniform, who stood by a window talking to a tall man wearing stars and a ribbon.
  • Everyone moved back, and the Emperor came smiling out of the drawing room leading his hostess by the hand but not keeping time to the music.
  • She was not concerned about the Emperor or any of those great people whom Peronskaya was pointing out--she had but one thought: Is it possible no one will ask me, that I shall not be among the first to dance?
  • This family gathering seemed humiliating to Natasha--as if there were nowhere else for the family to talk but here at the ball.
  • Next day Prince Andrew thought of the ball, but his mind did not dwell on it long.
  • But either from fatigue or want of sleep he was ill-disposed for work and could get nothing done.
  • The visitor was Bitski, who served on various committees, frequented all the societies in Petersburg, and a passionate devotee of the new ideas and of Speranski, and a diligent Petersburg newsmonger--one of those men who choose their opinions like their clothes according to the fashion, but who for that very reason appear to be the warmest partisans.
  • It seemed to him that this was not Speranski but someone else.
  • But their gaiety seemed to Prince Andrew mirthless and tiresome.
  • Prince Andrew did not laugh and feared that he would be a damper on the spirits of the company, but no one took any notice of his being out of harmony with the general mood.
  • He tried several times to join in the conversation, but his remarks were tossed aside each time like a cork thrown out of the water, and he could not jest with them.
  • Now this world disconcerted him no longer and was no longer alien to him, but he himself having entered it found in it a new enjoyment.
  • He went to bed from habit, but soon realized that he could not sleep.
  • Let the dead bury their dead, but while one has life one must live and be happy! thought he.
  • Unfortunately she could not grant my request, but I hope, Count, I shall be more fortunate with you, he said with a smile.
  • Berg explained so clearly why he wanted to collect at his house a small but select company, and why this would give him pleasure, and why though he grudged spending money on cards or anything harmful, he was prepared to run into some expense for the sake of good society--that Pierre could not refuse, and promised to come.
  • But don't be late, Count, if I may venture to ask; about ten minutes to eight, please.
  • Contrary to his habit of being late, Pierre on that day arrived at the Bergs' house, not at ten but at fifteen minutes to eight.
  • (Berg measured his life not by years but by promotions.)
  • She was silent, and not only less pretty than at the ball, but only redeemed from plainness by her look of gentle indifference to everything around.
  • Pierre changed places several times during the game, sitting now with his back to Natasha and now facing her, but during the whole of the six rubbers he watched her and his friend.
  • This return to the subject of Natalie caused Prince Andrew to knit his brows with discomfort: he was about to rise, but Vera continued with a still more subtle smile:
  • "I... but no, I will talk to you later on," and with a strange light in his eyes and restlessness in his movements, Prince Andrew approached Natasha and sat down beside her.
  • But at that moment Berg came to Pierre and began insisting that he should take part in an argument between the general and the colonel on the affairs in Spain.
  • She felt that he wanted to say something to her but could not bring himself to do so.
  • But all the same that night Natasha, now agitated and now frightened, lay a long time in her mother's bed gazing straight before her.
  • "But such a... such a... never happened to me before!" she said.
  • At last I live, but I can't live without her!
  • But can she love me?...
  • But what of her?
  • "But do listen," returned Prince Andrew, holding him by the arm.
  • His father received his son's communication with external composure, but inward wrath.
  • Next day after her talk with her mother Natasha expected Bolkonski all day, but he did not come.
  • Her voice trembled, and she again nearly cried, but recovered and went on quietly:
  • Things are nice as it is, she said to herself, and she began walking up and down the room, not stepping simply on the resounding parquet but treading with each step from the heel to the toe (she had on a new and favorite pair of shoes) and listening to the regular tap of the heel and creak of the toe as gladly as she had to the sounds of her own voice.
  • A footman wanted to come in to clear away something in the room but she would not let him, and having closed the door behind him continued her walk.
  • But however much they left her in peace she could not now be at peace, and immediately felt this.
  • Natasha was looking at the mirror, but did not see herself.
  • "It is long since we had the pleasure..." began the countess, but Prince Andrew interrupted her by answering her intended question, obviously in haste to say what he had to.
  • The countess' face flushed hotly, but she said nothing.
  • I hope... but it will depend on her....
  • She wished to love him as a son, but felt that to her he was a stranger and a terrifying man.
  • It is true that Natasha is still young, but--so long as that?...
  • Why doubt what you cannot but know?
  • Yes, but what did he ask me?
  • "No," she replied, but she had not understood his question.
  • Natasha listened with concentrated attention, trying but failing to take in the meaning of his words.
  • But why a year?
  • Prince Andrew did not reply, but his face expressed the impossibility of altering that decision.
  • Naturally neither Natasha nor her parents wished to hear of this, but Prince Andrew was firm.
  • He came every day to the Rostovs', but did not behave to Natasha as an affianced lover: he did not use the familiar thou, but said you to her, and kissed only her hand.
  • At first the family felt some constraint in intercourse with Prince Andrew; he seemed a man from another world, and for a long time Natasha trained the family to get used to him, proudly assuring them all that he only appeared to be different, but was really just like all of them, and that she was not afraid of him and no one else ought to be.
  • He seldom laughed, but when he did he abandoned himself entirely to his laughter, and after such a laugh she always felt nearer to him.
  • Yes, he's a dear, but very absurd.
  • He is a most absent-minded and absurd fellow, but he has a heart of gold.
  • Nor did she cry when he was gone; but for several days she sat in her room dry-eyed, taking no interest in anything and only saying now and then, "Oh, why did he go away?"
  • But a fortnight after his departure, to the surprise of those around her, she recovered from her mental sickness just as suddenly and became her old self again, but with a change in her moral physiognomy, as a child gets up after a long illness with a changed expression of face.
  • But a fortnight after his departure, to the surprise of those around her, she recovered from her mental sickness just as suddenly and became her old self again, but with a change in her moral physiognomy, as a child gets up after a long illness with a changed expression of face.
  • He continually hurt Princess Mary's feelings and tormented her, but it cost her no effort to forgive him.
  • She felt that something had happened to him, but he said nothing to her about his love.
  • Religion, and religion alone, can--I will not say comfort us--but save us from despair.
  • Religion alone can explain to us what without its help man cannot comprehend: why, for what cause, kind and noble beings able to find happiness in life--not merely harming no one but necessary to the happiness of others--are called away to God, while cruel, useless, harmful persons, or such as are a burden to themselves and to others, are left living.
  • Five years have passed since then, and already I, with my petty understanding, begin to see clearly why she had to die, and in what way that death was but an expression of the infinite goodness of the Creator, whose every action, though generally incomprehensible to us, is but a manifestation of His infinite love for His creatures.
  • As it is, not only has she left us, and particularly Prince Andrew, with the purest regrets and memories, but probably she will there receive a place I dare not hope for myself.
  • But not to speak of her alone, that early and terrible death has had the most beneficent influence on me and on my brother in spite of all our grief.
  • Then, at the moment of our loss, these thoughts could not occur to me; I should then have dismissed them with horror, but now they are very clear and certain.
  • But together with this mental change he has grown physically much weaker.
  • But I am running on too long and am at the end of my second sheet.
  • If the doctors did not keep me here at the spas I should be back in Russia, but as it is I have to postpone my return for three months.
  • The princess was about to reply, but her father would not let her speak and, raising his voice more and more, cried:
  • But repressed vexation at his son's poor-spirited behavior found expression in his treatment of his daughter.
  • She wrote to Prince Andrew about the reception of his letter, but comforted him with hopes of reconciling their father to the idea.
  • Prince Andrew had loved his wife, she died, but that was not enough: he wanted to bind his happiness to another woman.
  • And they all struggled and suffered and tormented one another and injured their souls, their eternal souls, for the attainment of benefits which endure but for an instant.
  • She disclosed this thought to no one but to her confessor, Father Akinfi, the monk, and he approved of her intention.
  • Often, listening to the pilgrims' tales, she was so stimulated by their simple speech, mechanical to them but to her so full of deep meaning, that several times she was on the point of abandoning everything and running away from home.
  • But afterwards, when she saw her father and especially little Koko (Nicholas), her resolve weakened.
  • Fallen man has retained a love of idleness, but the curse weighs on the race not only because we have to seek our bread in the sweat of our brows, but because our moral nature is such that we cannot be both idle and at ease.
  • Rostov had become a bluff, good-natured fellow, whom his Moscow acquaintances would have considered rather bad form, but who was liked and respected by his comrades, subordinates, and superiors, and was well contented with his life.
  • But in the spring of that year, he received a letter from his mother, written without his father's knowledge, and that letter persuaded him to return.
  • His hussar comrades--not only those of his own regiment, but the whole brigade--gave Rostov a dinner to which the subscription was fifteen rubles a head, and at which there were two bands and two choirs of singers.
  • Sonya was nearly twenty; she had stopped growing prettier and promised nothing more than she was already, but that was enough.
  • On the contrary, but what dignity?
  • I was in love with Boris, with my teacher, and with Denisov, but this is quite different.
  • And don't attach importance to her being so bright: that's because she's living through the last days of her girlhood, but I know what she is like every time we receive a letter from him!
  • But what an account of everything might be Nicholas knew even less than the frightened and bewildered Mitenka.
  • The young count paid no heed to them, but, breathing hard, passed by with resolute strides and went into the house.
  • The countess, who heard at once from the maids what had happened at the lodge, was calmed by the thought that now their affairs would certainly improve, but on the other hand felt anxious as to the effect this excitement might have on her son.
  • But you know, my dear boy, it's a pity you got excited!
  • But they were carried forward--and you did not look at the other page.
  • And what I have done, I have done; but, if you like, I won't speak to him again.
  • But once the countess called her son and informed him that she had a promissory note from Anna Mikhaylovna for two thousand rubles, and asked him what he thought of doing with it.
  • Well, I don't like Anna Mikhaylovna and I don't like Boris, but they were our friends and poor.
  • It was frosty and the air was sharp, but toward evening the sky became overcast and it began to thaw.
  • Daniel did not answer, but winked instead.
  • But just as Daniel was about to go Natasha came in with rapid steps, not having done up her hair or finished dressing and with her old nurse's big shawl wrapped round her.
  • Sonya said you wouldn't go, but I knew that today is the sort of day when you couldn't help going.
  • We are going, but only wolf hunting: it would be dull for you.
  • It seemed to Daniel irksome and improper to be in a room at all, but to have anything to do with a young lady seemed to him impossible.
  • The old count had always kept up an enormous hunting establishment.
  • But don't go overriding the hounds," said "Uncle" sternly.
  • "In the first place, Trunila is not a 'dog,' but a harrier," thought Nicholas, and looked sternly at his sister, trying to make her feel the distance that ought to separate them at that moment.
  • The whippers-in no longer set on the hounds, but changed to the cry of ulyulyu, and above the others rose Daniel's voice, now a deep bass, now piercingly shrill.
  • The sounds of both packs mingled and broke apart again, but both were becoming more distant.
  • But Simon was no longer there.
  • He was galloping round by the bushes while the field was coming up on both sides, all trying to head the wolf, but it vanished into the wood before they could do so.
  • Nearer and nearer... now she was ahead of it; but the wolf turned its head to face her, and instead of putting on speed as she usually did Milka suddenly raised her tail and stiffened her forelegs.
  • The reddish Lyubim rushed forward from behind Milka, sprang impetuously at the wolf, and seized it by its hindquarters, but immediately jumped aside in terror.
  • But the quickness of the wolf's lope and the borzoi's slower pace made it plain that Karay had miscalculated.
  • But, coming toward him, he saw hounds and a huntsman galloping almost straight at the wolf.
  • But the wolf jumped up more quickly than anyone could have expected and, gnashing her teeth, flew at the yellowish borzoi, which, with a piercing yelp, fell with its head on the ground, bleeding from a gash in its side.
  • But here Nicholas only saw that something happened to Karay--the borzoi was suddenly on the wolf, and they rolled together down into a gully just in front of them.
  • But when he saw that the horsemen did not dismount and that the wolf shook herself and ran for safety, Daniel set his chestnut galloping, not at the wolf but straight toward the wood, just as Karay had run to cut the animal off.
  • But when he saw that the horsemen did not dismount and that the wolf shook herself and ran for safety, Daniel set his chestnut galloping, not at the wolf but straight toward the wood, just as Karay had run to cut the animal off.
  • The terrified wolf pressed back her ears and tried to rise, but the borzois stuck to her.
  • Nicholas was about to stab her, but Daniel whispered, Don't!
  • "Ah, but you are a crusty fellow, friend!" said the count.
  • The old count went home, and Natasha and Petya promised to return very soon, but as it was still early the hunt went farther.
  • The huntsmen got the fox, but stayed there a long time without strapping it to the saddle.
  • While still at a distance he took off his cap and tried to speak respectfully, but he was pale and breathless and his face was angry.
  • One of his eyes was black, but he probably was not even aware of it.
  • Rostov was particularly struck by the beauty of a small, pure-bred, red- spotted bitch on Ilagin's leash, slender but with muscles like steel, a delicate muzzle, and prominent black eyes.
  • (he again raised his cap to Natasha) "but as for counting skins and what one takes, I don't care about that."
  • The huntsman stood halfway up the knoll holding up his whip and the gentlefolk rode up to him at a footpace; the hounds that were far off on the horizon turned away from the hare, and the whips, but not the gentlefolk, also moved away.
  • But before the whip could reply, the hare, scenting the frost coming next morning, was unable to rest and leaped up.
  • When he jumped up he did not run at once, but pricked his ears listening to the shouting and trampling that resounded from all sides at once.
  • Again the beautiful Erza reached him, but when close to the hare's scut paused as if measuring the distance, so as not to make a mistake this time but seize his hind leg.
  • "But what is there in running across it like that?" said Ilagin's groom.
  • But when it is, then look out! his appearance seemed to Nicholas to be saying.
  • The house, with its bare, unplastered log walls, was not overclean--it did not seem that those living in it aimed at keeping it spotless--but neither was it noticeably neglected.
  • I did once, but gave it up.
  • The balalayka was retuned several times and the same notes were thrummed again, but the listeners did not grow weary of it and wished to hear it again and again.
  • "Uncle" did not answer, but smiled.
  • He took the guitar a little above the fingerboard, arching his left elbow with a somewhat theatrical gesture, and, with a wink at Anisya Fedorovna, struck a single chord, pure and sonorous, and then quietly, smoothly, and confidently began playing in very slow time, not My Lady, but the well-known song: Came a maiden down the street.
  • But the spirit and the movements were those inimitable and unteachable Russian ones that "Uncle" had expected of her.
  • But as soon as she had said it a new train of thoughts and feelings arose in her.
  • But he would understand it all.
  • But this lasted only a second.
  • "Good-bye, dear niece," his voice called out of the darkness--not the voice Natasha had known previously, but the one that had sung As 'twas growing dark last night.
  • They could not see the horses, but only heard them splashing through the unseen mud.
  • But she was very happy.
  • Yes, first I thought that we are driving along and imagining that we are going home, but that heaven knows where we are really going in the darkness, and that we shall arrive and suddenly find that we are not in Otradnoe, but in Fairyland.
  • Count Ilya Rostov had resigned the position of Marshal of the Nobility because it involved him in too much expense, but still his affairs did not improve.
  • They had not as many visitors as before, but the old habits of life without which the count and countess could not conceive of existence remained unchanged.
  • The count moved in his affairs as in a huge net, trying not to believe that he was entangled but becoming more and more so at every step, and feeling too feeble to break the meshes or to set to work carefully and patiently to disentangle them.
  • I can always sacrifice my feelings for my family's welfare," he said to himself, "but I can't coerce my feelings.
  • Natasha was still as much in love with her betrothed, found the same comfort in that love, and was still as ready to throw herself into all the pleasures of life as before; but at the end of the fourth month of their separation she began to have fits of depression which she could not master.
  • She could not see people unconcernedly, but had to send them on some errand.
  • She seemed to be trying whether any of them would get angry or sulky with her; but the serfs fulfilled no one's orders so readily as they did hers.
  • What she drew from the guitar would have had no meaning for other listeners, but in her imagination a whole series of reminiscences arose from those sounds.
  • "You always find something to do, but I can't," said Natasha.
  • But perhaps he'll come today, will come immediately.
  • The servants stood round the table--but Prince Andrew was not there and life was going on as before.
  • But Natasha stayed by her mother and glanced round as if looking for something.
  • And to feel not exactly dull, but sad?
  • I remember that I came to you afterwards and wanted to comfort you, but do you know, I felt ashamed to.
  • But you see, you remember!
  • So they went through their memories, smiling with pleasure: not the sad memories of old age, but poetic, youthful ones--those impressions of one's most distant past in which dreams and realities blend--and they laughed with quiet enjoyment.
  • It was dark in the room especially where they were sitting on the sofa, but through the big windows the silvery light of the full moon fell on the floor.
  • Dimmler had finished the piece but still sat softly running his fingers over the strings, evidently uncertain whether to stop or to play something else.
  • "Mamma, I don't at all want to," replied Natasha, but all the same she rose.
  • None of them, not even the middle-aged Dimmler, wanted to break off their conversation and quit that corner in the sitting room, but Natasha got up and Nicholas sat down at the clavichord.
  • She had said she did not want to sing, but it was long since she had sung, and long before she again sang, as she did that evening.
  • But the countess would not agree to his going; he had had a bad leg all these last days.
  • It was decided that the count must not go, but that if Louisa Ivanovna (Madame Schoss) would go with them, the young ladies might go to the Melyukovs', Sonya, generally so timid and shy, more urgently than anyone begging Louisa Ivanovna not to refuse.
  • While they drove past the garden the shadows of the bare trees often fell across the road and hid the brilliant moonlight, but as soon as they were past the fence, the snowy plain bathed in moonlight and motionless spread out before them glittering like diamonds and dappled with bluish shadows.
  • But no-- this is something new I've never seen before.
  • "Zakhar is shouting that I should turn to the left, but why to the left?" thought Nicholas.
  • Heaven only knows where we are going, and heaven knows what is happening to us--but it is very strange and pleasant whatever it is.
  • "I think this used to be Natasha," thought Nicholas, "and that was Madame Schoss, but perhaps it's not, and this Circassian with the mustache I don't know, but I love her."
  • They did not answer but began to laugh.
  • But here was a fairy forest with black moving shadows, and a glitter of diamonds and a flight of marble steps and the silver roofs of fairy buildings and the shrill yells of some animals.
  • But Herr Dimmler--isn't he good!
  • Sometimes, as she looked at the strange but amusing capers cut by the dancers, who--having decided once for all that being disguised, no one would recognize them--were not at all shy, Pelageya Danilovna hid her face in her handkerchief, and her whole stout body shook with irrepressible, kindly, elderly laughter.
  • It depends on what you hear; hammering and knocking--that's bad; but a sound of shifting grain is good and one sometimes hears that, too.
  • But none of you would go?
  • Outside, there was the same cold stillness and the same moon, but even brighter than before.
  • I will never let anyone say anything bad of Sonya, for there is nothing but good in her.
  • When they had undressed, but without washing off the cork mustaches, they sat a long time talking of their happiness.
  • But ready as she was to take the smallest speck for the image of a man or of a coffin, she saw nothing.
  • "Now, Miss Sonya is sure to see something," whispered Dunyasha; "while you do nothing but laugh."
  • "Of course she will!" whispered Natasha, but did not finish... suddenly Sonya pushed away the glass she was holding and covered her eyes with her hand.
  • She did not wish to disappoint either Dunyasha or Natasha, but it was hard to sit still.
  • But why shouldn't I say I saw something?
  • Coldly, without looking at her son, she sent for her husband and, when he came, tried briefly and coldly to inform him of the facts, in her son's presence, but unable to restrain herself she burst into tears of vexation and left the room.
  • The father and mother did not speak of the matter to their son again, but a few days later the countess sent for Sonya and, with a cruelty neither of them expected, reproached her niece for trying to catch Nicholas and for ingratitude.
  • Self- sacrifice was her most cherished idea but in this case she could not see what she ought to sacrifice, or for whom.
  • She could not help loving the countess and the whole Rostov family, but neither could she help loving Nicholas and knowing that his happiness depended on that love.
  • The countess, with a coldness her son had never seen in her before, replied that he was of age, that Prince Andrew was marrying without his father's consent, and he could do the same, but that she would never receive that intriguer as her daughter.
  • Exploding at the word intriguer, Nicholas, raising his voice, told his mother he had never expected her to try to force him to sell his feelings, but if that were so, he would say for the last time....
  • But he had no time to utter the decisive word which the expression of his face caused his mother to await with terror, and which would perhaps have forever remained a cruel memory to them both.
  • Firmly resolved, after putting his affairs in order in the regiment, to retire from the army and return and marry Sonya, Nicholas, serious, sorrowful, and at variance with his parents, but, as it seemed to him, passionately in love, left at the beginning of January to rejoin his regiment.
  • But the countess' health obliged them to delay their departure from day to day.
  • There was still no improvement in the countess' health, but it was impossible to defer the journey to Moscow any longer.
  • But instead of all that--here he was, the wealthy husband of an unfaithful wife, a retired gentleman-in-waiting, fond of eating and drinking and, as he unbuttoned his waistcoat, of abusing the government a bit, a member of the Moscow English Club, and a universal favorite in Moscow society.
  • Sometimes he consoled himself with the thought that he was only living this life temporarily; but then he was shocked by the thought of how many, like himself, had entered that life and that club temporarily, with all their teeth and hair, and had only left it when not a single tooth or hair remained.
  • Pierre no longer suffered moments of despair, hypochondria, and disgust with life, but the malady that had formerly found expression in such acute attacks was driven inwards and never left him for a moment.
  • "Helene, who has never cared for anything but her own body and is one of the stupidest women in the world," thought Pierre, "is regarded by people as the acme of intelligence and refinement, and they pay homage to her.
  • We all profess the Christian law of forgiveness of injuries and love of our neighbors, the law in honor of which we have built in Moscow forty times forty churches--but yesterday a deserter was knouted to death and a minister of that same law of love and forgiveness, a priest, gave the soldier a cross to kiss before his execution.
  • But I--what is to become of me? thought he.
  • He had the unfortunate capacity many men, especially Russians, have of seeing and believing in the possibility of goodness and truth, but of seeing the evil and falsehood of life too clearly to be able to take a serious part in it.
  • But under the influence of wine he said to himself: It doesn't matter.
  • I have a solution ready, but have no time now--I'll think it all out later on!
  • But the later on never came.
  • Julie, with whom she had corresponded for the last five years, was in Moscow, but proved to be quite alien to her when they met.
  • But what distressed the princess most of all was her father's irritability, which was always directed against her and had of late amounted to cruelty.
  • Next day the prince did not say a word to his daughter, but she noticed that at dinner he gave orders that Mademoiselle Bourienne should be served first.
  • He was received in the best houses not merely as a doctor, but as an equal.
  • Prince Nicholas had always ridiculed medicine, but latterly on Mademoiselle Bourienne's advice had allowed this doctor to visit him and had grown accustomed to him.
  • Nicholas' Day and the prince's name day--all Moscow came to the prince's front door but he gave orders to admit no one and to invite to dinner only a small number, a list of whom he gave to Princess Mary.
  • "You don't understand?" shouted the prince, "but I do!
  • But he could not restrain himself and with the virulence of which only one who loves is capable, evidently suffering himself, he shook his fists at her and screamed:
  • The prince's house did not belong to what is known as fashionable society, but his little circle--though not much talked about in town-- was one it was more flattering to be received in than any other.
  • Incidents were related evidently confirming the opinion that everything was going from bad to worse, but whether telling a story or giving an opinion the speaker always stopped, or was stopped, at the point beyond which his criticism might touch the sovereign himself.
  • Prince Bolkonski glanced at the young man as if about to say something in reply, but changed his mind, evidently considering him too young.
  • There in Petersburg they are always writing--not notes only but even new laws.
  • There now, you turned Metivier out by the scruff of his neck because he is a Frenchman and a scoundrel, but our ladies crawl after him on their knees.
  • "Ah, how bitter it is to love someone near to you and to feel that..." she went on in a trembling voice, "that you can do nothing for him but grieve him, and to know that you cannot alter this.
  • Then there is only one thing left--to go away, but where could I go?
  • But without finishing what she was saying, Princess Mary burst into tears.
  • She is enchanting, but what makes her so I don't know.
  • She was by now decidedly plain, but thought herself not merely as good-looking as before but even far more attractive.
  • But who could help loving her?
  • He laughed blandly at her naive diplomacy but listened to what she had to say, and sometimes questioned her carefully about the Penza and Nizhegorod estates.
  • Boris began, wishing to sting her; but at that instant the galling thought occurred to him that he might have to leave Moscow without having accomplished his aim, and have vainly wasted his efforts--which was a thing he never allowed to happen.
  • There was no need to say more: Julie's face shone with triumph and self- satisfaction; but she forced Boris to say all that is said on such occasions--that he loved her and had never loved any other woman more than her.
  • The countess was still unwell and unable to travel but it was impossible to wait for her recovery.
  • But we'll speak of that later on, she added, glancing at Sonya with a look that showed she did not want to speak of it in her presence.
  • Of course Prince Andrew is not a child and can shift without him, but it's not nice to enter a family against a father's will.
  • Natasha remained silent, from shyness Marya Dmitrievna supposed, but really because she disliked anyone interfering in what touched her love of Prince Andrew, which seemed to her so apart from all human affairs that no one could understand it.
  • 'Husbands' sisters bring up blisters,' but this one wouldn't hurt a fly.
  • At last an old, cross looking footman came and announced to the Rostovs that the prince was not receiving, but that the princess begged them to walk up.
  • She had decided to receive them, but feared lest the prince might at any moment indulge in some freak, as he seemed much upset by the Rostovs' visit.
  • He did not mention this to his daughter, but Natasha noticed her father's nervousness and anxiety and felt mortified by it.
  • But if you only knew how offensive it was... as if I...
  • But it all hurts terribly.
  • Natasha did not want to go, but could not refuse Marya Dmitrievna's kind offer which was intended expressly for her.
  • No, I had better not think of him; not think of him but forget him, quite forget him for the present.
  • We never hear a word but Dolokhov is mentioned.
  • She knew what it was all meant to represent, but it was so pretentiously false and unnatural that she first felt ashamed for the actors and then amused at them.
  • "Mais charmante!" said he, evidently referring to Natasha, who did not exactly hear his words but understood them from the movement of his lips.
  • They did not drag her away at once, but sang with her for a long time and then at last dragged her off, and behind the scenes something metallic was struck three times and everyone knelt down and sang a prayer.
  • She sang something mournfully, addressing the queen, but the king waved his arm severely, and men and women with bare legs came in from both sides and began dancing all together.
  • But suddenly a storm came on, chromatic scales and diminished sevenths were heard in the orchestra, everyone ran off, again dragging one of their number away, and the curtain dropped.
  • But looking into his eyes she was frightened, realizing that there was not that barrier of modesty she had always felt between herself and other men.
  • Natasha kept turning to Helene and to her father, as if asking what it all meant, but Helene was engaged in conversation with a general and did not answer her look, and her father's eyes said nothing but what they always said: Having a good time?
  • But now I like it very much indeed, he said, looking at her significantly.
  • Natasha did not understand what he was saying any more than he did himself, but she felt that his incomprehensible words had an improper intention.
  • But as soon as she had turned away she felt that he was there, behind, so close behind her.
  • All that was going on before her now seemed quite natural, but on the other hand all her previous thoughts of her betrothed, of Princess Mary, or of life in the country did not once recur to her mind and were as if belonging to a remote past.
  • But why 'still?'
  • His father announced to him that he would now pay half his debts for the last time, but only on condition that he went to Moscow as adjutant to the commander-in-chief--a post his father had procured for him--and would at last try to make a good match there.
  • Pierre received him unwillingly at first, but got used to him after a while, sometimes even accompanied him on his carousals, and gave him money under the guise of loans.
  • But he did not run after the unmarried girls, especially the rich heiresses who were most of them plain.
  • "She's first-rate, my dear fellow, but not for us," replied Dolokhov.
  • To the family Natasha seemed livelier than usual, but she was far less tranquil and happy than before.
  • But in nothing in the house was the holiday so noticeable as in Marya Dmitrievna's broad, stern face, which on that day wore an invariable look of solemn festivity.
  • "But anything suits you, my charmer!" she remarked.
  • There were a good many people there, but nearly all strangers to Natasha.
  • Anatole moved a chair for Natasha and was about to sit down beside her, but the count, who never lost sight of her, took the seat himself.
  • Natasha looked at the fat actress, but neither saw nor heard nor understood anything of what went on before her.
  • The count wished to go home, but Helene entreated him not to spoil her improvised ball, and the Rostovs stayed on.
  • During the ecossaise, which she also danced with him, Anatole said nothing when they happened to be by themselves, but merely gazed at her.
  • Her father asked her to come home, but she begged to remain.
  • I cannot come to visit you but is it possible that I shall never see you?
  • His large, glittering, masculine eyes were so close to hers that she saw nothing but them.
  • But she also loved Anatole, of that there was no doubt.
  • He took it into his head to begin shouting, but I am not one to be shouted down.
  • But what's the use of talking?
  • If your betrothed comes here now--there will be no avoiding a quarrel; but alone with the old man he will talk things over and then come on to you.
  • But if he won't--that's his affair, said Marya Dmitrievna, looking for something in her reticule.
  • "But she doesn't like me," said Natasha.
  • He is an invalid and an old man who must be forgiven; but he is good and magnanimous and will love her who makes his son happy.
  • Only so could I be completely happy; but now I have to choose, and I can't be happy without either of them.
  • But with that one nothing is spoiled.
  • But am I really to abandon forever the joy of Prince Andrew's love, in which I have lived so long?
  • Then he went on to say that he knew her parents would not give her to him--for this there were secret reasons he could reveal only to her--but that if she loved him she need only say the word yes, and no human power could hinder their bliss.
  • As she read she glanced at the sleeping Natasha, trying to find in her face an explanation of what she was reading, but did not find it.
  • But it can't be that she loves him!
  • And with the decision and tenderness that often come at the moment of awakening, she embraced her friend, but noticing Sonya's look of embarrassment, her own face expressed confusion and suspicion.
  • But, Natasha, can that be all over?
  • "But I can't believe it," insisted Sonya.
  • I had heard that it happens like this, and you must have heard it too, but it's only now that I feel such love.
  • "But think what you are doing," cried Sonya.
  • "But what has happened between you?" she asked.
  • But why this secrecy?
  • You know Prince Andrew gave you complete freedom--if it is really so; but I don't believe it!
  • But there must be reasons!
  • But Natasha, guessing her doubts, interrupted her in alarm.
  • But if he is dishonorable?
  • "But I can't live without him!" cried Natasha.
  • I don't want anyone, I don't love anyone but him.
  • I don't want to quarrel with you, but go, for God's sake go!
  • On Friday the Rostovs were to return to the country, but on Wednesday the count went with the prospective purchaser to his estate near Moscow.
  • "But you haven't refused Bolkonski?" said she.
  • But what am I to do?
  • "Natasha," said she, "you asked me not to speak to you, and I haven't spoken, but now you yourself have begun.
  • It won't be you, but I, who'll suffer.
  • But what is there to oblige him to reply?
  • But perhaps she really has already refused Bolkonski--she sent a letter to Princess Mary yesterday.
  • I helped you, but all the same I must tell you the truth; it is a dangerous business, and if you think about it--a stupid business.
  • "Go to the devil!" cried Anatole and, clutching his hair, left the room, but returned at once and dropped into an armchair in front of Dolokhov with his feet turned under him.
  • But why talk nonsense!
  • But he liked them; liked that mad driving at twelve miles an hour, liked upsetting a driver or running down a pedestrian, and flying at full gallop through the Moscow streets.
  • But with "his gentlemen" he always drove himself and never demanded anything for his work.
  • Drive all three to death but get me there in three hours.
  • Why, she'll rush out more dead than alive just in the things she is wearing; if you delay at all there'll be tears and 'Papa' and 'Mamma,' and she's frozen in a minute and must go back--but you wrap the fur cloak round her first thing and carry her to the sleigh.
  • "Marya Dmitrievna, for God's sake let me in to her!" she pleaded, but Marya Dmitrievna unlocked the door and went in without giving her an answer....
  • I'd treat you differently, but I'm sorry for your father, so I will conceal it.
  • Natasha did not change her position, but her whole body heaved with noiseless, convulsive sobs which choked her.
  • "It's lucky for him that he escaped me; but I'll find him!" she said in her rough voice.
  • But when your father comes back tomorrow what am I to tell him?
  • "But what did you want?" cried Marya Dmitrievna, growing angry again.
  • Marya Dmitrievna was to speak again but Natasha cried out:
  • Natasha did not reply, nor did she sob any longer, but she grew cold and had a shivering fit.
  • But Natasha was not asleep; with pale face and fixed wide-open eyes she looked straight before her.
  • From the pretense of illness, from his daughter's distress, and by the embarrassed faces of Sonya and Marya Dmitrievna, the count saw clearly that something had gone wrong during his absence, but it was so terrible for him to think that anything disgraceful had happened to his beloved daughter, and he so prized his own cheerful tranquillity, that he avoided inquiries and tried to assure himself that nothing particularly had happened; and he was only dissatisfied that her indisposition delayed their return to the country.
  • But still he pitied Prince Andrew to the point of tears and sympathized with his wounded pride, and the more he pitied his friend the more did he think with contempt and even with disgust of that Natasha who had just passed him in the ballroom with such a look of cold dignity.
  • "But how get married?" said Pierre, in answer to Marya Dmitrievna.
  • Pierre saw that the count was much upset and tried to change the subject, but the count returned to his troubles.
  • Pierre did not stay for dinner, but left the room and went away at once.
  • He paced through the ballroom, waited till everyone had come, and as Anatole had not turned up did not stay for dinner but drove home.
  • "If you allow yourself in my drawing room..." whispered Helene, but Pierre did not reply and went out of the room.
  • Anatole followed him with his usual jaunty step but his face betrayed anxiety.
  • He took a heavy paperweight and lifted it threateningly, but at once put it back in its place.
  • But how can I?...
  • I know I can't prevent your doing so, but if you have a spark of conscience...
  • They are armed against you by the same experience of debauchery; but to promise a maid to marry her... to deceive, to kidnap....
  • Pierre paused and looked at Anatole no longer with an angry but with a questioning look.
  • "I don't know that and don't want to," he said, not looking at Pierre and with a slight tremor of his lower jaw, "but you have used such words to me--'mean' and so on--which as a man of honor I can't allow anyone to use."
  • Pierre saw the distracted count, and Sonya, who had a tear-stained face, but he could not see Natasha.
  • She sighed, looking toward the door of the room where Prince Andrew was, evidently intending to express her sympathy with his sorrow, but Pierre saw by her face that she was glad both at what had happened and at the way her brother had taken the news of Natasha's faithlessness.
  • I know his pride will not let him express his feelings, but still he has taken it better, far better, than I expected.
  • "But is it possible that all is really ended?" asked Pierre.
  • Still getting stouter? he said with animation, but the new wrinkle on his forehead deepened.
  • I do not, and never did, like Speranski personally, but I like justice!
  • "Both true and untrue," Pierre began; but Prince Andrew interrupted him.
  • But I don't know, said Pierre.
  • I said that a fallen woman should be forgiven, but I didn't say I could forgive her.
  • "But can this be compared...?" said Pierre.
  • Natasha was standing in the middle of the drawing room, emaciated, with a pale set face, but not at all shamefaced as Pierre expected to find her.
  • He thought she would give him her hand as usual; but she, stepping up to him, stopped, breathing heavily, her arms hanging lifelessly just in the pose she used to stand in when she went to the middle of the ballroom to sing, but with quite a different expression of face.
  • Pierre sniffed as he looked at her, but did not speak.
  • Till then he had reproached her in his heart and tried to despise her, but he now felt so sorry for her that there was no room in his soul for reproach.
  • She stopped and breathed still more quickly, but did not shed tears.
  • But... I should like to know one thing....
  • But I don't know, don't know at all....
  • I am not worth it! exclaimed Natasha and turned to leave the room, but Pierre held her hand.
  • But when he said it he was amazed at his own words.
  • If I were not myself, but the handsomest, cleverest, and best man in the world, and were free, I would this moment ask on my knees for your hand and your love!
  • Millions of men perpetrated against one another such innumerable crimes, frauds, treacheries, thefts, forgeries, issues of false money, burglaries, incendiarisms, and murders as in whole centuries are not recorded in the annals of all the law courts of the world, but which those who committed them did not at the time regard as being crimes.
  • Man lives consciously for himself, but is an unconscious instrument in the attainment of the historic, universal, aims of humanity.
  • In historic events the so-called great men are labels giving names to events, and like labels they have but the smallest connection with the event itself.
  • He mounted it and rode at a gallop to one of the bridges over the Niemen, deafened continually by incessant and rapturous acclamations which he evidently endured only because it was impossible to forbid the soldiers to express their love of him by such shouting, but the shouting which accompanied him everywhere disturbed him and distracted him from the military cares that had occupied him from the time he joined the army.
  • Each of the three armies had its own commander-in-chief, but there was no supreme commander of all the forces, and the Emperor did not assume that responsibility himself.
  • Boris was now a rich man who had risen to high honors and no longer sought patronage but stood on an equal footing with the highest of those of his own age.
  • He was meeting Helene in Vilna after not having seen her for a long time and did not recall the past, but as Helene was enjoying the favors of a very important personage and Boris had only recently married, they met as good friends of long standing.
  • But the Emperor and Balashev passed out into the illuminated garden without noticing Arakcheev who, holding his sword and glancing wrathfully around, followed some twenty paces behind them.
  • He was satisfied with the form in which he had expressed his thoughts, but displeased that Boris had overheard it.
  • Balashev did not do so at once, but continued to advance along the road at a walking pace.
  • The French colonel with difficulty repressed a yawn, but was polite and evidently understood Balashev's importance.
  • But royaute oblige! * and he felt it incumbent on him, as a king and an ally, to confer on state affairs with Alexander's envoy.
  • Balashev replied that there was "nothing offensive in the demand, because..." but Murat interrupted him.
  • But instead of that, at the next village the sentinels of Davout's infantry corps detained him as the pickets of the vanguard had done, and an adjutant of the corps commander, who was fetched, conducted him into the village to Marshal Davout.
  • He became still more absorbed in his task when the Russian general entered, and after glancing over his spectacles at Balashev's face, which was animated by the beauty of the morning and by his talk with Murat, he did not rise or even stir, but scowled still more and sneered malevolently.
  • "Your Emperor's orders are obeyed in your army, but here," said Davout, "you must do as you're told."
  • "You are perfectly at liberty to treat me with respect or not," protested Balashev, "but permit me to observe that I have the honor to be adjutant general to His Majesty...."
  • His short hair had evidently just been brushed, but one lock hung down in the middle of his broad forehead.
  • The Emperor, my master... but the sight of the Emperor's eyes bent on him confused him.
  • Here Balashev hesitated: he remembered the words the Emperor Alexander had not written in his letter, but had specially inserted in the rescript to Saltykov and had told Balashev to repeat to Napoleon.
  • Balashev remembered these words, "So long as a single armed foe remains on Russian soil," but some complex feeling restrained him.
  • Such demands as to retreat beyond the Vistula and Oder may be made to a Prince of Baden, but not to me!
  • But who first joined his army?
  • What has she given you? he continued hurriedly, evidently no longer trying to show the advantages of peace and discuss its possibility, but only to prove his own rectitude and power and Alexander's errors and duplicity.
  • But he had begun talking, and the more he talked the less could he control his words.
  • But Napoleon did not let him speak.
  • But no, he has preferred to surround himself with my enemies, and with whom?
  • Barclay is said to be the most capable of them all, but I cannot say so, judging by his first movements.
  • He's stupid, but he has experience, a quick eye, and resolution....
  • Balashev knew how to reply to each of Napoleon's remarks, and would have done so; he continually made the gesture of a man wishing to say something, but Napoleon always interrupted him.
  • To the alleged insanity of the Swedes, Balashev wished to reply that when Russia is on her side Sweden is practically an island: but Napoleon gave an angry exclamation to drown his voice.
  • Balashev began to feel uncomfortable: as envoy he feared to demean his dignity and felt the necessity of replying; but, as a man, he shrank before the transport of groundless wrath that had evidently seized Napoleon.
  • "But what do I care about your allies?" said Napoleon.
  • Napoleon nodded condescendingly, as if to say, I know it's your duty to say that, but you don't believe it yourself.
  • But, to his surprise, Balashev received, through Duroc, an invitation to dine with the Emperor that day.
  • He not only showed no sign of constraint or self-reproach on account of his outburst that morning, but, on the contrary, tried to reassure Balashev.
  • In the course of conversation he mentioned Moscow and questioned Balashev about the Russian capital, not merely as an interested traveler asks about a new city he intends to visit, but as if convinced that Balashev, as a Russian, must be flattered by his curiosity.
  • "But a large number of monasteries and churches is always a sign of the backwardness of a people," said Napoleon, turning to Caulaincourt for appreciation of this remark.
  • "But nowhere in Europe is there anything like that," said Napoleon.
  • This reply of Balashev's, which hinted at the recent defeats of the French in Spain, was much appreciated when he related it at Alexander's court, but it was not much appreciated at Napoleon's dinner, where it passed unnoticed.
  • After his interview with Pierre in Moscow, Prince Andrew went to Petersburg, on business as he told his family, but really to meet Anatole Kuragin whom he felt it necessary to encounter.
  • On reaching Petersburg he inquired for Kuragin but the latter had already left the city.
  • But he again failed to meet Kuragin in Turkey, for soon after Prince Andrew arrived, the latter returned to Russia.
  • Not only could he no longer think the thoughts that had first come to him as he lay gazing at the sky on the field of Austerlitz and had later enlarged upon with Pierre, and which had filled his solitude at Bogucharovo and then in Switzerland and Rome, but he even dreaded to recall them and the bright and boundless horizons they had revealed.
  • Dessalles, the tutor he had brought from Switzerland, was wearing a coat of Russian cut and talking broken Russian to the servants, but was still the same narrowly intelligent, conscientious, and pedantic preceptor.
  • But though externally all remained as of old, the inner relations of all these people had changed since Prince Andrew had seen them last.
  • During his stay at Bald Hills all the family dined together, but they were ill at ease and Prince Andrew felt that he was a visitor for whose sake an exception was being made and that his presence made them all feel awkward.
  • The old prince knew very well that he tormented his daughter and that her life was very hard, but he also knew that he could not help tormenting her and that she deserved it.
  • "Ah, he has passed judgment... passed judgement!" said the old man in a low voice and, as it seemed to Prince Andrew, with some embarrassment, but then he suddenly jumped up and cried: "Be off, be off!
  • Prince Andrew wished to leave at once, but Princess Mary persuaded him to stay another day.
  • That day he did not see his father, who did not leave his room and admitted no one but Mademoiselle Bourienne and Tikhon, but asked several times whether his son had gone.
  • The boy, curly- headed like his mother and glowing with health, sat on his knee, and Prince Andrew began telling him the story of Bluebeard, but fell into a reverie without finishing the story.
  • He thought not of this pretty child, his son whom he held on his knee, but of himself.
  • She understood that when speaking of "trash" he referred not only to Mademoiselle Bourienne, the cause of her misery, but also to the man who had ruined his own happiness.
  • The old man feels he is guilty, but cannot change himself.
  • Everyone was dissatisfied with the general course of affairs in the Russian army, but no one anticipated any danger of invasion of the Russian provinces, and no one thought the war would extend farther than the western, the Polish, provinces.
  • He had gone to Petersburg, but Prince Andrew was glad to hear this.
  • But the question whether the camp was advantageous or disadvantageous remained for him undecided.
  • The Emperor was with the first army, but not as commander-in-chief.
  • In the orders issued it was stated, not that the Emperor would take command, but only that he would be with the army.
  • The Emperor, moreover, had with him not a commander-in-chief's staff but the imperial headquarters staff.
  • In attendance on him was the head of the imperial staff, Quartermaster General Prince Volkonski, as well as generals, imperial aides-de-camp, diplomatic officials, and a large number of foreigners, but not the army staff.
  • But this was only the external condition; the essential significance of the presence of the Emperor and of all these people, from a courtier's point of view (and in an Emperor's vicinity all became courtiers), was clear to everyone.
  • It was this: the Emperor did not assume the title of commander-in-chief, but disposed of all the armies; the men around him were his assistants.
  • Bennigsen was a landlord in the Vilna province who appeared to be doing the honors of the district, but was in reality a good general, useful as an adviser and ready at hand to replace Barclay.
  • The men of that party, remembering Suvorov, said that what one had to do was not to reason, or stick pins into maps, but to fight, beat the enemy, keep him out of Russia, and not let the army get discouraged.
  • They insisted on the retention of the camp at Drissa, according to Pfuel's plan, but on changing the movements of the other armies.
  • Of a fourth opinion the most conspicuous representative was the Tsarevich, who could not forget his disillusionment at Austerlitz, where he had ridden out at the head of the Guards, in his casque and cavalry uniform as to a review, expecting to crush the French gallantly; but unexpectedly finding himself in the front line had narrowly escaped amid the general confusion.
  • They said: Nothing but sorrow, shame, and ruin will come of all this!
  • The fifth party consisted of those who were adherents of Barclay de Tolly, not so much as a man but as minister of war and commander-in- chief.
  • The eighth and largest group, which in its enormous numbers was to the others as ninety-nine to one, consisted of men who desired neither peace nor war, neither an advance nor a defensive camp at the Drissa or anywhere else, neither Barclay nor the Emperor, neither Pfuel nor Bennigsen, but only the one most essential thing--as much advantage and pleasure for themselves as possible.
  • It was not a council of war, but, as it were, a council to elucidate certain questions for the Emperor personally.
  • There was about him something of Weyrother, Mack, and Schmidt, and many other German theorist-generals whom Prince Andrew had seen in 1805, but he was more typical than any of them.
  • Pfuel was short and very thin but broad-boned, of coarse, robust build, broad in the hips, and with prominent shoulder blades.
  • Prince Andrew did not catch what he said and would have passed on, but Chernyshev introduced him to Pfuel, remarking that Prince Andrew was just back from Turkey where the war had terminated so fortunately.
  • Prince Andrew's eyes were still following Pfuel out of the room when Count Bennigsen entered hurriedly, and nodding to Bolkonski, but not pausing, went into the study, giving instructions to his adjutant as he went.
  • The Emperor moved forward evidently wishing to end the conversation, but the flushed and excited Italian, oblivious of decorum, followed him and continued to speak.
  • But when Volkonski said, with a frown, that it was in the Emperor's name that he asked his opinion, Pfuel rose and, suddenly growing animated, began to speak:
  • But Pfuel, like a man heated in a fight who strikes those on his own side, shouted angrily at his own supporter, Wolzogen:
  • He was ridiculous, and unpleasantly sarcastic, but yet he inspired involuntary respect by his boundless devotion to an idea.
  • But besides this feeling of respect, Pfuel evoked pity in Prince Andrew.
  • From the tone in which the courtiers addressed him and the way Paulucci had allowed himself to speak of him to the Emperor, but above all from a certain desperation in Pfuel's own expressions, it was clear that the others knew, and Pfuel himself felt, that his fall was at hand.
  • Prince Andrew, listening to this polyglot talk and to these surmises, plans, refutations, and shouts, felt nothing but amazement at what they were saying.
  • The success of a military action depends not on them, but on the man in the ranks who shouts, 'We are lost!' or who shouts, 'Hurrah!'
  • At the review next day the Emperor asked Prince Andrew where he would like to serve, and Prince Andrew lost his standing in court circles forever by not asking to remain attached to the sovereign's person, but for permission to serve in the army.
  • On receiving this letter, Nicholas did not even make any attempt to get leave of absence or to retire from the army, but wrote to his parents that he was sorry Natasha was ill and her engagement broken off, and that he would do all he could to meet their wishes.
  • Nothing but honor could keep me from returning to the country.
  • But now, at the commencement of the campaign, I should feel dishonored, not only in my comrades' eyes but in my own, if I preferred my own happiness to my love and duty to the Fatherland.
  • But now, at the commencement of the campaign, I should feel dishonored, not only in my comrades' eyes but in my own, if I preferred my own happiness to my love and duty to the Fatherland.
  • But this shall be our last separation.
  • But now the campaign was beginning, and he had to remain with his regiment.
  • If the thought that things looked bad chanced to enter anyone's head, he tried to be as cheerful as befits a good soldier and not to think of the general trend of affairs, but only of the task nearest to hand.
  • But he did not express his thoughts, for in such matters, too, he had gained experience.
  • "But you take it without sugar?" she said, smiling all the time, as if everything she said and everything the others said was very amusing and had a double meaning.
  • It is not the sugar I want, but only that your little hand should stir my tea.
  • "Well, but supposing Mary Hendrikhovna is 'King'?" asked Ilyin.
  • But I'll send an orderly....
  • "No, gentlemen, you have had your sleep, but I have not slept for two nights," replied the doctor, and he sat down morosely beside his wife, waiting for the game to end.
  • When he had gone, taking his wife with him, and had settled down with her in their covered cart, the officers lay down in the tavern, covering themselves with their wet cloaks, but they did not sleep for a long time; now they exchanged remarks, recalling the doctor's uneasiness and his wife's delight, now they ran out into the porch and reported what was taking place in the covered trap.
  • But Rostov went off to his squadron without waiting for tea.
  • When campaigning, Rostov allowed himself the indulgence of riding not a regimental but a Cossack horse.
  • To ride this horse was a pleasure to him, and he thought of the horse, of the morning, of the doctor's wife, but not once of the impending danger.
  • He had grown accustomed when going into action to think about anything but what would seem most likely to interest him--the impending danger.
  • As soon as the sun appeared in a clear strip of sky beneath the clouds, the wind fell, as if it dared not spoil the beauty of the summer morning after the storm; drops still continued to fall, but vertically now, and all was still.
  • As they took the places vacated by the uhlans, bullets came from the front, whining and whistling, but fell spent without taking effect.
  • He felt instinctively that if the hussars struck at the French dragoons now, the latter could not withstand them, but if a charge was to be made it must be done now, at that very moment, or it would be too late.
  • The officer fell, not so much from the blow--which had but slightly cut his arm above the elbow--as from the shock to his horse and from fright.
  • His pale and mud-stained face--fair and young, with a dimple in the chin and light-blue eyes--was not an enemy's face at all suited to a battlefield, but a most ordinary, homelike face.
  • He hurriedly but vainly tried to get his foot out of the stirrup and did not remove his frightened blue eyes from Rostov's face.
  • On all sides, the hussars were busy with the dragoons; one was wounded, but though his face was bleeding, he would not give up his horse; another was perched up behind an hussar with his arms round him; a third was being helped by an hussar to mount his horse.
  • "But what on earth is worrying me?" he asked himself as he rode back from the general.
  • But while Nicholas was considering these questions and still could reach no clear solution of what puzzled him so, the wheel of fortune in the service, as often happens, turned in his favor.
  • They could not think of anything but how to help her.
  • Doctors came to see her singly and in consultation, talked much in French, German, and Latin, blamed one another, and prescribed a great variety of medicines for all the diseases known to them, but the simple idea never occurred to any of them that they could not know the disease Natasha was suffering from, as no disease suffered by a live man can be known, for every living person has his own peculiarities and always has his own peculiar, personal, novel, complicated disease, unknown to medicine--not a disease of the lungs, liver, skin, heart, nerves, and so on mentioned in medical books, but a disease consisting of one of the innumerable combinations of the maladies of those organs.
  • But, above all, that thought was kept out of their minds by the fact that they saw they were really useful, as in fact they were to the whole Rostov family.
  • But when he had gone into another room, to which the countess hurriedly followed him, he assumed a grave air and thoughtfully shaking his head said that though there was danger, he had hopes of the effect of this last medicine and one must wait and see, that the malady was chiefly mental, but...
  • Natasha was calmer but no happier.
  • She not merely avoided all external forms of pleasure--balls, promenades, concerts, and theaters--but she never laughed without a sound of tears in her laughter.
  • But it was gone forever.
  • It comforted her to reflect that she was not better as she had formerly imagined, but worse, much worse, than anybody else in the world.
  • But this was not enough.
  • But there was nothing to come.
  • But she was not even grateful to him for it; nothing good on Pierre's part seemed to her to be an effort, it seemed so natural for him to be kind to everyone that there was no merit in his kindness.
  • On her way home at an early hour when she met no one but bricklayers going to work or men sweeping the street, and everybody within the houses was still asleep, Natasha experienced a feeling new to her, a sense of the possibility of correcting her faults, the possibility of a new, clean life, and of happiness.
  • She's much thinner, but all the same she's pretty!
  • But she was always imagining that.
  • She knew for certain that she was pretty, but this no longer gave her satisfaction as it used to.
  • From habit she scrutinized the ladies' dresses, condemned the bearing of a lady standing close by who was not crossing herself properly but in a cramped manner, and again she thought with vexation that she was herself being judged and was judging others, and suddenly, at the sound of the service, she felt horrified at her own vileness, horrified that the former purity of her soul was again lost to her.
  • Take me, take me! prayed Natasha, with impatient emotion in her heart, not crossing herself but letting her slender arms hang down as if expecting some invisible power at any moment to take her and deliver her from herself, from her regrets, desires, remorse, hopes, and sins.
  • "Lord God of might, God of our salvation!" began the priest in that voice, clear, not grandiloquent but mild, in which only the Slav clergy read and which acts so irresistibly on a Russian heart.
  • But neither could she doubt the righteousness of the prayer that was being read on bended knees.
  • "Wherefore?" which had come to him amid every occupation, was now replaced, not by another question or by a reply to the former question, but by her image.
  • But latterly, when more and more disquieting reports came from the seat of war and Natasha's health began to improve and she no longer aroused in him the former feeling of careful pity, an ever- increasing restlessness, which he could not explain, took possession of him.
  • He wrote the words L'Empereur Alexandre, La nation russe and added up their numbers, but the sums were either more or less than 666.
  • Once when making such calculations he wrote down his own name in French, Comte Pierre Besouhoff, but the sum of the numbers did not come right.
  • How, or by what means, he was connected with the great event foretold in the Apocalypse he did not know, but he did not doubt that connection for a moment.
  • She had her back to him when he opened the door, but when, turning quickly, she saw his broad, surprised face, she blushed and came rapidly up to him.
  • But I don't want to interrupt you, he added, and was about to go to the drawing room.
  • But why do you ask me?
  • "I don't know myself," Natasha answered quickly, "but I should not like to do anything you disapproved of.
  • But she did not give him time to say them.
  • He was preparing to enter the university, but he and his friend Obolenski had lately, in secret, agreed to join the hussars.
  • Pierre began feeling in his pockets for the papers, but could not find them.
  • But you'll be late for dinner.
  • But Sonya, who had gone to look for the papers in the anteroom, had found them in Pierre's hat, where he had carefully tucked them under the lining.
  • I don't know, I am very far from having military tastes, but in these times no one can answer for himself.
  • Everything seems funny to you, but this isn't at all a joke....
  • Let him but say the word and we'll all go....
  • "But did you notice, it says, 'for consultation'?" said Pierre.
  • Well, Papa, I tell you definitely, and Mamma too, it's as you please, but I say definitely that you must let me enter the army, because I can't... that's all....
  • But the count had already recovered from his excitement.
  • Petya stopped short, flushed till he perspired, but still got out the words, "when our Fatherland is in danger."
  • But you said yourself that we would sacrifice everything.
  • "Because I love you!" was what he wanted to say, but he did not say it, and only blushed till the tears came, and lowered his eyes.
  • He tried to smile but could not: his smile expressed suffering, and he silently kissed her hand and went out.
  • But the farther he went and the more his attention was diverted by the ever-increasing crowds moving toward the Kremlin, the less he remembered to walk with the sedateness and deliberation of a man.
  • But within the Trinity Gateway he was so pressed to the wall by people who probably were unaware of the patriotic intentions with which he had come that in spite of all his determination he had to give in, and stop while carriages passed in, rumbling beneath the archway.
  • After standing some time in the gateway, Petya tried to move forward in front of the others without waiting for all the carriages to pass, and he began resolutely working his way with his elbows, but the woman just in front of him, who was the first against whom he directed his efforts, angrily shouted at him:
  • But it was impossible to smarten oneself up or move to another place, because of the crowd.
  • One of the generals who drove past was an acquaintance of the Rostovs', and Petya thought of asking his help, but came to the conclusion that that would not be a manly thing to do.
  • There were people not only in the square, but everywhere--on the slopes and on the roofs.
  • For a while the crowd was less dense, but suddenly all heads were bared, and everyone rushed forward in one direction.
  • Petya stood on tiptoe and pushed and pinched, but could see nothing except the people about him.
  • For a moment the crowd stood still, but then it made another rush forward.
  • But in spite of this he continued to struggle desperately forward, and from between the backs of those in front he caught glimpses of an open space with a strip of red cloth spread out on it; but just then the crowd swayed back--the police in front were pushing back those who had pressed too close to the procession: the Emperor was passing from the palace to the Cathedral of the Assumption--and Petya unexpectedly received such a blow on his side and ribs and was squeezed so hard that suddenly everything grew dim before his eyes and he lost consciousness.
  • But in spite of this he continued to struggle desperately forward, and from between the backs of those in front he caught glimpses of an open space with a strip of red cloth spread out on it; but just then the crowd swayed back--the police in front were pushing back those who had pressed too close to the procession: the Emperor was passing from the palace to the Cathedral of the Assumption--and Petya unexpectedly received such a blow on his side and ribs and was squeezed so hard that suddenly everything grew dim before his eyes and he lost consciousness.
  • All these conversations, especially the joking with the girls, were such as might have had a particular charm for Petya at his age, but they did not interest him now.
  • Petya too would have run there, but the clerk who had taken the young gentleman under his protection stopped him.
  • He did not know why, but he had to have a biscuit from the Tsar's hand and he felt that he must not give way.
  • He sprang forward and upset an old woman who was catching at a biscuit; the old woman did not consider herself defeated though she was lying on the ground--she grabbed at some biscuits but her hand did not reach them.
  • He did not go straight home from the Kremlin, but called on his friend Obolenski, who was fifteen and was also entering the regiment.
  • The chief magnates sat on high- backed chairs at a large table under the portrait of the Emperor, but most of the gentry were strolling about the room.
  • He pushed forward, feeling stirred, but not yet sure what stirred him or what he would say.
  • Evidently accustomed to managing debates and to maintaining an argument, he began in low but distinct tones:
  • But to judge what is best--conscription or the militia--we can leave to the supreme authority....
  • "Yes, and this is not a time for discussing," he continued, "but for acting: there is war in Russia!
  • Glinka, the editor of the Russian Messenger, who was recognized (cries of "author! author!" were heard in the crowd), said that "hell must be repulsed by hell," and that he had seen a child smiling at lightning flashes and thunderclaps, but "we will not be that child."
  • One of the old men nearest to him looked round, but his attention was immediately diverted by an exclamation at the other side of the table.
  • I never doubted the devotion of the Russian nobles, but today it has surpassed my expectations.
  • The actors of 1812 have long since left the stage, their personal interests have vanished leaving no trace, and nothing remains of that time but its historic results.
  • But all these hints at what happened, both from the French side and the Russian, are advanced only because they fit in with the event.
  • And not only was Napoleon not afraid to extend his line, but he welcomed every step forward as a triumph and did not seek battle as eagerly as in former campaigns, but very lazily.
  • You plotted against me, you lied to Prince Andrew about my relations with that Frenchwoman and made me quarrel with him, but you see I need neither her nor you!
  • We pass the time as we can, but in war as in war!
  • But as soon as he had left the room the old prince, looking uneasily round, threw down his napkin and went himself.
  • Dessalles looked in amazement at the prince, who was talking of the Niemen when the enemy was already at the Dnieper, but Princess Mary, forgetting the geographical position of the Niemen, thought that what her father was saying was correct.
  • But I didn't invent it myself.
  • Princess Mary saw Dessalles' embarrassed and astonished look fixed on her father, noticed his silence, and was struck by the fact that her father had forgotten his son's letter on the drawing-room table; but she was not only afraid to speak of it and ask Dessalles the reason of his confusion and silence, but was afraid even to think about it.
  • He wished to sleep, but he knew he would not be able to and that most depressing thoughts came to him in bed.
  • Every place seemed unsatisfactory, but worst of all was his customary couch in the study.
  • It was unsatisfactory everywhere, but the corner behind the piano in the sitting room was better than other places: he had never slept there yet.
  • He was not meditating, but only deferring the moment of making the effort to lift those legs up and turn over on the bed.
  • But hardly had he done so before he felt the bed rocking backwards and forwards beneath him as if it were breathing heavily and jolting.
  • The prince allowed no one at Bald Hills to drive with ringing bells; but on a long journey Alpatych liked to have them.
  • As he approached Smolensk he heard the sounds of distant firing, but these did not impress him.
  • This fact impressed Alpatych, but in thinking about his own business he soon forgot it.
  • Folks are leaving the town, but you have come to it, said he.
  • Many people were hurrying through the streets and there were many soldiers, but cabs were still driving about, tradesmen stood at their shops, and service was being held in the churches as usual.
  • 'One man though undone is but one,' as the proverb says, but with thirteen in your family and all the property...
  • But the Governor did not finish: a dusty perspiring officer ran into the room and began to say something in French.
  • Ferapontov came out after her, but on seeing Alpatych adjusted his waistcoat, smoothed his hair, yawned, and followed Alpatych into the opposite room.
  • But these sounds were hardly heard in comparison with the noise of the firing outside the town and attracted little attention from the inhabitants.
  • "What marvels!" she exclaimed, but hearing her master's voice she turned back, pulling down her tucked-up skirt.
  • Once more something whistled, but this time quite close, swooping downwards like a little bird; a flame flashed in the middle of the street, something exploded, and the street was shrouded in smoke.
  • On seeing the soldiers he was about to shout at them, but suddenly stopped and, clutching at his hair, burst into sobs and laughter:
  • Each day fleecy clouds floated across the sky and occasionally veiled the sun, but toward evening the sky cleared again and the sun set in reddish-brown mist.
  • But on the road, the highroad along which the troops marched, there was no such freshness even at night or when the road passed through the forest; the dew was imperceptible on the sandy dust churned up more than six inches deep.
  • But he was kind and gentle only to those of his regiment, to Timokhin and the like--people quite new to him, belonging to a different world and who could not know and understand his past.
  • But despite this, thanks to his regiment, Prince Andrew had something to think about entirely apart from general questions.
  • He called for Taras the gardener, but no one replied.
  • But not far from Bald Hills he again came out on the road and overtook his regiment at its halting place by the dam of a small pond.
  • The officer, Timokhin, with his red little nose, standing on the dam wiping himself with a towel, felt confused at seeing the prince, but made up his mind to address him nevertheless.
  • "Flesh, bodies, cannon fodder!" he thought, and he looked at his own naked body and shuddered, not from cold but from a sense of disgust and horror he did not himself understand, aroused by the sight of that immense number of bodies splashing about in the dirty pond.
  • I, for my part, begged him personally most urgently and finally wrote him, but nothing would induce him to consent.
  • I swear to you on my honor that Napoleon was in such a fix as never before and might have lost half his army but could not have taken Smolensk.
  • With fifteen thousand men I held the enemy at bay for thirty-five hours and beat him; but he would not hold out even for fourteen hours.
  • If he reports that our losses were great, it is not true; perhaps about four thousand, not more, and not even that; but even were they ten thousand, that's war!
  • But the enemy has lost masses...
  • He gave me his word he would not retreat, but suddenly sent instructions that he was retiring that night.
  • I am not merely civil to him but obey him like a corporal, though I am his senior.
  • This is painful, but, loving my benefactor and sovereign, I submit.
  • In Helene's circle the war in general was regarded as a series of formal demonstrations which would very soon end in peace, and the view prevailed expressed by Bilibin--who now in Petersburg was quite at home in Helene's house, which every clever man was obliged to visit--that not by gunpowder but by those who invented it would matters be settled.
  • "I have talked and talked at the Assembly of the Nobility," Prince Vasili interrupted, "but they did not listen to me.
  • But he retrieved his mistake at once.
  • But on the twenty- ninth of July Kutuzov received the title of Prince.
  • "But, Prince, they say he is blind!" said he, reminding Prince Vasili of his own words.
  • A good chessplayer having lost a game is sincerely convinced that his loss resulted from a mistake he made and looks for that mistake in the opening, but forgets that at each stage of the game there were similar mistakes and that none of his moves were perfect.
  • How much more complex than this is the game of war, which occurs under certain limits of time, and where it is not one will that manipulates lifeless objects, but everything results from innumerable conflicts of various wills!
  • But when Napoleon asked him whether the Russians thought they would beat Bonaparte or not, Lavrushka screwed up his eyes and considered.
  • But if three days pass, then after that, well, then that same battle will not soon be over.
  • Lelorgne d'Ideville smilingly interpreted this speech to Napoleon thus: "If a battle takes place within the next three days the French will win, but if later, God knows what will happen."
  • "As soon as Napoleon's interpreter had spoken," says Thiers, "the Cossack, seized by amazement, did not utter another word, but rode on, his eyes fixed on the conqueror whose fame had reached him across the steppes of the East.
  • Napoleon rode on, dreaming of the Moscow that so appealed to his imagination, and "the bird restored to its native fields" galloped to our outposts, inventing on the way all that had not taken place but that he meant to relate to his comrades.
  • But while himself remaining, he gave instructions for the departure of the princess and Dessalles with the little prince to Bogucharovo and thence to Moscow.
  • The fact that he did not, as she had feared, order her to be carried away by force but only told her not to let him see her cheered Princess Mary.
  • But what it was, no one could tell: it might be some caprice of a sick and half-crazy man, or it might relate to public affairs, or possibly to family concerns.
  • The doctor said this restlessness did not mean anything and was due to physical causes; but Princess Mary thought he wished to tell her something, and the fact that her presence always increased his restlessness confirmed her opinion.
  • She assumed an attitude of prayer, looked at the icons, repeated the words of a prayer, but she could not pray.
  • She could not sleep and several times went to the door and listened, wishing to enter but not deciding to do so.
  • But never had she felt so grieved for him or so much afraid of losing him.
  • But she drove these thoughts away with disgust.
  • But what could have happened?
  • She could not understand them, but tried to guess what he was saying and inquiringly repeated the words he uttered.
  • Princess Mary could not quite make out what he had said, but from his look it was clear that he had uttered a tender caressing word such as he had never used to her before.
  • He was still lying on the bed as before, but the stern expression of his quiet face made Princess Mary stop short on the threshold.
  • But she stepped back immediately.
  • Heaven only knows who arranged all this and when, but it all got done as if of its own accord.
  • The old prince used to approve of them for their endurance at work when they came to Bald Hills to help with the harvest or to dig ponds, and ditches, but he disliked them for their boorishness.
  • But such undercurrents still existed among the people and gathered new forces ready to manifest themselves just as strangely, unexpectedly, and at the same time simply, naturally, and forcibly.
  • But this he was unable to do, for he received tidings that the French had unexpectedly advanced, and had barely time to remove his own family and valuables from his estate.
  • But on hearing the order Dron lowered his eyes and remained silent.
  • Alpatych named others, but they too, according to Dron, had no horses available: some horses were carting for the government, others were too weak, and others had died for want of fodder.
  • But he also knew that Dron, who had acquired property and was hated by the commune, must be hesitating between the two camps: the masters' and the serfs'.
  • Dron got up and was about to say something, but Alpatych interrupted him.
  • Having wrung a submissive "I understand" from Dron, Alpatych contented himself with that, though he not only doubted but felt almost certain that without the help of troops the carts would not be forthcoming.
  • She lay on the sofa with her face to the wall, fingering the buttons of the leather cushion and seeing nothing but that cushion, and her confused thoughts were centered on one subject--the irrevocability of death and her own spiritual baseness, which she had not suspected, but which had shown itself during her father's illness.
  • She wished to pray but did not dare to, dared not in her present state of mind address herself to God.
  • Unconsciously she sat up, smoothed her hair, got up, and went to the window, involuntarily inhaling the freshness of the clear but windy evening.
  • But she remembered too how he had changed of late toward Mademoiselle Bourienne and could not bear to see her, thereby showing how unjust were the reproaches Princess Mary had mentally addressed to her.
  • She said her only consolation was the fact that the princess allowed her to share her sorrow, that all the old misunderstandings should sink into nothing but this great grief; that she felt herself blameless in regard to everyone, and that he, from above, saw her affection and gratitude.
  • The princess heard her, not heeding her words but occasionally looking up at her and listening to the sound of her voice.
  • I understand that you could not, and cannot, think of yourself, but with my love for you I must do so....
  • He hopes we should be in time to get away tomorrow, but I think it would now be better to stay here, said Mademoiselle Bourienne.
  • For herself she did not care where she remained or what happened to her, but she felt herself the representative of her dead father and of Prince Andrew.
  • "Dronushka," she said, regarding as a sure friend this Dronushka who always used to bring a special kind of gingerbread from his visit to the fair at Vyazma every year and smilingly offer it to her, "Dronushka, now since our misfortune..." she began, but could not go on.
  • But why didn't you tell me, Dronushka?
  • "But we have grain belonging to my brother?" she said.
  • Dron made no answer but sighed deeply.
  • "But I never told them to come," said Princess Mary.
  • "But I never sent for them," declared the princess.
  • But again the sense that she represented her father and her brother gave her courage, and she boldly began her speech.
  • She could not fathom whether it was curiosity, devotion, gratitude, or apprehension and distrust--but the expression on all the faces was identical.
  • "We are all very thankful for your bounty, but it won't do for us to take the landlord's grain," said a voice at the back of the crowd.
  • "But why not?" asked the princess.
  • "But why don't you want to take it?" she asked again.
  • But as if this angered him, he bent his head quite low and muttered:
  • We are sorry for you, but we're not willing.
  • And again all the faces in that crowd bore an identical expression, though now it was certainly not an expression of curiosity or gratitude, but of angry resolve.
  • "But you can't have understood me," said Princess Mary with a sad smile.
  • But her voice was drowned by the voices of the crowd.
  • Again Princess Mary tried to catch someone's eye, but not a single eye in the crowd was turned to her; evidently they were all trying to avoid her look.
  • For a long time that night Princess Mary sat by the open window of her room hearing the sound of the peasants' voices that reached her from the village, but it was not of them she was thinking.
  • Never will that moment return for him or for me when he might have said all he longed to say, and not Tikhon but I might have heard and understood him.
  • And not the face she had known ever since she could remember and had always seen at a distance, but the timid, feeble face she had seen for the first time quite closely, with all its wrinkles and details, when she stooped near to his mouth to catch what he said.
  • And the horror that had seized her when she touched him and convinced herself that that was not he, but something mysterious and horrible, seized her again.
  • She tried to think of something else and to pray, but could do neither.
  • "But why have you collected here?" he added.
  • "May I make bold to trouble your honor?" said he respectfully, but with a shade of contempt for the youthfulness of this officer and with a hand thrust into his bosom.
  • At the moment when Rostov and Ilyin were galloping along the road, Princess Mary, despite the dissuasions of Alpatych, her nurse, and the maids, had given orders to harness and intended to start, but when the cavalrymen were espied they were taken for Frenchmen, the coachman ran away, and the women in the house began to wail.
  • But on glancing at Rostov's face Ilyin stopped short.
  • It was your son's turn to be conscripted, but no fear!
  • But we all have to die.
  • But before the words were well out of his mouth, his cap flew off and a fierce blow jerked his head to one side.
  • Unwilling to obtrude himself on the princess, Rostov did not go back to the house but remained in the village awaiting her departure.
  • But the princess, if she did not again thank him in words, thanked him with the whole expression of her face, radiant with gratitude and tenderness.
  • Prince Andrew replied that he was not on his Serene Highness' staff but was himself a new arrival.
  • "I had the pleasure," replied Prince Andrew, "not only of taking part in the retreat but of losing in that retreat all I held dear--not to mention the estate and home of my birth--my father, who died of grief.
  • This memory carried him sadly and sweetly back to those painful feelings of which he had not thought lately, but which still found place in his soul.
  • But the bleached eyeball, the scar, and the familiar weariness of his expression were still the same.
  • But at that moment Denisov, no more intimidated by his superiors than by the enemy, came with jingling spurs up the steps of the porch, despite the angry whispers of the adjutants who tried to stop him.
  • But Kutuzov evidently did not wish to enter that room till he was disengaged.
  • I don't order it or allow it, but I don't exact compensation either.
  • Advisers are always plentiful, but men are not.
  • I missed you at Bucharest, but I needed someone to send.
  • Everything in haste, but more haste, less speed.
  • It is not difficult to capture a fortress but it is difficult to win a campaign.
  • For that, not storming and attacking but patience and time are wanted.
  • Kamenski sent soldiers to Rustchuk, but I only employed these two things and took more fortresses than Kamenski and made them Turks eat horseflesh!
  • "But shan't we have to accept battle?" remarked Prince Andrew.
  • But believe me, my dear boy, there is nothing stronger than those two: patience and time, they will do it all.
  • But the advisers n'entendent pas de cette oreille, voila le mal. * Some want a thing--others don't.
  • It was said that Mamonov's regiment would cost him eight hundred thousand rubles, and that Bezukhov had spent even more on his, but that the best thing about Bezukhov's action was that he himself was going to don a uniform and ride at the head of his regiment without charging anything for the show.
  • The Razumovskis wanted to buy his house and his estate near Moscow, but it drags on and on.
  • A kindly old man but not up to much.
  • But now they have had him transferred to my regiment and are expecting him every day.
  • I know you were friendly with Natalie, and so... but I was always more friendly with Vera--that dear Vera.
  • But I cannot understand the cruelty...
  • She is well, but sad.
  • But do you know who rescued her?
  • But how could one say that in Russian?
  • "There will be less panic and less gossip," ran the broadsheet "but I will stake my life on it that scoundrel will not enter Moscow."
  • The second broadsheet stated that our headquarters were at Vyazma, that Count Wittgenstein had defeated the French, but that as many of the inhabitants of Moscow wished to be armed, weapons were ready for them at the arsenal: sabers, pistols, and muskets which could be had at a low price.
  • But, above all, the French will be here any day now, so what are we waiting for?
  • But I will, I'll give the order at once.
  • Oh, but it's so...
  • Of his intimate friends only the Rostovs remained, but he did not go to see them.
  • The balloon was not yet ready, but Pierre learned that it was being constructed by the Emperor's desire.
  • But the attention of the crowd--officials, burghers, shopkeepers, peasants, and women in cloaks and in pelisses--was so eagerly centered on what was passing in Lobnoe Place that no one answered him.
  • The stout man rose, frowned, shrugged his shoulders, and evidently trying to appear firm began to pull on his jacket without looking about him, but suddenly his lips trembled and he began to cry, in the way full-blooded grown-up men cry, though angry with himself for doing so.
  • He was told that there in Perkhushkovo the earth trembled from the firing, but nobody could answer his questions as to who had won.
  • Before the battle of Borodino our strength in proportion to the French was about as five to six, but after that battle it was little more than one to two: previously we had a hundred thousand against a hundred and twenty thousand; afterwards little more than fifty thousand against a hundred thousand.
  • But later on, to fit what had occurred, the historians provided cunningly devised evidence of the foresight and genius of the generals who, of all the blind tools of history were the most enslaved and involuntary.
  • On the other question, how the battle of Borodino and the preceding battle of Shevardino were fought, there also exists a definite and well- known, but quite false, conception.
  • The Russians did not seek out the best position but, on the contrary, during the retreat passed many positions better than Borodino.
  • Not only did the Russians not fortify the position on the field of Borodino to the left of, and at a right angle to, the highroad (that is, the position on which the battle took place), but never till the twenty- fifth of August, 1812, did they think that a battle might be fought there.
  • Napoleon, riding to Valuevo on the twenty-fourth, did not see (as the history books say he did) the position of the Russians from Utitsa to Borodino (he could not have seen that position because it did not exist), nor did he see an advanced post of the Russian army, but while pursuing the Russian rearguard he came upon the left flank of the Russian position--at the Shevardino Redoubt--and unexpectedly for the Russians moved his army across the Kolocha.
  • Had Napoleon not ridden out on the evening of the twenty-fourth to the Kolocha, and had he not then ordered an immediate attack on the redoubt but had begun the attack next morning, no one would have doubted that the Shevardino Redoubt was the left flank of our position, and the battle would have taken place where we expected it.
  • So it happened that throughout the whole battle the Russians opposed the entire French army launched against our left flank with but half as many men.
  • The battle of Borodino was not fought on a chosen and entrenched position with forces only slightly weaker than those of the enemy, but, as a result of the loss of the Shevardino Redoubt, the Russians fought the battle of Borodino on an open and almost unentrenched position, with forces only half as numerous as the French; that is to say, under conditions in which it was not merely unthinkable to fight for ten hours and secure an indecisive result, but unthinkable to keep an army even from complete disintegration and flight.
  • The sunshine from behind the hill did not penetrate into the cutting and there it was cold and damp, but above Pierre's head was the bright August sunshine and the bells sounded merrily.
  • But beneath the slope, by the cart with the wounded near the panting little nag where Pierre stood, it was damp, somber, and sad.
  • It's not the soldiers only, but I've seen peasants today, too....
  • He kept looking to either side of the road for familiar faces, but only saw everywhere the unfamiliar faces of various military men of different branches of the service, who all looked with astonishment at his white hat and green tail coat.
  • But the doctor interrupted him and moved toward his gig.
  • "I would go with you but on my honor I'm up to here"--and he pointed to his throat.
  • We have ten thousand carts, but we need other things as well--we must manage as best we can!
  • They may die tomorrow; why are they thinking of anything but death?
  • The cavalry ride to battle and meet the wounded and do not for a moment think of what awaits them, but pass by, winking at the wounded.
  • The commander-in-chief was putting up there, but just when Pierre arrived he was not in and hardly any of the staff were there--they had gone to the church service.
  • It was ours yesterday, but now it is his.
  • Yesterday our left flank was there at Shevardino, you see, where the oak is, but now we have withdrawn our left wing--now it is over there, do you see that village and the smoke?
  • But the battle will hardly be there.
  • But wherever it may be, many a man will be missing tomorrow! he remarked.
  • An elderly sergeant who had approached the officer while he was giving these explanations had waited in silence for him to finish speaking, but at this point, evidently not liking the officer's remark, interrupted him.
  • The officer appeared abashed, as though he understood that one might think of how many men would be missing tomorrow but ought not to speak of it.
  • Standing among the crowd of peasants, Pierre recognized several acquaintances among these notables, but did not look at them--his whole attention was absorbed in watching the serious expression on the faces of the crowd of soldiers and militiamen who were all gazing eagerly at the icon.
  • When the service was over, Kutuzov stepped up to the icon, sank heavily to his knees, bowed to the ground, and for a long time tried vainly to rise, but could not do so on account of his weakness and weight.
  • But if you want to ride round the position, come along with us.
  • But I should like to see the right flank.
  • Well, you can do that later, but the chief thing is the left flank.
  • But where is Prince Bolkonski's regiment?
  • You see... but Boris did not finish, for at that moment Kaysarov, Kutuzov's adjutant, came up to Pierre.
  • The faces all expressed animation and apprehension, but it seemed to Pierre that the cause of the excitement shown in some of these faces lay chiefly in questions of personal success; his mind, however, was occupied by the different expression he saw on other faces--an expression that spoke not of personal matters but of the universal questions of life and death.
  • But a militiaman got there before him.
  • I concluded that if I reported to your Serene Highness you might send me away or say that you knew what I was reporting, but then I shouldn't lose anything...
  • But if I were right, I should be rendering a service to my Fatherland for which I am ready to die.
  • But his thoughts--the simplest, clearest, and therefore most terrible thoughts--would give him no peace.
  • But it was much simpler really....
  • But Napoleon came and swept him aside, unconscious of his existence, as he might brush a chip from his path, and his Bald Hills and his whole life fell to pieces.
  • That all this should still be, but no me....
  • The red-nosed Captain Timokhin, formerly Dolokhov's squadron commander, but now from lack of officers a battalion commander, shyly entered the shed followed by an adjutant and the regimental paymaster.
  • He had approached the shed full of animation, but on seeing Prince Andrew's face he felt constrained and ill at ease.
  • I went to see them, but missed them.
  • The officers were about to take leave, but Prince Andrew, apparently reluctant to be left alone with his friend, asked them to stay and have tea.
  • Not being a military man I can't say I have understood it fully, but I understand the general position.
  • But when his Serenity took command everything became straight forward.
  • While Russia was well, a foreigner could serve her and be a splendid minister; but as soon as she is in danger she needs one of her own kin.
  • "But that's impossible," said Prince Andrew as if it were a matter settled long ago.
  • But on what then?
  • The French losses were almost equal to ours, but very early we said to ourselves that we were losing the battle, and we did lose it.
  • But tomorrow we shan't say it!
  • But what awaits us tomorrow?
  • The fact is that those men with whom you have ridden round the position not only do not help matters, but hinder.
  • That's what I was saying to you-- those German gentlemen won't win the battle tomorrow but will only make all the mess they can, because they have nothing in their German heads but theories not worth an empty eggshell and haven't in their hearts the one thing needed tomorrow--that which Timokhin has.
  • Such magnanimity and sensibility are like the magnanimity and sensibility of a lady who faints when she sees a calf being killed: she is so kindhearted that she can't look at blood, but enjoys eating the calf served up with sauce.
  • Take no prisoners, but kill and be killed!
  • He paced up and down a few times in silence, but his eyes glittered feverishly and his lips quivered as he began speaking.
  • War is not courtesy but the most horrible thing in life; and we ought to understand that and not play at war.
  • But what is war?
  • On re-entering the shed Prince Andrew lay down on a rug, but he could not sleep.
  • "I not only understood her, but it was just that inner, spiritual force, that sincerity, that frankness of soul-- that very soul of hers which seemed to be fettered by her body--it was that soul I loved in her... loved so strongly and happily..." and suddenly he remembered how his love had ended.
  • Napoleon's short hair was wet and matted on the forehead, but his face, though puffy and yellow, expressed physical satisfaction.
  • But Napoleon had dressed and come out with such unexpected rapidity that he had not time to finish arranging the surprise.
  • But though Napoleon knew that de Beausset had to say something of this kind, and though in his lucid moments he knew it was untrue, he was pleased to hear it from him.
  • But Napoleon nodded to the traveler, and de Beausset had to mount.
  • General Campan's division did not seize the first fortification but was driven back, for on emerging from the wood it had to reform under grapeshot, of which Napoleon was unaware.
  • But in the disposition it is said that, after the fight has commenced in this manner, orders will be given in accordance with the enemy's movements, and so it might be supposed that all necessary arrangements would be made by Napoleon during the battle.
  • But this was not and could not be done, for during the whole battle Napoleon was so far away that, as appeared later, he could not know the course of the battle and not one of his orders during the fight could be executed.
  • The French soldiers went to kill and be killed at the battle of Borodino not because of Napoleon's orders but by their own volition.
  • There was nothing left for them to do but cry "Vive l'Empereur!" and go to fight, in order to get food and rest as conquerors in Moscow.
  • So the way in which these people killed one another was not decided by Napoleon's will but occurred independently of him, in accord with the will of hundreds of thousands of people who took part in the common action.
  • The dispositions cited above are not at all worse, but are even better, than previous dispositions by which he had won victories.
  • His pseudo- orders during the battle were also no worse than formerly, but much the same as usual.
  • The dispositions drawn up by Weyrother for the battle of Austerlitz were a model of perfection for that kind of composition, but still they were criticized--criticized for their very perfection, for their excessive minuteness.
  • But the Guards, Rapp, the Guards are intact? he remarked interrogatively.
  • Corvisart gave me these lozenges but they don't help at all.
  • It was the same panorama he had admired from that spot the day before, but now the whole place was full of troops and covered by smoke clouds from the guns, and the slanting rays of the bright sun, rising slightly to the left behind Pierre, cast upon it through the clear morning air penetrating streaks of rosy, golden-tinted light and long dark shadows.
  • All this was vivid, majestic, and unexpected; but what impressed Pierre most of all was the view of the battlefield itself, of Borodino and the hollows on both sides of the Kolocha.
  • From the left, over fields and bushes, those large balls of smoke were continually appearing followed by their solemn reports, while nearer still, in the hollows and woods, there burst from the muskets small cloudlets that had no time to become balls, but had their little echoes in just the same way.
  • He tried to pass either in front of them or to the right or left, but there were soldiers everywhere, all with the same preoccupied expression and busy with some unseen but evidently important task.
  • Pierre saw that there was a bridge in front of him and that soldiers were doing something on both sides of it and in the meadow, among the rows of new-mown hay which he had taken no notice of amid the smoke of the campfires the day before; but despite the incessant firing going on there he had no idea that this was the field of battle.
  • The adjutant looked angrily at him, evidently also intending to shout at him, but on recognizing him he nodded.
  • But the adjutant turned his horse about and rode on.
  • "Here it's tolerable," said he, "but with Bagration on the left flank they're getting it frightfully hot."
  • Pierre was about to ask, but seeing the stern expression of the adjutant who was also looking that way, he checked himself.
  • "No it's not that, but her action seems so jerky," said Pierre in a puzzled tone.
  • "He was here a minute ago but has just gone that way," someone told him, pointing to the right.
  • But in a gentleman it's wonderful!
  • The booming cannonade and the fusillade of musketry were growing more intense over the whole field, especially to the left where Bagration's fleches were, but where Pierre was the smoke of the firing made it almost impossible to distinguish anything.
  • But the men in the battery seemed not to notice this, and merry voices and jokes were heard on all sides.
  • The ranks of the infantry disappeared amid the smoke but their long- drawn shout and rapid musketry firing could still be heard.
  • On the right of the battery soldiers shouting "Hurrah!" were running not forwards but backwards, it seemed to Pierre.
  • On entering the earthwork he noticed that there were men doing something there but that no shots were being fired from the battery.
  • There were many dead whom he did not know, but some he recognized.
  • The red-faced man was still twitching, but they did not carry him away.
  • Sometimes shouts were heard through the firing, but it was impossible to tell what was being done there.
  • Napoleon, standing on the knoll, looked through a field glass, and in its small circlet saw smoke and men, sometimes his own and sometimes Russians, but when he looked again with the naked eye, he could not tell where what he had seen was.
  • But not only was it impossible to make out what was happening from where he was standing down below, or from the knoll above on which some of his generals had taken their stand, but even from the fleches themselves--in which by this time there were now Russian and now French soldiers, alternately or together, dead, wounded, alive, frightened, or maddened-- even at those fleches themselves it was impossible to make out what was taking place.
  • But not only was it impossible to make out what was happening from where he was standing down below, or from the knoll above on which some of his generals had taken their stand, but even from the fleches themselves--in which by this time there were now Russian and now French soldiers, alternately or together, dead, wounded, alive, frightened, or maddened-- even at those fleches themselves it was impossible to make out what was taking place.
  • The marshals and generals, who were nearer to the field of battle but, like Napoleon, did not take part in the actual fighting and only occasionally went within musket range, made their own arrangements without asking Napoleon and issued orders where and in what direction to fire and where cavalry should gallop and infantry should run.
  • But even their orders, like Napoleon's, were seldom carried out, and then but partially.
  • But even their orders, like Napoleon's, were seldom carried out, and then but partially.
  • But contrary to what had always happened in their former battles, instead of the news they expected of the enemy's flight, these orderly masses returned thence as disorganized and terrified mobs.
  • The generals re-formed them, but their numbers constantly decreased.
  • The adjutant bent his head affirmatively and began to report, but the Emperor turned from him, took a couple of steps, stopped, came back, and called Berthier.
  • But now something strange was happening to his troops.
  • He gave no orders, but only assented to or dissented from what others suggested.
  • But he sent an adjutant to take the news round the army.
  • He treated his Serene Highness with a somewhat affected nonchalance intended to show that, as a highly trained military man, he left it to Russians to make an idol of this useless old man, but that he knew whom he was dealing with.
  • Wolzogen was about to make a rejoinder, but Kutuzov interrupted him.
  • The tales passing from mouth to mouth at different ends of the army did not even resemble what Kutuzov had said, but the sense of his words spread everywhere because what he said was not the outcome of cunning calculations, but of a feeling that lay in the commander-in-chief's soul as in that of every Russian.
  • At times, as if to allow them a respite, a quarter of an hour passed during which the cannon balls and shells all flew overhead, but sometimes several men were torn from the regiment in a minute and the slain were continually being dragged away and the wounded carried off.
  • But when our artillery or cavalry advanced or some of our infantry were seen to move forward, words of approval were heard on all sides.
  • But the liveliest attention was attracted by occurrences quite apart from, and unconnected with, the battle.
  • But this one has hit!
  • The peasants went up and took him by his shoulders and legs, but he moaned piteously and, exchanging looks, they set him down again.
  • "But isn't it all the same now?" thought he.
  • He raised his head and looked about him, but above the level of the wounded men.
  • Men were supporting him in their arms and offering him a glass of water, but his trembling, swollen lips could not grasp its rim.
  • But now it is too late.
  • "Our fire is mowing them down by rows, but still they hold on," said the adjutant.
  • You may go and kill whom you please, but I don't want to do so anymore!
  • The cannon balls flew just as swiftly and cruelly from both sides, crushing human bodies, and that terrible work which was not done by the will of a man but at the will of Him who governs men and worlds continued.
  • But neither the French nor the Russians made that effort, and the flame of battle burned slowly out.
  • But the French did not make that effort.
  • Napoleon did not give his Guards, not because he did not want to, but because it could not be done.
  • It was not Napoleon alone who had experienced that nightmare feeling of the mighty arm being stricken powerless, but all the generals and soldiers of his army whether they had taken part in the battle or not, after all their experience of previous battles--when after one tenth of such efforts the enemy had fled--experienced a similar feeling of terror before an enemy who, after losing HALF his men, stood as threateningly at the end as at the beginning of the battle.
  • Not that sort of victory which is defined by the capture of pieces of material fastened to sticks, called standards, and of the ground on which the troops had stood and were standing, but a moral victory that convinces the enemy of the moral superiority of his opponent and of his own impotence was gained by the Russians at Borodino.
  • The French invaders, like an infuriated animal that has in its onslaught received a mortal wound, felt that they were perishing, but could not stop, any more than the Russian army, weaker by one half, could help swerving.
  • By adopting smaller and smaller elements of motion we only approach a solution of the problem, but never reach it.
  • But however small the units it takes, we feel that to take any unit disconnected from others, or to assume a beginning of any phenomenon, or to say that the will of many men is expressed by the actions of any one historic personage, is in itself false.
  • But the mind of man not only refuses to believe this explanation, but plainly says that this method of explanation is fallacious, because in it a weaker phenomenon is taken as the cause of a stronger.
  • But the mind of man not only refuses to believe this explanation, but plainly says that this method of explanation is fallacious, because in it a weaker phenomenon is taken as the cause of a stronger.
  • Whenever I look at my watch and its hands point to ten, I hear the bells of the neighboring church; but because the bells begin to ring when the hands of the clock reach ten, I have no right to assume that the movement of the bells is caused by the position of the hands of the watch.
  • But though I do not know what causes the cold winds to blow when the oak buds unfold, I cannot agree with the peasants that the unfolding of the oak buds is the cause of the cold wind, for the force of the wind is beyond the influence of the buds.
  • He gave orders to prepare for a fresh conflict to finish the enemy and did this not to deceive anyone, but because he knew that the enemy was beaten, as everyone who had taken part in the battle knew it.
  • But all that evening and next day reports came in one after another of unheard-of losses, of the loss of half the army, and a fresh battle proved physically impossible.
  • But a commander in chief, especially at a difficult moment, has always before him not one proposal but dozens simultaneously.
  • But a commander in chief, especially at a difficult moment, has always before him not one proposal but dozens simultaneously.
  • But even that he cannot do.
  • For instance, on the twenty-eighth it is suggested to him to cross to the Kaluga road, but just then an adjutant gallops up from Miloradovich asking whether he is to engage the French or retire.
  • The commander in chief listened to what was being said and sometimes asked them to repeat their remarks, but did not himself take part in the conversations or express any opinion.
  • From all this talk he saw only one thing: that to defend Moscow was a physical impossibility in the full meaning of those words, that is to say, so utterly impossible that if any senseless commander were to give orders to fight, confusion would result but the battle would still not take place.
  • It would not take place because the commanders not merely all recognized the position to be impossible, but in their conversations were only discussing what would happen after its inevitable abandonment.
  • But something had to be decided, and these conversations around him which were assuming too free a character must be stopped.
  • They waited for him from four till six o'clock and did not begin their deliberations all that time but talked in low tones of other matters.
  • She was nearest to him and saw how his face puckered; he seemed about to cry, but this did not last long.
  • Admitting the view of Barclay and others that a defensive battle at Fili was impossible, but imbued with Russian patriotism and the love of Moscow, he proposed to move troops from the right to the left flank during the night and attack the French right flank the following day.
  • The discussion recommenced, but pauses frequently occurred and they all felt that there was no more to be said.
  • Every Russian might have predicted it, not by reasoning but by the feeling implanted in each of us and in our fathers.
  • They were ashamed to be called cowards, ashamed to leave, but still they left, knowing it had to be done.
  • The prince was about to say something, but Helene interrupted him.
  • "Well, yes," said she, "it may be that he has other sentiments for me than those of a father, but that is not a reason for me to shut my door on him.
  • But for heaven's sake listen to me!
  • "But the law, religion..." said the prince, already yielding.
  • All that was done around her and to her at this time, all the attention devoted to her by so many clever men and expressed in such pleasant, refined ways, and the state of dove-like purity she was now in (she wore only white dresses and white ribbons all that time) gave her pleasure, but her pleasure did not cause her for a moment to forget her aim.
  • But the abbe, though he evidently enjoyed the beauty of his companion, was absorbed in his mastery of the matter.
  • But the question is again a twofold one: firstly...
  • He was delighted at the unexpected rapidity of his pupil's progress, but could not abandon the edifice of argument he had laboriously constructed.
  • The question was no longer whether this was possible, but only which was the better match and how the matter would be regarded at court.
  • But, my dear child, consult only your own heart.
  • But I love them, you know, and don't want to distress either of them.
  • But tell me, how will your husband look at the matter?
  • "But it says plainly: 'Whosoever shall marry her that is divorced...'" said the old princess.
  • She is right, but how is it that we in our irrecoverable youth did not know it?
  • But such ordinary conditions of life were nowhere to be found.
  • By rights I am a militia officer, but my men are not here.
  • Scarcely had Pierre laid his head on the pillow before he felt himself falling asleep, but suddenly, almost with the distinctness of reality, he heard the boom, boom, boom of firing, the thud of projectiles, groans and cries, and smelled blood and powder, and a feeling of horror and dread of death seized him.
  • But they... they were steady and calm all the time, to the end... thought he.
  • But how cast off all the superfluous, devilish burden of my outer man?
  • But he died! thought Pierre.
  • Pierre did not understand what his benefactor was saying, but he knew (the categories of thoughts were also quite distinct in his dream) that he was talking of goodness and the possibility of being what they were.
  • But though they were kindly they did not look at Pierre and did not know him.
  • Wishing to speak and to attract their attention, he got up, but at that moment his legs grew cold and bare.
  • For a moment as he was rearranging his cloak Pierre opened his eyes and saw the same penthouse roofs, posts, and yard, but now they were all bluish, lit up, and glittering with frost or dew.
  • But that's not what I want.
  • Again he covered himself up with his cloak, but now neither the lodge nor his benefactor was there.
  • They do not talk, but act.
  • The spoken word is silver but the unspoken is golden.
  • Man can be master of nothing while he fears death, but he who does not fear it possesses all.
  • Thoughts cannot be united, but to harness all these thoughts together is what we need!
  • But what am I to do?
  • If they're sent out and brought back again later on it will do no harm, but as things are now one can't answer for anything.
  • "But you see what he writes..." said another, pointing to a printed sheet he held in his hand.
  • An ax will be useful, a hunting spear not bad, but a three-pronged fork will be best of all: a Frenchman is no heavier than a sheaf of rye.
  • "But military men have told me that it is impossible to fight in the town," said Pierre, "and that the position..."
  • But what have you heard?
  • But what did you hear?
  • But evidently they had come to some understanding.
  • They threatened and questioned him, but he stuck to that: 'I made it up myself.'
  • But the point is that the count was much annoyed.
  • The count had the father fetched, but the fellow stuck to it.
  • But he's a good-for-nothing lad!
  • A short man was saying something, but when Pierre entered he stopped speaking and went out.
  • But that's not the point.
  • "But what did Klyucharev do wrong, Count?" asked Pierre.
  • "That is for me to know, but not for you to ask," shouted Rostopchin.
  • But I did not summon you to discuss my actions, but to give you advice--or an order if you prefer it.
  • But I did not summon you to discuss my actions, but to give you advice--or an order if you prefer it.
  • And I will knock the nonsense out of anybody"-- but probably realizing that he was shouting at Bezukhov who so far was not guilty of anything, he added, taking Pierre's hand in a friendly manner, "We are on the eve of a public disaster and I haven't time to be polite to everybody who has business with me.
  • She tried to get Nicholas back and wished to go herself to join Petya, or to get him an appointment somewhere in Petersburg, but neither of these proved possible.
  • Though Petya would remain in the service, this transfer would give the countess the consolation of seeing at least one of her sons under her wing, and she hoped to arrange matters for her Petya so as not to let him go again, but always get him appointed to places where he could not possibly take part in a battle.
  • I want no one but Petya, she thought.
  • It was felt that everything would suddenly break up and change, but up to the first of September nothing had done so.
  • "I was never pleased at Bolkonski's engagement to Natasha," said the countess, "but I always wanted Nicholas to marry the princess, and had a presentiment that it would happen.
  • But despite her grief, or perhaps just because of it, she took on herself all the difficult work of directing the storing and packing of their things and was busy for whole days.
  • They laughed and were gay not because there was any reason to laugh, but because gaiety and mirth were in their hearts and so everything that happened was a cause for gaiety and laughter to them.
  • For a while she had stood beside Sonya while the china was being packed and tried to help, but soon gave it up and went to her room to pack her own things.
  • At first she found it amusing to give away dresses and ribbons to the maids, but when that was done and what was left had still to be packed, she found it dull.
  • I beg you not to indulge in trifles now, but to help to pack, and tomorrow we must go, go, go!...
  • But Natasha would not give in.
  • I see you were right, but just take out the top one.
  • But this only lasted a moment.
  • But hard as they all worked till quite late that night, they could not get everything packed.
  • We have a house of our own in Moscow, but it's a long way from here, and there's nobody living in it.
  • The price of weapons, of gold, of carts and horses, kept rising, but the value of paper money and city articles kept falling, so that by midday there were instances of carters removing valuable goods, such as cloth, and receiving in payment a half of what they carted, while peasant horses were fetching five hundred rubles each, and furniture, mirrors, and bronzes were being given away for nothing.
  • As to the serfs the only indication was that three out of their huge retinue disappeared during the night, but nothing was stolen; and as to the value of their possessions, the thirty peasant carts that had come in from their estates and which many people envied proved to be extremely valuable and they were offered enormous sums of money for them.
  • Not only were huge sums offered for the horses and carts, but on the previous evening and early in the morning of the first of September, orderlies and servants sent by wounded officers came to the Rostovs' and wounded men dragged themselves there from the Rostovs' and from neighboring houses where they were accommodated, entreating the servants to try to get them a lift out of Moscow.
  • After all, ours are things that can be bought but think what being left behind means to them!...
  • "But I heard," said Natasha.
  • He had nothing to do in Moscow, but he had noticed that everyone in the army was asking for leave to visit Moscow and had something to do there.
  • But in general I can tell you, Papa, that such a heroic spirit, the truly antique valor of the Russian army, which they--which it" (he corrected himself) "has shown or displayed in the battle of the twenty-sixth-- there are no words worthy to do it justice!
  • I tell you, Papa" (he smote himself on the breast as a general he had heard speaking had done, but Berg did it a trifle late for he should have struck his breast at the words "Russian army"), "I tell you frankly that we, the commanders, far from having to urge the men on or anything of that kind, could hardly restrain those... those... yes, those exploits of antique valor," he went on rapidly.
  • But why are you so anxious?
  • The count was about to say something, but evidently restrained himself.
  • But the countess pushed her daughter away and went up to her husband.
  • It no longer seemed strange to them but on the contrary it seemed the only thing that could be done, just as a quarter of an hour before it had not seemed strange to anyone that the wounded should be left behind and the goods carted away but that had seemed the only thing to do.
  • The wounded dragged themselves out of their rooms and stood with pale but happy faces round the carts.
  • Many of the wounded asked them not to unload the carts but only to let them sit on the top of the things.
  • But the work of unloading, once started, could not be arrested.
  • Sonya too was busy all this time, but the aim of her efforts was quite different from Natasha's.
  • But who is it?
  • "Natasha does not know yet, but he is going with us," said Sonya.
  • And Dunyasha, with clenched teeth, without replying but with an aggrieved look on her face, hastily got into the coach to rearrange the seat.
  • She did not know who was in it, but each time she looked at the procession her eyes sought that caleche.
  • But the coachman could not stop, for from the Meshchanski Street came more carts and carriages, and the Rostovs were being shouted at to move on and not block the way.
  • But having taken a dozen steps he seemed to remember something and stopped.
  • Pierre glanced absently at Natasha and was about to say something, but the countess interrupted him.
  • "There will be another battle tomorrow..." he began, but Natasha interrupted him.
  • But what is the matter with you, Count?
  • But as soon as the man had left the room Pierre took up his hat which was lying on the table and went out of his study by the other door.
  • But there were some carriages waiting, and as soon as Pierre stepped out of the gate the coachmen and the yard porter noticed him and raised their caps to him.
  • Makar Alexeevich, the brother of my late master--may the kingdom of heaven be his--has remained here, but he is in a weak state as you know, said the old servant.
  • As it was sealed up so it has remained, but Sophia Danilovna gave orders that if anyone should come from you they were to have the books.
  • More than two hours passed and Gerasim took the liberty of making a slight noise at the door to attract his attention, but Pierre did not hear him.
  • No, but I want something else.
  • But as soon as Pierre turned toward him he wrapped his dressing gown around him with a shamefaced and angry look and hurried away.
  • "But could it be otherwise?" he thought.
  • But no, it can't be true that I am in Moscow, he suddenly thought.
  • But I shall spare her.
  • But can it be true that I am in Moscow?
  • But am I really in Moscow?
  • Yes, here it lies before me, but why is the deputation from the city so long in appearing? he wondered.
  • "But it's impossible..." declared the gentlemen of the suite, shrugging their shoulders but not venturing to utter the implied word--le ridicule...
  • "But it's impossible..." declared the gentlemen of the suite, shrugging their shoulders but not venturing to utter the implied word--le ridicule...
  • There were still people in it, perhaps a fiftieth part of its former inhabitants had remained, but it was empty.
  • But one has only to observe that hive to realize that there is no longer any life in it.
  • There is no longer the measured quiet sound of throbbing activity, like the sound of boiling water, but diverse discordant sounds of disorder.
  • They do not sting, but crawl away from danger.
  • But there were no dealers with voices of ingratiating affability inviting customers to enter; there were no hawkers, nor the usual motley crowd of female purchasers--but only soldiers, in uniforms and overcoats though without muskets, entering the Bazaar empty-handed and silently making their way out through its passages with bundles.
  • But there were no dealers with voices of ingratiating affability inviting customers to enter; there were no hawkers, nor the usual motley crowd of female purchasers--but only soldiers, in uniforms and overcoats though without muskets, entering the Bazaar empty-handed and silently making their way out through its passages with bundles.
  • Tradesmen and their assistants (of whom there were but few) moved about among the soldiers quite bewildered.
  • But the roll of the drums did not make the looting soldiers run in the direction of the drum as formerly, but made them, on the contrary, run farther away.
  • But the roll of the drums did not make the looting soldiers run in the direction of the drum as formerly, but made them, on the contrary, run farther away.
  • "But how are you going to stop them?" replied another officer.
  • The officer pounced on the soldiers who were in the shops, but at that moment fearful screams reached them from the huge crowd on the Moskva bridge and the officer ran out into the square.
  • What is it? he asked, but his comrade was already galloping off past Vasili the Beatified in the direction from which the screams came.
  • The officer did not decline, but took the note quietly and thanked her.
  • They were singing discordantly, arduously, and with great effort, evidently not because they wished to sing, but because they wanted to show they were drunk and on a spree.
  • But he's sucked our blood and now he thinks he's quit of us.
  • When the crowd collected round him he seemed confused, but at the demand of the tall lad who had pushed his way up to him, he began in a rather tremulous voice to read the sheet from the beginning.
  • "Your honor..." replied the shopman in the frieze coat, "your honor, in accord with the proclamation of his highest excellency the count, they desire to serve, not sparing their lives, and it is not any kind of riot, but as his highest excellence said..."
  • Not only did it seem to him (as to all administrators) that he controlled the external actions of Moscow's inhabitants, but he also thought he controlled their mental attitude by means of his broadsheets and posters, written in a coarse tone which the people despise in their own class and do not understand from those in authority.
  • "But what do they want?" he asked the superintendent of police.
  • But it is a turbulent crowd, your excellency--I hardly managed to get away from it.
  • As often happens with passionate people, he was mastered by anger but was still seeking an object on which to vent it.
  • I'll come out to you in a moment, but we must first settle with the villain.
  • But Rostopchin did not look at him.
  • He alone of all the Russians has disgraced the Russian name, he has caused Moscow to perish, said Rostopchin in a sharp, even voice, but suddenly he glanced down at Vereshchagin who continued to stand in the same submissive attitude.
  • Hearing not so much the words as the angry tone of Rostopchin's voice, the crowd moaned and heaved forward, but again paused.
  • They are like wolves whom nothing but flesh can appease.
  • To a man not swayed by passion that welfare is never certain, but he who commits such a crime always knows just where that welfare lies.
  • Not only did his reason not reproach him for what he had done, but he even found cause for self-satisfaction in having so successfully contrived to avail himself of a convenient opportunity to punish a criminal and at the same time pacify the mob.
  • Half an hour later he was driving with his fast horses across the Sokolniki field, no longer thinking of what had occurred but considering what was to come.
  • The caleche flew over the ground as fast as the horses could draw it, but for a long time Count Rostopchin still heard the insane despairing screams growing fainter in the distance, while his eyes saw nothing but the astonished, frightened, bloodstained face of "the traitor" in the fur-lined coat.
  • Even now he felt clearly that the gory trace of that recollection would not pass with time, but that the terrible memory would, on the contrary, dwell in his heart ever more cruelly and painfully to the end of his life.
  • But I did not do it for my own sake.
  • To all of them from the marshal to the least soldier, that place was not the Vozdvizhenka, Mokhavaya, or Kutafyev Street, nor the Troitsa Gate (places familiar in Moscow), but a new battlefield which would probably prove sanguinary.
  • No masters of the houses being found anywhere, the French were not billeted on the inhabitants as is usual in towns but lived in it as in a camp.
  • It was a weary and famished, but still a fighting and menacing army.
  • But it remained an army only until its soldiers had dispersed into their different lodgings.
  • As soon as the men of the various regiments began to disperse among the wealthy and deserted houses, the army was lost forever and there came into being something nondescript, neither citizens nor soldiers but what are known as marauders.
  • There were many such men both in the shops and houses--but there was no army.
  • But despite all these measures the men, who had till then constituted an army, flowed all over the wealthy, deserted city with its comforts and plentiful supplies.
  • As a hungry herd of cattle keeps well together when crossing a barren field, but gets out of hand and at once disperses uncontrollably as soon as it reaches rich pastures, so did the army disperse all over the wealthy city.
  • Moscow was burned by its inhabitants, it is true, but by those who had abandoned it and not by those who remained in it.
  • He did not know how or when this thought had taken such possession of him, but he remembered nothing of the past, understood nothing of the present, and all he saw and heard appeared to him like a dream.
  • Then during the first day spent in inaction and solitude (he tried several times to fix his attention on the masonic manuscripts, but was unable to do so) the idea that had previously occurred to him of the cabalistic significance of his name in connection with Bonaparte's more than once vaguely presented itself.
  • But when he returned to the house convinced that Moscow would not be defended, he suddenly felt that what before had seemed to him merely a possibility had now become absolutely necessary and inevitable.
  • If he were now to leave Moscow like everyone else, his flight from home, the peasant coat, the pistol, and his announcement to the Rostovs that he would remain in Moscow would all become not merely meaningless but contemptible and ridiculous, and to this Pierre was very sensitive.
  • Pierre knew this, but instead of acting he only thought about his undertaking, going over its minutest details in his mind.
  • But that is all the same!
  • 'It is not I but the hand of Providence that punishes thee,' I shall say, thought he, imagining what he would say when killing Napoleon.
  • "Well then, take me and execute me!" he went on, speaking to himself and bowing his head with a sad but firm expression.
  • While Pierre, standing in the middle of the room, was talking to himself in this way, the study door opened and on the threshold appeared the figure of Makar Alexeevich, always so timid before but now quite transformed.
  • On seeing Pierre he grew confused at first, but noticing embarrassment on Pierre's face immediately grew bold and, staggering on his thin legs, advanced into the middle of the room.
  • But the French entered and still Pierre did not retire--an irresistible curiosity kept him there.
  • "But I have had a lucky escape this time," he added, pointing to the damaged plaster of the wall.
  • "We French are merciful after victory, but we do not pardon traitors," he added, with a look of gloomy dignity and a fine energetic gesture.
  • The Frenchman listened in silence with the same gloomy expression, but suddenly turned to Pierre with a smile.
  • But however indubitable that conclusion and the officer's conviction based upon it, Pierre felt it necessary to disillusion him.
  • The soldiers in the yard, hearing the shot, came into the passage asking what had happened, and expressed their readiness to punish the culprits, but the officer sternly checked them.
  • When the French officer went into the room with Pierre the latter again thought it his duty to assure him that he was not French and wished to go away, but the officer would not hear of it.
  • But as the captain had the wine they had taken while passing through Moscow, he left the kvass to Morel and applied himself to the bottle of Bordeaux.
  • We are feared, but we are loved.
  • And then the Emperor... he began, but Pierre interrupted him.
  • But that man has vanquished me.
  • The German who knew little French, answered the two first questions by giving the names of his regiment and of his commanding officer, but in reply to the third question which he did not understand said, introducing broken French into his own German, that he was the quartermaster of the regiment and his commander had ordered him to occupy all the houses one after another.
  • Pierre still considered that it would be a useful and worthy action to slay the evildoer, but now he felt that he would not do it.
  • He did not know why, but he felt a foreboding that he would not carry out his intention.
  • He thought this, but still sat in the same place.
  • A strange feeling of weakness tied him to the spot; he wished to get up and go away, but could not do so.
  • He's a German, but a nice fellow all the same....
  • But he's a German.
  • Pierre did not answer, but looked cordially into the Frenchman's eyes whose expression of sympathy was pleasing to him.
  • But all that is only life's setting, the real thing is love--love!
  • But now it seemed to him that that meeting had had in it something very important and poetic.
  • More than anything else in Pierre's story the captain was impressed by the fact that Pierre was very rich, had two mansions in Moscow, and that he had abandoned everything and not left the city, but remained there concealing his name and station.
  • "But look here, brothers, there's another fire!" remarked an orderly.
  • But that's not Mytishchi, it's farther away.
  • But what do you think, Daniel Terentich?
  • But Natasha looked at her as if not understanding what was said to her and again fixed her eyes on the corner of the stove.
  • But you didn't see it!
  • The countess knew this, but what it might be she did not know, and this alarmed and tormented her.
  • She knew Prince Andrew was in the same yard as themselves and in a part of the hut across the passage; but this dreadful incessant moaning made her sob.
  • Her head moved from side to side from habit, but her eyes, feverishly wide, looked fixedly before her.
  • But in the yard there was a light from the fire at Little Mytishchi a mile and a half away, and through the night came the noise of people shouting at a tavern Mamonov's Cossacks had set up across the street, and the adjutant's unceasing moans could still be heard.
  • After a short silence the countess spoke again but this time no one replied.
  • She did not know why she had to, she knew the meeting would be painful, but felt the more convinced that it was necessary.
  • But now that the moment had come she was filled with dread of what she might see.
  • But an irresistible impulse drew her forward.
  • He was the same as ever, but the feverish color of his face, his glittering eyes rapturously turned toward her, and especially his neck, delicate as a child's, revealed by the turn-down collar of his shirt, gave him a peculiarly innocent, childlike look, such as she had never seen on him before.
  • But how about you?
  • Prince Andrew answered all his questions reluctantly but reasonably, and then said he wanted a bolster placed under him as he was uncomfortable and in great pain.
  • But Prince Andrew's mind was not in a normal state in that respect.
  • All the powers of his mind were more active and clearer than ever, but they acted apart from his will.
  • But how did God enjoin that law?
  • But besides this there was something else of importance.
  • "But perhaps that's my shirt on the table," he thought, "and that's my legs, and that is the door, but why is it always stretching and drawing itself out, and 'piti-piti-piti' and 'ti-ti' and 'piti-piti-piti'...?
  • "But perhaps that's my shirt on the table," he thought, "and that's my legs, and that is the door, but why is it always stretching and drawing itself out, and 'piti-piti-piti' and 'ti-ti' and 'piti-piti-piti'...?
  • It is possible to love someone dear to you with human love, but an enemy can only be loved by divine love.
  • And he vividly pictured to himself Natasha, not as he had done in the past with nothing but her charms which gave him delight, but for the first time picturing to himself her soul.
  • In that world some structure was still being erected and did not fall, something was still stretching out, and the candle with its red halo was still burning, and the same shirtlike sphinx lay near the door; but besides all this something creaked, there was a whiff of fresh air, and a new white sphinx appeared, standing at the door.
  • But the face remained before him with the force of reality and drew nearer.
  • Prince Andrew wished to return to that former world of pure thought, but he could not, and delirium drew him back into its domain.
  • He realized that it was the real living Natasha, and he was not surprised but quietly happy.
  • With a rapid but careful movement Natasha drew nearer to him on her knees and, taking his hand carefully, bent her face over it and began kissing it, just touching it lightly with her lips.
  • But Prince Andrew did not see that, he saw her shining eyes which were beautiful.
  • Though with the intimacy now established between the wounded man and Natasha the thought occurred that should he recover their former engagement would be renewed, no one--least of all Natasha and Prince Andrew--spoke of this: the unsettled question of life and death, which hung not only over Bolkonski but over all Russia, shut out all other considerations.
  • It was eleven by the clock, but it seemed peculiarly dark out of doors.
  • But it then occurred to him for the first time that he certainly could not carry the weapon in his hand through the streets.
  • Now and then he met Russians with anxious and timid faces, and Frenchmen with an air not of the city but of the camp, walking in the middle of the streets.
  • In another side street a sentinel standing beside a green caisson shouted at him, but only when the shout was threateningly repeated and he heard the click of the man's musket as he raised it did Pierre understand that he had to pass on the other side of the street.
  • But he was not destined to bring his mood safely to his destination.
  • But Pierre, though he felt that something unusual was happening around him, did not realize that he was approaching the fire.
  • But this is a monster and neither a man nor a father!
  • "But where was she left?" asked Pierre.
  • Pierre, accompanied by the maid, was advancing to the spot where the general stood, but the French soldiers stopped him.
  • But seeing a stranger the sickly, scrofulous-looking child, unattractively like her mother, began to yell and run away.
  • But he made an effort not to throw the child down and ran with her to the large house.
  • But Pierre was not listening to the woman.
  • But his comrade, throwing down the boots and drawing his sword, moved threateningly toward Pierre.
  • But of all these various suspected characters, Pierre was considered to be the most suspicious of all.
  • The Empress Elisabeth, however, when asked what instructions she would be pleased to give--with her characteristic Russian patriotism had replied that she could give no directions about state institutions for that was the affair of the sovereign, but as far as she personally was concerned she would be the last to quit Petersburg.
  • They all knew very well that the enchanting countess' illness arose from an inconvenience resulting from marrying two husbands at the same time, and that the Italian's cure consisted in removing such inconvenience; but in Anna Pavlovna's presence no one dared to think of this or even appear to know it.
  • We belong to different camps, but that does not prevent my esteeming her as she deserves.
  • "It may turn out very well," he thought, "but if not, they'll know how to arrange matters."
  • But no one said anything.
  • But what a loss Kutaysov is!
  • But next day no news arrived from the army and the public mood grew anxious.
  • That day Prince Vasili no longer boasted of his protege Kutuzov, but remained silent when the commander-in-chief was mentioned.
  • It was said that Prince Vasili and the old count had turned upon the Italian, but the latter had produced such letters from the unfortunate deceased that they had immediately let the matter drop.
  • As long as this news remained unofficial it was possible to doubt it, but the next day the following communication was received from Count Rostopchin:
  • This messenger was Michaud, a Frenchman who did not know Russian, but who was quoique etranger, russe de coeur et d'ame, * as he said of himself.
  • I left it all in flames, replied Michaud in a decided tone, but glancing at the Emperor he was frightened by what he had done.
  • But this lasted only a moment.
  • But it was not really so.
  • Most of the people at that time paid no attention to the general progress of events but were guided only by their private interests, and they were the very people whose activities at that period were most useful.
  • In Petersburg and in the provinces at a distance from Moscow, ladies, and gentlemen in militia uniforms, wept for Russia and its ancient capital and talked of self-sacrifice and so on; but in the army which retired beyond Moscow there was little talk or thought of Moscow, and when they caught sight of its burned ruins no one swore to be avenged on the French, but they thought about their next pay, their next quarters, of Matreshka the vivandiere, and like matters.
  • When he had changed, poured water over his head, and scented himself, Nicholas arrived at the governor's rather late, but with the phrase "better late than never" on his lips.
  • There were a great many ladies and some of Nicholas' Moscow acquaintances, but there were no men who could at all vie with the cavalier of St. George, the hussar remount officer, the good-natured and well-bred Count Rostov.
  • But the latter's good-natured naivete was so boundless that sometimes even he involuntarily yielded to Nicholas' good humor.
  • When he had parted from Malvintseva Nicholas wished to return to the dancing, but the governor's little wife placed her plump hand on his sleeve and, saying that she wanted to have a talk with him, led him to her sitting room, from which those who were there immediately withdrew so as not to be in her way.
  • Catherine Petrovna speaks of Lily, but I say, no--the princess!
  • But, my dear boy, among other things you are too attentive to the other, the blonde.
  • But see here, to tell the truth, Aunt...
  • You see, Aunt, Mamma has long wanted me to marry an heiress, but the very idea of marrying for money is repugnant to me.
  • But Princess Bolkonskaya--that's another matter.
  • But you don't suppose I'm going to get you married at once?
  • But Princess Mary experienced a painful rather than a joyful feeling--her mental tranquillity was destroyed, and desires, doubts, self-reproach, and hopes reawoke.
  • But when on Sunday after church the footman announced in the drawing room that Count Rostov had called, the princess showed no confusion, only a slight blush suffused her cheeks and her eyes lit up with a new and radiant light.
  • Evidently she could speak of Russia's misfortunes with a certain artificiality, but her brother was too near her heart and she neither could nor would speak lightly of him.
  • Nicholas blushed and was confused when people spoke to him about the princess (as she did when he was mentioned) and even when he thought of her, but in her presence he felt quite at ease, and said not at all what he had prepared, but what, quite appropriately, occurred to him at the moment.
  • But he also knew (or rather felt at the bottom of his heart) that by resigning himself now to the force of circumstances and to those who were guiding him, he was not only doing nothing wrong, but was doing something very important--more important than anything he had ever done in his life.
  • But he also knew (or rather felt at the bottom of his heart) that by resigning himself now to the force of circumstances and to those who were guiding him, he was not only doing nothing wrong, but was doing something very important--more important than anything he had ever done in his life.
  • But he never thought about her as he had thought of all the young ladies without exception whom he had met in society, nor as he had for a long time, and at one time rapturously, thought about Sonya.
  • But with Princess Mary, to whom they were trying to get him engaged, he could never picture anything of future married life.
  • It was the same face he had seen before, there was the same general expression of refined, inner, spiritual labor, but now it was quite differently lit up.
  • The princess looked at him, not grasping what he was saying, but cheered by the expression of regretful sympathy on his face.
  • That evening Nicholas did not go out, but stayed at home to settle some accounts with the horse dealers.
  • When he had finished that business it was already too late to go anywhere but still too early to go to bed, and for a long time he paced up and down the room, reflecting on his life, a thing he rarely did.
  • When he met her again in Voronezh the impression she made on him was not merely pleasing but powerful.
  • But that day's encounter in church had, he felt, sunk deeper than was desirable for his peace of mind.
  • In men Rostov could not bear to see the expression of a higher spiritual life (that was why he did not like Prince Andrew) and he referred to it contemptuously as philosophy and dreaminess, but in Princess Mary that very sorrow which revealed the depth of a whole spiritual world foreign to him was an irresistible attraction.
  • But no, he could not imagine that.
  • Reveries about Sonya had had something merry and playful in them, but to dream of Princess Mary was always difficult and a little frightening.
  • She was right," he thought, remembering what the governor's wife had said: "Nothing but misfortune can come of marrying Sonya.
  • Yes, prayer can move mountains, but one must have faith and not pray as Natasha and I used to as children, that the snow might turn into sugar-- and then run out into the yard to see whether it had done so.
  • In this letter the countess also mentioned that Prince Andrew was among the wounded traveling with them; his state was very critical, but the doctor said there was now more hope.
  • Neither he nor she said a word about what "Natasha nursing him" might mean, but thanks to this letter Nicholas suddenly became almost as intimate with the princess as if they were relations.
  • But a few days before they left Moscow, moved and excited by all that was going on, she called Sonya to her and, instead of reproaching and making demands on her, tearfully implored her to sacrifice herself and repay all that the family had done for her by breaking off her engagement with Nicholas.
  • Sonya burst into hysterical tears and replied through her sobs that she would do anything and was prepared for anything, but gave no actual promise and could not bring herself to decide to do what was demanded of her.
  • But now they wanted her to sacrifice the very thing that constituted the whole reward for her self-sacrifice and the whole meaning of her life.
  • But when she heard of Prince Andrew's presence in their house, despite her sincere pity for him and for Natasha, she was seized by a joyful and superstitious feeling that God did not intend her to be separated from Nicholas.
  • She knew that Natasha loved no one but Prince Andrew and had never ceased to love him.
  • She had in fact seen nothing then but had mentioned the first thing that came into her head, but what she had invented then seemed to her now as real as any other recollection.
  • She not only remembered what she had then said--that he turned to look at her and smiled and was covered with something red--but was firmly convinced that she had then seen and said that he was covered with a pink quilt and that his eyes were closed.
  • "But what does it mean?" she added meditatively.
  • A few minutes later Prince Andrew rang and Natasha went to him, but Sonya, feeling unusually excited and touched, remained at the window thinking about the strangeness of what had occurred.
  • Again they interrupted him: they had not asked where he was going, but why he was found near the fire?
  • No flames were seen, but columns of smoke rose on all sides, and all Moscow as far as Pierre could see was one vast charred ruin.
  • But there seemed to be no one to celebrate this holiday: everywhere were blackened ruins, and the few Russians to be seen were tattered and frightened people who tried to hide when they saw the French.
  • Pierre felt himself to be an insignificant chip fallen among the wheels of a machine whose action he did not understand but which was working well.
  • Pierre went close up to him, but Davout, evidently consulting a paper that lay before him, did not look up.
  • To him Davout was not merely a French general, but a man notorious for his cruelty.
  • Looking at his cold face, as he sat like a stern schoolmaster who was prepared to wait awhile for an answer, Pierre felt that every instant of delay might cost him his life; but he did not know what to say.
  • But before he had decided what to do, Davout raised his head, pushed his spectacles back on his forehead, screwed up his eyes, and looked intently at him.
  • "He is a Russian spy," Davout interrupted, addressing another general who was present, but whom Pierre had not noticed.
  • "Monseigneur!" exclaimed Pierre, not in an offended but in a pleading voice.
  • But at that moment an adjutant entered and reported something to Davout.
  • But where they were to take him Pierre did not know: back to the coach house or to the place of execution his companions had pointed out to him as they crossed the Virgin's Field.
  • "Yes, of course!" replied Davout, but what this "yes" meant, Pierre did not know.
  • In another moment Davout would have realized that he was doing wrong, but just then the adjutant had come in and interrupted him.
  • There was a stir in the ranks of the soldiers and it was evident that they were all hurrying--not as men hurry to do something they understand, but as people hurry to finish a necessary but unpleasant and incomprehensible task.
  • But who, after all, is doing this?
  • Probably a word of command was given and was followed by the reports of eight muskets; but try as he would Pierre could not afterwards remember having heard the slightest sound of the shots.
  • That shoulder rose and fell rhythmically and convulsively, but spadefuls of earth were already being thrown over the whole body.
  • But Pierre did not understand him and remained near the post, and no one drove him away.
  • All but one rejoined their companies.
  • He heard what they said, but did not understand the meaning of the words and made no kind of deduction from or application of them.
  • He looked at their faces and figures, but they all seemed to him equally meaningless.
  • He had experienced this before, but never so strongly as now.
  • But now he felt that the universe had crumbled before his eyes and only meaningless ruins remained, and this not by any fault of his own.
  • But as soon as he closed them he saw before him the dreadful face of the factory lad-- especially dreadful because of its simplicity--and the faces of the murderers, even more dreadful because of their disquiet.
  • And there was so much kindliness and simplicity in his singsong voice that Pierre tried to reply, but his jaw trembled and he felt tears rising to his eyes.
  • "Oh, I'm all right," said he, "but why did they shoot those poor fellows?
  • "I say things happen not as we plan but as God judges," he replied, thinking that he was repeating what he had said before, and immediately continued:
  • "A wife for counsel, a mother-in-law for welcome, but there's none as dear as one's own mother!" said he.
  • "But it's all the same now," Pierre could not help saying.
  • But he, my younger brother, had five little ones, while I, you see, only left a wife behind.
  • We had a little girl, but God took her before I went as a soldier.
  • But we are always judging, 'that's not well--that's not right!'
  • Our luck is like water in a dragnet: you pull at it and it bulges, but when you've drawn it out it's empty!
  • But what was that you said: Frola and Lavra?
  • Sounds of crying and screaming came from somewhere in the distance outside, and flames were visible through the cracks of the shed, but inside it was quiet and dark.
  • But his brilliantly white, strong teeth which showed in two unbroken semicircles when he laughed--as he often did--were all sound and good, there was not a gray hair in his beard or on his head, and his whole body gave an impression of suppleness and especially of firmness and endurance.
  • But the chief peculiarity of his speech was its directness and appositeness.
  • He could do everything, not very well but not badly.
  • He did not sing like a trained singer who knows he is listened to, but like the birds, evidently giving vent to the sounds in the same way that one stretches oneself or walks about to get rid of stiffness, and the sounds were always high-pitched, mournful, delicate, and almost feminine, and his face at such times was very serious.
  • He liked to talk and he talked well, adorning his speech with terms of endearment and with folk sayings which Pierre thought he invented himself, but the chief charm of his talk lay in the fact that the commonest events--sometimes just such as Pierre had witnessed without taking notice of them--assumed in Karataev's a character of solemn fitness.
  • He liked to hear the folk tales one of the soldiers used to tell of an evening (they were always the same), but most of all he liked to hear stories of real life.
  • Karataev had no attachments, friendships, or love, as Pierre understood them, but loved and lived affectionately with everything life brought him in contact with, particularly with man--not any particular man, but those with whom he happened to be.
  • He loved his dog, his comrades, the French, and Pierre who was his neighbor, but Pierre felt that in spite of Karataev's affectionate tenderness for him (by which he unconsciously gave Pierre's spiritual life its due) he would not have grieved for a moment at parting from him.
  • Sometimes Pierre, struck by the meaning of his words, would ask him to repeat them, but Platon could never recall what he had said a moment before, just as he never could repeat to Pierre the words of his favorite song: native and birch tree and my heart is sick occurred in it, but when spoken and not sung, no meaning could be got out of it.
  • But his life, as he regarded it, had no meaning as a separate thing.
  • When Princess Mary heard from Nicholas that her brother was with the Rostovs at Yaroslavl she at once prepared to go there, in spite of her aunt's efforts to dissuade her--and not merely to go herself but to take her nephew with her.
  • Whether it were difficult or easy, possible or impossible, she did not ask and did not want to know: it was her duty, not only to herself, to be near her brother who was perhaps dying, but to do everything possible to take his son to him, and so she prepared to set off.
  • Not by a single word had Nicholas alluded to the fact that Prince Andrew's relations with Natasha might, if he recovered, be renewed, but Princess Mary saw by his face that he knew and thought of this.
  • But the very difficulties and preoccupations of the journey, which she took so actively in hand, saved her for a while from her grief and gave her strength.
  • What "still the same" might mean Princess Mary did not ask, but with an unnoticed glance at little seven-year-old Nicholas, who was sitting in front of her looking with pleasure at the town, she bowed her head and did not raise it again till the heavy coach, rumbling, shaking and swaying, came to a stop.
  • "The doctor says that he is not in danger," said the countess, but as she spoke she raised her eyes with a sigh, and her gesture conveyed a contradiction of her words.
  • But she felt oppressed by the fact that the mood of everyone around her was so far from what was in her own heart.
  • "How..." she began her question but stopped short.
  • Natasha was gazing at her, but seemed afraid and in doubt whether to say all she knew or not; she seemed to feel that before those luminous eyes which penetrated into the very depths of her heart, it was impossible not to tell the whole truth which she saw.
  • But she still hoped, and asked, in words she herself did not trust:
  • But how is his wound?
  • Then fever set in, but the doctor had said the fever was not very serious.
  • "But two days ago this suddenly happened," said Natasha, struggling with her sobs.
  • I don't know why, but you will see what he is like.
  • No, it's not that, but worse.
  • "But in what am I to blame?" she asked herself.
  • In the deep gaze that seemed to look not outwards but inwards there was an almost hostile expression as he slowly regarded his sister and Natasha.
  • It was plain that he was making an effort to listen, but could not do so.
  • Princess Mary heard his words but they had no meaning for her, except as a proof of how far away he now was from everything living.
  • When little Nicholas was brought into Prince Andrew's room he looked at his father with frightened eyes, but did not cry, because no one else was crying.
  • "Mary, you know the Gosp..." but he broke off.
  • But how simple it is.
  • Not only did Prince Andrew know he would die, but he felt that he was dying and was already half dead.
  • He had twice experienced that terribly tormenting fear of death--the end--but now he no longer understood that fear.
  • Recalling the moment at the ambulance station when he had seen Kuragin, he could not now regain the feeling he then had, but was tormented by the question whether Kuragin was alive.
  • His illness pursued its normal physical course, but what Natasha referred to when she said: "This suddenly happened," had occurred two days before Princess Mary arrived.
  • He looked at her without moving and saw that she wanted to draw a deep breath after stooping, but refrained from doing so and breathed cautiously.
  • At the Troitsa monastery they had spoken of the past, and he had told her that if he lived he would always thank God for his wound which had brought them together again, but after that they never spoke of the future.
  • Natasha felt happy and agitated, but at once remembered that this would not do and that he had to be quiet.
  • "But you have not slept," she said, repressing her joy.
  • But they were only thoughts.
  • He dreamed that he was lying in the room he really was in, but that he was quite well and unwounded.
  • Prince Andrew dimly realized that all this was trivial and that he had more important cares, but he continued to speak, surprising them by empty witticisms.
  • He went, and tried to hurry, but his legs refused to move and he knew he would not be in time to lock the door though he painfully strained all his powers.
  • But just when he was clumsily creeping toward the door, that dreadful something on the other side was already pressing against it and forcing its way in.
  • He seized the door, making a final effort to hold it back--to lock it was no longer possible--but his efforts were weak and clumsy and the door, pushed from behind by that terror, opened and closed again.
  • But at the instant he died, Prince Andrew remembered that he was asleep, and at the very instant he died, having made an effort, he awoke.
  • She closed them but did not kiss them, but clung to that which reminded her most nearly of him--his body.
  • Man's mind cannot grasp the causes of events in their completeness, but the desire to find those causes is implanted in man's soul.
  • But we need only penetrate to the essence of any historic event--which lies in the activity of the general mass of men who take part in it--to be convinced that the will of the historic hero does not control the actions of the mass but is itself continually controlled.
  • But we need only penetrate to the essence of any historic event--which lies in the activity of the general mass of men who take part in it--to be convinced that the will of the historic hero does not control the actions of the mass but is itself continually controlled.
  • But there are laws directing events, and some of these laws are known to us while we are conscious of others we cannot comprehend.
  • That flank march might not only have failed to give any advantage to the Russian army, but might in other circumstances have led to its destruction.
  • What would have happened if on approaching Tarutino, Napoleon had attacked the Russians with but a tenth of the energy he had shown when he attacked them at Smolensk?
  • Having crossed over, by a forced march, to the Tula road beyond the Pakhra, the Russian commanders intended to remain at Podolsk and had no thought of the Tarutino position; but innumerable circumstances and the reappearance of French troops who had for a time lost touch with the Russians, and projects of giving battle, and above all the abundance of provisions in Kaluga province, obliged our army to turn still more to the south and to cross from the Tula to the Kaluga road and go to Tarutino, which was between the roads along which those supplies lay.
  • If instead of imagining to ourselves commanders of genius leading the Russian army, we picture that army without any leaders, it could not have done anything but make a return movement toward Moscow, describing an arc in the direction where most provisions were to be found and where the country was richest.
  • Kutuzov's merit lay, not in any strategic maneuver of genius, as it is called, but in the fact that he alone understood the significance of what had happened.
  • The beast wounded at Borodino was lying where the fleeing hunter had left him; but whether he was still alive, whether he was strong and merely lying low, the hunter did not know.
  • But he continued to exert all his powers to restrain his troops from attacking.
  • The war went on independently of them, as it had to go: that is, never in the way people devised, but flowing always from the essential attitude of the masses.
  • That readiness will not weaken in me, but I and Russia have a right to expect from you all the zeal, firmness, and success which your intellect, military talent, and the courage of the troops you command justify us in expecting.
  • But by the time this letter, which proved that the real relation of the forces had already made itself felt in Petersburg, was dispatched, Kutuzov had found himself unable any longer to restrain the army he commanded from attacking and a battle had taken place.
  • But where is it?
  • These sounds made his spirits rise, but at the same time he was afraid that he would be blamed for not having executed sooner the important order entrusted to him.
  • But all was still quiet.
  • Kutuzov began, but checked himself immediately and sent for a senior officer.
  • It was an autumn night with dark purple clouds, but no rain.
  • The ground was damp but not muddy, and the troops advanced noiselessly, only occasionally a jingling of the artillery could be faintly heard.
  • Some columns, supposing they had reached their destination, halted, piled arms, and settled down on the cold ground, but the majority marched all night and arrived at places where they evidently should not have been.
  • Meantime, according to the dispositions which said that "the First Column will march" and so on, the infantry of the belated columns, commanded by Bennigsen and directed by Toll, had started in due order and, as always happens, had got somewhere, but not to their appointed places.
  • And they did indeed get somewhere, though not to their right places; a few eventually even got to their right place, but too late to be of any use and only in time to be fired at.
  • "I prefer not to take lessons from anyone, but I can die with my men as well as anybody," he said, and advanced with a single division.
  • Meanwhile another column was to have attacked the French from the front, but Kutuzov accompanied that column.
  • He well knew that nothing but confusion would come of this battle undertaken against his will, and as far as was in his power held the troops back.
  • "The word attack is always on your tongue, but you don't see that we are unable to execute complicated maneuvers," said he to Miloradovich who asked permission to advance.
  • They are asking to attack and making plans of all kinds, but as soon as one gets to business nothing is ready, and the enemy, forewarned, takes measures accordingly.
  • Kutuzov did not reply, but when they reported to him that Murat's troops were in retreat he ordered an advance, though at every hundred paces he halted for three quarters of an hour.
  • "That's how everything is done with us, all topsy-turvy!" said the Russian officers and generals after the Tarutino battle, letting it be understood that some fool there is doing things all wrong but that we ourselves should not have done so, just as people speak today.
  • But people who talk like that either do not know what they are talking about or deliberately deceive themselves.
  • But if the aim of the battle was what actually resulted and what all the Russians of that day desired--to drive the French out of Russia and destroy their army--it is quite clear that the battle of Tarutino, just because of its incongruities, was exactly what was wanted at that stage of the campaign.
  • He not merely did nothing of the kind, but on the contrary he used his power to select the most foolish and ruinous of all the courses open to him.
  • He remained in Moscow till October, letting the troops plunder the city; then, hesitating whether to leave a garrison behind him, he quitted Moscow, approached Kutuzov without joining battle, turned to the right and reached Malo-Yaroslavets, again without attempting to break through and take the road Kutuzov took, but retiring instead to Mozhaysk along the devastated Smolensk road.
  • But to say that he destroyed his army because he wished to, or because he was very stupid, would be as unjust as to say that he had brought his troops to Moscow because he wished to and because he was very clever and a genius.
  • But we, thank God, have no need to recognize his genius in order to hide our shame.
  • Your misfortunes are cruel, but His Majesty the Emperor and King desires to arrest their course.
  • But when not on duty they will only wear a red ribbon round the left arm.
  • But as food was too precious to be given to foreigners, who were for the most part enemies, Napoleon preferred to supply them with money with which to purchase food from outside, and had paper rubles distributed to them.
  • Not only was the paper money valueless which Napoleon so graciously distributed to the unfortunate, but even silver lost its value in relation to gold.
  • But it did not go away.
  • Napoleon, too, carried away his own personal tresor, but on seeing the baggage trains that impeded the army, he was (Thiers says) horror-struck.
  • This little dog lived in their shed, sleeping beside Karataev at night; it sometimes made excursions into the town but always returned again.
  • He is a Russian seigneur who has had misfortunes, but he is a man.
  • "It's good, quite good, thank you," said the Frenchman, in French, "but there must be some linen left over."
  • But the bits left over? said the Frenchman again and smiled.
  • But give me the pieces that are over.
  • People said they were not Christians, but they too have souls.
  • "But they'll make grand leg bands, dear friend," he said, and went back into the shed.
  • His anger with his wife and anxiety that his name should not be smirched now seemed not merely trivial but even amusing.
  • But Pierre believed it without any mental reservation.
  • And this not only stayed with him during the whole of his imprisonment, but even grew in strength as the hardships of his position increased.
  • But even as he spoke he began to doubt whether this was the corporal he knew or a stranger, so unlike himself did the corporal seem at that moment.
  • He did not again go to the sick man, nor turn to look at him, but stood frowning by the door of the hut.
  • "But he is dying," Pierre again began.
  • Through the cross streets of the Khamovniki quarter the prisoners marched, followed only by their escort and the vehicles and wagons belonging to that escort, but when they reached the supply stores they came among a huge and closely packed train of artillery mingled with private vehicles.
  • Pierre did not see the people as individuals but saw their movement.
  • Pierre felt that that fatal force which had crushed him during the executions, but which he had not felt during his imprisonment, now again controlled his existence.
  • It was terrible, but he felt that in proportion to the efforts of that fatal force to crush him, there grew and strengthened in his soul a power of life independent of it.
  • The evening was ending, but the night had not yet come.
  • Pierre turned back, not to his companions by the campfire, but to an unharnessed cart where there was nobody.
  • Ermolov wished to act on his own judgment, but Dokhturov insisted that he must have Kutuzov's instructions.
  • "But this is very important, from General Dokhturov," said Bolkhovitinov, entering the open door which he had found by feeling in the dark.
  • Napoleon is at Forminsk, said Bolkhovitinov, unable to see in the dark who was speaking but guessing by the voice that it was not Konovnitsyn.
  • On Konovnitsyn's handsome, resolute face with cheeks flushed by fever, there still remained for an instant a faraway dreamy expression remote from present affairs, but then he suddenly started and his face assumed its habitual calm and firm appearance.
  • From whom? he asked immediately but without hurry, blinking at the light.
  • He regarded the whole business of the war not with his intelligence or his reason but by something else.
  • There was within him a deep unexpressed conviction that all would be well, but that one must not trust to this and still less speak about it, but must only attend to one's own work.
  • Like Dokhturov he had the reputation of being a man of very limited capacity and information, and like Dokhturov he never made plans of battle but was always found where the situation was most difficult.
  • He often fell asleep unexpectedly in the daytime, but at night, lying on his bed without undressing, he generally remained awake thinking.
  • It will fall of itself when ripe, but if picked unripe the apple is spoiled, the tree is harmed, and your teeth are set on edge.
  • Like an experienced sportsman he knew that the beast was wounded, and wounded as only the whole strength of Russia could have wounded it, but whether it was mortally wounded or not was still an undecided question.
  • But he needed further proofs and it was necessary to wait.
  • But that's not what is needed now.
  • But the contingencies are endless.
  • But in any case proofs were needed; he had waited a whole month for them and grew more impatient the longer he waited.
  • He imagined all sorts of possible contingencies, just like the younger men, but with this difference, that he saw thousands of contingencies instead of two or three and based nothing on them.
  • But these were only suppositions, which seemed important to the younger men but not to Kutuzov.
  • But these were only suppositions, which seemed important to the younger men but not to Kutuzov.
  • But the destruction of the French, which he alone foresaw, was his heart's one desire.
  • Toll was beginning to say something but Kutuzov checked him.
  • He tried to say something, but his face suddenly puckered and wrinkled; he waved his arm at Toll and turned to the opposite side of the room, to the corner darkened by the icons that hung there.
  • Dokhturov went to Malo- Yaroslavets, but Kutuzov lingered with the main army and gave orders for the evacuation of Kaluga--a retreat beyond which town seemed to him quite possible.
  • Everywhere Kutuzov retreated, but the enemy without waiting for his retreat fled in the opposite direction.
  • But though they all realized that it was necessary to get away, there still remained a feeling of shame at admitting that they must flee.
  • That Napoleon agreed with Mouton, and that the army retreated, does not prove that Napoleon caused it to retreat, but that the forces which influenced the whole army and directed it along the Mozhaysk (that is, the Smolensk) road acted simultaneously on him also.
  • But that native land was too far off, and for a man going a thousand miles it is absolutely necessary to set aside his final goal and to say to himself: "Today I shall get to a place twenty-five miles off where I shall rest and spend the night," and during the first day's journey that resting place eclipses his ultimate goal and attracts all his hopes and desires.
  • Each of them desired nothing more than to give himself up as a prisoner to escape from all this horror and misery; but on the one hand the force of this common attraction to Smolensk, their goal, drew each of them in the same direction; on the other hand an army corps could not surrender to a company, and though the French availed themselves of every convenient opportunity to detach themselves and to surrender on the slightest decent pretext, such pretexts did not always occur.
  • Their very numbers and their crowded and swift movement deprived them of that possibility and rendered it not only difficult but impossible for the Russians to stop this movement, to which the French were directing all their energies.
  • But drawing from his aged wisdom what they could understand, he told them of the golden bridge, and they laughed at and slandered him, flinging themselves on, rending and exulting over the dying beast.
  • But then, in 1812, the French gain a victory near Moscow.
  • In such actions, instead of two crowds opposing each other, the men disperse, attack singly, run away when attacked by stronger forces, but again attack when opportunity offers.
  • But such a war does not fit in under any rule and is directly opposed to a well-known rule of tactics which is accepted as infallible.
  • But the assignment of these various meanings to the factor does not yield results which accord with the historic facts.
  • This equation does not give us the value of the unknown factor but gives us a ratio between two unknowns.
  • Through these forests Denisov and his party rode all day, sometimes keeping well back in them and sometimes coming to the very edge, but never losing sight of the moving French.
  • Denisov had two hundred, and Dolokhov might have as many more, but the disparity of numbers did not deter Denisov.
  • But it is not presupposable that it is the lieutenant colonel himself, said the esaul, who was fond of using words the Cossacks did not know.
  • The approaching riders having descended a decline were no longer visible, but they reappeared a few minutes later.
  • "But Komarov and I"--he pointed to the Cossack--"were prepared.
  • But what's this? he asked, noticing the French drummer boy.
  • But can you stay till tomowwow?
  • But, just what did the genewal tell you?
  • The boy, thrusting his cold hands into his pockets and lifting his eyebrows, looked at Denisov in affright, but in spite of an evident desire to say all he knew gave confused answers, merely assenting to everything Denisov asked him.
  • But the firing and shouting did not relate to them.
  • We killed a score or so of 'more-orderers,' but we did no harm else...
  • I went to get Frenchmen, answered Tikhon boldly and hurriedly, in a husky but melodious bass voice.
  • Petya badly wanted to laugh, but noticed that they all refrained from laughing.
  • "Oh, but he was a regular good-for-nothing," said Tikhon.
  • "But I questioned him," said Tikhon.
  • "But why are you angry?" remonstrated Tikhon, "just as if I'd never seen your Frenchmen!
  • But this uneasiness lasted only a moment.
  • He was highly delighted with what he saw and experienced in the army, but at the same time it always seemed to him that the really heroic exploits were being performed just where he did not happen to be.
  • It's capital for us here, but what of him?
  • But having caught himself saying too much about the flints, he was now afraid to speak out.
  • "I might ask," he thought, "but they'll say: 'He's a boy himself and so he pities the boy.'
  • There were many things Petya wanted to say to the drummer boy, but did not dare to.
  • But he fingered the money in his pocket and wondered whether it would seem ridiculous to give some to the drummer boy.
  • Petya had heard in the army many stories of Dolokhov's extraordinary bravery and of his cruelty to the French, so from the moment he entered the hut Petya did not take his eyes from him, but braced himself up more and more and held his head high, that he might not be unworthy even of such company.
  • But Dolokhov, who in Moscow had worn a Persian costume, had now the appearance of a most correct officer of the Guards.
  • But we must know what troops they are and their numbers, said Dolokhov.
  • He was taken today but he knows nothing.
  • "But for you and me, old fellow, it's time to drop these amenities," continued Dolokhov, as if he found particular pleasure in speaking of this subject which irritated Denisov.
  • But if they did catch me they'd string me up to an aspen tree, and with all your chivalry just the same.
  • But above all Denisov must not dare to imagine that I'll obey him and that he can order me about.
  • But, noticing his mistake, he broke off short and, with a frown, greeted Dolokhov as a stranger, asking what he could do for him.
  • Dolokhov, as if he had not heard the question, did not reply, but lighting a short French pipe which he took from his pocket began asking the officer in how far the road before them was safe from Cossacks.
  • Dolokhov remarked that the Cossacks were a danger only to stragglers such as his companion and himself, "but probably they would not dare to attack large detachments?" he added inquiringly.
  • But Dolokhov restarted the conversation which had dropped and began putting direct questions as to how many men there were in the battalion, how many battalions, and how many prisoners.
  • Petya wished to say "Good night" but could not utter a word.
  • Petya rode beside him, longing to look round to see whether or not the French were running after them, but not daring to.
  • Coming out onto the road Dolokhov did not ride back across the open country, but through the village.
  • Tell Denisov, 'at the first shot at daybreak,' said Dolokhov and was about to ride away, but Petya seized hold of him.
  • But Petya did not let go of him and Dolokhov saw through the gloom that Petya was bending toward him and wanted to kiss him.
  • But, devil take you, I haven't slept because of you!
  • "But... no," said Petya, "I don't want to sleep yet.
  • The rain was over, but drops were still falling from the trees.
  • And Petya gave the Cossack a detailed account not only of his ride but also of his object, and why he considered it better to risk his life than to act "just anyhow."
  • Perhaps he was really sitting on a wagon, but it might very well be that he was not sitting on a wagon but on a terribly high tower from which, if he fell, he would have to fall for a whole day or a whole month, or go on falling and never reach the bottom.
  • Perhaps it was just the Cossack, Likhachev, who was sitting under the wagon, but it might be the kindest, bravest, most wonderful, most splendid man in the world, whom no one knew of.
  • Petya was as musical as Natasha and more so than Nicholas, but had never learned music or thought about it, and so the melody that unexpectedly came to his mind seemed to him particularly fresh and attractive.
  • Each instrument--now resembling a violin and now a horn, but better and clearer than violin or horn--played its own part, and before it had finished the melody merged with another instrument that began almost the same air, and then with a third and a fourth; and they all blended into one and again became separate and again blended, now into solemn church music, now into something dazzlingly brilliant and triumphant.
  • But perhaps it's music of my own.
  • With a solemn triumphal march there mingled a song, the drip from the trees, and the hissing of the saber, "Ozheg-zheg-zheg..." and again the horses jostled one another and neighed, not disturbing the choir but joining in it.
  • His horse by habit made as if to nip his leg, but Petya leaped quickly into the saddle unconscious of his own weight and, turning to look at the hussars starting in the darkness behind him, rode up to Denisov.
  • He did not say another word to Petya but rode in silence all the way.
  • It was getting lighter and lighter, but the mist still hid distant objects.
  • On the bridge he collided with a Cossack who had fallen behind, but he galloped on.
  • Petya was galloping along the courtyard, but instead of holding the reins he waved both his arms about rapidly and strangely, slipping farther and farther to one side in his saddle.
  • They understood that the saddles and Junot's spoon might be of some use, but that cold and hungry soldiers should have to stand and guard equally cold and hungry Russians who froze and lagged behind on the road (in which case the order was to shoot them) was not merely incomprehensible but revolting.
  • At Dorogobuzh while the soldiers of the convoy, after locking the prisoners in a stable, had gone off to pillage their own stores, several of the soldier prisoners tunneled under the wall and ran away, but were recaptured by the French and shot.
  • Pierre did not know why, but since Karataev had begun to grow weaker it had cost him an effort to go near him.
  • While imprisoned in the shed Pierre had learned not with his intellect but with his whole being, by life itself, that man is created for happiness, that happiness is within him, in the satisfaction of simple human needs, and that all unhappiness arises not from privation but from superfluity.
  • After the second day's march Pierre, having examined his feet by the campfire, thought it would be impossible to walk on them; but when everybody got up he went along, limping, and, when he had warmed up, walked without feeling the pain, though at night his feet were more terrible to look at than before.
  • However, he did not look at them now, but thought of other things.
  • It seemed to him that he was thinking of nothing, but far down and deep within him his soul was occupied with something important and comforting.
  • His feeling of pity for this man frightened him and he wished to go away, but there was no other fire, and Pierre sat down, trying not to look at Platon.
  • But well as he knew it, Pierre now listened to that tale as to something new, and the quiet rapture Karataev evidently felt as he told it communicated itself also to Pierre.
  • But I have not killed anyone or taken anything that was not mine, but have only helped my poorer brothers.
  • But I have not killed anyone or taken anything that was not mine, but have only helped my poorer brothers.
  • A paper has come from the Tsar!' so they began looking for him," here Karataev's lower jaw trembled, "but God had already forgiven him--he was dead!
  • And Pierre's soul was dimly but joyfully filled not by the story itself but by its mysterious significance: by the rapturous joy that lit up Karataev's face as he told it, and the mystic significance of that joy.
  • But Pierre was not sufficiently sure of himself.
  • Pierre did not look round again but went limping up the hill.
  • Each drop tried to spread out and occupy as much space as possible, but others striving to do the same compressed it, sometimes destroyed it, and sometimes merged with it.
  • "And Plat-" he began, but did not finish.
  • The French, excited by all that had happened, were talking loudly among themselves, but as they passed Dolokhov who gently switched his boots with his whip and watched them with cold glassy eyes that boded no good, they became silent.
  • From Moscow to Vyazma the French army of seventy-three thousand men not reckoning the Guards (who did nothing during the whole war but pillage) was reduced to thirty-six thousand, though not more than five thousand had fallen in battle.
  • But still he and those about him retained their old habits: wrote commands, letters, reports, and orders of the day; called one another sire, mon cousin, prince d'Eckmuhl, roi de Naples, and so on.
  • But these orders and reports were only on paper, nothing in them was acted upon for they could not be carried out, and though they entitled one another Majesties, Highnesses, or Cousins, they all felt that they were miserable wretches who had done much evil for which they had now to pay.
  • First he rings his bell fearlessly, but when he gets into a tight place he runs away as quietly as he can, and often thinking to escape runs straight into his opponent's arms.
  • At first while they were still moving along the Kaluga road, Napoleon's armies made their presence known, but later when they reached the Smolensk road they ran holding the clapper of their bell tight--and often thinking they were escaping ran right into the Russians.
  • But after a four days' halt the mob, with no maneuvers or plans, again began running along the beaten track, neither to the right nor to the left but along the old--the worst--road, through Krasnoe and Orsha.
  • But after a four days' halt the mob, with no maneuvers or plans, again began running along the beaten track, neither to the right nor to the left but along the old--the worst--road, through Krasnoe and Orsha.
  • Seeing their enemy unexpectedly the French fell into confusion and stopped short from the sudden fright, but then they resumed their flight, abandoning their comrades who were farther behind.
  • At the Berezina they again became disorganized, many were drowned and many surrendered, but those who got across the river fled farther.
  • "C'est grand!" * say the historians, and there no longer exists either good or evil but only "grand" and "not grand."
  • And Napoleon, escaping home in a warm fur coat and leaving to perish those who were not merely his comrades but were (in his opinion) men he had brought there, feels que c'est grand, *(2) and his soul is tranquil.
  • But why did they not execute those maneuvers?
  • But even if we admitted that Kutuzov, Chichagov, and others were the cause of the Russian failures, it is still incomprehensible why, the position of the Russian army being what it was at Krasnoe and at the Berezina (in both cases we had superior forces), the French army with its marshals, kings, and Emperor was not captured, if that was what the Russians aimed at.
  • If the aim of the Russians consisted in cutting off and capturing Napoleon and his marshals--and that aim was not merely frustrated but all attempts to attain it were most shamefully baffled--then this last period of the campaign is quite rightly considered by the French to be a series of victories, and quite wrongly considered victorious by Russian historians.
  • But not even that could be said for those who drew up this project, for it was not they who had suffered from the trampled beds.
  • One can cut off a slice of bread, but not an army.
  • But the French troops quite rightly did not consider that this suited them, since death by hunger and cold awaited them in flight or captivity alike.
  • To them the words of Miloradovich seem very interesting, and so do their surmises and the rewards this or that general received; but the question of those fifty thousand men who were left in hospitals and in graves does not even interest them, for it does not come within the range of their investigation.
  • But pure and complete sorrow is as impossible as pure and complete joy.
  • She was gazing where she knew him to be; but she could not imagine him otherwise than as he had been here.
  • One of his legs twitches just perceptibly, but rapidly.
  • I said it then only because it would have been dreadful for him, but he understood it differently.
  • She stopped him and said: Terrible for you, but not for me!
  • You know that for me there is nothing in life but you, and to suffer with you is the greatest happiness for me, and he took her hand and pressed it as he had pressed it that terrible evening four days before his death.
  • But at the instant when it seemed that the incomprehensible was revealing itself to her a loud rattle of the door handle struck painfully on her ears.
  • She heard Dunyasha's words about Peter Ilynich and a misfortune, but did not grasp them.
  • She ran to her father, but he feebly waved his arm, pointing to her mother's door.
  • She did not let go of her mother but struggled tenderly with her, demanded a pillow and hot water, and unfastened and tore open her mother's dress.
  • Natasha looked at her with eyes full of tears and in her look there was nothing but love and an entreaty for forgiveness.
  • Her persevering and patient love seemed completely to surround the countess every moment, not explaining or consoling, but recalling her to life.
  • During the third night the countess kept very quiet for a few minutes, and Natasha rested her head on the arm of her chair and closed her eyes, but opened them again on hearing the bedstead creak.
  • Sonya and the count tried to replace Natasha but could not.
  • But the same blow that almost killed the countess, this second blow, restored Natasha to life.
  • She thought her life was ended, but her love for her mother unexpectedly showed her that the essence of life--love--was still active within her.
  • Natasha lay down, but when Princess Mary had drawn the blinds and was going away she called her back.
  • But she is quite original, strange, new, and unknown.
  • And Natasha, embracing her, began kissing her face and hands, making Princess Mary feel shy but happy by this demonstration of her feelings.
  • She did not think of applying submission and self-abnegation to her own life, for she was accustomed to seek other joys, but she understood and loved in another those previously incomprehensible virtues.
  • She did not know and would not have believed it, but beneath the layer of slime that covered her soul and seemed to her impenetrable, delicate young shoots of grass were already sprouting, which taking root would so cover with their living verdure the grief that weighed her down that it would soon no longer be seen or noticed.
  • But besides this, since the exhaustion and enormous diminution of the army caused by the rapidity of the advance had become evident, another reason for slackening the pace and delaying presented itself to Kutuzov.
  • To that end Kutuzov's activity was directed during the whole campaign from Moscow to Vilna--not casually or intermittently but so consistently that he never once deviated from it.
  • But to the generals, especially the foreign ones in the Russian army, who wished to distinguish themselves, to astonish somebody, and for some reason to capture a king or a duke--it seemed that now--when any battle must be horrible and senseless--was the very time to fight and conquer somebody.
  • Not only did his contemporaries, carried away by their passions, talk in this way, but posterity and history have acclaimed Napoleon as grand, while Kutuzov is described by foreigners as a crafty, dissolute, weak old courtier, and by Russians as something indefinite--a sort of puppet useful only because he had a Russian name.
  • Not merely in these cases but continually did that old man--who by experience of life had reached the conviction that thoughts and the words serving as their expression are not what move people--use quite meaningless words that happened to enter his head.
  • But that man, so heedless of his words, did not once during the whole time of his activity utter one word inconsistent with the single aim toward which he moved throughout the whole war.
  • And only that feeling placed him on that highest human pedestal from which he, the commander-in-chief, devoted all his powers not to slaying and destroying men but to saving and showing pity on them.
  • It was no longer the commander-in-chief speaking but an ordinary old man who wanted to tell his comrades something very important.
  • You see, brothers, I know it's hard for you, but it can't be helped!
  • It is hard for you, but still you are at home while they--you see what they have come to, said he, pointing to the prisoners.
  • While they were strong we didn't spare ourselves, but now we may even pity them.
  • But after all who asked them here?
  • An infantry regiment which had left Tarutino three thousand strong but now numbered only nine hundred was one of the first to arrive that night at its halting place--a village on the highroad.
  • But wait a moment, boys...
  • Heave away, boys!... but despite their united efforts the wattle hardly moved, and in the silence that followed the heavy breathing of the men was audible.
  • Fetch some more wood! shouted a red-haired and red-faced man, screwing up his eyes and blinking because of the smoke but not moving back from the fire.
  • This red-haired man was neither a sergeant nor a corporal, but being robust he ordered about those weaker than himself.
  • But in the Third Company they say nine men were missing yesterday.
  • Yes, it's all very well, but when a man's feet are frozen how can he walk?
  • "Well, you know," said the sharp-nosed man they called Jackdaw in a squeaky and unsteady voice, raising himself at the other side of the fire, "a plump man gets thin, but for a thin one it's death.
  • "But they're a clean folk, lads," the first man went on; "he was white-- as white as birchbark--and some of them are such fine fellows, you might think they were nobles."
  • "But they don't understand our talk at all," said the dancer with a puzzled smile.
  • But theirs,' he says, 'are white as paper and not so much smell as a whiff of gunpowder.'
  • It's the only one worth remembering; but since that... it's only been tormenting folk.
  • But he didn't know the right charm.
  • He rose and tried to walk, but staggered and would have fallen had not a soldier standing by held him up.
  • The older men, who thought it undignified to amuse themselves with such nonsense, continued to lie at the opposite side of the fire, but one would occasionally raise himself on an elbow and glance at Morel with a smile.
  • Some Russians even did that, but they were exceptions.
  • Certain destruction lay behind the French but in front there was hope.
  • But after Bennigsen's departure, the Grand Duke Tsarevich Constantine Pavlovich joined the army.
  • The Emperor with a rapid glance scanned Kutuzov from head to foot, frowned for an instant, but immediately mastering himself went up to the old man, extended his arms and embraced him.
  • Kutuzov had received the Order of St. George of the First Class and the Emperor showed him the highest honors, but everyone knew of the imperial dissatisfaction with him.
  • Kutuzov alone would not see this and openly expressed his opinion that no fresh war could improve the position or add to the glory of Russia, but could only spoil and lower the glorious position that Russia had gained.
  • But despite the fact that the doctors treated him, bled him, and gave him medicines to drink, he recovered.
  • Just then he was only anxious to get away as quickly as possible from places where people were killing one another, to some peaceful refuge where he could recover himself, rest, and think over all the strange new facts he had learned; but on reaching Orel he immediately fell ill.
  • But for a long time in his dreams he still saw himself in the conditions of captivity.
  • He could not see an aim, for he now had faith--not faith in any kind of rule, or words, or ideas, but faith in an ever-living, ever-manifest God.
  • But even then, at moments of weakness as he had accounted them, his mind had penetrated to those distances and he had there seen the same pettiness, worldliness, and senselessness.
  • As before he was absent-minded and seemed occupied not with what was before his eyes but with something special of his own.
  • "Yes, he is a very, very kind man when he is not under the influence of bad people but of people such as myself," thought she.
  • But to his surprise Willarski soon noticed that Pierre had lagged much behind the times, and had sunk, as he expressed it to himself, into apathy and egotism.
  • But someone else needs it still more.
  • He was as indifferent as heretofore to money matters, but now he felt certain of what ought and what ought not to be done.
  • But in January Savelich came from Moscow and gave him an account of the state of things there, and spoke of the estimate an architect had made of the cost of rebuilding the town and country houses, speaking of this as of a settled matter.
  • Why this was necessary he did not know, but he knew for certain that it was necessary.
  • His income would be reduced by three fourths, but he felt it must be done.
  • But the first plunderers were followed by a second and a third contingent, and with increasing numbers plundering became more and more difficult and assumed more definite forms.
  • The French found Moscow abandoned but with all the organizations of regular life, with diverse branches of commerce and craftsmanship, with luxury, and governmental and religious institutions.
  • These forms were lifeless but still existed.
  • But plundering by the Russians, with which the reoccupation of the city began, had an opposite effect: the longer it continued and the greater the number of people taking part in it the more rapidly was the wealth of the city and its regular life restored.
  • Everybody was celebrating the victory, everything was bubbling with life in the ruined but reviving city.
  • Pierre felt particularly well disposed toward them all, but was now instinctively on his guard for fear of binding himself in any way.
  • He had heard that the Rostovs were at Kostroma but the thought of Natasha seldom occurred to him.
  • He felt himself not only free from social obligations but also from that feeling which, it seemed to him, he had aroused in himself.
  • The house had escaped the fire; it showed signs of damage but its general aspect was unchanged.
  • Pierre remembered that the princess always had lady companions, but who they were and what they were like he never knew or remembered.
  • Again the princess glanced round at her companion with even more uneasiness in her manner and was about to add something, but Pierre interrupted her.
  • But when he mentioned the Rostovs, Princess Mary's face expressed still greater embarrassment.
  • "But no, it can't be!" he thought.
  • But at that moment Princess Mary said, "Natasha!"
  • But the more he tried to hide it the more clearly--clearer than any words could have done--did he betray to himself, to her, and to Princess Mary that he loved her.
  • But as soon as he tried to continue the conversation he had begun with Princess Mary he again glanced at Natasha, and a still-deeper flush suffused his face and a still-stronger agitation of mingled joy and fear seized his soul.
  • Pierre had failed to notice Natasha because he did not at all expect to see her there, but he had failed to recognize her because the change in her since he last saw her was immense.
  • Pierre's confusion was not reflected by any confusion on Natasha's part, but only by the pleasure that just perceptibly lit up her whole face.
  • The countess is in a dreadful state; but it was necessary for Natasha herself to see a doctor.
  • Natasha had already opened her mouth to speak but suddenly stopped.
  • Pierre's confusion had now almost vanished, but at the same time he felt that his freedom had also completely gone.
  • He did not purposely say things to please her, but whatever he was saying he regarded from her standpoint.
  • But Pierre's face quivering with emotion, his questions and his eager restless expression, gradually compelled her to go into details which she feared to recall for her own sake.
  • He wished to take leave of Princess Mary, but she would not let him go.
  • "But I am three times as rich as before," returned Pierre.
  • "What I have certainly gained is freedom," he began seriously, but did not continue, noticing that this theme was too egotistic.
  • We were not an exemplary couple," he added quickly, glancing at Natasha and noticing on her face curiosity as to how he would speak of his wife, "but her death shocked me terribly.
  • Not only did I never see him but I heard nothing about him--I was in much lower company!
  • But it's true that you remained in Moscow to kill Napoleon?
  • It was clear that she understood not only what he said but also what he wished to, but could not, express in words.
  • When he spoke of the execution he wanted to pass over the horrible details, but Natasha insisted that he should not omit anything.
  • Pierre began to tell about Karataev, but paused.
  • Princess Mary understood his story and sympathized with him, but she now saw something else that absorbed all her attention.
  • The footmen came in with sad and stern faces to change the candles, but no one noticed them.
  • "People speak of misfortunes and sufferings," remarked Pierre, "but if at this moment I were asked: 'Would you rather be what you were before you were taken prisoner, or go through all this again?' then for heaven's sake let me again have captivity and horseflesh!
  • We imagine that when we are thrown out of our usual ruts all is lost, but it is only then that what is new and good begins.
  • I too should wish nothing but to relive it all from the beginning.
  • It was hard and painful, but good, very good! said Natasha.
  • Yes, but he's wonderful.
  • Evidently it has to be so, said he to himself, and hastily undressing he got into bed, happy and agitated but free from hesitation or indecision.
  • But perhaps I shall go.
  • "But what about my heirs?" said Pierre.
  • But probably he knows it well enough and is only pretending.
  • But what a kind, pleasant face and how he smiles as he looks at me.
  • But he had hardly entered the room before he felt her presence with his whole being by the loss of his sense of freedom.
  • Pierre dined with them and would have spent the whole evening there, but Princess Mary was going to vespers and Pierre left the house with her.
  • Pierre noticed this but could not go.
  • He felt uneasy and embarrassed, but sat on because he simply could not get up and take his leave.
  • Tomorrow--but I won't say good-by yet.
  • I will call round in case you have any commissions for me, said he, standing before Princess Mary and turning red, but not taking his departure.
  • But I want to be a brother to her.
  • I don't know when I began to love her, but I have loved her and her alone all my life, and I love her so that I cannot imagine life without her.
  • I cannot propose to her at present, but the thought that perhaps she might someday be my wife and that I may be missing that possibility... that possibility... is terrible.
  • She was going to say that to speak of love was impossible, but she stopped because she had seen by the sudden change in Natasha two days before that she would not only not be hurt if Pierre spoke of his love, but that it was the very thing she wished for.
  • But what am I to do?
  • But it can't be....
  • But I may come again tomorrow?
  • The whole meaning of life--not for him alone but for the whole world--seemed to him centered in his love and the possibility of being loved by her.
  • When dealing with the affairs and papers of his dead wife, her memory aroused in him no feeling but pity that she had not known the bliss he now knew.
  • "I may have appeared strange and queer then," he thought, "but I was not so mad as I seemed.
  • She spoke little of Pierre, but when Princess Mary mentioned him a long-extinguished light once more kindled in her eyes and her lips curved with a strange smile.
  • The change that took place in Natasha at first surprised Princess Mary; but when she understood its meaning it grieved her.
  • But when she was with Natasha she was not vexed with her and did not reproach her.
  • Natasha gave herself up so fully and frankly to this new feeling that she did not try to hide the fact that she was no longer sad, but bright and cheerful.
  • I wanted to listen at the door, but I knew you would tell me.
  • But what's to be done?
  • But noticing the grieved expression on Princess Mary's face she guessed the reason of that sadness and suddenly began to cry.
  • But why go to Petersburg?
  • But no, no, he must...
  • But the mysterious forces that move humanity (mysterious because the laws of their motion are unknown to us) continued to operate.
  • But what is chance?
  • He had no plan, he was afraid of everything, but the parties snatched at him and demanded his participation.
  • But the once proud and shrewd rulers of France, feeling that their part is played out, are even more bewildered than he, and do not say the words they should have said to destroy him and retain their power.
  • Chance forms the characters of the rulers of France, who submit to him; chance forms the character of Paul I of Russia who recognizes his government; chance contrives a plot against him which not only fails to harm him but confirms his power.
  • Not only is he great, but so are his ancestors, his brothers, his stepsons, and his brothers-in-law.
  • But suddenly instead of those chances and that genius which hitherto had so consistently led him by an uninterrupted series of successes to the predestined goal, an innumerable sequence of inverse chances occur--from the cold in his head at Borodino to the sparks which set Moscow on fire, and the frosts--and instead of genius, stupidity and immeasurable baseness become evident.
  • The invaders flee, turn back, flee again, and all the chances are now not for Napoleon but always against him.
  • Napoleon himself is no longer of any account; all his actions are evidently pitiful and mean, but again an inexplicable chance occurs.
  • But by some strange chance no one perceives this.
  • But the smooth sea again suddenly becomes disturbed.
  • But the wave they feel to be rising does not come from the quarter they expect.
  • Any guard might arrest him, but by strange chance no one does so and all rapturously greet the man they cursed the day before and will curse again a month later.
  • Do you now see that it was not he but I who moved you?
  • But dazed by the force of the movement, it was long before people understood this.
  • But as soon as the necessity for a general European war presented itself he appeared in his place at the given moment and, uniting the nations of Europe, led them to the goal.
  • Not unto us, not unto us, but unto Thy Name!...
  • But the ultimate purpose of the bee is not exhausted by the first, the second, or any of the processes the human mind can discern.
  • She had all that people are valued for, but little that could have made him love her.
  • He tried to avoid his old acquaintances with their commiseration and offensive offers of assistance; he avoided all distraction and recreation, and even at home did nothing but play cards with his mother, pace silently up and down the room, and smoke one pipe after another.
  • But remembering her relations with Nicholas in Voronezh she was shy about doing so.
  • But instead of being greeted with pleasure as she had expected, at his first glance at her his face assumed a cold, stiff, proud expression she had not seen on it before.
  • But after her visit the old countess spoke of her several times a day.
  • But I don't in the least want to, Mamma.
  • But I never said I was dull.
  • She is a very admirable young woman and you always liked her, but now suddenly you have got some notion or other in your head.
  • But she could not pacify herself with these reflections; a feeling akin to remorse troubled her when she thought of her visit.
  • With Mademoiselle Bourienne's help the princess had maintained the conversation very well, but at the very last moment, just when he rose, she was so tired of talking of what did not interest her, and her mind was so full of the question why she alone was granted so little happiness in life, that in a fit of absent-mindedness she sat still, her luminous eyes gazing fixedly before her, not noticing that he had risen.
  • He wished to help her and say something pleasant, but could think of nothing to say.
  • "Yes, yes," said she, "but you have no reason to regret the past, Count.
  • But this is not at all an interesting or cheerful subject.
  • But the princess had caught a glimpse of the man she had known and loved, and it was to him that she now spoke.
  • "I had come so near to you... and to all your family that I thought you would not consider my sympathy misplaced, but I was mistaken," and suddenly her voice trembled.
  • "I don't know why," she continued, recovering herself, "but you used to be different, and..."
  • "But why, Count, why?" she almost cried, unconsciously moving closer to him.
  • "I don't understand your why, Count," she continued, "but it's hard for me...
  • The chief thing in his eyes was not the nitrogen in the soil, nor the oxygen in the air, nor manures, nor special plows, but that most important agent by which nitrogen, oxygen, manure, and plow were made effective-- the peasant laborer.
  • The peasant seemed to him not merely a tool, but also a judge of farming and an end in himself.
  • When a decision had to be taken regarding a domestic serf, especially if one had to be punished, he always felt undecided and consulted everybody in the house; but when it was possible to have a domestic serf conscripted instead of a land worker he did so without the least hesitation.
  • He could not have said by what standard he judged what he should or should not do, but the standard was quite firm and definite in his own mind.
  • Countess Mary was jealous of this passion of her husband's and regretted that she could not share it; but she could not understand the joys and vexations he derived from that world, to her so remote and alien.
  • Countess Mary turned red and then pale, but continued to sit with head bowed and lips compressed and gave her husband no reply.
  • But what is the matter with you, Mary? he suddenly asked.
  • Countess Mary raised her head and tried to speak, but hastily looked down again and her lips puckered.
  • She never cried from pain or vexation, but always from sorrow or pity, and when she wept her radiant eyes acquired an irresistible charm.
  • He understood what she was weeping about, but could not in his heart at once agree with her that what he had regarded from childhood as quite an everyday event was wrong.
  • But he did forget himself once or twice within a twelvemonth, and then he would go and confess to his wife, and would again promise that this should really be the very last time.
  • Among the gentry of the province Nicholas was respected but not liked.
  • She could not find fault with Sonya in any way and tried to be fond of her, but often felt ill-will toward her which she could not overcome.
  • Perhaps she lacks egotism, I don't know, but from her is taken away, and everything has been taken away.
  • Like a cat, she had attached herself not to the people but to the home.
  • Pierre had gone to Petersburg on business of his own for three weeks as he said, but had remained there nearly seven weeks and was expected back every minute.
  • But today she quite forgot that and was hurt that he should be angry with her without any reason, and she felt unhappy.
  • She knew her remarks sounded unnatural, but could not refrain from asking some more questions.
  • Nicholas and his wife lived together so happily that even Sonya and the old countess, who felt jealous and would have liked them to disagree, could find nothing to reproach them with; but even they had their moments of antagonism.
  • She sat down and played with them a little, but the thought of her husband and his unreasonable crossness worried her.
  • She made no reply, but to avoid obeying Sonya beckoned to Andrew to follow her quietly and went to the door.
  • But do I love my wife?
  • I don't love it, but just try to cut it off!
  • I'm not like that myself, but I understand.
  • I say: 'Papa wants to sleep!' but she says, 'No, he's laughing.'
  • But you know you may be unfair.
  • These questions, then as now, existed only for those who see nothing in marriage but the pleasure married people get from one another, that is, only the beginnings of marriage and not its whole significance, which lies in the family.
  • If the purpose of marriage is the family, the person who wishes to have many wives or husbands may perhaps obtain much pleasure, but in that case will not have a family.
  • And she not only saw no need of any other or better husband, but as all the powers of her soul were intent on serving that husband and family, she could not imagine and saw no interest in imagining how it would be if things were different.
  • Natasha did not care for society in general, but prized the more the society of her relatives--Countess Mary, and her brother, her mother, and Sonya.
  • His wife's demands astonished him, but they also flattered him, and he submitted to them.
  • Pierre had but to show a partiality for anything to get just what he liked done always.
  • Their way of life and place of residence, their acquaintances and ties, Natasha's occupations, the children's upbringing, were all selected not merely with regard to Pierre's expressed wishes, but to what Natasha from the thoughts he expressed in conversation supposed his wishes to be.
  • It very often happened that in a moment of irritation husband and wife would have a dispute, but long afterwards Pierre to his surprise and delight would find in his wife's ideas and actions the very thought against which she had argued, but divested of everything superfluous that in the excitement of the dispute he had added when expressing his opinion.
  • But only what was really good in him was reflected in his wife, all that was not quite good was rejected.
  • And this was not the result of logical reasoning but was a direct and mysterious reflection.
  • To Pierre's timid look of inquiry after reading the letter she replied by asking him to go, but to fix a definite date for his return.
  • That creature said: You are angry, you are jealous, you would like to pay him out, you are afraid--but here am I!
  • She was nursing her boy when the sound of Pierre's sleigh was heard at the front door, and the old nurse--knowing how to please her mistress-- entered the room inaudibly but hurriedly and with a beaming face.
  • The blood rushed to Natasha's face and her feet involuntarily moved, but she could not jump up and run out.
  • But at the door she stopped as if her conscience reproached her for having in her joy left the child too soon, and she glanced round.
  • But what about me?
  • But you were enjoying yourself.
  • But how is Petya?
  • But how he did frighten me...
  • But in spite of much that was interesting and had to be discussed, the baby with the little cap on its unsteady head evidently absorbed all his attention.
  • But the father whom the boy did not remember appeared to him a divinity who could not be pictured, and of whom he never thought without a swelling heart and tears of sadness and rapture.
  • But in time he grew used to this demand.
  • She ate, drank, slept, or kept awake, but did not live.
  • She wanted nothing from life but tranquillity, and that tranquillity only death could give her.
  • But until death came she had to go on living, that is, to use her vital forces.
  • But those glances expressed something more: they said that she had played her part in life, that what they now saw was not her whole self, that we must all become like her, and that they were glad to yield to her, to restrain themselves for this once precious being formerly as full of life as themselves, but now so much to be pitied.
  • But those glances expressed something more: they said that she had played her part in life, that what they now saw was not her whole self, that we must all become like her, and that they were glad to yield to her, to restrain themselves for this once precious being formerly as full of life as themselves, but now so much to be pitied.
  • The countess had long wished for such a box, but as she did not want to cry just then she glanced indifferently at the portrait and gave her attention chiefly to the box for cards.
  • But best of all you have brought yourself back--for I never saw anything like it, you ought to give your wife a scolding!
  • But to the old countess those contemporaries of hers seemed to be the only serious and real society.
  • Once or twice Pierre was carried away and began to speak of these things, but Nicholas and Natasha always brought him back to the health of Prince Ivan and Countess Mary Alexeevna.
  • But I mustn't go there-- those stockings are to be a surprise for me.
  • Nicholas and Denisov rose, asked for their pipes, smoked, went to fetch more tea from Sonya--who sat weary but resolute at the samovar--and questioned Pierre.
  • "Why this," began Pierre, not sitting down but pacing the room, sometimes stopping short, gesticulating, and lisping: "the position in Petersburg is this: the Emperor does not look into anything.
  • The aim is excellent but in the present circumstances something else is needed.
  • What I say is widen the scope of our society, let the mot d'ordre be not virtue alone but independence and action as well!
  • "But action with what aim?" he cried.
  • Not merely is it not hostile to government, but it is a society of true conservatives--a society of gentlemen in the full meaning of that word.
  • Yes, but it's a secret society and therefore a hostile and harmful one which can only cause harm.
  • It is not at all what you suppose; but that is what the German Tugendbund was, and what I am proposing.
  • The Tugendbund is all vewy well for the sausage eaters, but I don't understand it and can't even pwonounce it, interposed Denisov in a loud and resolute voice.
  • I agwee that evewything here is wotten and howwible, but the Tugendbund I don't understand.
  • Pierre smiled, Natasha began to laugh, but Nicholas knitted his brows still more and began proving to Pierre that there was no prospect of any great change and that all the danger he spoke of existed only in his imagination.
  • "I will tell you this," he said, rising and trying with nervously twitching fingers to prop up his pipe in a corner, but finally abandoning the attempt.
  • But you also say that our oath of allegiance is a conditional matter, and to that I reply: 'You are my best friend, as you know, but if you formed a secret society and began working against the government- -be it what it may--I know it is my duty to obey the government.
  • But you also say that our oath of allegiance is a conditional matter, and to that I reply: 'You are my best friend, as you know, but if you formed a secret society and began working against the government- -be it what it may--I know it is my duty to obey the government.
  • Her defense was weak and inapt but she attained her object.
  • The conversation at supper was not about politics or societies, but turned on the subject Nicholas liked best--recollections of 1812.
  • I tried threats, but he only grew angrier.
  • They were for the most part quite insignificant trifles, but did not seem so to the mother or to the father either, now that he read this diary about his children for the first time.
  • He had none, but looked so unhappily and greedily at the others while they were eating!
  • There could be no doubt not only of his approval but also of his admiration for his wife.
  • Perhaps it need not be done so pedantically, thought Nicholas, or even done at all, but this untiring, continual spiritual effort of which the sole aim was the children's moral welfare delighted him.
  • He was proud of her intelligence and goodness, recognized his own insignificance beside her in the spiritual world, and rejoiced all the more that she with such a soul not only belonged to him but was part of himself.
  • But he is impossible: such a child!
  • Of course he is right there," said Countess Mary, "but he forgets that we have other duties nearer to us, duties indicated to us by God Himself, and that though we might expose ourselves to risks we must not risk our children."
  • But they insisted on their own view: love of one's neighbor and Christianity--and all this in the presence of young Nicholas, who had gone into my study and broke all my things.
  • A fine lad, a fine lad! repeated Nicholas, who at heart was not fond of Nicholas Bolkonski but was always anxious to recognize that he was a fine lad.
  • A wonderful boy, but I am dreadfully afraid for him.
  • No, but I know I must work to comfort my mother, to repay you, and not to leave the children such beggars as I was.
  • But she knew she must not say this and that it would be useless to do so.
  • But she had to force herself to attend, for what he was saying did not interest her at all.
  • She looked at him and did not think, but felt, about something different.
  • She did not compare them with him, but compared her feeling for them with her feeling for him, and felt with regret that there was something lacking in her feeling for young Nicholas.
  • This simultaneous discussion of many topics did not prevent a clear understanding but on the contrary was the surest sign that they fully understood one another.
  • In saying this Natasha was sincere in acknowledging Mary's superiority, but at the same time by saying it she made a demand on Pierre that he should, all the same, prefer her to Mary and to all other women, and that now, especially after having seen many women in Petersburg, he should tell her so afresh.
  • But I understand that you value what opens up a fresh line, said she, repeating words Pierre had once uttered.
  • "You know how much I..." he began to soften down what he had said; but Natasha interrupted him to show that this was unnecessary.
  • But I can't help it.
  • But I succeeded in uniting them all; and then my idea is so clear and simple.
  • What I say is: 'Join hands, you who love the right, and let there be but one banner--that of active virtue.'
  • Natasha would have had no doubt as to the greatness of Pierre's idea, but one thing disconcerted her.
  • And one couldn't love more, but this is something special....
  • But I'm sorry to leave you.
  • But all the same?
  • In front was Glory, which was similar to those threads but rather thicker.
  • I loved you, but I have orders from Arakcheev and will kill the first of you who moves forward.
  • Little Nicholas turned to look at Pierre but Pierre was no longer there.
  • In his place was his father-- Prince Andrew--and his father had neither shape nor form, but he existed, and when little Nicholas perceived him he grew faint with love: he felt himself powerless, limp, and formless.
  • But Uncle Nicholas came nearer and nearer to them.
  • But someday I shall have finished learning, and then I will do something.
  • It would seem that having rejected the belief of the ancients in man's subjection to the Deity and in a predetermined aim toward which nations are led, modern history should study not the manifestations of power but the causes that produce it.
  • But modern history has not done this.
  • But modern history cannot give that reply.
  • In 1807 he suddenly made friends with him, but in 1811 they again quarreled and again began killing many people.
  • But the Allied monarchs were angry at this and went to fight the French once more.
  • All that may be so and mankind is ready to agree with it, but it is not what was asked.
  • The answers given by this kind of historian to the question of what force causes events to happen are satisfactory only as long as there is but one historian to each event.
  • As soon as historians of different nationalities and tendencies begin to describe the same event, the replies they give immediately lose all meaning, for this force is understood by them all not only differently but often in quite contradictory ways.
  • They do not recognize it as a power inherent in heroes and rulers, but as the resultant of a multiplicity of variously directed forces.
  • In describing a war or the subjugation of a people, a general historian looks for the cause of the event not in the power of one man, but in the interaction of many persons connected with the event.
  • But Napoleon's power suppressed the ideas of the Revolution and the general temper of the age.
  • Not only does it occur at every step, but the universal historians' accounts are all made up of a chain of such contradictions.
  • But the universal historian Gervinus, refuting this opinion of the specialist historian, tries to prove that the campaign of 1813 and the restoration of the Bourbons were due to other things beside Alexander's will--such as the activity of Stein, Metternich, Madame de Stael, Talleyrand, Fichte, Chateaubriand, and others.
  • The historian evidently decomposes Alexander's power into the components: Talleyrand, Chateaubriand, and the rest--but the sum of the components, that is, the interactions of Chateaubriand, Talleyrand, Madame de Stael, and the others, evidently does not equal the resultant, namely the phenomenon of millions of Frenchmen submitting to the Bourbons.
  • That Chateaubriand, Madame de Stael, and others spoke certain words to one another only affected their mutual relations but does not account for the submission of millions.
  • But why intellectual activity is considered by the historians of culture to be the cause or expression of the whole historical movement is hard to understand.
  • But not to speak of the intrinsic quality of histories of this kind (which may possibly even be of use to someone for something) the histories of culture, to which all general histories tend more and more to approximate, are significant from the fact that after seriously and minutely examining various religious, philosophic, and political doctrines as causes of events, as soon as they have to describe an actual historic event such as the campaign of 1812 for instance, they involuntarily describe it as resulting from an exercise of power--and say plainly that that was the result of Napoleon's will.
  • As gold is gold only if it is serviceable not merely for exchange but also for use, so universal historians will be valuable only when they can reply to history's essential question: what is power?
  • But as soon as we do not admit that, it becomes essential to determine what is this power of one man over others.
  • In the domain of jurisprudence, which consists of discussions of how a state and power might be arranged were it possible for all that to be arranged, it is all very clear; but when applied to history that definition of power needs explanation.
  • From this fundamental difference between the view held by history and that held by jurisprudence, it follows that jurisprudence can tell minutely how in its opinion power should be constituted and what power-- existing immutably outside time--is, but to history's questions about the meaning of the mutations of power in time it can answer nothing.
  • But what this program consists in these historians do not say, or if they do they continually contradict one another.
  • But why did it not react on Louis XIV or on Louis XV--why should it react just on Louis XVI?
  • Historians of the third class assume that the will of the people is transferred to historic personages conditionally, but that the conditions are unknown to us.
  • But in that case, if the force that moves nations lies not in the historic leaders but in the nations themselves, what significance have those leaders?
  • But in that case, if the force that moves nations lies not in the historic leaders but in the nations themselves, what significance have those leaders?
  • But in that case the question arises whether all the activity of the leaders serves as an expression of the people's will or only some part of it.
  • If the whole activity of the leaders serves as the expression of the people's will, as some historians suppose, then all the details of the court scandals contained in the biographies of a Napoleon or a Catherine serve to express the life of the nation, which is evident nonsense; but if it is only some particular side of the activity of an historical leader which serves to express the people's life, as other so-called "philosophical" historians believe, then to determine which side of the activity of a leader expresses the nation's life, we have first of all to know in what the nation's life consists.
  • And the history of the Godfreys and the Minnesingers has remained the history of Godfreys and Minnesingers, but the history of the life of the peoples and their impulses has remained unknown.
  • If we unite both these kinds of history, as is done by the newest historians, we shall have the history of monarchs and writers, but not the history of the life of the peoples.
  • The theory of the transference of the collective will of the people to historic persons may perhaps explain much in the domain of jurisprudence and be essential for its purposes, but in its application to history, as soon as revolutions, conquests, or civil wars occur--that is, as soon as history begins--that theory explains nothing.
  • (With this method of observation it often happens that the observer, influenced by the direction he himself prefers, regards those as leaders who, owing to the people's change of direction, are no longer in front, but on one side, or even in the rear.)
  • But to understand phenomena man has, besides abstract reasoning, experience by which he verifies his reflections.
  • And experience tells us that power is not merely a word but an actually existing phenomenon.
  • The historians, in accord with the old habit of acknowledging divine intervention in human affairs, want to see the cause of events in the expression of the will of someone endowed with power, but that supposition is not confirmed either by reason or by experience.
  • Only the expression of the will of the Deity, not dependent on time, can relate to a whole series of events occurring over a period of years or centuries, and only the Deity, independent of everything, can by His sole will determine the direction of humanity's movement; but man acts in time and himself takes part in what occurs.
  • No command ever appears spontaneously, or itself covers a whole series of occurrences; but each command follows from another, and never refers to a whole series of events but always to one moment only of an event.
  • But to know what can and what cannot be executed is impossible, not only in the case of Napoleon's invasion of Russia in which millions participated, but even in the simplest event, for in either case millions of obstacles may arise to prevent its execution.
  • But to know what can and what cannot be executed is impossible, not only in the case of Napoleon's invasion of Russia in which millions participated, but even in the simplest event, for in either case millions of obstacles may arise to prevent its execution.
  • Amid a long series of unexecuted orders of Napoleon's one series, for the campaign of 1812, was carried out--not because those orders differed in any way from the other, unexecuted orders but because they coincided with the course of events that led the French army into Russia; just as in stencil work this or that figure comes out not because the color was laid on from this side or in that way, but because it was laid on from all sides over the figure cut in the stencil.
  • So that examining the relation in time of the commands to the events, we find that a command can never be the cause of the event, but that a certain definite dependence exists between the two.
  • To understand in what this dependence consists it is necessary to reinstate another omitted condition of every command proceeding not from the Deity but from a man, which is, that the man who gives the command himself takes part in the event.
  • The noncommissioned officers (of whom there are fewer) perform the action itself less frequently than the soldiers, but they already give commands.
  • An officer still less often acts directly himself, but commands still more frequently.
  • The commander-in-chief never takes direct part in the action itself, but only gives general orders concerning the movement of the mass of the troops.
  • When an event is taking place people express their opinions and wishes about it, and as the event results from the collective activity of many people, some one of the opinions or wishes expressed is sure to be fulfilled if but approximately.
  • But these justifications have a very necessary significance in their own day.
  • But wherever it may turn there always will be the wave anticipating its movement.
  • Wherever the ship may go, the rush of water which neither directs nor increases its movement foams ahead of it, and at a distance seems to us not merely to move of itself but to govern the ship's movement also.
  • But examining the events themselves and the connection in which the historical persons stood to the people, we have found that they and their orders were dependent on events.
  • But the law of history relates to man.
  • But regarding him from within ourselves as what we are conscious of, we feel ourselves to be free.
  • Through his reason man observes himself, but only through consciousness does he know himself.
  • But his will--which forms the essence of his life--man recognizes (and can but recognize) as free.
  • But his will--which forms the essence of his life--man recognizes (and can but recognize) as free.
  • But I have lifted my hand and let it fall.
  • But learning just as certainly that his will is subject to laws, he does not and cannot believe this.
  • He feels that however impossible it may be, it is so, for without this conception of freedom not only would he be unable to understand life, but he would be unable to live for a single moment.
  • But the same man apart from that connection appears to be free.
  • The subject for history is not man's will itself but our presentation of it.
  • Our conception of the degree of freedom often varies according to differences in the point of view from which we regard the event, but every human action appears to us as a certain combination of freedom and inevitability.
  • The proportion of freedom to inevitability decreases and increases according to the point of view from which the action is regarded, but their relation is always one of inverse proportion.
  • But in the Crusades we already see an event occupying its definite place in history and without which we cannot imagine the modern history of Europe, though to the chroniclers of the Crusades that event appeared as merely due to the will of certain people.
  • My action seems to me free; but asking myself whether I could raise my arm in every direction, I see that I raised it in the direction in which there was least obstruction to that action either from things around me or from the construction of my own body.
  • I lift it, but ask myself: could I have abstained from lifting my arm at the moment that has already passed?
  • But I am not now abstaining from doing so at the first moment when I asked the question.
  • But even if--imagining a man quite exempt from all influences, examining only his momentary action in the present, unevoked by any cause--we were to admit so infinitely small a remainder of inevitability as equaled zero, we should even then not have arrived at the conception of complete freedom in man, for a being uninfluenced by the external world, standing outside of time and independent of cause, is no longer a man.
  • But besides this, even if, admitting the remaining minimum of freedom to equal zero, we assumed in some given case--as for instance in that of a dying man, an unborn babe, or an idiot--complete absence of freedom, by so doing we should destroy the very conception of man in the case we are examining, for as soon as there is no freedom there is also no man.
  • Man's free will differs from every other force in that man is directly conscious of it, but in the eyes of reason it in no way differs from any other force.
  • But just as the subject of every science is the manifestation of this unknown essence of life while that essence itself can only be the subject of metaphysics, even the manifestation of the force of free will in human beings in space, in time, and in dependence on cause forms the subject of history, while free will itself is the subject of metaphysics.
  • In another form but along the same path of reflection the other sciences have proceeded.
  • From the time the law of Copernicus was discovered and proved, the mere recognition of the fact that it was not the sun but the earth that moves sufficed to destroy the whole cosmography of the ancients.
  • But even after the discovery of the law of Copernicus the Ptolemaic worlds were still studied for a long time.
  • But when truth conquered, theology established itself just as firmly on the new foundation.
  • Rice Time is child-friendly, but beer and wine is served at the restaurant.
  • Purdys, New York, is the ideal destination not only for sight-seeing but also for restaurant-hopping.
  • Dress is casual, but Cubs attire might get you some odd looks.
  • This simple take-out restaurant has anything but a simple menu.
  • The kitchen is overseen by a professional chef, but the food is prepared and served by students.
  • Pizza Rustica Restaurant & Bar Pizza Rustica may not grab you with its name alone, but one look at the menu and a whiff of smoke from the hardwood-fired oven should do the trick.
  • The menu is mostly seafood, but there are other choices as well.
  • The menu changes seasonally but may include appetizers like salmon ceviche, iced oysters, or crispy lamb apricot and almond spring rolls.
  • The mammoth T-bone is a top seller but if you're dining with friends, consider the four-person Porterhouse cut.
  • The town was settled in 1719 by Scottish immigrants, but was originally the land of the Pawtucket Indians.
  • They roll up generous-sized burritos with the typical fillings of chicken and steak, but vegan options include fillings such as grilled portobello mushrooms, fresh spinach and garlic, and chickpea with red curry.
  • Not only is the area infamous for blues music, but tasty BBQ cooking is a south-side specialty.
  • Everything is available for carryout or delivery but can also be enjoyed in the cozy eating area.
  • Chanterelle, part of the TriBeCa neighborhood in New York City, is a very walkable area that is known not only for its picturesque cobblestone streets, but also for its numerous restaurants, many of which enjoy world-class reputations.
  • The servers come and join you at your table and crack smart jokes about your order, but it's all in good fun and part of its charm.
  • It has shows every night but Monday with two showings Wednesday and Friday and three on Saturday.
  • They do not have a dress code, but making reservations is strongly suggested.
  • The Wild West does not take reservations but can be reached via telephone for information on the menu, special events, and hours of operation.
  • None of the options for nightlife in Canton have direct websites, but they can all easily be reached via telephone.
  • The inn operates as a bed and breakfast but serves breakfast to the public on Sunday mornings.
  • Today the restaurant serves food, drinks and entertains with karaoke, but it is also reportedly haunted.
  • The menu at the Queen of Sheba is filled with not only entrees, but many appetizers, vegetarian dishes, desserts and a selection of red, white and Ethiopian wines.
  • A standard room at the Wynn is approximately 640 square feet but select suites measure more than 3,000 square feet.
  • Hanni's is an ideal location for meat lovers, but there is a large vegetarian menu as well.
  • Very few restaurants are distinctly Arabic, but the few that are have a large following of devoted diners.
  • The food is authentically Cuban, but you can find other famous Caribbean dishes like Jamaican jerk chicken on the menu.
  • Everyone will know your business, but the good news is that no one will care.
  • Credit cards are accepted but reservations are not.
  • Portland is divided into five different "quadrants," but this article is divided into three diverse areas: the West Side, the East Side and the Suburbs.
  • Portland has had a green reputation for a long time, but only recently, it's gotten a new one--foodie.
  • Permanently at dock on the Delaware River at Penn's Landing, Moshulu's heyday as a trading ship is far behind, but its rank as a fine restaurant has gained it AAA four-diamond rating.
  • The small menu changes weekly, but one of the signature dishes is Rigatoni in Pork Sauce.
  • Pasta is included on every menu, but a variety of other main dishes and some interesting appetizers are also readily available at these establishments.
  • Check out the hole-in-the-wall restaurants that you've never heard of before, but which serve fantastic food.
  • The seafood is fresh and delicious, but if looking for one of the restaurant's signature dishes, order the oven roasted duck with honey orange gastrique.
  • Steakhouse The specialty here is steaks, as indicated by the name, but don't let that fool you.
  • Restaurants on Buckley Road might be a bit out of the way, but savvy travelers know that sometimes the most fun can be found off of the beaten path.
  • Dining attire is casual, but swimsuits must be covered and dry to enter the restaurant.
  • Beache's Bar and Grill Beache's Bar and Grill serves a wide variety of dishes, but specializes in seafood, steaks and pasta entrees.
  • Its menu includes customary Chinese dishes, such as sweet and sour pork and cashew chicken, but it also lists some uncommon choices such as lemongrass chicken and kung pao triple delight.
  • You can play pool or bowl at the club, but make sure you check the dress code.
  • Don't worry, there are still options if you want to explore by day and dance by night but can't legally drink yet.
  • Wokano Asian Bistro Located in Capitol Hill, this restaurant specializes in Asian fusion but has some excellent Korean dishes like jaam bang (noodles) and jaam-bong (seafood stew).
  • But all that adventure can really make a person tired.
  • There are multiple Shore House Cafés in Southern California, but this is the only one that is open 24 hours.
  • Lee's Sandwiches is a chain, but the Garden Grove location is the only location that is open 24 hours a day.
  • Conesus Inn The average meal here costs $34 (2009) but is definitely worth the money.
  • There is food available in every price range, but it is especially nice to treat yourself to an expensive meal while in Rochester.
  • Located in deep Southeast Portland, the Pub can be a real trek to get to but is well worth the effort.
  • The menu features classic Chinese fare, as well as delicious, but lesser-known dishes.
  • The Chambersburg shop is the company's original location, but they have eight other locations in the Trenton area.
  • Diners can come in as early as 6 in the morning any day of the week to enjoy Dave's food, but they must be out before closing time: 3 p.m.
  • The restaurant boasts an extensive selection of both commonly known German dishes and their lesser-known but traditional counterparts.
  • L'Ancestral Restaurant4514 Travis St, Dallas, TX 75205(214) 528-1081 Bijoux Located in the Inwood Village, Bijoux is a relative newcomer to the local French cuisine scene, but was voted Best New Restaurant of 2006 by the Dallas Morning News.
  • There are a few, but it just takes some looking to find them.
  • Thrill-seeking tourists flock to Orange County not just for the theme parks, but also to explore the wilds of Casper's Wilderness Park, to surf the waves on Huntington Beach and to fish at Dana Wharf.
  • The food is on the pricey side, but the portions are huge and the quality is great, and the menu is flexible and constantly changing.
  • Most of the schnitzel dinners are priced in the $10 range and there are also inexpensive, but authentic beers from Austria and Germany.
  • Low on price, but high on spice, the restaurant offers dirty rice, crawfish casserole, and its state-fair-winning corn fritters.
  • The menu changes daily, but Yats serves up Louisiana cuisine, with a heavy emphasis on beans, rich flavorful sauces, and rice.
  • Expect a bustling but sophisticated setting inside, where you'll mingle with both native Cubans and Texans, surrounded by images of Cuba and Cuban movie stars and the sounds of tropical music.
  • Bottles are priced at retail (as the store portion of the establishment offers carryout wine sales), but there is a $12 corkage fee to have the bottle opened in the restaurant.
  • Not only is it the location of highly esteemed equestrian competitions, but it's also famous for the Keeneland Race Course and Kentucky Horse Park, where visitors can observe 50 breeds of horses.
  • Perfect for a day trip, Avon is only an hour's drive away from New York City, but with its boardwalk dotted by Victorian lamps and benches, it seems a world apart.
  • Hana Yori of Japan3601 Grape RoadMishawaka, IN 46545(574) 258-5933hanayori.com A Taste Seoul Garden specializes in teriyaki cuisine but has less than a dozen sushi offerings, including favorites like California, tuna and cucumber rolls.
  • It might be a bit pricey, but the food is definitely worth every penny.
  • The location is in a strip mall, but the dining room is clean and it is close to the Shoveler Pond Trial in the Anahuac Wildlife RefugeBunga Raya Restaurant10829 W.
  • This restaurant howls for some aesthetic improvement but receives high complements for mouthwatering fare.
  • Modern Restaurant and Pizzeria Davenport Park may look a little barren at first glance, but if you wait until the sunset, you will never believe you thought this park was plain.
  • Desserts include apple strudel and German chocolate cake (not really German in origin, but tasty nonetheless) and the beer list contains an impressive 80 different varieties (many of them German).8024 Max Blobs Park Rd.
  • S., was opened as a dance hall and biergarten as well as restaurant in 1933, but closed its doors in 2007.
  • It also has an adjacent lodge with all of the same amenities, but set away from the hustle and bustle of the hotel.
  • Entries can be pricey--the tamarind beef tenderloin costs $22.95, but the food has earned raves from critics.6 W.
  • Chef Ethan Stowell prepares dinner nightly in this relaxing but elegant downtown Seattle restaurant.
  • SouthSeattle, WA 98104(206) 467-7797ilterrazzocarmine.com Union Restaurant Seattle may seem like our typical big city, but there are always some green areas if you are willing to look.
  • Seattle may be a large city, but outdoor enthusiasts can still find a plethora of activities to occupy their time.
  • Moro's is very small and does not accept reservations, but once you sit down, the service is extremely attentive.
  • Portofino can provide you with not only a nourishing meal but also a lovely view of the Detroit River, as the restaurant is situated directly on the docks, complete with its own Portofino Friendship yacht that you can set sail on before or after dinner.
  • Accommodation is in traditional hotel rooms, as well as private casitas, where you can enjoy all the amenities of home, but without all the hustle-bustle.
  • Orders may be faxed in or phoned in, but there is as of yet no option to order online as the website is still under construction.
  • There is a restaurant with a full bar, but the restaurant is seldom crowded as the restaurant does the bulk of its business through carryout or delivery.
  • Peking Restaurant Peking Restaurant offers primarily Cantonese fare, but a number of spicy Hunan options are available.
  • The service and décor can be a bit lacking at times, but for those seeking spicy Latin food, this is the place to be when in this part of New Jersey.
  • Chili's has an extensive menu with all sorts of items, but it can be said that they specialize in Tex-Mex style cooking.
  • Located in a strip mall, it's not much from the outside, but the inside looks authentic.
  • Old Heidelberg Restaurant, Lounge & Bar Old Heidelberg has a Bavarian kitsch atmosphere with steins on the ceiling and garden gnomes everywhere, but the authenticity of the menu is clear.
  • In the area, there are not too many restaurants directly on the lake, but there are a few notable ones in the more populated outskirts.
  • OR Smoothies café is small, but dedicated almost entirely toward vegetarian choices.
  • This tiny diner consists of about eight booths and a counter, but serves up the best breakfast around and is extremely low priced.
  • Large but not pretentious, this northeast Kansas restaurant is known for home cooking and a monstrous 20 oz.
  • A little hard to find (better take a map) but well worth a wrong turn or two in western Kansas to find aged, charcoal-grilled steaks.
  • But not everyone knows that Kansas has a hidden treasure trove of steak houses that serve melt-in-your-mouth tender, and frequently local, beef.
  • The culinary experiences of San Francisco are abundant but the sushi is upheld by residents and visitors alike as a must for travelers.
  • Days in the San Francisco Bay Area are easily filled with outdoor activities whether it be hiking in the Muir Woods or kayaking along miles of rocky coastline but the evening remains to explore the culture of the city.
  • But regardless of what night you go, you will always find pool tables, music and a dance floor for a night of great fun.
  • By day you interact with nature, but by night it is time for some social interaction and Columbus nightlife.
  • But many outdoor enthusiasts need to let off a little steam on vacation.
  • Fresh sushi can be the most amazing experience, but finding a legit and fresh sushi restaurant can be very hard.
  • But its location in International Plaza makes the restaurant ideal for a late meal or midnight snack.
  • But the restaurant's true charm lies in the locale.
  • Insider tip: not on the menu, but always available and delicious-- the chicken nachos.
  • A popular spot for vacation homes for urbanites, Annandale is small but has plenty offer locals and visitors alike.
  • The space is small, but the German food is authentic and traditional, cooked with the freshest ingredients.
  • It is known for the famous imported German soft pretzels served with their signature homemade Bier Cheese, but it serves many other German and American dishes as well.
  • The restaurant not only serves authentic German and Hungarian foods, but also offers up more than 40 draft and bottled beers from the full service bar.
  • C. hot-spot throughout the warmer season, but the Rathskeller in the basement is the place to go to get that authentic German pub feel.
  • The restaurant does not have a full bar, but it offers Birch beer on tap.
  • The restaurant is low-key and basic, but the food is delicious.
  • Not only is their beer and wine selection extensive, but they also provide take out service and a children's menu.
  • This popular Northwest Philadelphia restaurant usually has a line, but its cheesesteaks are definitely worth the wait.
  • But the city has a lot more to offer than Independence Hall and the Liberty Bell.
  • Should you find yourself in the Milwaukee area over the Easter holiday, it may be a little late in the season for ice fishing, but you can always celebrate the holiday by going out for brunch.
  • Milwaukee may be a large urban center, but it still offers ample opportunities for outdoor recreation.
  • Steaks on the dinner menu are right around $30 per plate, but you will not find steak on the lunch menu.
  • But don't look for much vegetarian fare beyond sides and salads.
  • The road may be paved, but that climb can still work up quite an appetite.
  • Walk-ins are welcome but reservations are recommended as the restaurant frequently has a waiting list.
  • The restaurant does not have a liquor license, but you are welcome to bring your own wine or beer if you so choose.42 W.
  • Parking is ample but during the summer months, it fills quickly.
  • If you're looking for a slightly unusual but delicious dessert, be sure to order the fried pineapple off the appetizer menu.
  • Buffet items feature not only Chinese dishes but also seafood (snow crab, mussels and shrimp), meats such as roast beef and baked chicken, and desserts that include Hershey's ice cream.
  • If you're hankering for a steak but don't want to miss out on the renowned seafood from local waters, Grilled Wild Sea Scallops can be added to any entrée.
  • Right on the beach, The Windjammer serves beer, cocktails and traditional bar food, but it's famous for live music, volleyball tournaments and for hosting the annual Budweiser Bikini Bash.
  • But while there may be a limited number of options and variety there are certainly enough quality destinations to keep satisfy the appetite of those in search of a quick repast before a hike, bike or camping excursion.
  • Mack and Manco's Pizza is not just a pizzeria but an Ocean City tradition.
  • One might not immediately think of French cuisine in Minnesota's capital city, but you needn't leave the city limits to get your fix of steak frites, bouillabaise, or coq au vin.
  • This is a carnivore's dream but vegetarians will find enough delicious meat free options on the salad bar.
  • Vegetarian entrees are available but not plentiful.581 Main St.
  • It invites you to try anything on the menu but recommends the Charro Platter ($13.95), Enchilada Platter ($12.95) and the Tacos al Pastor ($2.50 each).
  • Reservations are required as the restaurant is small, but quaint.
  • There is mozzarella cheese, but this cheese is smothered in sauerkraut and corned beef, and the final product tastes far more like a Reuben sandwich than it does anything you might order from Domino's.
  • Helvetia, WV 26224(304) 924-6435 Villa da Vinci The Villa da Vinci is, as the name implies, not a German restaurant, but an Italian one, featuring a pretty standard array of subs, pizza and pasta dishes as well as steak, chicken and fish.
  • Mailloux, a woman who, he says, claims to be in her late 80s but whom the locals (and some of her own relatives) swear is more than 100 years old.
  • Popular for not only its food but also its colorful and vibrant restaurant design, La Puerta Azul was named "Best Mexican" by Hudson Valley Magazine.
  • The restaurant is also popular for its simple but stylish Sunday brunch, which you can eat indoors in front of a roaring fire or, on warmer days, on the pretty patio.
  • Apple Betty Diner Apple Betty Diner is proud of its quick and pleasant service and cheap but delicious short meals.
  • The chicken Marsala here consistently gets good marks (it's just spicy enough, but not too spicy), the interior of the restaurant is spotlessly clean, and the wait staff is incredibly friendly.
  • Dine at one of the upstairs couch tables, but be warned, the pubs do get a little noisy.
  • The food is exceptional at O'Porto but is particularly talked about because of the seafood.
  • The Firebox also has a raw bar, which is a bit pricey, but the seafood is incredibly fresh.
  • When many visitors think of Texan food, images of meaty BBQ come to mind, but in many of the metropolitan areas, there are also vegan options.
  • It has grown since then into a franchise, but still maintains the diner feel of the original Huddle House.
  • Kalamazoo, Michigan, remains a college town first but also welcomes visitors of all kinds who will enjoy the entertainment only a college town offers.
  • But it's the food that people keep coming back, especially the tasty lunch specialties.
  • Blue Plate Café Downtown113 S Court Ave Memphis, TN 38103 (901) 523-2050 Ethnic Haunts Bhan Thai Bhan Thai might not have the most extensive menu in town, but the quality can't be beat.
  • The menu is not deep, but covers a lot of ground for a no-muss, no-fuss diner.
  • Holiday's "The German Restaurant" is the only German restaurant in Holiday, but the good news is that it's the only one you need.
  • Arroz con Pato is roast duck with cilantro risotto, but what makes this dish really zing is the red peppers.
  • The cuisine is likely unfamiliar to most, as Peruvian food is typical South American, but with an added spicy hot flair.
  • Siesta Key Oyster Bar is a favorite with locals and tourists alike not just for the food, but also the live music every night.
  • Of course, there are oysters raw on the half shell or steamed, but SKOB also has an extensive menu of other seafood delights.
  • There are four locations in Santa Barbara, but the State Street restaurant is just a couple of blocks from Vera Cruz Park.
  • Scarsdale Metro Restaurant likes to do big events, but will only serve food from a smaller catering menu.
  • The menu changes with the season, but almost always has a handful of staple dishes, like pan-roasted chicken, sweet corn risotto, salmon tartare and marinated grilled shrimp.
  • Reservations are recommended; the restaurant is charming but small.
  • Over the years, it has built a reputation for delicious sandwiches, burger and salads, but it is most famous for its signature buffalo-style chicken wings.
  • Schaumburg, a suburb of Chicago, is not only a starting point for all of Chicago's shopping but also a place to explore the outdoors.
  • Clifton Park, NY 12065(518) 383-6666mangiarestaurant.com Pancho's Mexican Buffet For those who enjoy Mexican food but are not too keen on the idea of braving super-hot dishes, Pancho's Mexican Buffet offers an ideal selection for you.
  • You can find a number of chain restaurants in the city, but there are original eating spots that you can also try.
  • La Vina has a quiet, elegant atmosphere, but not overly formal.
  • Smuggler's CoveRoute 611Tannersville, PA 18372(570) 629-2277smugglerscove.net Alaska Pete's Roadhouse Grille and Moondog Saloon Also accessible to Route I-80, but about 15 minutes from Tannersville is Alaska Pete's Roadhouse Grille and Moondog Saloon.
  • The vindalu curries are very hot but flavorful, and a favorite is the chicken vindalu.
  • They specialize in tandoor style preparation, but they also offer a small selection of curries.
  • A large pizza here runs about $10, but if you're planning on just a quick lunch or dinner here, then expect to spend about $7 - $8 per person.
  • El Corral Restaurant2201 E River RdTucson, AZ 85710520-299-6092www.elcorraltucson.com Claim Jumper Visitors from the East Coast may not have had the experience of Claim Jumper, but it should be visited on any trip to the West.
  • But after a long day of working up an appetite, it's good to know that Palm Desert offers plenty of restaurants where you can enjoy a fine meal.
  • Large groups are easily accommodated, but call ahead to reserve adequate space.
  • All your favorite traditional dishes are on the menu, but you will also have the opportunity to try innovative menu items.
  • Bellevue, Washington 98006(425) 451-1909‎http://www.moghulpalace.net Spice Route Indian Cuisine Looking for Indian food but want to try something a little different.
  • Elegance is the key word throughout the Jefferson, but the new bar does contribute to a more casual feel inside the restaurant.
  • Many of the staff don't speak much English, but they understand "hot pot," and that's really all there is to it.
  • It's genuine Thai food, not Americanized, but the portions are huge.
  • The restaurant can also accommodate large parties, but advises that reservations are made well in advance.
  • The menu includes breakfast basics of eggs and bacon, but also specials like the garden scramble and the lucky scramble.
  • Houses in the area have been or are being renovated, but still are in keeping with their funky craftsman or bungalow style.
  • This restaurant is only open for dinner but does have late hours every night of the week.
  • They accept debit or credit cards and reservations are accepted but not required.
  • There is a long list of microbrew bars in Portland, but patrons rate a select few particularly high because of the beers and the atmosphere.
  • Collingswood, NJ 08108 856-869-3345thetortillapress.com Blackbird Owned by a New Jersey native, Blackbird is a casual but upscale Italian dining venue.
  • Yes, there is the standard Bud and Bud Light but there are also local brews: Kentucky Ale, and Kentucky Bourbon Ale. 154 Patchen Drive # 87 (at Richmond Road)Lexington, KY 40509(859) 269-7621shamrocksky.com Resources Kentucky Horse Park McConnel Spring
  • Columbia's promises the fried green tomatoes on their appetizer menu are "the best in town," but are only seasonal.
  • Miyako After riding, and learning about horses all day, one might not immediately think "sushi." But when that craving hits, it hits, and you'll be glad for Miyako.
  • Parking is available on the street and behind the restaurant building, but you'll need to feed the meter.
  • State College, PA 16801 (814) 237-1582oldenewyork.net Herwig's Austrian Bistro Herwig's in State College is Austrian, not German, but the cuisine of the two neighboring countries is similar.
  • Hofbrauhas The Hofbrauhas Pub & Eatery in Abbottstown dates to 1958, but the property goes back even further.
  • Start with the cold cucumber soup--it may sound strange, but it is actually unique and delicious.
  • You may be roughing it in Lexington during the day, but when night falls, if you're in the mood for a bit of luxury, Lexington has a few restaurants that may be to your liking.
  • The abundance of activities will no doubt satisfy any outdoor enthusiasts' hunger for adventure, but leave them with hunger pains.
  • Sandy has innumerable attractions, but tourists often come to the area to enjoy summer hiking and climbing as well as winter skiing and snowshoeing.
  • The state of Massachusetts has many different Brazilian restaurants, mostly concentrated around the city of Boston but a few a bit farther west toward the center of the state.
  • Austin has no shortage of steakhouses, but a few choices stand apart from the rest.
  • But get there early--the "6 under $6" menu is only available from 11:00 am to 4:00 pm.
  • Courtyard Grille All that hiking give you a hankering for some quality steak, but you don't feel like emptying your wallet to fill your belly.
  • They are closed on Sunday but open Monday through Friday 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. and Saturdays 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.
  • Gouverneur, New York, is a small town, but there is plenty of adventure for all in the surrounding area.
  • Come dressed casual but fashionable, and bring cash--no credit cards are accepted.
  • Lake Placid Pub and Brewery813 Mirror Lake DrLake Placid, NY (518) 523-3813ubuale.com Taste Bistro and Bar Taste Bistro and Bar is located inside the Mirror Lake Inn Resort and Spa but it doesn't taste like typical hotel food.
  • Noon Mark Diner Noon Mark Diner is a local hot spot serving rustic but tasty cuisine.
  • This restaurant features Italian favorites like chicken florentine, but you can also order creative Italian cuisine such as the veal scaloppini with shiitake mushrooms.
  • Takeout also is available, but you might want to stick around and enjoy the famously relaxed clean environment that The Garden Grille is well-known for.
  • There may be long waits on weekend evenings, but many will tell you that the wait is worth your time.
  • There may be hundreds of Rhode Island restaurants but only a handful that cater specifically to vegan diners.
  • Illinois, home of Chicago and the Magnificent Mile, not only offers great shopping, but also a wide range of activities throughout the state.
  • There are the usual steak cuts, but the thick, juicy gourmet hamburgers, with a variety of toppings, are top sellers.
  • Pizzas are, of course, the restaurant's specialty, but the salads and its espresso are also bestsellers.
  • Tampa, FL 33612-5416(813) 979-1464 Saigon Bay It's easy to bypass this unassuming eatery behind the University Collection Shopping Center, but that would be a mistake.
  • The dining room may need updating but the food is top-notch.
  • You'll find nothing fancy or creatively over the top, but tasty Vietnamese peasant fare at reasonable prices. 8404 Hillsborough Ave.
  • Appetizers are standard, like egg rolls and won ton soup, but the rest of the menu includes a variety of beef, rice, and noodle soups, along with several rice dishes.
  • The food menu is pretty standard pub fare consisting mainly of wraps, paninis and burgers, but also offers several chicken, steak, and seafood entrees.
  • Located right off the Taconic Parkway, the restaurant has its local following but also gets a number of travelers.
  • Get your dogs with cheese, chili or both, but be sure to include a side of homemade onion rings with your order.
  • You'll find the expected noodle and fried rice entrees on the menu, but the real show stoppers are the rich, complex, red, green, yellow and Massaman curries, with a choice of chicken, pork, beef, shrimp, squid, scallops, or tofu and vegetables.
  • The no-frills dining room is fairly plain, but the food is anything but.
  • The no-frills dining room is fairly plain, but the food is anything but.
  • California might be known for its sunsets and seafood, but California can also fire up a grill and serve up a mean steak.
  • You might think that you are stuck with sushi and salad on your west coast visit, but think again.
  • The venue doesn't accept reservations, so you may have to wait, but it's worth it.
  • It may be tiny, but guests can join in for lunch or dinner, and feast on above average gastropub eats like Ahi Tuna, sirloin steak and other "flawless" hot entrees.
  • Dewitt, New York, restaurants are primarily comprised of national franchises, but the following selections are strictly homegrown.
  • Items offered on the menu change depending on what is in season, but it is a changing selection of seafood, salads and desserts.
  • Their website says the environment is "dressy casual" and that men should wear collared shirts, but shorts are acceptable.
  • But if you're willing to venture out to a nearby town or take the train into Philadelphia, your Indian food options will increase.
  • Las Brisas This SoCal favorite is famous not only for its Mexican Riviera cuisine but its panoramic view of the Pacific Ocean.
  • Thousands of Southern California restaurants boast of cutting-edge cuisine and a memorable culinary experience, but if you come to California to see the views from a peak, you might be yearning for meal with a view of the Pacific Ocean.
  • With so many choices available it can be hard to decide, but rest assured, whether it's a Philly Steak sandwich or Tilapia stuffed with shrimp, crab and scallops, there's something that every diner will enjoy.
  • But take note that Bronxville is a college town, and you may have to battle the students for a table.
  • Nicky's Pizzeria & Restaurant Nicky's Pizzeria & Restaurant in White Plains may not have the most refined menu, or the plushest decor, but its high-quality, old-fashioned ingredients keep bringing back satisfied customers.
  • But for those of us who may like to get out of the city setting occasionally and get a bite to eat in a quieter, tree-lined atmosphere, Westchester can offer a smorgasbord of tasty and high-quality delights.
  • A dining institution in Ogdensburg, it offers, but of course; hamburgers.
  • Lawrence River but don't forget to save some time, and visit the popular and top-rated Restaurants in the City of Ogdensburg.
  • They are closed on Tuesdays, but offer both lunch and dinner the rest of the week.
  • But the Greek delights, some say, are incomparable.
  • But you'll be pleasantly surprised by what you find here.
  • China King Buffet features the fare you'd expect at a small town Chinese buffet, but at a higher quality.
  • Pasta dishes come in quite large servings, but most other entrees are about right for one person.
  • Club 57 offers a variety of Italian meals, but the sun-dried tomato pasta is the best of the bunch.
  • The choice of entrees ranges from seafood to pasta, but they also have burgers, steaks and chicken to satisfy guest's needs.
  • The lunch/dinner restaurant is closed on Mondays, but the bar is open seven days a week. 612 W.
  • Dress is casual but be aware--Nami will cost you more than a Texas-style steakhouse, but it comes with Hibachi entertainment.
  • Dress is casual but be aware--Nami will cost you more than a Texas-style steakhouse, but it comes with Hibachi entertainment.
  • The cheese appetizers are delicious, but the rich chocolate desserts are the main draw for many.
  • Many are geared to families, but there are plenty that maintain a romantic ambiance.
  • Central Florida is best know for Disney World and other theme parks, but it's also home to some lovely state parks as well as some excellent restaurants.
  • Wear casual attire, but not bike shorts, and be prepared for mid to high-range prices.
  • Restaurants in Delmar, New York, are easy to find, as most are located along Delaware Avenue, between Kenwood and Plymouth Avenues. 333 Café Named after its address, the 333 Café serves gourmet dinners in a trendy but casual atmosphere.
  • The selection of Burnt Hills restaurants is not large, but the variety and quality of the restaurants are more than adequate for a town of its size.
  • Hot bread, baked fresh daily, is served at each table, but other sides such as a 1-pound, salt-crusted baked potato and Malio's Famous Gorgonzola Salad are a la carte.
  • It still attracts sports stars and celebrities but also caters to a swank business crowd lured by $5 Happy Hour on weekdays.
  • Prices are reasonable, but call ahead for reservations during peak times.
  • The restaurant can be crowded on weekend nights, but reservations are not accepted.
  • The restaurant's reputation rests on its thin-crust pizzas (white or whole wheat) topped with high-quality ingredients and baked in a wood fire, but salads, pasta dishes and sandwiches are available as well.
  • The Summit offers contemporary American fare in a casual but elegant atmosphere.
  • The specialty is the fresh-ground burgers and the tasty hand-cut French fries, but some people prefer the fish and chips.
  • But you can push your way past the unhealthy fast food and find some healthier options to help you refuel for your next adventure.
  • Fraser might be a small town in Colorado, but that does not mean there aren't plenty of outdoor activities.
  • It not only has an extensive wine menu, but a drinks menu to complement the pub-like atmosphere.
  • Portland, OR 97214(503) 546-8796www.lepigeon.com Beast Beast may look plain from the outside, but don't be deceived.
  • Steak may not be the first food that comes to mind in a city famous for fried chicken and mint juleps, but red meat options in Louisville are abundant and can meet a variety of tastes and pocket books.
  • Pause Kitchen and Bar5101 N Interstate AvePortland, OR 97217(971) 230-0705 McMenamins Kennedy School Northeast Portland's McMenamins Kennedy School is a remodeled elementary school, so how could it be anything but kid friendly.
  • Screen Door is delicious but unpretentious, serving hearty, home cooking that incorporates local organic produce and meats.
  • Guests mostly go to Toro for their individual plates of tapas, but they also offer several dinner entree options for two.
  • Their menu never gets old, partly because they have such a large selection, but also because they add new items every six weeks.
  • Churrascaria Braza488 Farmington AvenueHartford, CT 06105(860) 882-1839hottomatos.net Brazil Grill Churrascaria and Pizza Brazil Grill Pizza, as it sometimes called, is a fairly small, but clean, restaurant serving a variety of pizza pies.
  • Reservations are encouraged, but are not necessary.
  • Prices vary, but as of 2009 a three-course dinner starts at $69, making it a somewhat pricey choice.
  • Menu items vary, but typical items include exotic salads, several meat entrees and a couple desert choices that incorporate local fruit.
  • There are usually some vegetarian options, but the menu also includes lots of local fish and other kinds of meat.
  • Minneapolis, MN 55454 612-339-9385chaisthai.com Tum Rup Thai Located in the trendy Uptown neighborhood of Minneapolis, Tum Rup Thai is the kind of place that you'll need to shower and change before visiting, but it's well worth washing up for.
  • Entrees will run about $20, but it's well worth the price.
  • If you are looking to get some good wurst, this is the place to go, but the restaurant also serves milder flavored German food.
  • Most entres run around $20 a person, but the portions are large.
  • The atmosphere is elegant, and understated, with quiet but efficient service.
  • After a blight all but wiped out successive crops in the early 1900's, the local economy turned to dairy farming, but Milford has never forgotten its role in the glory days of the hop industry.
  • After a blight all but wiped out successive crops in the early 1900's, the local economy turned to dairy farming, but Milford has never forgotten its role in the glory days of the hop industry.
  • There is nothing but beautiful scenery to enjoy while enjoying lunch or dinner.
  • Ferris Steakhouse is closed on Sunday, but you can visit them for dinner from 5 p.m. to 10 p.m., Monday through Friday.
  • The grape leaves and falafel are not quite as good at Ya Hala as some other Lebanese restaurants, but the Lebanese delicacy "moughrabieh" is never to be topped.
  • The strip mall location is unassuming, but the interior is neat and cozy, with friendly service.
  • Dress is casual, but leave the bike shorts at home.
  • Many entrees are under $10, but the steaks run from $17.95 to $31.95.
  • Most of the dishes at Smoky's are reasonably priced, but fancier cuts of meat will run between $25-$35 and lobster is at market price.
  • They have the usual Thai dishes like Pad Thai and Drunken Noodles, but if you are feeling adventurous, then try the Pla Rad Prik (Deep Fried Fish in Spicy Thai Sauce) or the Rama Duck (Stir Fried Duck).
  • Pho Basil177 Massachusetts AveBoston, MA 02115(617) 262-5377 Brown Sugar Café The name may be deceiving, but this restaurant is far from a café.
  • But, if you're craving exotic Asian flavors, check out these top Thai restaurants in South Portland.
  • Booster Juice offers its own line of funky juice mixes, with names like "Green Hornet" and "Tahiti Squeeze," but also offers to make custom creations to order, complete with your choice of health supplement.
  • Parking can be difficult in this area, but a walk through the Bottom or along the nearby canal makes for a complete night on the town.
  • It's not as famous for clam pizza as Pepe's, but Sally's offers its own specialties.
  • Pepe's now has several branches, but the original is a "must see" with it's cavernous coal ovens and pizza chefs working out in the open.
  • The atmosphere is clubby but friendly, with a large, dark wooden bar separated from the dining room.
  • Brooklyn, New York 11228Tel: (718) 238-2633grubhub.com/nyc/yummy-chinese-restaurant-on-13th Garden Tortilla and Chinese Exp You're done bicycling around Dyker Beach Park and ready for some food, but you and your bike partner can't agree on what to eat.
  • Free delivery is available with a minimum order, but a few tables are available if you want to eat on the premises.
  • Minimal order price for delivery is $10, but the food is consistently rated as high-end on the takeout spectrum.
  • Considered by online reviewers at Yahoo's local business pages to be "the best Chinese food in New Haven," Sing-Wah specializes in traditional Chinese dishes full of flavor but without the grease.
  • One of the reasons for this may be the presence of Yale University, one of the largest and most famous colleges in the United States, but the town's decorated history in cuisine may also attest to the high quantity.
  • San Francisco, CA 94117(415) 864-8643nopasf.com/ Salt House Like Nopa, the Salt House has big hippie-inspired communal tables, but it does not force everyone to sit at them.
  • Not only does the city have memorable landmarks, but it also has some of the best restaurants in the state.
  • Many diners prefer Almaz over other Ethiopian eateries in the area but warn against its American menu offerings.140 S 20th St.
  • Functioning in a coffeehouse format, Almaz has an inexpensive but limited menu.
  • But it's also an option for locals, when they want the kind of reliably low-key and comfortable environment provided by such a brand, without having to break the bank.
  • It's a pleasant but no-frills greasy spoon with a relaxed atmosphere--despite the brisk table turn-over and unlimited coffee that keeps its patrons wide-eyed.
  • Their flavors are subtle, and intricate rather than aggressively spicy, but they'll be happy to make it hot if your sense of culinary adventure matches your passion for the outdoors.
  • But it's also a friendly bar, specializing in the after-dinner "cigars and Porto" tradition, with an assortment of Jamaican, Honduran and Dominican cigars to enjoy, and some of the ports aged longer than 15 years.
  • You can sit in if you wish, but most people prefer to "grab and go".
  • Cloud 9 is located within the Cheyenne Regional Airport, and it is open for lunch and dinner everyday but Sundays.
  • The dining area is smoke-free, but smoking is permitted in the saloon area.
  • Pets are allowed but only in the separate Cottage Suite.
  • Check-in is from 3 to 6 p.m but arranging for another time is possible.
  • The North End restaurant near Fisherman's Wharf is, alas, a tourist magnet, but still serves tasty southern Italian dishes at reasonable prices.
  • Big 4 Africa is known for its Big 5, but we're not talking animals here; we're talking tycoons.
  • But be forewarned: the portions in this moderately priced restaurant are known to be huge.
  • Shucks features a full bar but is still a fine choice for families.70 State St.
  • They offer a dining menu as well, but if looking for a final touch after dinner, the eclairs washed down with a frappe is the way to go.
  • Greek Islands Restaurant From the moment you step into Greek Islands, you are treated not as a customer but as family.
  • Au Pied de Cochon at the InterContinental Buckhead Hotel is on the pricier side, but boasts private tables draped in rich red curtains for an especially romantic touch.
  • Four million people visit Charleston and its surrounding areas each year, not only for its history, but for its many beaches and outdoor activities, such as kayaking or canoeing through the Blackwater Swamp of Cypress Gardens.
  • Their service includes a beautiful inside dining area, but customers can choose to eat outside as well.
  • While visiting, it is important to not just feed the mind, but to feed the stomach as well.
  • Many try and very few outside of Chicago have managed to do it, but as Joey D's is owned by a Chicago native, this Chicago-style eatery ranks at the top of Bradenton pizza places.
  • Vertoris Pizza House What makes Vertoris Pizza House so special is not only its brick-oven thin-crust pizza, but the fact that a large portion of their menu is gluten free, making it one of the only gluten-free pizza places in the Bradenton area.
  • Not only does Shula's serve steak, but it also offers a wide range of seafood and adult beverages.
  • Smaller parties can sit at smaller tables, but guests in parties of four or six sit at Trotter's famous kitchen tables, enjoying a 12- to 14-course dinner experience.
  • But there are three top choices that are sure to please anyone with a craving for Italian.
  • Intrigue, suspense and mystery are all classic Hitchcock, but this clever satire also tickles your funny bone.
  • But you'll find both at Paloma Mexican Haute Cuisine, which has garnered the restaurant so much attention that it's often difficult to get a table unless you call several days ahead for reservations.
  • They accept credit cards but don't expect fast service.
  • Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19147(215) 465-1440taqueriaveracruzana.comLa Lupe is a small BYOB that provides better food than ambiance but has authentic food although there are few meatless dishes.
  • They use fresh ingredients but unfortunately have limited vegetarian choices.
  • It is a BYOB place but there's a state store nearby and parking should not be a problem.
  • Northern Liberties Las Cazuelas: A very reasonable small, unpretentious neighborhood restaurant where they don't expect you to press your shorts but serve decent portions of authentic Mexican food.
  • Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19103(215) 546-0181tequilasphilly.comParking may be an issue for most Center City establishments but there are public and private lots in the area.
  • They offer large portions but few vegetarian options.
  • Chicago has many fine restaurants, but a few stand out from the rest.
  • While it features the expected pizza and pasta that every Italian restaurant has, the food is anything but typical.
  • While Chez Shea's dining room is a more formal and romantic setting, Shea's Lounge Bistro next door is also a great location for quality French food, but in a more casual setting.
  • The food is OK but there are better restaurants in the Portland waterfront area.
  • John Feeney wanted to have a saloon but he used the grocery store as a front at the beginning.
  • The Great Lost Bear A Portland mainstay for locals since 1979, The Great Lost Bear is not just a bar but a restaurant and brew pub as well.
  • The menu is Italian inspired but based on seasonal local California items which gives it a fresh and unique appeal.
  • Frascati is up on steep Russian Hill, just above North beach, but is right on the cable car line, making it perfect for a super romantic San Francisco evening out on the town.