How to use Bushman in a sentence

bushman
  • Here it bends south again, and with many a zigzag continues its general westerly direction, crossing the arid plains of Bechuana, Bushman and Namaqualands.

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  • Upon the surface is coloring; red for the Bushman, with black whisker though female; white for the European type, with black tattoo patterns.

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  • The colonists also, pressing forward to those territories, came in contact with these Ishmaelites - the farmers' cattle and sheep, guarded only by a Hottentot herdsman, offering the strongest temptation to the Bushman.

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  • As an example we may take the instance of Qing, the Bushman hunter.

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  • The Bushman who saw the Wind meant to throw a stone at it, but it ran into a hill.

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  • He has a wife, an adopted daughter, whose real father is the " swallower " in Bushman swallowing myths, and the daughter has a son, who is the Ichneumon.

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  • This serpent was a universal devourer of everything and everybody, like Kwai Hemm, the all-devourer in Bushman mythology.

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  • The origin of the Bushman is lost in obscurity, but he may be conceived as the original inhabitant of the southern portion of the continent.

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  • Here, again, a local guide will introduce us to the ancient Bushman rock engravings or petroglyphs.

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  • Brandberg Mountain is an ancient Bushman spiritual site and tonight we will sleep under the shadow of this giant granite monolith.

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  • Other of the farmers hastily laagered and were able to repulse the Zulu attacks; the assailants suffering serious loss at a fight near the Bushman's river.

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  • Of these formulae '(chosen because illustrated by Greek heroic legends) - (I) is a sanction of barbarous nuptial etiquette; (2) is an obvious ordinary incident; (3) is moral, and both (3) and (1) may pair off with all the myths of the origin of death from the infringement of a taboo or sacred command; (4) would naturally occur wherever, as on the West Coast of Africa, human victims have been offered to sharks or other beasts; (5) the story of flight from a horrible crime, occurs in some stellar myths, and is an easy and natural invention; (6) flight from wizard father or husband, is found in Bushman and Namaqua myth, where the husband is an elephant; (7) success of youngest brother, may have been an explanation and sanction of " tungsten-recht " - Maui in New Zealand is an example, and Herodotus found the story among the Scythians; (8) the bride given to successful adventurer, is consonant with heroic manners as late as Homer; (9) is no less consonant with the belief that beasts have human sentiments and supernatural powers; (to) the " strong man," is found among Eskimo and Zulus, and was an obvious invention when strength was the most admired of qualities; (II) the baffled ogre, is found among Basques and Irish, and turns on a form of punning which inspires an " ananzi " story in West Africa; (12) descent into Hades, is the natural result of the savage conception of Hades, and the tale is told of actual living people in the Solomon Islands and in New Caledonia; Eskimo Angekoks can and do descend into Hades - it is the prerogative of the necromantic magician; (13) " the false bride," found among the Zulus, does not permit of such easy explanation - naturally, in Zululand, the false bride is an animal; (14) the bride accused of bearing be 1st-children, has already been disposed of; the belief is inevitable where no distinction worth mentioning is taken between men and animals.

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  • Though the racial affinities of the Hottentots have been disputed, the most satisfactory view on the whole is that they represent a blend of Bushman, Negroid and Hamitic elements.

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  • OfficialPapers Relative to the Condition and Treatment of the Native Tribes of South Africa, parts I to 5 (1649-1809), edited by Donald Moodie, late Protector of Slaves (Cape Town, 1838), the same writer's The Evidence of the Motives and Objects of the Bushman Wars, 1769-77, &c. (Cape Town, 1841); also Treaties with Native Chiefs.

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  • Here we see the religious view of Cagn, the Bushman god.

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  • The chief being among the supernatural characters of Bushman mythology is the insect called the Mantis.'

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  • This is precisely the Bushman view; the sun was a man who irradiated light from his armpit.

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  • Among the lowest races the culture-hero commonly wears a bestial guise, is a spider (Melanesia), an eagle hawk (in some myths and south-east Australia), a coyote (north-west America), a dog or raven (Thlinkeet), a mantis insect (Bushman), and so forth, yet is endowed with human or even super-human qualities, and often shades off into a permanent and practically deathless god.

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