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burrows

burrows Sentence Examples

  • It burrows under houses, and is very destructive to plants, fruit and even poultry.

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  • It burrows under houses, and is very destructive to plants, fruit and even poultry.

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  • Burrows, The Discoveries in Crete (1913); E.

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  • In their native haunts they are extremely timid and wary, and very difficult to approach, being rarely seen out of their burrows in the daytime.

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  • They are devoted sun-worshippers and in the early morning, before it is daylight, they emerge from their burrows and wait in rows till their divinity appears; when they bask joyfully in his beams."

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  • They are devoted sun-worshippers and in the early morning, before it is daylight, they emerge from their burrows and wait in rows till their divinity appears; when they bask joyfully in his beams."

    3
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  • Musk-rats are most active at night, spending the greater part of the day concealed in their burrows in the bank, which consist of a chamber with numerous passages, all of which open under the surface of the water.

    2
    1
  • Mole-rats are easily recognized by the peculiarly flattened head, in which the minute eyes are covered with skin, the wart-like ears, and rudimentary tail; they make burrows in sandy soil, and feed on bulbs and roots.

    2
    1
  • Douglas Ogilby (Catalogue of Australian Mammals, p. 1, Sydney, 1902), but expressed the hope "that further inquiries might be made by naturalists in Australia as to the actual finding of such eggs in the burrows, so that this most interesting point might be finally settled."

    2
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  • of the Illinois line who came from the East, who lived in dug-outs like the hillside burrows of the badger, and who did not go home in winter like the miners from southern Illinois and farther south, who were called "suckers," a name borrowed from the migrating fish in the Rock, Illinois and other rivers flowing south.

    1
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  • In habits they are partly diurnal; and live either in burrows among the crevices of rocks, beneath the leaves of aquatic plants in marshy districts, or underneath the floors of outbuildings.

    1
    0
  • Typical spiny squirrels differ from true squirrels in being completely terrestrial in their habits, and live either in clefts or holes of rocks, or in burrows which they dig themselves.

    1
    0
  • The noises made by some Ptinidae (Anobium) tapping on the walls of their burrows with their mandibles give rise to the "death tick" that has for long alarmed the superstitious.

    1
    1
  • Along one line there was a gradual elaboration of the tube until it culminated, so far as structural complexity is concerned, in the so-called trapdoor nests or burrows of various families; along the other line the tubular retreat either retains its primitive simplicity in association with a new structure, the snare or net, or is entirely superseded by the latter.

    1
    1
  • In the burrows made by the Mygalomorphae, on the contrary, the hinge is strong and highly elastic, its component silken threads being laid on in such a way that the door shuts with a snap when the occupant has passed in or out.

    1
    1
  • No plausible suggestion has been offered as to the purpose of these mysterious burrows, which cannot fail to remind us of the labyrinth which, according to Varro's description as quoted by Pliny (Hist.

    1
    1
  • The female burrows in the epidermis much as the female trap-door spider burrows in turf in order to make a nest in which to rear her young.

    1
    1
  • The young, of which seldom more than one is produced at a birth, remain in the burrows for several months.

    1
    1
  • Chinchillas live in burrows, and these subterranean dwellings undermine the ground in some parts of the Chilean Andes to such an extent as to cause danger to travellers on horseback.

    1
    1
  • In habits they are partly diurnal; and live either in burrows among the crevices of rocks, beneath the leaves of aquatic plants in marshy districts, or underneath the floors of outbuildings.

    1
    1
  • Typical spiny squirrels differ from true squirrels in being completely terrestrial in their habits, and live either in clefts or holes of rocks, or in burrows which they dig themselves.

    1
    1
  • The platypus is aquatic in its habits, passing most of its time in the water or close to the margin of lakes and streams, swimming and diving with the greatest ease, and forming for the purpose of sleeping and breeding deep burrows in the banks, which generally have two orifices, one just above the water level, concealed among long grass and leaves, and the other below the surface.

    1
    1
  • They are recognizable by their slender and elongate hind-legs; many of them provision their burrows with spiders.

    1
    1
  • Burrows, The Discoveries in Crete (1907); A.

    1
    1
  • The impregnated female jigger burrows into the feet of men and dogs, and becomes distended with eggs until its abdomen attains the size and appearance of a small pea.

    0
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  • It burrows in the ground, but in other respects resembles bandicoots in habits.

    0
    0
  • They are of small size and live entirely on the ground, making nests of dried leaves, grass and sticks in holiow places and forming burrows in which they pass a great part of the day.

    0
    0
  • But some species inhabiting sandy deserts form extensive burrows.

    0
    0
  • They associate in communities, forming their burrows among loose rocks, and coming out to feed in the early morning and towards sunset.

    0
    0
  • During the winter earwigs lie dormant; but in the early months of the year females with their eggs may be found in the soil, frequently in deserted earthworm burrows.

    0
    0
  • They make burrows wherein they place insects or spiders which they have caught and stung, laying their eggs beside the victim so that the young larvae find themselves in presence of an abundant and appropriate food-supply.

    0
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  • and forming mounds penetrated by numerous burrows.

    0
    0
  • Deep down in the burrows dwell the viscachas, from which in frequented districts they seldom emerge till evening, unless to drink after a shower.

    0
    0
  • When alarmed, they rush to their burrows, and if these are disturbed utter a growling sound.

    0
    0
  • By means of this muscular foot the cockle burrows rapidly in the muddy sand of the sea-shore, and it can also when it is not buried perform considerable leaps by suddenly bending the foot.

    0
    0
  • It is chiefly employed in destroying rats and other vermin, and in driving rabbits from their burrows.

    0
    0
  • It constructs elaborate burrows containing several chambers, one of which is employed as a granary, and filled with corn, frequently of several kinds, for winter use.

    0
    0
  • As a rule, the males, females, and young of the first year occupy separate burrows.

    0
    0
  • During the winter these animals retire to their burrows, sleeping the greater part of the time, but awakening about February or March, when they feed on the garnered grain.

    0
    0
  • Its burrows are sought after in the countries where it abounds, both for capturing the animal and for rifling its store.

    0
    0
  • They retire into self-dug burrows.

    0
    0
  • Cram, in their American Animals (1902), "they dig burrows for themselves or else take possession of those already made by badgers and prairie-dogs.

    0
    0
  • Geomys bursaries, the "red pocket-gopher" of North America, with deeply grooved incisors, inhabits the plains of the Mississippi, living in burrows like the mole.

    0
    0
  • They spend their whole time buried in the hot desert sand, in which they construct burrows, throwing up at intervals small hillocks.

    0
    0
  • in length, being the largest member of the group. It has a long tail, brown fur and red incisors, and lives in burrows near water, feeding on aquatic plants.

    0
    0
  • They take their name of tuco-tuco from their cry, which resembles the blows of a hammer on an anvil, and may be heard all day as the little rodents move in their burrows, generally formed in sandy soil.

    0
    0
  • In some districts the ground is undermined by these burrows, in which stores of food are accumulated.

    0
    0
  • 1 Burrows, Discoveries in Crete (1907), 140 sqq.

    0
    0
  • Like the males of Ildebaha, those of Seothyra wander about by day in search of the females which live concealed in burrows.

    0
    0
  • It makes its nest in burrows in the banks of streams, breeding once a year about the month of April, and producing five or six young at a birth.

    0
    0
  • The gentry, who had proclaimed their inability to suppress conventicles, were ordered to sign a bond making them responsible for their tenants, and were bound over to keep the king's peace by " law burrows," a method common in private life but unheard of between monarch and people.

    0
    0
  • Marmots inhabit open country, either among mountains, or, more to the north, in the plains; and associate in large colonies, forming burrows, each tenanted by a single family.

    0
    0
  • In the winter when the ground is deep in snow, marmots retire to the depths of their burrows, where as many as ten or fifteen may occupy the same chamber.

    0
    0
  • It is a gregarious animal, living in considerable colonies in burrows, which it excavates with its nails and teeth in the sandy soil of Egypt and Arabia.

    0
    0
  • The Arabs, however, succeed by closing up all the exits from the burrows with a single exception, by which the rodents are forced to escape, and over which a net is placed for their capture.

    0
    0
  • Annelids left their traces in burrows and casts on the sea-floor (Arenicolites, Cruziana, Scolithus, &c.).

    0
    0
  • They live entirely on the ground, or in burrows or holes among rocks, and feed on grass, roots and other vegetable substances.

    0
    0
  • Rattlesnakes, owls and weasels are commonly found in the burrows; but their presence is no indication of the existence of a kind of "happy family" arrangement, the snakes, at any rate, preying on the young marmots.

    0
    0
  • In habits agoutis are nocturnal, dwelling in forests, where they conceal themselves during the day in hollow tree-trunks, or in burrows among roots.

    0
    0
  • Except the Me Sili and Me Sala, from opposite sides, and the Nam Hang, which burrows its way through a range of hills from the E., and the Nam Pan, coming from the W., there is no considerable tributary till 19° 52' N., where the Nam Teng comes in on the right from the central Shan States.

    0
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  • it prefers by day the gloom of caves and ruins, or of the burrows which it occasionally forms, and issues forth at sunset, when it commences its unearthly howling.

    0
    0
  • Some species of the Uropygi (Thelyphonidae) dig burrows; and in the east there is a family of Amblypygi, the Charontidae, of which many of the species live in the recesses of deep caves.

    0
    0
  • Gerbils are inhabitants of open sandy plains, where they dwell in burrows furnished with numerous exits, and containing large grass-lined chambers.

    0
    0
  • A land species belonging to the allied genus Conolophus also occurs in the Galapagos, which differs from most of its kind in forming burrows in the ground.

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  • It forms burrows, often 6 or 8 ft.

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  • It is a native of Australia, where it chiefly abounds in New South Wales, inhabiting rocky and mountainous districts, where it burrows among the loose sand, or hides itself in crevices of rocks.

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  • Some represent the tracks or burrows of worms, crustaceans or other animals; others, the course of rills of water on a sandy or muddy shore; others, again, the marks left on the bottom by bodies drifted along by the waves.

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  • aardvark burrows are vital resources in the bushveld too.

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  • The toads live in underground burrows and make electronic bleeps audible from a distance of 30 meters.

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  • The toads live in underground burrows and make electronic bleeps audible from a distance of 30 meters.

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  • Humboldt's penguins excavate burrows to nest in, usually about 3 meters in length.

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  • These allow them to dig burrows up to 10m in length.

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  • The female mink is just small enough to enter the water vole burrows, leaving the vole with no refuge.

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  • Food is stored in underground burrows or occasionally in disused bird nests.

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  • These funny looking fish actually dig deep burrows in the sandy seabed.

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  • Follow the roads around the airport where you will see a number of cones each marking nest burrows of the owls.

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  • burrows in the sand beneath the dwarf mangroves whose leaves form their primary diet.

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  • burrows in the soil, lying in wait for passing prey.

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  • Now that John and Jose have moved to a sunnier climate, our new leaders are Jim and Christine Burrows.

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  • dig burrows up to 10m in length.

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  • excavate burrows with an underwater entrance.

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  • Burrows are rarely seen on the buttocks and male genitalia - instead there may be small, firm, red lumps.

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  • hibernate during the winter in well-lined winter burrows, their heart rate dropping to just two beats per minute during this time.

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  • marmot burrows along the path!

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  • The female mink is just small enough to enter the water vole burrows, leaving the vole with no refuge.

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  • A walk to see the petrels around their burrows in the forest.

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  • piddock burrows are approximately conical in shape, with the opening being narrower than the base of the burrow.

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  • On a recent visit, I was pleased to bump into the parish priest, Father John Burrows.

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  • rabbit burrows.

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  • Toads, lizards, and tiger salamanders use the burrows to escape from drying winds.

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  • scurrying away to their nearby burrows.

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  • These funny looking fish actually dig deep burrows in the sandy seabed.

    0
    0
  • finding water shrews is difficult as they tend to remain hidden in burrows and among vegetation.

    0
    0
  • The recent hot summers have been good for breeding with the largest ever number of burrows recorded in 1996.

    0
    0
  • During the winter, water voles will happily share these burrows, but come spring they become territorial.

    0
    0
  • The water course reveals the burrows of the endangered water vole.

    0
    0
  • The female mink is just small enough to enter the water vole burrows, leaving the vole burrows, leaving the vole with no refuge.

    0
    0
  • The impregnated female jigger burrows into the feet of men and dogs, and becomes distended with eggs until its abdomen attains the size and appearance of a small pea.

    0
    0
  • It burrows in the ground, but in other respects resembles bandicoots in habits.

    0
    0
  • The reason for this extreme degeneration is probably to be found in the sandy nature of the soil in which the creature burrows, a substance which would evidently irritate and inflame any functional remnant of an eye.

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  • Other terrestrial marsupials are the wombat (Phascolomys), a large, clumsy, burrowing animal, not unlike a pig, which attains a weight of from 60 to 100 lb; the bandicoot (Perameles), a rat-like creature whose depredations annoy the agriculturist; the native cat (Dasyurus), noted robber of the poultry yard; the Tasmanian wolf (Thylacinus), which preys on large game; and the recently discovered Notoryctes, a small animal which burrows like a mole in the desert of the interior.

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  • Douglas Ogilby (Catalogue of Australian Mammals, p. 1, Sydney, 1902), but expressed the hope "that further inquiries might be made by naturalists in Australia as to the actual finding of such eggs in the burrows, so that this most interesting point might be finally settled."

    0
    0
  • Observations upon captive specimens have led to the conclusion that it feeds principally on juices, especially of the sugar-cane, which it obtains by tearing open the hard woody circumference of the stalk with its strong incisor teeth; but it is said also to devour certain species of wood-boring caterpillars, which it obtains by first cutting down with its teeth upon their burrows, and then picking them out of their retreat with the claw of its attenuated middle finger.

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  • The ne~ root thus laid down burrows through the cortex of the mother-root and finally emerges into the soil.

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  • Wounds may be artificially grouped, under such heads as the following: Burrows and excavations in bark and wood, due te boring insects, especially beetles.

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  • They are of small size and live entirely on the ground, making nests of dried leaves, grass and sticks in holiow places and forming burrows in which they pass a great part of the day.

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    0
  • The other is exemplified by the white, wrinkled, soft-skinned, legless grub of a weevil, which lives underground feeding on roots, or burrows in the tissues of plants (fig.

    0
    0
  • The noises made by some Ptinidae (Anobium) tapping on the walls of their burrows with their mandibles give rise to the "death tick" that has for long alarmed the superstitious.

    0
    0
  • Along one line there was a gradual elaboration of the tube until it culminated, so far as structural complexity is concerned, in the so-called trapdoor nests or burrows of various families; along the other line the tubular retreat either retains its primitive simplicity in association with a new structure, the snare or net, or is entirely superseded by the latter.

    0
    0
  • In the burrows made by the Mygalomorphae, on the contrary, the hinge is strong and highly elastic, its component silken threads being laid on in such a way that the door shuts with a snap when the occupant has passed in or out.

    0
    0
  • Musk-rats are most active at night, spending the greater part of the day concealed in their burrows in the bank, which consist of a chamber with numerous passages, all of which open under the surface of the water.

    0
    0
  • Mole-rats are easily recognized by the peculiarly flattened head, in which the minute eyes are covered with skin, the wart-like ears, and rudimentary tail; they make burrows in sandy soil, and feed on bulbs and roots.

    0
    0
  • No plausible suggestion has been offered as to the purpose of these mysterious burrows, which cannot fail to remind us of the labyrinth which, according to Varro's description as quoted by Pliny (Hist.

    0
    0
  • The function of alimentation is closely associated with that of locomotion, somewhat as in the burrowing earthworm; in the excavation of its burrows the sand is passed through the body, and any nutrient matter that may adhere to it is extracted during its passage through the intestine, the exhausted sand being finally ejected through the vent at the orifice of the burrow and appearing at low tide as a worm casting.

    0
    0
  • But some species inhabiting sandy deserts form extensive burrows.

    0
    0
  • The female burrows in the epidermis much as the female trap-door spider burrows in turf in order to make a nest in which to rear her young.

    0
    0
  • The young, of which seldom more than one is produced at a birth, remain in the burrows for several months.

    0
    0
  • Chinchillas live in burrows, and these subterranean dwellings undermine the ground in some parts of the Chilean Andes to such an extent as to cause danger to travellers on horseback.

    0
    0
  • They associate in communities, forming their burrows among loose rocks, and coming out to feed in the early morning and towards sunset.

    0
    0
  • During the winter earwigs lie dormant; but in the early months of the year females with their eggs may be found in the soil, frequently in deserted earthworm burrows.

    0
    0
  • The platypus is aquatic in its habits, passing most of its time in the water or close to the margin of lakes and streams, swimming and diving with the greatest ease, and forming for the purpose of sleeping and breeding deep burrows in the banks, which generally have two orifices, one just above the water level, concealed among long grass and leaves, and the other below the surface.

    0
    0
  • In their native haunts they are extremely timid and wary, and very difficult to approach, being rarely seen out of their burrows in the daytime.

    0
    0
  • They make burrows wherein they place insects or spiders which they have caught and stung, laying their eggs beside the victim so that the young larvae find themselves in presence of an abundant and appropriate food-supply.

    0
    0
  • The females have a wonderful power of finding their burrows on returning from their hunting expeditions.

    0
    0
  • They are recognizable by their slender and elongate hind-legs; many of them provision their burrows with spiders.

    0
    0
  • and forming mounds penetrated by numerous burrows.

    0
    0
  • Deep down in the burrows dwell the viscachas, from which in frequented districts they seldom emerge till evening, unless to drink after a shower.

    0
    0
  • When alarmed, they rush to their burrows, and if these are disturbed utter a growling sound.

    0
    0
  • By means of this muscular foot the cockle burrows rapidly in the muddy sand of the sea-shore, and it can also when it is not buried perform considerable leaps by suddenly bending the foot.

    0
    0
  • It is chiefly employed in destroying rats and other vermin, and in driving rabbits from their burrows.

    0
    0
  • It constructs elaborate burrows containing several chambers, one of which is employed as a granary, and filled with corn, frequently of several kinds, for winter use.

    0
    0
  • As a rule, the males, females, and young of the first year occupy separate burrows.

    0
    0
  • During the winter these animals retire to their burrows, sleeping the greater part of the time, but awakening about February or March, when they feed on the garnered grain.

    0
    0
  • Its burrows are sought after in the countries where it abounds, both for capturing the animal and for rifling its store.

    0
    0
  • They retire into self-dug burrows.

    0
    0
  • Coyotes are creatures of slinking and stealthy habits, living in burrows in the plains, and hunting in packs at night, when they utter yapping cries and blood-curdling yells as they gallop. Hares ("jack-rabbits"), chipmunks or ground-squirrels, and mice form a large portion of their food; but coyotes also kill the fawns of deer and prongbuck, as well as sage-hens and other kinds of game-birds.

    0
    0
  • Cram, in their American Animals (1902), "they dig burrows for themselves or else take possession of those already made by badgers and prairie-dogs.

    0
    0
  • Geomys bursaries, the "red pocket-gopher" of North America, with deeply grooved incisors, inhabits the plains of the Mississippi, living in burrows like the mole.

    0
    0
  • They spend their whole time buried in the hot desert sand, in which they construct burrows, throwing up at intervals small hillocks.

    0
    0
  • in length, being the largest member of the group. It has a long tail, brown fur and red incisors, and lives in burrows near water, feeding on aquatic plants.

    0
    0
  • They take their name of tuco-tuco from their cry, which resembles the blows of a hammer on an anvil, and may be heard all day as the little rodents move in their burrows, generally formed in sandy soil.

    0
    0
  • In some districts the ground is undermined by these burrows, in which stores of food are accumulated.

    0
    0
  • SCABIES, or Itch, a skin disease due to an animal parasite, the Sarcoptes scabei (see Mite), which burrows under the epidermis at any part of the body, but hardly ever in the face or scalp of adults; it usually begins at the clefts of the fingers, where its presence may be inferred from several scattered pimples, which will probably have been torn at their summits by the scratching of the patient, or have been otherwise converted into vesicles or pustules.

    0
    0
  • 1 Burrows, Discoveries in Crete (1907), 140 sqq.

    0
    0
  • Like the males of Ildebaha, those of Seothyra wander about by day in search of the females which live concealed in burrows.

    0
    0
  • Burrows, The Discoveries in Crete (1907); A.

    0
    0
  • It makes its nest in burrows in the banks of streams, breeding once a year about the month of April, and producing five or six young at a birth.

    0
    0
  • Burrows, The Discoveries in Crete (1913); E.

    0
    0
  • The gentry, who had proclaimed their inability to suppress conventicles, were ordered to sign a bond making them responsible for their tenants, and were bound over to keep the king's peace by " law burrows," a method common in private life but unheard of between monarch and people.

    0
    0
  • Marmots inhabit open country, either among mountains, or, more to the north, in the plains; and associate in large colonies, forming burrows, each tenanted by a single family.

    0
    0
  • In the winter when the ground is deep in snow, marmots retire to the depths of their burrows, where as many as ten or fifteen may occupy the same chamber.

    0
    0
  • It is a gregarious animal, living in considerable colonies in burrows, which it excavates with its nails and teeth in the sandy soil of Egypt and Arabia.

    0
    0
  • The Arabs, however, succeed by closing up all the exits from the burrows with a single exception, by which the rodents are forced to escape, and over which a net is placed for their capture.

    0
    0
  • Annelids left their traces in burrows and casts on the sea-floor (Arenicolites, Cruziana, Scolithus, &c.).

    0
    0
  • They live entirely on the ground, or in burrows or holes among rocks, and feed on grass, roots and other vegetable substances.

    0
    0
  • Rattlesnakes, owls and weasels are commonly found in the burrows; but their presence is no indication of the existence of a kind of "happy family" arrangement, the snakes, at any rate, preying on the young marmots.

    0
    0
  • In habits agoutis are nocturnal, dwelling in forests, where they conceal themselves during the day in hollow tree-trunks, or in burrows among roots.

    0
    0
  • Burrows J.H.S., xvi.

    0
    0
  • Except the Me Sili and Me Sala, from opposite sides, and the Nam Hang, which burrows its way through a range of hills from the E., and the Nam Pan, coming from the W., there is no considerable tributary till 19° 52' N., where the Nam Teng comes in on the right from the central Shan States.

    0
    0
  • it prefers by day the gloom of caves and ruins, or of the burrows which it occasionally forms, and issues forth at sunset, when it commences its unearthly howling.

    0
    0
  • Some species of the Uropygi (Thelyphonidae) dig burrows; and in the east there is a family of Amblypygi, the Charontidae, of which many of the species live in the recesses of deep caves.

    0
    0
  • Gerbils are inhabitants of open sandy plains, where they dwell in burrows furnished with numerous exits, and containing large grass-lined chambers.

    0
    0
  • A land species belonging to the allied genus Conolophus also occurs in the Galapagos, which differs from most of its kind in forming burrows in the ground.

    0
    0
  • of the Illinois line who came from the East, who lived in dug-outs like the hillside burrows of the badger, and who did not go home in winter like the miners from southern Illinois and farther south, who were called "suckers," a name borrowed from the migrating fish in the Rock, Illinois and other rivers flowing south.

    0
    0
  • It forms burrows, often 6 or 8 ft.

    0
    0
  • It is a native of Australia, where it chiefly abounds in New South Wales, inhabiting rocky and mountainous districts, where it burrows among the loose sand, or hides itself in crevices of rocks.

    0
    0
  • Some represent the tracks or burrows of worms, crustaceans or other animals; others, the course of rills of water on a sandy or muddy shore; others, again, the marks left on the bottom by bodies drifted along by the waves.

    0
    0
  • These may be holes among riverside tree roots, outlying badger setts or enlarged rabbit burrows.

    0
    0
  • Toads, lizards, and tiger salamanders use the burrows to escape from drying winds.

    0
    0
  • Several landed heavily on the boardwalk and remained on view for a short while before scurrying away to their nearby burrows.

    0
    0
  • Finding water shrews is difficult as they tend to remain hidden in burrows and among vegetation.

    0
    0
  • The recent hot summers have been good for breeding with the largest ever number of burrows recorded in 1996.

    0
    0
  • During the winter, water voles will happily share these burrows, but come spring they become territorial.

    0
    0
  • Like funnel web spiders, they live in burrows, often with a trapdoor entrance, from which they ambush prey.

    0
    0
  • The water course reveals the burrows of the endangered water vole.

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  • I thought that too and then I saw that Freddie Prinze Jr. was cast as a star and the supporting roles were filled by Saffron Burrows, Matthew Lilliard, and Jurgen Prochnow.

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  • When a human comes in contact with the female mite, the mite burrows under the skin, laying eggs along the line of its burrow.

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  • Burrows are seen as winding, slightly raised gray lines along the skin.

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  • Because of the intense itching, burrows may be obscured by scratch marks left by the patient.

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  • Babies may have burrows on the soles of their feet, palms of their hands, and faces.

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  • Diagnosis can be made simply by observing the characteristic burrows of the mites causing scabies.

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  • But soon, as we readers discovered, he clarified that hobbits weren't den beasts that dug out burrows to house their litters, but little people who built their homes underground.

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  • Burrows, Cinque Ports (1895); F.

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  • The ne~ root thus laid down burrows through the cortex of the mother-root and finally emerges into the soil.

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  • Wounds may be artificially grouped, under such heads as the following: Burrows and excavations in bark and wood, due te boring insects, especially beetles.

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  • The females have a wonderful power of finding their burrows on returning from their hunting expeditions.

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  • Burrows J.H.S., xvi.

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  • Burrows, Cinque Ports (1895); F.

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  • The monitor, or forktongued lizard, which burrows in the earth, climbs and swims, is said to grow to a length of 8 to 9 f t.

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  • The monitor, or forktongued lizard, which burrows in the earth, climbs and swims, is said to grow to a length of 8 to 9 f t.

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