Burrow sentence example

burrow
  • They burrow among tall grass.
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  • The male does not burrow, but wanders freely on the surface of the skin.
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  • Most earthworms live in the soil, which they devour as they burrow through it.
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  • Thus there were coarbs of Columba at Iona, Kells, Derry, burrow and other places.
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  • During the daytime the hillock at the entrance to the burrow is frequently occupied by one or more members of the family, which at the approach of strangers sit up on their hind-legs in order to get a better view.
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  • The burrow of the young hamster is only about a foot in depth, while that of the adult descends 4 or 5 ft.
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  • It lives in a burrow, generally excavated by itself; but when pursued, seeks safety in flight, rather than by a retreat to its hole.
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  • If its mouth be taken as between St Bee's Head on the English and Burrow Head on the Scottish coast, its length is 50 m.
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  • The female, instead of provisioning her burrow with a supply of food that will suffice the larva for its whole life, brings fresh flies with which she regularly feeds her young.
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  • If alarmed they utter a shrill loud whistle, and rush down the burrow, but reappear after a few minutes to see if the danger is past.
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  • In habits the fox is to a great extent solitary, and its home is usually a burrow, which may be excavated by its own labour, but is more often the usurped or deserted tenement of a badger or a rabbit.
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  • My instinct tells me that my head is an organ for burrowing, as some creatures use their snout and fore paws, and with it I would mine and burrow my way through these hills.
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  • Even better, Professor Dumbledore himself will be the one to escort him to the Burrow.
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  • The prairie species (C. ludovicianus) makes a raised, funnel-shaped entrance to its burrow.
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  • In the burrow the queen bee builds a few small cells from wax made in her body.
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  • A fox earth can be an enlarged rabbit burrow, a dug out under a tree or similar.
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  • In pigs adult worms burrow into the mucosa of the small intestine where the female produces larvae.
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  • The burrow was artificially created by poking a stick in the sand to the average depth of a male fiddler crab burrow.
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  • A trace fossil is the trace left behind by an animal, eg footprint, burrow " .
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  • The marl provides excellent conditions for the mayfly nymphs to make a stable burrow in which they dwell for approximately 2 years.
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  • Reg Bamford lost to Matthew Burrow after completing a sextuple against the " Beast.
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  • The fifth abdominal segment has a pair of strong dorsal hook-like processes, by means of which the larva supports itself in the burrow which it excavates in the earth, the great head blocking the entrance with the mandibles ready to seize on any unwary insect that may venture within reach.
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  • Others, with soft, white, cylindrical bodies, which recall the caterpillars of moths, burrow in the leaves or stems of plants.
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  • Besides these characters, the rabbit is separated from the hare by the fact that it brings forth its young naked, blind, and helpless; to compensate for this, it digs a deep burrow in the earth in which they are born and reared, while the young of the hare are born fully clothed with fur, and able to take care of themselves, in the shallow depression or "form" in which they are produced.
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  • The function of alimentation is closely associated with that of locomotion, somewhat as in the burrowing earthworm; in the excavation of its burrows the sand is passed through the body, and any nutrient matter that may adhere to it is extracted during its passage through the intestine, the exhausted sand being finally ejected through the vent at the orifice of the burrow and appearing at low tide as a worm casting.
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  • Bacteria of various kinds which alight upon their surfaces begin to fructify in abundance, but are rapidly destroyed as they burrow deeply.
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  • The genus is common to the northern half of both hemispheres, and its members, like those of the two preceding groups, burrow and hibernate (see Marmot).
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  • The caterpillars burrow into soft dry sand to pupate in summer, emerging the following year.
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  • Burrow contents were analyzed to assess their significance to sediment radiotracer profiles and organic composition.
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  • Any saboteur activity experienced by the Four Burrow usually involves people being bused into the County from far afield.
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  • Reg Bamford lost to Matthew Burrow after completing a sextuple against the Beast.
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  • E The burrow swats idly at a fly with his tail.
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  • Worker bees collect nectar and pollen for the queen and new larvae to eat, and keep the burrow tidy.
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  • The towels and rags will also allow the kittens to burrow in between the layers of cloth to keep the warmth inside the box.
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  • However, mites also burrow into the skin of the ear and cause irritation.
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  • Oakwood rides include popular fare such as Speed, Hydro, The Bounce, Vertigo, Spooky 3D, Snake River Falls, Brer Rabbit's Burrow and more.
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  • Body lice appear similar to head lice; however, they burrow into the skin and are rarely seen except on clothing where they lay their nits in seams.
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  • When a human comes in contact with the female mite, the mite burrows under the skin, laying eggs along the line of its burrow.
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  • The female mite may be seen at one end of the burrow, as a tiny pearl-like bump underneath the skin.
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  • A sterilized needle can be used to explore the pearly bump at the end of a burrow, remove its contents, and place it on a slide to be examined.
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  • When lice lay their eggs, expect that they can burrow in pillowcase, bedding, sheets, clothing, and couches.
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  • Professional surfer Taj Burrow is known as the "aerial surfing master."
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  • Inspired and endorsed by Burrow, the Billabong Lux board shorts are part of the Signature series and feature a unique print with embroidered and appliquéd logos.
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  • Some fly through the air, others burrow in the earth, while several families have become fully adapted to life in fresh water.
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  • Trap-door nests are made by spiders belonging to two widely different groups, namely the Lycosidae or wolf-spiders, to which the true tarantula belongs, and the Mygalomorphae, containing the species which construct the best-known types of this style of burrow.
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  • In both there are species which form no nest or burrow, others which construct a simple silk-lined tunnel in the soil, and others which close the aperture of the burrow with a hinged door; while both share the habit of lining the burrow with silk to prevent the infall of loose sand or mould; and the species which make an open burrow close the aperture with a sheet of silk in the winter during hibernation and open it again in the spring.
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  • In the trap-door species of Lycosidae, like, for instance, Lycosa opifex of the Russian steppes, the hinge is weak and the lid of the burrow is kept normally shut by being very much thicker and heavier at its free margin opposite the hinge so that it readily falls by its own weight.
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  • Its upper side is always covered by the spider with pieces of the vegetation growing hard by, so that, when the door is closed, the position of the burrow is completely concealed.
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  • If an attempt be made by any enemy to lift the lid, the spider seizes its inner side with his fangs and striking his claws into the walls of the burrow offers the greatest possible resistance to the efforts of the intruder.
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  • As a rule terrestrial spiders guard the cocoon in the permanent burrow, as in the trap-door spiders, or in the silken retreat which acts as a temporary nursery, as in the Salticidae.
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  • Other webspinning spiders (Tegenaria) have somewhat similar habits; and the male of the park-web spider (Atypus), one of the Mygalomorphae, taps the walls of the tubular web of the female before daring to bite a hole in it and descend into her burrow.
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  • The fifth pair of prosomatic appendages is used by these scorpions when burrowing, to kick back the sand as the burrow is excavated by the great chelae.
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  • Like most other young animals, fox-cubs are exceedingly playful, and may be seen chasing one another in front of the mouth of the burrow, or even running after their own tails.
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  • Other caterpillars, "budworms" (Heliothis, spp.), attack the buds or burrow into the seed-pods.
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  • These tail-shielded snakes, of which about 40 species are known, are viviparous and burrow in the ground, preferring damp mountainforests.
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  • Some species, however, are alleged to be carnivorous, and a North American form of the genus Hydropsyche is said to spin around the mouth of its burrow a silken net for the capture of small animal organisms living in the water.
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  • Fabre states that the lastnamed insect uses a stone for the temporary closing of her burrow, and the Peckhams have seen a female Ammophila take a stone between her mandibles and use it as a hammer for pounding down the earth over her finished nest.
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  • Yet it may be thought that the usual instinct of the " diggingwasps " to capture and store up food in an underground burrow for the benefit of offspring which they will never see is even more surprising.
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  • They are very prolific, the female producing several litters in the year, each consisting of over a dozen blind young; and these, when not more than three weeks old, are turned out of the parental burrow to form underground homes for themselves.
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  • On retiring for the winter the hamster closes the various entrances to its burrow, and becomes torpid during the coldest period.
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  • All the skinks seem to be viviparous, and they prefer dry, sandy ground, in which they burrow and move quickly about in search of their animal food.
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  • A peculiarly wedge-shaped snout, and toes provided with strong fringes, enable this animal to burrow rapidly in and under the sand of the desert.
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  • Here in the spring the half-dozen or more coyote pups are brought forth; and it is said that at this season the old ones systematically drive any large game they may be chasing as near to their burrow, where the young coyotes are waiting to be fed, as possible before killing it, in order to save the labour of dragging it any great distance.
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  • A very few have the power of swimming by opening and shutting the valves of the shell (Pecten, Lima); most can crawl slowly or burrow rapidly; others are, when adult, permanently fixed to stones or rocks either by the shell or the byssus.
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  • The genus is common to the northern half of both hemispheres, and its members burrow and hibernate.
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  • The species of Octodon have larger ears, longer, tufted tails and the sides of the cheekteeth indented by plates of enamel; they are chiefly found in hedgerows and bushes, where they burrow.
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  • It is nowhere abundant, but is found over the northern parts of Europe and Asia, and is a quiet, inoffensive animal, nocturnal and solitary in its habits, sleeping by day in its burrow, and issuing forth at night to feed on roots, beech-mast, fruits, the eggs of birds, small quadrupeds, frogs and insects.
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  • In 1805 he married Harriet Burrow, whose mother, a widow, kept an establishment for lunatics in Hoxton.
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  • Some are perforating algae and burrow into the substance of molluscan shells, in company with certain Green and Blue-green Algae.
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  • Many - like the common "solitary" bees Halictus and Andrena - burrow in the ground; the holes of species of Andrena are commonly seen in springtime opening on sandy banks, grassy lawns or gravel paths.
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  • Others have the power of producing sounds, one use to which they put this faculty being apparently to signal from their burrow in the sand that they are "not at home" to an inopportune visitor.
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  • Others cause much damage in forests, by boring under the bark and through the wood of trees, whilst some even burrow in the tissue of the leaves.
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  • It lives on dry, welldrained ground, and digs a deep burrow lined with silk to prevent the infall of loose particles of soil.
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  • In the winter it covers the orifice of this burrow with a layer of silk, and lies dormant underground until the return of spring.
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  • It also uses the burrow as a safe retreat during moulting and guards its cocoon and young in its depths.
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  • Each burrow has but one entrance, which is closed up when winter approaches; a second hole, however, being previously driven from the sleeping place to within a short distance of the surface of the ground.
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  • This second hole is opened the next year, and used as the ordinary entrance, so that the number of closed up holes round a burrow gives an indication of the length of time that it has been occupied.
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  • Upon hatching, the young, which differ from the adult in possessing long antennae and a pair of powerful fossorial anterior legs, fall to the ground, burrow below the surface, and spend a prolonged subterranean larval existence feeding upon the roots of vegetation.
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  • Almost every bush seemed to provide shelter for a nesting burrow.
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  • What about your pet's natural instincts to burrow, forage or fly?
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  • The house is still but a sort of porch at the entrance of a burrow.
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  • Reprint of 1st edition, edited by J.W. Burrow.
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  • Help them create bugs that crawl, fly or burrow, and explain the differences between them all.
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  • Most of Half Blood Prince takes place within the safety of the Hogwarts castle and grounds with the usual stops at the Dursley home, the Burrow and Hogsmeade, all familiar places to loyal readers.
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  • If allowed to land and burrow, it will make the place it claims uninhabitable, killing all other vegetation.
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  • The lid is sometimes thin and wafer-like as in the burrow of the species of Nemesia, sometimes thick and cord-like as in that of the species of Cteniza or Pachylomerus.
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  • Quite commonly the burrow has a second passage running obliquely upwards from the main passage to the surface of the soil, and this subsidiary track may itself be shut off from the main branch by an inner door, so that when an enemy has forced an entrance through the main door, the spider retreats behind the second, leaving the intruder to explore the seemingly empty burrow.
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  • Mechanicville (originally called Burrow) was chartered by the county court in 1859, and incorporated as a village in 1870.
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  • The developing eggs are not carried about by the mother, but deposited in her subaqueous burrow, "where they are aerated by the currents of water produced by the abdominal feet of the parent."
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  • They burrow in the sands of every shore; they throng the weeds between tide-marks; they ascend all streams; they are found in deep wells, in caverns, in lakes; in Arctic waters they swarm in numbers beyond computation; they find lodgings on crabs, on turtles, on weed-grown buoys; they descend into depths of the ocean down to hundreds or thousands of fathoms; they are found in mountain streams as far above sea-level as some of their congeners live below it.
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  • Another group of Hymenoptera occasionally causes much harm in fir plantations, namely, the Siricidae or wood-wasps, whose larvae burrow into the trunks of the trees and thus kill them.
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  • Other allied African genera are Steatomys and Lophuromys, which include several species of small mouse-like rodents, with the habits of dormice generally, though some burrow in cornfields.
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  • If an aperture for ingress and egress, for purposes of feeding, were left in the wall of such a chamber, there would arise in a rudimentary form what is known as the tubular nest or web; and the next important step was possibly the adoption of such a nest as a permanent abode for the spider., Some spiders, like the Drassidae and Salticidae, have not advanced beyond this stage in architectural industry; but next to the cocoon this simple tubular retreat - whether spun in a crevice or burrow or simply attached to the lower side of a stone - is the most constant feature to be observed in the spinning habits of spiders.
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  • They are harmless and inoffensive creatures, offering no resistance when caught; their principal means of escape being the extraordinary rapidity with which they burrow in the ground, and the tenacity with which they retain their hold in their subterranean retreats.
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