Burns sentence example

burns
  • It burns with a pale blue flame, forming sulphur dioxide and water.
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  • Cobalt burns in nitric oxide at 150° C. giving the monoxide.
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  • This mixture burns with a green flame forming boron trioxide; whilst boron is deposited on passing the gas mixture through a hot tube, or on depressing a cold surface in the gas flame.
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  • It burns with a pale blue flame to form carbon dioxide and sulphur dioxide.
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  • A mixture of carbon bisulphide vapour and nitric oxide burns with a very intense blue-coloured flame, which is very rich in the violet or actinic rays.
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  • The metal is quite permanent in dry air, but in moist air it becomes coated with a superficial layer of the oxide; it burns on heating to redness, forming a brown coloured oxide; and is readily soluble in mineral acids with formation of the corresponding salts.
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  • In front of Greyfriars church stands a marble statue of Burns, unveiled in 1882, and there is also a monument to Charles, third duke of Queensberry.
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  • The most interesting event in the history of Dumfries is its connexion with Burns, for the poet resided here from December 1791 till his death on the 21st of July 1796.
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  • Potassium, when heated, burns in the vapour of carbon bisulphide, forming potassium sulphide and liberating carbon.
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  • Just take a drop to your tongue, see if it burns.
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  • He is the connecting-link between the greater "Makars" of the 5th and 16th centuries, and Fergusson (q.v.) and Burns.
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  • Dumfries, Annan, Kirkcudbright, Lochmaben and Sanquharthe "Five Carlins" of Burns's Election Ballads - combine to return one member to Parliament.
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  • Robert Burns, the poet, in a letter dated August 1784, describes the sect as idle and immoral.
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  • The barley-corn has been personified as representing the malt liquor made from barley, as in Burns's song "John Barleycorn."
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  • The arrests of Sims and of Shadrach in Boston in 1851; of "Jerry" M`Henry, in Syracuse, New York, in the same year; of Anthony Burns in 1854, in Boston; and of the two Garner families in 1856, in Cincinnati, with other cases arising under the Fugitive Slave Law of 1850, probably had as much to do with bringing on the Civil War as did the controversy over slavery in the Territories.
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  • It boils at 83-85° C. and burns with a green coloured flame.
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  • If the gas be mixed with the vapour of carbon disulphide, the mixture burns with a vivid lavender-coloured flame Nitric oxide is soluble in solutions of ferrous salts, a dark brown solution being formed, which is readily decomposed by heat, with evolution of nitric oxide.
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  • John Thoreau, his father, who married the daughter of a New England clergyman, was the son of a John Thoreau of the isle of Jersey, who, in Boston, married a Scottish lady of the name of Burns.
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  • Its library contains many important MSS., among them Burns's correspondence with George Thomson, and several cartularies including those of St Andrews and Brechin.
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  • This step, which caused him to be ostracized for a time from the Boston circles in which he had been reared, brought him the cases of the fugitive slaves, Shadrach, Sims and Burns, and of the rescuers of Shadrach.
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  • On the night following the surrender of Burns (May 1854) Dana was brutally assaulted on the Boston streets.
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  • More popular than any of the preceding, and well known in England through Sir John Bowring's translation, are the charming lyrics of Alexander Petofi (q.v.), the " Burns " of Hungary.
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  • He is the Magyarizer of Shakespeare's Anthony and Cleopatra, Othello, Macbeth, Henry VIII., Winter's Tale, Romeo and Juliet and Tempest, as also of some of the best pieces of Burns, Moore, Byron, Shelley, Milton, Beranger, Lamartine, Victor Hugo, Goethe and others.
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  • The powdery metal when heated in air to 150° or 170° C. catches fire and burns brilliantly into U 3 0 8; it decomposes water slowly at ordinary temperatures, but rapidly when boiling.
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  • It burns in oxygen at 170°, in chlorine at 180°, in bromine at 210°, in iodine at 260°, in sulphur at 50o, and combines with nitrogen at about iooa.
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  • This strain runs throughout many of the occasional poems, and is not wanting in odd passages in Dunbar's contemporaries; and it has the additional interest of showing a direct historical relationship with the work of later Scottish poets, and chiefly with that of Robert Burns.
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  • The city has 95 acres of boulevards and avenues under park supervision and several fine parks (17, with 307 acres in 1907), notably Washington (containing Calverley's bronze statue of Robert Burns, and Rhind's "Moses at' the Rock of Horeb"), Beaver and Dudley, in which is the old Dudley Observatory - the present Observatory building is in Lake Avenue, south-west of Washington Park, where is also the Albany Hospital.
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  • It burns when brought into contact with chlorine, forming silicon chloride and hydrochloric acid.
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  • It burns with a pale-blue flame forming silicon fluoride, silicofluoric acid and silicic acid.
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  • It is a colourless liquid which boils at 33° C. It fumes in air and burns with a green flame.
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  • It crystallizes in octahedra which melt at 120.5° C. and boil at 290° C. Its vapour burns with a red flame.
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  • He had sixteen children, his son Patrick being the "auld Wodrow" of Burns's poem "Twa Herds."
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  • Ayr proper lies on the south bank of the river, which is crossed by three bridges, besides the railway viaduct - the Victoria Bridge (erected in 1898) and the famous "Twa Brigs" of Burns.
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  • The prophecy which Burns put into the mouth of the venerable structure came true in 1877, when the newer bridge yielded to floods and had to be rebuilt.
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  • There are statues of Burns, the 13th earl of Eglinton, General Smith Neill and Sir William Wallace.
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  • The "auld clay biggin" in which Robert Burns was born on the 25th of January 1759, has been completely repaired and is now the property of the Ayr Burns's Monument trustees.
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  • Not far distant, on a conspicuous position close by the banks of the Doon, stands the Grecian monument to Burns, in the grounds of which is the grotto containing Thom's figures of Tam o' Shanter and Souter Johnnie.
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  • In the last case it becomes coated with a greyish-black layer of an oxide (dioxide (?)), at a red heat the layer consists of the trioxide (B1203), and is yellow or green in the case of pure bismuth, and violet or blue if impure; at a bright red heat it burns with a bluish flame to the trioxide.
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  • When heated in air, tellurium burns, forming the dioxide Te02.
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  • It burns, and also, like sulphuretted hydrogen, precipitates many metals from solutions of their salts.
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  • When heated in air the metal burns if in the form of thin wire, and is superficially oxidized if more compact.
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  • It is unaffected by any acid or mixture of acids, but burns to the pentoxide when heated.
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  • This class of c coal burns with a very small amount of flame, produc ing intense local heat and no smoke.
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  • Fire-damp when mixed with from four to twelve times its volume of atmospheric air is explosive; but when the proportion is above or below these limits it burns quietly with a pale blue flame.
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  • It is a silvery white metal which burns on heating in air.
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  • Heated in contact with air to a temperature of 480° C., acetylene ignites and burns with a flame, the appearance of which varies with the way in which it is brought in contact with the air.
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  • With the gas in excess a heavy lurid flame emitting dense volumes of smoke results, whilst if it be driven out in a sufficiently thin sheet, it burns with a flame of intense brilliancy and almost perfect whiteness, by the light of which colours can be judged as well as they can by daylight.
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  • It is probable that when a flame is smoking badly, distinct traces of carbon monoxide are being produced, but when an acetylene flame burns properly the products are as harmless as those of coal gas, and, light for light, less in amount.
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  • Hydrogen gas readily burns in oxygen or air with the formation of water.
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  • The powdery metal burns readily in air; the crystalline metal requires to be heated in an oxyhydrogen flame before it catches fire.
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  • Dialogues is reprinted in the Quarterly Series (Burns & Oates).
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  • On adjusting the gas so that it burns in a thin column, just not roaring, it is extraordinarily sensitive to some particular range of notes, going down and roaring when a note is sounded.
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  • In addition to the statues in Juneau Park there is a statue of Kosciusko in the park of that name; one of Washington and a soldiers' monument on Grand Avenue; a statue of Henry Bergh in front of the city hall; one of Robert Burns in the First Ward Park, and, in Washington Park, a replica of Ernst Rietschel's Schiller-Goethe monument in Jena, given to the city in 1908 by the Germans of Milwaukee.
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  • It is fed by the Gyle and numerous burns, and drained by the Achray to Loch Achray and thence by the Black Avon to Loch Vennacher.
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  • Heated in chlorine or with bromine, it yields carbon and calcium chloride or bromide; at a dull red heat it burns in oxygen, forming calcium carbonate, and it becomes incandescent in sulphur vapour at 500°, forming calcium sulphide and carbon disulphide.
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  • It does not support combustion; and it does not burn readily unless mixed with oxygen, when it burns with a pale yellowish-green flame.
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  • The hydrogen in ammonia is capable of replacement by metals, thus magnesium burns in the gas with the formation of magnesium nitride Mg3N2, and when the gas is passed over heated sodium or potassium, sodamide, NaNH 2, and potassamide, KNH 2, are formed.
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  • The patient's skin burns, that of a frog is cold to the touch; therefore tie to the foot of the bed a frog, bound with red and black thread, and wash down the sick man so that the water of ablution falls 1 In its technical ecclesiastical sense the ablution is the ritual washing of the chalice and of the priest's fingers after the celebration of Holy Communion in the Catholic Church.
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  • It contemplates the assumption of the vow for a limited period only, and gives particular details as to the atoning ceremonies at the sanctuary by which the vow must be recommenced if broken by accidental defilement, and the closing sacrifice, at which the Nazarite on the expiry of his vow cuts off his hair and burns it on the altar, thus returning to ordinary life.
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  • Exposed to moist air it rapidly oxidizes to the hydroxide; and it burns on heating in air with a yellow flame, yielding the monoxide and dioxide.
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  • It burns when heated in dry air, and ignites in moist air; it is decomposed by water, giving caustic soda and hydrogen.
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  • Sodium dioxide is chiefly employed as an oxidizing agent, being used in mineral analysis and in various organic preparations; it readily burns paper, wood, &c., but does not evolve oxygen unless heated to a high temperature.
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  • Charcoal burns when heated in air, usually without the formation of flame, although a flame is apparent if the temperature be raised.
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  • It burns when heated in an atmosphere of oxygen, forming carbon dioxide, and when heated in sulphur vapour it forms carbon bisulphide.
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  • It burns with a characteristic pale blue flame to form carbon dioxide.
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  • It Is A Colourless, Odourless Gas, Which Burns With A Blue Flame And Is Decomposed By Heat.
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  • Petroleum was discovered on Little Rennick's Creek, near Burkesville, in Cumberland county, in 1829, when a flowing oil well (the " American well," whose product was sold as " American oil " to heal rheumatism, burns, &c.) was struck by men boring for a "salt well," and after a second discovery in the 'sixties at the mouth of Crocus Creek a small but steady amount of oil was got each year.
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  • The free acid is a colourless liquid with a smell resembling bitter almonds; it boils at 26.1° C., and may be solidified, in which condition it melts at -14° C. It burns with a blue flame,.
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  • A phosphide, PCr, is known; it burns in oxygen forming the phosphate.
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  • Blacklock was among the first friends of Burns in Edinburgh, being one of the earliest to recognize his genius.
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  • The problem of magnesium reduction is in many respects similar to that of aluminium extraction, bait the lightness of the metal as compared, bulk for bulk, with its fused salts, and the readiness with which it burns when exposed to air at high temperatures, render the problem somewhat more difficult.
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  • It also burns when heated in a current of steam, which it decomposes with the liberation of hydrogen and the formation of magnesia.
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  • Magnesium Oxide, magnesia, MgO, occurs native as the mineral periclase, and is formed when magnesium burns in air; it may also be prepared by the gentle ignition of the hydroxide or carbonate.
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  • Boric acid is easily soluble in alcohol, and if the vapour of the solution be inflamed it burns with a characteristic vivid green colour.
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  • Later, when most of it has been oxidized, the carbon begins to oxidize to carbonic oxide, which in turn burns.
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  • The blast of air forced in through the tuyeres near the bottom of the furnace burns the coke there, and the intense heat thus caused melts away the surrounding iron, so that this column of coke and iron gradually descends; but it is kept at its full height by feeding more coke and iron at its top, until all the iron needed for the day's work has thus been charged.
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  • Hydrogen burns with a pale blue non-luminous flame, but will not support the combustion of ordinary combustibles.
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  • It burns with a white flame and is soluble in water.
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  • In the abbey precincts are statues to the poet Robert Tannahill (1774-1810) and Alexander Wilson (1766-1813), the American ornithologist, both of whom were born in Paisley, and, elsewhere, to Robert Burns, George Aitkin Clark, Thomas Coats and Sir Peter Coats.
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  • In oxygen or air diamond burns at about 850°, and only continues to do so if maintained at a high temperature; but in the absence of oxidising agents it may be raised to a much higher temperature.
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  • It burns in air, and also in chlorine and bromine, and is readily oxidized by nitric acid.
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  • He read and re-read in early boyhood the Bible, Aesop, Robinson Crusoe, Pilgrim's Progress, Weems's Life of Washington and a history of the United States; and later read every book he could borrow from the neighbours, Burns and Shakespeare becoming favourites.
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  • Facing the pier a statue was erected in 1898 of Mary Campbell, Burns's "Highland Mary," who was a native of Dunoon.
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  • Hutchinson, David Hume, Home and Robertson were assiduous in avoiding Scotticisms as far as they might; even Burns, who summed up the popular past of Scotland in his vernacular poetry, as a rule wrote English in his letters, and when he wrote English verse he often followed the artificial style of the 18th century.
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  • The volumes of the book clubs, Bannatyne, Maitland, Abbotsford and Spalding, are full of matter; also those of the Early Scottish Texts Society and the Wodrow Society, with the works of Knox, Calderwood and the History of the Sufferings by Woodrow (edited by the Rev. Robert Burns, 1837-1838).
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  • The " Scottish prejudice " which Burns tells us was " poured " into his veins from the Wallace is not obvious to the dispassionate reader of the Brus.
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  • The historical student will be mainly interested in discovering anticipations of the later style and purpose of Ramsay, Fergusson and Burns, and in finding therein early evidence of what has been too often treated as the characteristics of later Scotticism.
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  • The reading of 15thand 16thcentury verse in the light of these will bring home the critical error of treating such poems as Burns's Collar's Saturday Night, the Address to the Deil, and Scotch Drink as entirely expressions of the later poet's personal predilection.
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  • The convivial verse, at its best in Dunbar's Testament of Mr Andrew Kennedy, may be studied in Quhy sould nocht Allane honorit be, one of the many eulogies of John Barleycorn anticipatory of Burns's well-known piece.
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  • If the work begun by Allan Ramsay, continued by Fergusson and completed by Burns, were matter for separate treatment, it would be necessary to show not only that the editorial zeal which turned these writers to the forgotten vernacular and to " popular " themes was inspired by the general conditions of reaction against the artificiality of the century; but that it was because these poets were Scots, and in Scotland, that they chose this line of return to nature and naturalness, and did honour, partly by protest, to the slighted efforts of the " vulgar " muse.
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  • It is permanent in dry air, but tarnishes in moist air; it can be hammered and rolled; it melts at 623° C. It burns readily on heating, with a brilliant flame; and it also combines with chlorine,bromine, iodine, sulphur, phosphorus and cyanogen.
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  • It is a pleasant-smelling gas, which burns when ignited, and may be condensed to a liquid which boils at 23.6° C. It is somewhat soluble in water and readily soluble in alcohol, and concentrated sulphuric acid.
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  • He found that pressure increases luminosity, so that hydrogen, for example, the flame of which in normal circumstances gives no light, burns with a luminous flame under a pressure of ten or twenty atmospheres, and the inference he drew was that the presence of solid particles is not the only factor that determines the light-giving power of a flame.
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  • The wood is soft and neither strong nor durable; it burns better in the green state than that of most trees, and is often used by the hunters of the North-West as fuel; split into thin layers, it was formerly employed in the United States for bonnet and hat making.
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  • The vapour of nickel carbonyl burns with a luminous flame, a cold surface depressed in the flame being covered with a black deposit of nickel.
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  • The vapour burns with a smoky green-edged flame.
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  • The powdered metal burns at a red heat to form the trioxide; it is very slowly attacked by moist air.
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  • The city has a number of good statues, chief among which are copies of the Farnese Hercules (Victoria Square) and of Canova's Venus (North Terrace), statues of Queen Victoria and Robert Burns, Sir Thomas Elder's statue at the university, and a memorial (1905) over the grave of Colonel Light, founder of the colony, in Light Square.
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  • The burning of hazel nuts for the magical investigation of the future is alluded to by John Gay in Thursday, or the Spell, and by Burns in Halloween.
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  • The streams, or "waters" as they are called, are nearly all hill burns, affording good fishing.
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  • Many compounds containing hydrogen are readily decomposed by the gas; for example, a piece of paper dipped in turpentine inflames in an atmosphere of chlorine, producing hydrochloric acid and a copious deposit of soot; a lighted taper burns in chlorine with a dull smoky flame.
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  • If any one was ever awake to the joys of living it was the minnesinger, troubadour or goliard, and the world had to wait until Rousseau and Burns before its external beauty was discovered, or at least deeply appreciated, by any but a few Dutch artists.
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  • Of the former kind were Homer, Lucretius, Burns, Scott; of the latter were Euripides, Dryden, Milton.
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  • The molten metal is sea-green in colour, and at higher temperatures (in the electric arc) it vaporizes and burns with a green flame.
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  • If much carbonaceous matter be present (and this is generally so when iron sponge is used as the precipitant) the crude product is heated to redness in the air; this burns out the carbon, and, at the same time, oxidizes a little of the copper, which must be subsequently reduced.
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  • When ignited, picric acid burns quietly with a smoky flame.
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  • The monoxide is formed when the metal burns in air, but is usually prepared by the ignition of the nitrate, oxygen and oxides of nitrogen being liberated.
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  • He does not possess the fiery pulse and humaneness of Burns, but the exquisite perfection of his metre and the subtle alliance of his thought and expression must always secure for him the warmest admiration of true lovers of poetic art.
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  • In Kay Park (484 acres), purchased from the duke of Portland for 90co, stands the Burns Memorial, consisting of two storeys and a tower, and containing a museum in which have been placed many important MSS.
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  • The first edition of Robert Burns's poems was published here in 1786.
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  • Pure antimony is quite permanent in air at ordinary temperatures, but when heated in air or oxygen it burns, forming the trioxide.
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  • It decomposes steam at a red heat, and burns (especially when finely powdered) in chlorine.
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  • On precipitating antimony trichloride or tartar emetic in acid solution with sulphuretted hydrogen, an orange-red precipitate of the hydrated sulphide is obtained, which turns black on being heated to 200° C The trisulphide heated in a current of hydrogen is reduced to the metallic state; it burns in air forming the tetroxide, and is soluble in concentrated hydrochloric acid, in solutions of the caustic alkalis, and in alkaline sulphides.
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  • Near Albert Harbour stands the old west now the north parish church (a Gothic edifice dating from 1591) containing some stained-glass windows by William Morris; in its kirkyard Burns's "Highland Mary" was buried (1786).
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  • It burns with a blue flame when heated in the air or in oxygen, at the same time giving a characteristic smell of rotten horseradish, a reaction which serves for the recognition of the element.
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  • It is decomposed by heat, burns with a blue flame, and behaves as a reducing agent.
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  • It burns with a brightly luminous flame, and is spontaneously inflammable at about too° C. When mixed with oxygen it combines explosively if the mixture be under diminished pressure, and is violently decomposed by the halogens.
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  • It burns when heated to about 200° C. Oxidizing agents decompose it with great violence.
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  • Considerable burns on the face or body may result from the application of sulphuric acid in the practice known as "vitriol-throwing," a brownish black eschar serving to distinguish the burns produced by this acid from those of other corrosive fluids.
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  • In the same gardens are a bronze statue of Burns and Baron Marochetti's seated figure of Prince Albert.
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  • A bronze statue of Robert Burns was unveiled in 1898.
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  • His call as a poet came when a teacher lent to him the poems of Burns.
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  • It is a colourless liquid which boils at 11 -12° C., and its vapour burns with a luminous flame.
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  • The Corporation buildings, a blend of the Scots Baronial and French Gothic styles, contain busts of several Scottish sovereigns a statue of Robert Burns, and Sir Noel Paton's painting of the "Spirit of Religion."
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  • It is not volatilized even when heated to redness in a current of hydrogen, and it burns readily to the pentoxide when heated in oxygen.
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  • The dioxide when heated in oxygen burns, forming the pentoxide.
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  • It is a volatile compound which burns when heated in oxygen and which is unacted upon by sulphuric and hydrochloric acids.
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  • The school grew in numbers, and Barnes occupied all his spare time in assiduous study, reading during these years authors so diverse in character as Herodotus, Sallust, Ovid, Petrarch, Buffon and Burns.
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  • A correspondence took place between him and Burns, who considered his "Tullochgorum" "the best Scotch song Scotland ever saw," and procured his collaboration for Johnson's Musical Museum.
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  • Arsenic burns on heating in a current of oxygen, with a pale lavender-coloured flame, forming the trioxide.
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  • It burns in an atmosphere of chlorine forming the trichloride; it also combines directly with bromine and sulphur on heating, while on fusion with alkalis it forms arsenites.
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  • It easily burns, forming arsenious oxide if the combustion proceeds in an excess of air, or arsenic if the supply of air is limited; it is also decomposed into its constituent elements when heated.
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  • Realgar occurs native in orange prisms of specific gravity 3.5; it is prepared artificially by fusing together arsenic and sulphur, but the resulting products vary somewhat in composition; it is readily fusible and sublimes unchanged, and burns on heating in a current of oxygen, forming arsenic trioxide and sulphur dioxide.
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  • It burns on heating in air, and is soluble in solutions of alkaline hydroxides and carbonates, forming thioarsenites, As2S3 + 4KOH = K2HAsO3 + K2HAsS3 + 1H2O.
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  • When the fire burns, or the water moistens, these terms merely express the habitual connexion which our senses perceive between one thing and another.
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  • With him began the " enthusiasm of humanity " that was afterwards to become so marked in the poetry of Burns and Shelley, Wordsworth and Byron.
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  • Frankincense burns with a bright white flame, leaving an ash consisting mainly of calcium carbonate, the remainder being calcium phosphate, and the sulphate,.
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  • You mean to tell me, if I could get my fangs to work, and your blood didn't give me third degree burns, I could feed to my heart's content without hurting you?
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  • More on the Medicines Control Agency The Cochrane Injuries group was investigating the use of human albumin in the treatment of burns victims.
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  • It burns anthracite or coke and will perform well with modern smokeless fuels.
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  • This is the ultimate word on Burns; a collection of every single song and poem written by Scotland's best know bard.
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  • Robert Burns, Scotland's most famous bard, drew heavily upon these songs for his poetry, as did Sir Walter Scott.
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  • As the boiler burns biogas, a proportion of its output would be converted to electricity, while the rest heats the home.
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  • One man suffered superficial burns, rather than almost certain death had he still been holding the spike.
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  • The result can be severe burns or in some cases, fatalities.
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  • Seventy-two soldiers of the East India Company die as a result of methane poisoning and third-degree ammonia burns.
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  • The only real way to lose weight is by eating fewer calories than your body burns in a given day.
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  • Trikatu formula increases the digestive fire, which then burns away these accumulated toxins and cleanses the alimentary canal.
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  • It burns with a brilliant blue flame - the name cesium derives from the sky-blue lines in its spectrum.
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  • The Master and 1st Officer received burns to arms and upper bodies through being lightly clad.
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  • The carpets are being recycled by small company Carpet Burns, started by Kelly Atkins.
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  • The same preparation has been applied as a warm compress to suppurating cuts, or as a cool compress to burns.
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  • Paul Burns then struck the crossbar with a superb 20 yard strike.
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  • Captain Rhian Williams duly received the League Shield from RFU President Gill Burns before an appreciative crowd on the pitch after the match.
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  • Preparation of hospital emergency plans to cope with large influx of patients with burns, lung damage and trauma.
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  • The coke (essentially impure carbon) burns in the blast of hot air to form carbon dioxide - a strongly exothermic reaction.
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  • It is the only extant example of Burns writing in his colloquial Ayrshire Scots.
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  • Burns to the eye Burns to the eye may affect the eyelids, conjunctiva or cornea.
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  • Burns grew furious at the tho of such a vile act.
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  • At least the link for vic Galloway 's interview with joey burns of calexico is working today.
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  • In some severe burns and wounds, aloe gel may actually impede healing.
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  • Burns caused by the passage of heavy currents through the body or by direct contact with an electrically heated surface.
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  • Steve Burns expects Combe to remain a hotbed of FF1600 action under the CCRC regime.
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  • A fact not overlooked by Burns but conveniently ignored by the Government.
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  • He considered that there were ' presentational problems ' with introducing a ban on the use of bovine intestines in haggis on Burns Night.
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  • British lawman Stanley (Ray Winstone) captures bushrangers Charlie and Mike Burns (Guy Pearce and Richard Wilson ).
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  • Two other Barn professionals are also on the undercard - unbeaten light welterweight Ricky Burns and super middleweight Thomas Cannon.
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  • Quite apart from the danger of third-degree burns, balti dishes serve only to make one's portions appear minuscule.
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  • It operates by changing the amount of air in the air/fuel mixture which the engine burns.
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  • Several drivers were interested in this excellent deal, including outgoing FF1600 co-ordinator Steve Burns, but Darcy beat them all to it.
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  • This may include things like cracked window panes, stains or burns on the carpet or any damaged items of furniture.
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  • Some are formed together in one piece, which means when the bulb burns out, the lamp either becomes a paperweight or trash.
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  • There was a nice surround of laser photocoagulation burns surrounding the margins of the detachment.
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  • Burns, then, clearly did his bit to preserve Scotland's heritage, not to mention language, for future posterity.
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  • In addition to Powder Burns, Greg Dulli remains as typically prolific as ever.
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  • Items associated with Robert Burns are automatically retrieved from selected CAIRNS catalogs.
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  • There are several rivulets and burns in this parish.
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  • With these pressure sealers there's no liquid glue, water or heat, meaning no mess or risk of burns.
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  • Crystal clear burns tumble through Caledonian pine forests where ancient Scots pines, withered over three or more centuries, stand sentinel.
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  • The wound must be covered as quickly as possible to prevent sepsis, which is a constant threat to patients with burns.
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  • Children learn how to make black eyes, bruises, burns and even partially severed limbs!
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  • When sodium metal burns in a chlorine atmosphere a white crystalline solid, sodium chloride, is formed.
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  • The following year Massey did expand the address into a small book concerning spiritualism, published by James Burns.
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  • They can also provide consultations on family planning and offer a minor injuries service, treating sprains, minor burns and cuts.
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  • Rob Burns invites submission of complete transcriptions of Wills for his countrywide site ' Wills for All ' .
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  • There are specialist burns consultants and plastic surgeons as well as nursing and care staff on site.
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  • Too much UVB however is not a good thing because it burns.
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  • There's a small selection of Burns's poetry translated into English for those who find themselves defeated by eighteenth-century Scottish vernacular.
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  • Before then a sequence of six tributary burns draining the moors to the west of the river had to be crossed by stone viaducts.
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  • Burns wid hiv said ah wiz chist " bleezin ' finely " .
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  • Unfortunately his extremely zealous brand of police work means that Starsky burns through partners faster than his beloved Gran Torino goes through spark plugs.
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  • Cobalt burns in nitric oxide at 150° C. giving the monoxide.
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  • Pure amorphous boron is a chestnut-coloured powder of specific gravity 2.45; it sublimes in the electric arc, is totally unaffected by air at ordinary temperatures, and burns on strong ignition with production of the oxide B 2 0 3 and the nitride BN.
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  • In conjunction with Messrs Burns of Glasgow and Messrs Maclver of Liverpool, proprietors of rival lines of coasting steamers between Glasgow and Liverpool, he formed a company, and the first voyage of a Cunard steamship was successfully made by the "Britannia" from Liverpool to Boston, U.S.A., between July 4 and 19, 1840 (see Steamship Lines).
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  • It forms grey coloured octahedra of specific gravity 5.49 6 at 20° C., melting at 900° C.; it burns at a red heat, is insoluble in hydrochloric acid, but dissolves in aqua regia, and is also soluble in molten alkalis.
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  • A mile and a half to the north-west of Dumfries lies Lincluden Abbey, "an old ruin," says Burns, "in a sweet situation at the confluence of the Cluden and the Nith."
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  • In 1851 the Court House was surrounded with chains to prevent the " rescue " of a slave (Sims) held for rendition under the Fugitive Slave Law; another slave (Shadrach) was released this same year, and in 1854 there was a riot and intense excitement over the rendition of Anthony Burns.
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  • It boils at 83-85° C. and burns with a green coloured flame.
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  • The powdery metal when heated in air to 150° or 170° C. catches fire and burns brilliantly into U 3 0 8; it decomposes water slowly at ordinary temperatures, but rapidly when boiling.
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  • It burns in oxygen at 170°, in chlorine at 180°, in bromine at 210°, in iodine at 260°, in sulphur at 50o, and combines with nitrogen at about iooa.
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  • It is a colourless liquid which boils at 33° C. It fumes in air and burns with a green flame.
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  • It crystallizes in octahedra which melt at 120.5° C. and boil at 290° C. Its vapour burns with a red flame.
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  • At ordinary temperatures it is a gas, but may be condensed to a liquid which boils at - 6° C. It has a strong ammoniacal smell, burns readily and is exceedingly soluble in water.
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  • The prophecy which Burns put into the mouth of the venerable structure came true in 1877, when the newer bridge yielded to floods and had to be rebuilt (1879); and the older structure itself was closed for public safety in 1904.
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  • Heated in contact with air to a temperature of 480° C., acetylene ignites and burns with a flame, the appearance of which varies with the way in which it is brought in contact with the air.
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  • Heated in chlorine or with bromine, it yields carbon and calcium chloride or bromide; at a dull red heat it burns in oxygen, forming calcium carbonate, and it becomes incandescent in sulphur vapour at 500°, forming calcium sulphide and carbon disulphide.
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  • It will only combine with hydrogen in the presence of a catalyst, but combines with many other elements directly; for example, phosphorus melts and then inflames, antimony burns in the vapour, and mercury when heated with iodine combines with it rapidly.
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  • The free acid is a colourless liquid with a smell resembling bitter almonds; it boils at 26.1° C., and may be solidified, in which condition it melts at -14° C. It burns with a blue flame,.
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  • In oxygen or air diamond burns at about 850°, and only continues to do so if maintained at a high temperature; but in the absence of oxidising agents it may be raised to a much higher temperature.
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  • It is permanent in dry air, but tarnishes in moist air; it can be hammered and rolled; it melts at 623° C. It burns readily on heating, with a brilliant flame; and it also combines with chlorine,bromine, iodine, sulphur, phosphorus and cyanogen.
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  • It is a pleasant-smelling gas, which burns when ignited, and may be condensed to a liquid which boils at 23.6° C. It is somewhat soluble in water and readily soluble in alcohol, and concentrated sulphuric acid.
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  • On precipitating antimony trichloride or tartar emetic in acid solution with sulphuretted hydrogen, an orange-red precipitate of the hydrated sulphide is obtained, which turns black on being heated to 200° C The trisulphide heated in a current of hydrogen is reduced to the metallic state; it burns in air forming the tetroxide, and is soluble in concentrated hydrochloric acid, in solutions of the caustic alkalis, and in alkaline sulphides.
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  • Burns's John Barleycorn); but it is better to refer it to the tearing of the flesh of the victim at sacrifices at which the deity or the sacred animal was slain, and sacramentally eaten raw (cf.
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  • It burns with a brightly luminous flame, and is spontaneously inflammable at about too° C. When mixed with oxygen it combines explosively if the mixture be under diminished pressure, and is violently decomposed by the halogens.
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  • It burns when heated to about 200° C. Oxidizing agents decompose it with great violence.
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  • It is a colourless liquid which boils at 11 -12° C., and its vapour burns with a luminous flame.
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  • Every sale from the point the robot was turned on to when the sun finally burns out will be perfectly remembered.
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  • The beekeeper closes the hive, chalks a mark on it, and when he has time tears out its contents and burns it clean.
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  • It recently revised an anthology Burns for Bairns mainly for the purpose of its recitation competitions.
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  • Burns reminisces fondly of a show in Barcelona last December, where his fourteen piece band turned a concert performance into a party.
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  • Read what Rabbie Burns wrote about ' Sic a parcel o ' rogues in a nation !
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  • An hour of roller skating, which most children can manage without noticing, burns about 300 calories.
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  • The first installment is a bid to salve the wounds of those missing their daily dose of Pete Burns.
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  • Key target group is children under 5 years old who suffer nearly 45% of all severe burns and scalds accidents.
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  • Vitamin E is known to accelerate the healing of burns and prevents thick scar formation when applied...
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  • With these pressure sealers there 's no liquid glue, water or heat, meaning no mess or risk of burns.
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  • Dealing with Blisters... Those fluid filled bubbles are mild second-degree burns caused by friction.
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  • Children learn how to make black eyes, bruises, burns and even partially severed limbs !
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  • According to the International Maritime Organization (IMO) the average shipboard fire burns for 23 hours at sea and 20 hours in port.
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  • Smoking - Do n't leave a cigarette smoldering in an ashtray - it can tip out as it burns down.
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  • The following year Massey did expand the address into a small book Concerning Spiritualism, published by James Burns.
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  • But Inspector Burns was a stolid character; and was either too stupid or too clever to resent such trifles.
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  • Rob Burns invites submission of complete transcriptions of Wills for his countrywide site ' Wills for All '.
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  • If a tot of whiskey is more your tipple, I recommend Burns ' Night at Manchester city center 's The Bridge.
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  • Artificial turf will tend to give painful friction burns in equivalent situations.
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  • There 's a small selection of Burns 's poetry translated into English for those who find themselves defeated by eighteenth-century Scottish vernacular.
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  • A young girl was sitting by the bed and wafting cool air over Jacob 's burns with an embroidered fan.
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  • Burns wid hiv said ah wiz chist " bleezin ' finely ".
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  • This assumption suggests that burns would particularly benefit from this regime of wound cleansing.
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  • Many were killed instantly, others lay writhing on the ground screaming in agony from the intolerable pain of their burns.
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  • Batteries can also leak causing internal chemical burns.
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  • To help reduce the risk of falls, strangulation, suffocation, and burns, do not position the crib near windows, draperies, electrical cords, hanging wall decorations, heating sources, curtain cords or climbable furniture.
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  • How long wood burns depends on the type of wood and its moisture content.
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  • One of the most common causes of injury in the house is burns caused by a space heater.
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  • The previous line in the poem offers stark contrast, using the phrase "sun burns crimson bright" as a way to heighten the experience.
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  • It is a form of fossil fuel and is not considered a renewable resource, however, it is considered an alternative fuel because it burns much cleaner than gasoline or diesel.
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  • Methane Gas - Methane gas is being explored as a naturally renewing source of energy because it burns more cleanly than other fuel sources and may be used to replace standard oil based fuel.
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  • While the use of braided cotton cord is usual (a braided cord burns back on itself), it is not a given in the soy candle making business.
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  • Soy wax is easier to clean up than paraffin candle wax, but you must still protect your furniture, yourself, and your family from hot wax burns.
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  • For burns, cuts or bruises, a salve or cream made with flower essences often speeds relief and healing.
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  • Cayenne significantly increases heat production in the body which burns calories.
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  • Aborigines have used tea tree oil for many years to treat burns, cuts, and wounds.
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  • Aborigines press tea tree leaves onto wounds or used them as poultices on burns or cuts.
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  • For mild to moderate burns aloe vera gel applied directly from a healthy plant leaf or a supply of harvested aloe gel will ease the pain.
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  • The aloe vera plant is easy to grow, and its gel has been used for centuries to treat simple burns.
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  • Many people keep an aloe vera plant in the kitchen and snip a leaf to treat burns incurred while cooking.
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  • Salves treated burns, cuts, scrapes, splinters, and more serious lesions.
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  • While typical black drawing salves are fine for minor skin complains and treating splinters, black salves that contain bloodroot can cause serious skin burns and may not cure cancer.
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  • They often crushed the leaves to use for burns, infections, cuts, and abrasions.
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  • Skin problems such as boils, burns, or ulcers may benefit from a slippery elm poultice or tinctures when used several times per day.
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  • St. John's Wort also can be used to treat other conditions, such as skin inflammation, wounds or burns, recurring ear infections and vitiligo, which is a skin pigmentation disorder.
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  • St. John's Wort can be taken internally to treat depression and applied topically to help heal wounds, burns and skin inflammation.
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  • To treat wounds, burns and skin inflammation, spread a thin layer of St. John's Wort oil over the affected area and cover with a bandage.
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  • That's great news for those with fair skin that normally turn orange with self-tanners, or those with lighter tones that turn red or even suffer painful burns when exposed to the sun.
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  • As your body burns oxygen, it produces free radicals.
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  • Supervise any heating - melting, drizzling, etc. - carefully to prevent scorching or burns.
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  • Climbing hills is a great butt toner, and it burns additional calories.
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  • Since the Nordic Track Pro uses dynamic lower and upper body movements, it burns more calories, while providing a safer low-impact workout.
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  • Exercise "burns" up these chemicals so that you don't constantly feel like fighting with someone, or hiding from the world.
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  • A fit individual burns more calories per hour than a person that is overweight.
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  • As a result, it burns through the nutrients quicker than if you don't exercise.
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  • Both men have second and third degree burns on their bodies, but doctors expect them both to make a full recovery over the next year.
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  • Barker suffered burns to the lower half of his body, while DJ AM suffered burns to mostly his hands and face.
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  • Co-stars included Pamela Anderson, Brooke Burns, Nicole Eggert and a host of others.
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  • When sailing, it burns approximately 1,100 gallons per hour.
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  • This is due to a volatile oil present in such quantity that the fresh-cut brushwood burns readily, while from the leaves "Bay water" is distilled.
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  • It is easily lighted, burns cheerfully and equably, and gives a good heat.
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  • This bulb is also a leader in energy savings, as it burns approximately 75 percent less energy but produces just as much light.
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  • The melamine coating will help protect the pattern underneath from scratches, burns and marks.
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  • Not to mention the water intake valve often becomes super heated, leading to burns in young children.Radiant floor heat is invisible.
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  • If you have been looking for creams that can help relieve burns, itching or other dermatological problems, or that can help improve your overall health, consider buying organic salves.
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  • By knowing how to prevent summer fires and how to act quickly if one should break out, you reduce the chance of injuries from burns and smoke inhalation.
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  • Many hospitals specialize in different methodologies such as cancer, heart disease, burns, kidney disease, or geriatrics.
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  • It is your responsibility as the parent to understand that children's eyes are susceptible to UV damage, which can lead to everything from painful yet easily healed surface burns to irreversible cataracts.
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  • Putting in contacts after storing them in water burns, anyway!
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  • With each successive word created, the flaming tile burns one layer closer to the bottom of the field.
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  • When the wick burns all the way down to those explosive sticks, the field detonates and the game ends.
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  • Each round has a specific number of balls players must clear off the board before the fuse on the dynamite at the bottom of the screen burns down.
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  • While this is basically true when it comes to food, alcohol calories are different because your body converts and burns them differently than other food and drink.
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  • This occurs because your body burns acetate as fuel first, and then resorts to burning fat after all acetate is depleted.
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  • When the tinder burns well, then add hardwood branches or kindling, logs or charcoal briquettes to the fire.
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  • Besides the benefits of the contracting uterus, the process of producing milk burns calories, which helps the mother to lose excess weight gained during pregnancy.
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  • Signs that a person has swallowed one of these substances include evidence of an empty container nearby, nausea or vomiting, and burns on the lips and skin around the mouth if the substance is a strong acid or alkali.
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  • Some acids and alkalis leave burns on the mouth.
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  • They are also more susceptible to fire-related asphyxiation, as well as more prone to burns than adults.
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  • A wound occurs when the integrity of any tissue is compromised (e.g. skin breaks, muscle tears, burns, or bone fractures).
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  • Abrasions. Also called scrapes, they occur when the skin is rubbed away by friction against another rough surface (e.g. rope burns and skinned knees).
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  • Internal injuries, cuts, burns, bruises, and broken or fractured bones are all possible results of battered child syndrome.
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  • The inflammation may be caused by conditions in the mouth itself, such as poor hygiene, from burns from hot food or drinks, or by conditions that affect the entire body, such as medications, allergic reactions, or infections.
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  • For those who engage in welding, eye protection, including the use of helmets, decreases the incidence a corneal abrasions caused by welding burns.
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  • Children with burns, eczema, or diaper rash or those who are immunosuppressed are highly susceptible to the herpes virus.
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  • If the child loses feelings in various body parts, injuries can be avoided by testing bathwater to prevent burns, inspecting the body visually for injuries, and using protective shoes and helmets.
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  • By contrast, high skin resistance can produce severe skin burns but prevent the current from entering the body.
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  • A child who has suffered an electric shock may have very little external injury or may have obvious severe burns.
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  • Burns are usually most severe at the points of contact with the electrical source.
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  • Brief low-voltage shocks (110-220 volts or less) that do not result in any symptoms or burns of the skin do not require care.
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  • A doctor should also always evaluate electric cord burns to the mouth of a child.
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  • At the clinic or hospital, treatment depends on the severity of the burns and/or the nature of other injuries found.
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  • Minor burns are usually treated with topical antibiotic ointment and dressings.
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  • More severe burns may require surgery to clean the wounds or even to perform skin grafting.
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  • Severe burns on the arms, legs, or hands may require surgery to remove damaged muscle or even amputation.
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  • Maxillofacial trauma refers to any injury to the face or jaw caused by physical force, the presence of foreign objects, animal or human bites, or burns.
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  • Extensive burns can cause the victim to go into shock.
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  • For first-degree burns, the child's parent can put a cold-water compress on the area or run cold water on it and cover it with a clean bandage for protection.
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  • Fractures, burns, and deep lacerations require treatment by a doctor but alternative treatments can help the body withstand injury and assist the healing process.
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  • Burns and lacerations cause scarring that might be improved by plastic surgery.
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  • Trauma may also be caused by chemicals or burns.
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  • The total cost of alcohol use by young people, including automobile crashes, violent crime, alcohol poisoning, burns, drowning, suicide attempts, and fetal alcohol syndrome is more than 58 billion dollars each year.
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  • An increasingly common form of chemical injury to the nasal membranes in toddlers is alkali burns caused by leakage from small batteries placed in the nose.
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  • Batteries placed in the nose should be removed as soon as possible, preferably within four hours to avoid serious burns from their contents.
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  • Unexplained or suspicious bruises or other marks on the skin are typical signs of physical abuse, as are burns.
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  • Or they penetrate skin damaged by burns, cuts and scrapes, infection, insect bites, or wounds.
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  • Trauma, burns, and some medications also increase caloric requirements.
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  • Burns are injuries to tissues that are caused by heat, friction, electricity, radiation, or chemicals.
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  • Burns are characterized by degree, based on the severity of the tissue damage.
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  • Minor burns may be treated at home or in a doctor's office.
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  • These are defined as first- or second-degree burns covering less than 15 percent of an adult's body or less than 10 percent of a child's body, or a third-degree burn on less than 2 percent BSA.
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  • Moderate burns should be treated at a hospital.
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  • These are defined as first- or second-degree burns covering 15 percent to 25 percent of an adult's body or 10 percent to 20 percent of a child's body, or a third-degree burn on 2 percent to 10 percent BSA.
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  • Critical, or major, burns are the most serious and should be treated in a specialized burn unit of a hospital.
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  • These are defined as first- or second-degree burns covering more than 25 percent of an adult's body or more than 20 percent of a child's body, or a third-degree burn on more than 10 percent BSA.
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  • In addition, burns involving the hands, feet, face, eyes, ears, or genitals are considered critical.
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  • Burns may be caused by even a brief encounter with heat greater than 120°F (49°C).
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  • The source of this heat may be the sun (causing a sunburn), hot liquids, steam, fire, electricity, friction (causing rug burns and rope burns), and chemicals (causing caustic burn upon contact).
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  • Extensive burns may induce shock, the symptoms of which are faintness, weakness, rapid pulse and breathing, pale and clammy skin, and bluish lips and fingernails.
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  • A physician or healthcare professional should be consulted whenever first or second degree burns cover more than 15 percent of a person's body surface area (BSA) or third degree burns involve more than 2 percent of a victim's BSA.
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  • Treatment of chemical or electrical burns is slightly different from the treatment of thermal burns but the objectives are the same.
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  • Cool (not cold) wet compresses may provide some pain relief when applied to small areas of first- and second-degree burns.
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  • In situations in which a person has received moderate or critical burns, lifesaving measures take precedence over burn treatment, and emergency medical assistance must be called.
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  • A person with serious burns may stop breathing, and artificial respiration (also called mouth-to-mouth resuscitation or rescue breathing) should be administered immediately.
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  • Also, a person with burns covering more than 12 percent BSA is likely to go into shock; this condition may be prevented by laying the person flat and elevating the feet about 12 inches (30 cm).
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  • Also, because burns dramatically deplete the body of fluids, replacement fluids are administered intravenously.
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  • As the burns heal, thick, taut scabs (eschar) form, which the doctor may have to cut to improve blood flow to the more elastic healthy tissue beneath.
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  • Burns from liquid chemicals must be rinsed with cool water for at least 15 minutes to stop the burning process.
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  • In cases of burns from dry chemicals such as lime, the powder should be completely brushed away before the area is washed.
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  • Before electrical burns are treated at the site of the accident, the power source must be disconnected if possible and the victim moved away from it to keep the person giving aid from being electrocuted.
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  • Electrical burns should be loosely covered with sterile gauze pads and the person taken to the hospital for further treatment.
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  • In addition to the excellent treatment of burns provided by traditional medicine, some alternative approaches may be helpful as well.
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  • A number of botanical remedies, applied topically, can also help burns heal.
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  • Minor burns may heal in five to ten days with no scarring.
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  • Moderate burns may heal in ten to 14 days and may leave scarring.
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  • Critical or major burns take more than 14 days to heal and leave significant scarring.
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  • Burns are commonly received in residential fires.
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  • Thermal burns are often received from electrical appliances.
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  • Electrical burns may be prevented by covering unused electrical outlets with safety plugs and keeping electrical cords away from infants and toddlers who might chew on them.
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  • Chemical burns may be prevented by wearing protective clothing, including gloves and eyeshields.
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